Author Topic: Film cliches you want to fuck off  (Read 142604 times)

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1890 on: March 08, 2020, 11:56:11 PM »
A cold shag can be nice and refreshing.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1891 on: March 08, 2020, 11:57:22 PM »
I complained about this earlier in the thread but that was 10,000 pages ago and I've just seen it again in Dark Waters so I'm cross again: people using modern cliched phrases in period films.

In Dark Waters, set in 1991, someone says "Good luck with that." Did people say that in 1991? Not impossible I suppose but it's such an irritating 2010s phrase. Fuck off.

It's not the anachronism that bothers me. It's the way it's used thoughtlessly - just a cliche absorbed into the screenplay without anyone questioning whether it makes sense at all, let alone whether it's a tired line.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2020, 12:18:54 AM by popcorn »

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1892 on: March 09, 2020, 01:13:54 AM »
For what it's worth, it seems to have been kicking around in 1992 (there's apparently an example in Woops!) - but certainly not anywhere near as frequently as now.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1893 on: March 09, 2020, 01:20:01 AM »
For what it's worth, it seems to have been kicking around in 1992 (there's apparently an example in Woops!) - but certainly not anywhere near as frequently as now.

I'm sure someone said it at some point in 1940, but it's not really the point. It's a modern cliche that's only in the film because of an unimaginative script, not because the writer thought it was an appropriate thing for someone to say in 1991. See also some fucking English general saying "All right, Mr Turing, I'll bite" in that godawful Enigma biopic, or anyone saying "Are you done?" following any rant in any film of the last 10 years, such as Spotlight.

famethrowa

  • mere rhetorical frippery
Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1894 on: March 09, 2020, 01:20:17 AM »
I complained about this earlier in the thread but that was 10,000 pages ago and I've just seen it again in Dark Waters so I'm cross again: people using modern cliched phrases in period films.

In Dark Waters, set in 1991, someone says "Good luck with that." Did people say that in 1991? Not impossible I suppose but it's such an irritating 2010s phrase. Fuck off.

It's not the anachronism that bothers me. It's the way it's used thoughtlessly - just a cliche absorbed into the screenplay without anyone questioning whether it makes sense at all, let alone whether it's a tired line.

There's a later Seinfeld where he says to George "well good luck with ALL that!" but I guess that's late 90s.

Agree totally though, and the music biopics are usually good fodder for this outrage, I've noticed a few 2000s phrases carelessly written in.

JesusAndYourBush

  • Earnest silky coconut shell
    • http://www.google.com
Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1895 on: March 09, 2020, 01:48:04 AM »
In the recent Agatha Christie thing on BBC 1 (set in the mid 60's) someone said "carked it" which I'm pretty sure is Australian slang and only arrived on these shores in the 80's via Neighbours & Home & Away.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1896 on: March 09, 2020, 09:01:24 AM »
In the recent Agatha Christie thing on BBC 1 (set in the mid 60's) someone said "carked it" which I'm pretty sure is Australian slang and only arrived on these shores in the 80's via Neighbours & Home & Away.

Quote from: Wiktionary
in fact, the term cark it is actually Hindi, and was picked up by the British during the Raj era. It was used prior to Australia's colonisation.

It stems from a Hindi word, like so many other english words such as bungalow, pajama, pakka, shampoo and a hundred others (books have been written on Hindi words coming into usage in english)

Back to cark.. it comes from the word Khak.. which means dirt, dust, etc. the word Khaki is also from the same root, meaning the colour of dust, or the colour of the dirt/mud, in Hindi.

So the term to 'cark it' derives from 'dust to dust, ashes to ashes' referring to death.. when we die, we return to dust.. therefore to cark it means to return to Khak...

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1897 on: March 16, 2020, 10:15:31 AM »
First OED cite for "carked it" is 1982 "A ‘stiff dunny’ is dead or, in other words ‘has carked it’." Without "it", "carked" is a bit older: from 1977 "That wog ya roughed up—well, he carked." (Richard Beilby · Gunner: a novel of the retreat from Crete, which I guess would be set in World War Two.) No doubt that it's very much Australian, but while "carked" might just about be mid-century Australian, "carked it" definitely isn't.

gilbertharding

  • Not even the rudest man in the Beatles
Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1898 on: March 17, 2020, 03:00:59 PM »
I used to like Call My Bluff when Frank Muir and Robert Robinson were on it.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1899 on: March 17, 2020, 03:44:44 PM »
I would guess that 'cark' and 'cark it' are pretty much the same age, given the pattern of usage in the late 70s and early 80s. There's a 1979 example of 'karked it' in a Canberra newspaper.

The Wiktionary stuff is a fine example of why you should leave lexicography to the professionals.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1900 on: March 20, 2020, 10:38:28 PM »
Both 80's Italian gangster films and 90's gangsta films all have that scene where the guys missuses are all sat together doing each other's hair and nails having an altmanesque overlapping dialogue chat about their men.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1901 on: March 20, 2020, 11:43:57 PM »
A Christmas Carol, and dramatic irony. Can't think of any examples right now, though.

neveragain

  • like those swamp tar pits that bubble and go Gloop
Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1902 on: March 21, 2020, 05:17:31 PM »
All dramatic irony? That's like getting rid of doors.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1903 on: March 21, 2020, 09:24:12 PM »
Bombs with a nice big LED clock that always goes down to the last few seconds.

Do actual bombs contain such clocks. And could a clever terror group not just have it go off with 3:43 showing or something..

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1904 on: March 21, 2020, 09:32:39 PM »
Bombs with a nice big LED clock that always goes down to the last few seconds.

Do actual bombs contain such clocks. And could a clever terror group not just have it go off with 3:43 showing or something..

According to Wikipedia the Casio f91 is a common choice in time bombs. But these days mobile phones are often used as remote detonators.

Re: Film cliches you want to fuck off
« Reply #1905 on: March 22, 2020, 05:16:31 PM »
Both 80's Italian gangster films and 90's gangsta films all have that scene where the guys missuses are all sat together doing each other's hair and nails having an altmanesque overlapping dialogue chat about their men.

I hate it when they talk about me also.

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