Author Topic: Cum Town Podcast  (Read 99943 times)

The Mollusk

  • A number of deceased arachnids... and beans
Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #690 on: April 08, 2021, 04:10:38 PM »
This is definitely still one of the funniest things ever when it's on form, but I stopped listening regularly a while ago. The absolute best quality about the show - Nick's willingness to make a punchline out of absolutely everything, himself included - is also it's worst, because it literally never changes and goes through infuriating periods in which it's primarily lead by his stubbornness and misanthropy, which rubs off negatively on the brain of any sane person. I tend to listen to old bits and the odd new riff on Youtube and its undeniable from being more exposed to its audience in the comments that a large portion of them are terrible. The same could be said of lots of media I enjoy, but given the nature of their sense of humour and the current cultural state of affairs, it feels a little less defensible than any other old media that couldn't possibly live up to today's standards. I didn't feel like that a while ago, but it's crept in...

Saying that, I don't think any of them are actually right-wing in any discernible sense, Stav in particular seems like a really nice person, and I do admire and appreciate Nick's creative commitment to being really funny and genuinely not giving a fuck. It would be embarrassing to hear if he was proud of himself or courting a broader audience, but it just rolls on carelessly, which is quite charming in small doses.

Good post.

I stopped listening to it a good while back now since I binged so hard on it when I first discovered it, ploughing through a good couple hundred episodes, that I felt like I'd heard all I needed to hear. I still maintain that it's some of the funniest shit I've ever heard, up there with Athletico Mince and MST3K as a media which just has me laughing uncontrollably.

Anyone thinking the boys are right wing would do well to go back and listen to the episode they did when Trump was first elected president. They gave a solid commentary on the whole thing which cemented their political stance - very much anti Trump and not right wing at all - without them ever having to outright say it.

That way of communicating sort of sums them up pretty well, I think, in that just because they're never saying they're one thing or the other, doesn't mean they're skirting/avoiding addressing the fact that they are actually one thing or the other. This obviously makes it super easy for right wingers to piggyback on that ambiguity (since we live in an age where post-irony is such a huge factor in why shit really fucking stinks in a lot of the media we can consume) but it certainly doesn't mean Cum Town itself can be tarred with the same brush. Of course, they could be doing a lot more to speak out against that sort of thing, but since when has Cum Town's brand been about acting even remotely responsible for its actions? It's the podcast equivalent of the longest ever fart joke and part of me still wants to defend it for being unapologetically and hilariously awful.

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #691 on: April 10, 2021, 12:34:55 AM »
I'm a very occasional listener - I usually only check in on a long commute when I've run out of other stuff to listen to - but I was quite surprised to see how popular it was on here. It's very funny, sometimes incredibly so, but it's hard to deny that it ticks virtually all the boxes when it comes to what your average internet person deems "unacceptable" and "indefensible". I've always been of the mind that some things are funny specifically because of how indefensible they are, and I think Cum Town's a fairly good example of that (especially since it's very hard to argue they're sincere about anything they say), but still the main recurring joke is that gayness is about the funniest thing that could happen in any given situation.

I think what appeals to a lot of people about it (which I think they've even mentioned) is that it acts as a kind of friendship simulator. This is absolutely the kind of stuff your average teenager might've offered among friends to make each other laugh - the carefree days. They've just managed to harness the best of that and turn it into a hugely popular podcast. I think there's been something of a gap in comedy for this sort of thing that they've filled quite nicely, but I don't think there's much more justification to it than that.

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #692 on: April 10, 2021, 12:46:24 AM »
Part of the issue is the UK comics that get US exposure. You'd like to think Stewart Lee and James Acaster would come up high on lists when people made an effort to find some English comics but it's gonna be after people like Jimmy Carr, McIntyre, Daniel Sloss...

I've been in the US a while and James Acaster's special was heavily promoted on Netflix, was on James Corden's show at least once, and I've seen memefied clips of his shared around all over the place. Conversely, I'm not sure many people here could name Michael McIntyre or Daniel Sloss. Even Jimmy Carr gave it a go out here five or six years ago, but didn't get very far. You're more likely to stumble across someone who knows Dylan Moran or Eddie Izzard.

Dunno why I felt the need to point that out. The equivalence of Stewart Lee and James Acaster just struck me as mad. People really don't know Stewart Lee out here. I've met precisely one person who did, and bizarrely it was because of the Tom O'Connor bit (which he loved, despite having no idea who Tom O'Connor was, but also felt no need to investigate further).

