Author Topic: Chart Music Podcast  (Read 117643 times)

dr beat

  • You're dealing with loved ones, I won't have it
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2160 on: July 11, 2019, 06:08:47 PM »
Great episode but I now feel a little too intimately acquainted with Taylor Parkes. But like David and Al, I also marvel at his Acker Bilk to STI in 0-120.

non capisco

  • A+ in arson class
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2161 on: July 11, 2019, 07:14:06 PM »
"It's not something that sticks in the mind, is it? Oh, I remember that incredible piss I had in 1988!"

non capisco

  • A+ in arson class
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2162 on: July 11, 2019, 10:52:03 PM »
Just watched SPOILER on the video playlist.
More than lives up to what Al and Taylor said about it!

Al's sheer delight at Taylor referencing that was possibly the highlight of the ep for me.

kidsick5000

  • Gotta be groovy for the moovy
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2163 on: July 11, 2019, 10:59:11 PM »
Taylor saying how much he hates Noel because “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all”

Delivered without any irony, it seems

Highlight.

non capisco

  • A+ in arson class
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2164 on: July 12, 2019, 12:06:45 AM »
Ah come on, that was saturated with irony.

Dripping all over the shop with it.

Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2165 on: July 12, 2019, 12:26:09 AM »
Had to scrape it off my speakers.

non capisco

  • A+ in arson class
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2166 on: July 12, 2019, 12:30:40 AM »
I was listening with headphones and it gunked up my ears, the irony, when he said that.

Viscous, it was.

Johnboy

  • rub a dub dub
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2167 on: July 16, 2019, 10:40:35 AM »
This is a great episode

I think I might go back and listen to the Taylor ones again, he really has some astute observations

I remember one where they were discussing the 1982 re release of Love Me Do and he talked about the huge cultural difference between 1962 and 1982, that culture moved at warp speed during that time but technology didn't really and today it's the opposite - I mean,I'd read a book of all this stuff.

Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2168 on: July 16, 2019, 02:40:19 PM »
Not having that High Llamas dis though

kidsick5000

  • Gotta be groovy for the moovy
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2169 on: July 16, 2019, 09:42:47 PM »
I remember one where they were discussing the 1982 re release of Love Me Do and he talked about the huge cultural difference between 1962 and 1982, that culture moved at warp speed during that time but technology didn't really and today it's the opposite - I mean,I'd read a book of all this stuff.

That’s worth a thread in itself. How pop culture hit an ice age.
It is nuts how much the thrust for things to be new really hit the brakes in the mid90s.
I think it was on Twitter in a discussion about Bowie’s Space Oddity and how many personas he’d been by the time of the rerelease in 75.
The respective evolutions of The Beatles and Bowie in such a short space of time is extraordinary.
If you hadn’t had a record out for a couple of years, your next one would amount to a comeback from the wilderness. Now releasing on a yearly basis amounts to oversaturation.
Even on TV, fame was something that could be lost at any moment - and when you were out, that was it. But now there are so many ways to get back into the party.

And I don’t know if it’s just our generation (currently late30s to 40s) or everyone of that age throughout time struggles to realise how recent 20 years ago actually is..
Or that from Livin La Vida Loca to today is the same amount of time from Elvis’ Heartbreak Hotel to the Damned’s New Rose.

Is it because retro became a much bigger thing in the 90s? And because of that there’s a loss of identity. Despite attempts to bring back the 80s, you dont see many attempts at a 90s revival. Is it because from grunge to britpop, these movements were already rooted in the past?


Chriddof

  • Things start to happen!
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2170 on: July 17, 2019, 01:02:14 AM »
So here's a pet theory I have. One thing that's interesting in regards to this is how dance music's* past has effectively been completely forgotten. Electronic music in general throughout the 90s (and also the 80s, of course) was the main source for "newness"; in fact I'd say right up to the turn of the century there were still developments in that area, unlike rock where things quickly stagnated around 1995. Electronic stuff was where the "feel" of the decade was forged for me, and if you look at the charts of the time the dance stuff tends to outnumber the grunge / britpop releases by a mile. (It's easy to forget that at the time things like Oasis getting the odd Number 1 were seen as some kind of triumph of rock over evil emotionless machines or whatever.) Now it's all been devolved into "EDM", and there are people about who genuinely don't realise that - for example - Daft Punk did not, in fact, create the genres they write and perform in.

See here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-tWqdEcGN4
And here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJVrPBX2PL8

There's even some people in that last video who don't realise that Daft Punk started in the 90s. Now, for a 90s revival to properly happen, I think there would need to be a better knowledge of the 90s itself, and of electronic music of both the final two decades of the last century, with specific emphasis on house, techno and drum and bass. As it is, there is now "80s music" (synth pop somewhere between 1981 and 1986 - which is great and that I personally love to bits, but it's not the whole story), and "90s music" which in mainstream media accounts at least has a weird focus on boy bands, ultra-commercial hip-hop, and a grudging acknowledgement of Nirvana thrown somewhere in there. "Oh yeah, there was this thing called grunge... er, shoe what?"** I can't really blame these kids for anything, as there's this slightly suspect rewriting of the past going on somehow.

Here's an example of this: given that despite the 90s having a couple of very specific and easily identifiable visual looks (grungy and "distressed" typography, or the more techno-inspired fonts / design you got elsewhere in music mags / club flyers of the time), there's a magazine currently available in the shops that purports to be a nostalgic look back onto the 90s, yet the cover looks like it's actually from 1987 only with the Teletubbies on it. (Can't find a picture of it, annoyingly, but go to your local WH Smith's and you'll most likely see it.) It's like the opening credits of Beverly Hills Teens threw up all over some promo photos of the Friends cast.

I do wonder if all this may be the result of the way advertisers famously had such a hard time selling stuff to Generation X during that decade, and some people somewhere deciding to "correct" that. I hope I'm just being ridiculously paranoid, but it kind of fits.

* I know some take issue with the phrase "dance music", as there was plenty of music you could dance to before, of course - I'm using that as the potentially more useful term of Electronic Dance Music has been nicked by twats.
** I am very much aware of the shoegaze revival of the last five or so years, but that hasn't had much of an impact outside of circles such as our own.

Johnboy

  • rub a dub dub
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2171 on: July 17, 2019, 09:12:31 AM »
Yes, the '90s mainstream just seemed to be bland versions of guitar/dance/boy&girl group

in previous decades the mainstream was the definite decent article but that could just be my age, knocking on 50

I think the dust has yet to settle on the '90s - there is certainly a '90s revival industry but it has no identity

kidsick5000

  • Gotta be groovy for the moovy
Re: Chart Music Podcast
« Reply #2172 on: July 17, 2019, 09:43:00 AM »
I think there's also a social evolution that people are younger for longer.
They dress younger, stay in shape, get married much later in life.
Even the advertising parameters of 'young' have stretched to 35.