Author Topic: "Look at their clothes! Look at their hair! Such pub rock ugliness, how can you like them?"  (Read 3146 times)

Quote from: "king mob"
Very much so, how many 30 something goth's , indie kids, ravers, etc still cling on to that image from their youth in an attempt to retain that memory of youth do you know?  If it's as many as me then its 9 people.


The other paradox is that I shudder to think that we all become this middle-class globule when we hit 40... the well-worn stereotype of pringle sweaters round necks, married with sub-urban house, the neat drive and garden, listening to Dido and Coldplay.  whiteliberals trying to be "trendy" and kidding ourselves that we're still in our youth.

I think the most respect is those 40-50 year old punks who were there first time around - complete with DMs, piercings and tartan.  They have more credibility than the fake punks kids who fail to grasp the ideals of the original scene.  (listen to me - I sound like a dad).

TJ

  • Cook'd & Bomb'd - A Richard Herring Forum
    • Tim Worthington's Newsround
The music business has always been first and foremost about making money. There's no disputing that fact.

What has changed, though, is that now it appears frightened to stray outside the normal established routes of making money, and is not prepared to take a major risk on something exciting and new that might make a commercial breakthrough despite hardly being top ten orientated.

To underline this, look at the late 1960s - The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Syd's Pink Floyd, Jethro Tull and countless others were all aimed squarely at top ten audiences by their record companies, irrespective of their underground popularity. And they all had top ten hits coming out of their ears. it was only later that the silly divisiveness set in - according to John Peel, "even stuff like Captain Beefheart was regarded as pop".

There was an article about the NME in yesterday's Independent, which is on their website here. Highlights include talk of  (gnnnngh) "brand strategy", and the publisher stating "We can't stand out there and be alternative; commercially that would be suicide now". And they said rock'n'roll would never die...

Quote from: "Bonely Child"
"We can't stand out there and be alternative; commercially that would be suicide now".


that's the catch.  "alternative" will rarely make money.  These days it just seems everyone is out to make money with total disregards to ingenuity, talent or orignality.

I suppose the British punk stuff back in the late 70s was packaged by the likes of Malcom Mclaren and Viv Westwood... but popular music now seems devoid of any message.  or passion.

And don't forget that controversial gobshite Julie Birchhill wasn't really interested in punk at all when she was writing in glowing terms about it in the 70s.  It was just the right market to be in.  And hey, it was better than working in Boots...

Quote from: "The Man With Brass Eyes"
Quote from: "king mob"
Very much so, how many 30 something goth's , indie kids, ravers, etc still cling on to that image from their youth in an attempt to retain that memory of youth do you know?  If it's as many as me then its 9 people.


The other paradox is that I shudder to think that we all become this middle-class globule when we hit 40... the well-worn stereotype of pringle sweaters round necks, married with sub-urban house, the neat drive and garden, listening to Dido and Coldplay.  whiteliberals trying to be "trendy" and kidding ourselves that we're still in our youth.

I think the most respect is those 40-50 year old punks who were there first time around - complete with DMs, piercings and tartan.  They have more credibility than the fake punks kids who fail to grasp the ideals of the original scene.  (listen to me - I sound like a dad).


i hope to god i dont become a sweater wearing globule, i hate sweaters.


I know what you mean about the old punks, same can go for the old hippies, goths , indie kids, etc.
Thing is at times i dont know whether to think the same as you or think that its perhaps time to move on a bit?