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #693 on: April 10, 2021, 01:32:40 AM »
I'm a very occasional listener - I usually only check in on a long commute when I've run out of other stuff to listen to - but I was quite surprised to see how popular it was on here. It's very funny, sometimes incredibly so, but it's hard to deny that it ticks virtually all the boxes when it comes to what your average internet person deems "unacceptable" and "indefensible". I've always been of the mind that some things are funny specifically because of how indefensible they are, and I think Cum Town's a fairly good example of that (especially since it's very hard to argue they're sincere about anything they say), but still the main recurring joke is that gayness is about the funniest thing that could happen in any given situation.

I think what appeals to a lot of people about it (which I think they've even mentioned) is that it acts as a kind of friendship simulator. This is absolutely the kind of stuff your average teenager might've offered among friends to make each other laugh - the carefree days. They've just managed to harness the best of that and turn it into a hugely popular podcast. I think there's been something of a gap in comedy for this sort of thing that they've filled quite nicely, but I don't think there's much more justification to it than that.

Great post.

which he loved, despite having no idea who Tom O'Connor was, but also felt no need to investigate further

To be fair, i've lived in the UK my entire life and I have no idea who Tom O'Connor is.

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #694 on: April 10, 2021, 02:22:55 AM »
To be fair, i've lived in the UK my entire life and I have no idea who Tom O'Connor is.

My parents bizarrely had a Name That Tune poster with his face on it when I was a kid. Other than that, I'd probably have no cause to know who he is either.

I think the bit works regardless of familiarity though. You instantly know the caliber of celebrity he's talking about, and that's all you need to know.

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #695 on: April 10, 2021, 12:04:49 PM »
I think the bit works regardless of familiarity though. You instantly know the caliber of celebrity he's talking about, and that's all you need to know.

Absolutely. I just imagined Tom O'Connor to be an ITV light entertainment game show Saturday night kinda guy.

up_the_hampipe

  • Crowd appeaser
Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #696 on: April 10, 2021, 05:14:34 PM »
I'm a very occasional listener - I usually only check in on a long commute when I've run out of other stuff to listen to - but I was quite surprised to see how popular it was on here. It's very funny, sometimes incredibly so, but it's hard to deny that it ticks virtually all the boxes when it comes to what your average internet person deems "unacceptable" and "indefensible". I've always been of the mind that some things are funny specifically because of how indefensible they are, and I think Cum Town's a fairly good example of that (especially since it's very hard to argue they're sincere about anything they say), but still the main recurring joke is that gayness is about the funniest thing that could happen in any given situation.

I think what appeals to a lot of people about it (which I think they've even mentioned) is that it acts as a kind of friendship simulator. This is absolutely the kind of stuff your average teenager might've offered among friends to make each other laugh - the carefree days. They've just managed to harness the best of that and turn it into a hugely popular podcast. I think there's been something of a gap in comedy for this sort of thing that they've filled quite nicely, but I don't think there's much more justification to it than that.

Yeah, agreed. They're in that nuanced area that doesn't really get factored into this ongoing debate about offensiveness in comedy. I've got a few "woke" friends who are very intolerant of a lot of stand-up material, but when joking around with them, they'll laugh at the sort of things you might hear on Cumtown. Maybe it's the context, stand-up is viewed as some sort of power position and there should be higher quality control. When you're messing around with friends, there's a mutual understanding. I think Kitson used to have a bit about having a close friend with whom you can "play with the dangerous flame of ironic bigotry". That was many years ago though, so I don't know if he stands by it now.

You have an understanding with the Cumboys because you're in their company a lot, and you know how they actually feel. They do have a habit of hanging about with people who might actually be bad, though. But it shows who they really are when, for example, they were on a show with Anthony Cumia and were very uncomfortable with his real hatefulness.

Jerzy Bondov

  • best not bother
    • righto so ive got five minutes off work and uh yeah im gonna have a cheeky volvic
Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #697 on: April 10, 2021, 08:01:01 PM »
I often think about Nick’s “that guy’s a fucking loser” story. Feels like a sort of key text in the development of Cum Town whatever dude this shits boring who cares

Re: Cum Town Podcast
« Reply #698 on: April 10, 2021, 11:47:39 PM »
I often think about Nick’s “that guy’s a fucking loser” story

What story is that?