Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 72899 times)

buttgammon

  • You can't trust a man what's made of gas
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #750 on: September 22, 2019, 01:05:39 PM »
I've only read Woodcutters, which I loved, but have been meaning to read some more of his work, especially after I enjoyed Adam Ehrlich Sachs' novel so much recently (he's talked quite a lot about Bernhard as an influence, and based on my limited reading he does seem to write in a similar-ish mode).

Well, you could well be in for a treat! Extinction is absolutely brilliant, and probably the best one to read next if you fancy reading some more Bernhard.

Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #751 on: September 22, 2019, 04:04:44 PM »
Well, you could well be in for a treat! Extinction is absolutely brilliant, and probably the best one to read next if you fancy reading some more Bernhard.

Thanks! Will check it out.

buttgammon

  • You can't trust a man what's made of gas
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #752 on: September 22, 2019, 05:42:17 PM »
Thanks! Will check it out.

The same goes for me and Sachs, who sounds like my cup of tea (but not until my current to-read pile has reduced).

Small Man Big Horse

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #753 on: October 02, 2019, 03:05:36 PM »
Before The Fall by Noah Hawley - A pretty strong effort from the Fargo / Legion showrunner, all about a plane crash where only one man and a young boy survive, which uses the situation to explore the lives of those who died, attack the kinds of cunts who work for Fox News style networks, and the way the media exploits tragedy in general. A couple of the chapters about the deceased aren't really needed but overall I enjoyed it a lot.

grassbath

  • Crocker was too green to see it
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #754 on: October 09, 2019, 05:09:01 PM »
I just got back from a holiday, which is where I have the sufficient mental space to do most of my reading nowadays. This time I chose to re-read something that I had loved on first encounter. It was between The Man Who Loved Children by Christina Stead, and The Sound and the Fury. In the end I settled for the Faulkner, and largely binged it on a night train from Bucharest to Istanbul. It's hardly a novel that needs another reader singing its praises, but it is staggering. A dreamlike, horrible tale of obsession, failure, childhood and adulthood, sex, race, God and time.

Rightly it is praised for its more experimental qualities, but maybe my favourite thing is the absolute control of the more conventional dramatic elements. Faulkner gets so inside his characters and is such a master of voice that he can write out a very sparse bit of dialogue, just 'he said' and 'she said's, and it be movie-vivid and deeply emotional and probing. Mrs Compson and Jason are appalling, some of the best villains in fiction. Despite having essentially no redeeming qualities at all, they never feel cartoonish but are eminently real and historical in their pathetic malevolence, avatars for every human failing you can name.

I love how the childlike simplicity of Benjy's chapter semi-accidentally lapses into Biblical grandeur and intensity, fitting his role as a kind of unassuming 'seer' of events: 'We went along the fence and came to the garden fence, where our shadows were. My shadow was higher than Luster's on the fence. We came to the broken place and went through it.' And when Quentin recalls the ambiguous details of his incestuous relationship with Caddy, the prose pure blooms with the madness of adolescent sexuality, and despite its abjection and violence is queerly erotic.

Fuck, it's good. Now i'm reading By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept by Elizabeth Smart, which is so far navel-gazing, melodramatic prose-poetry bollocks with no room to breathe in it at all, but I guess it had a lot to live up to.

buttgammon

  • You can't trust a man what's made of gas
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #755 on: October 09, 2019, 08:26:29 PM »
I just got back from a holiday, which is where I have the sufficient mental space to do most of my reading nowadays. This time I chose to re-read something that I had loved on first encounter. It was between The Man Who Loved Children by Christina Stead, and The Sound and the Fury. In the end I settled for the Faulkner, and largely binged it on a night train from Bucharest to Istanbul. It's hardly a novel that needs another reader singing its praises, but it is staggering. A dreamlike, horrible tale of obsession, failure, childhood and adulthood, sex, race, God and time.

Rightly it is praised for its more experimental qualities, but maybe my favourite thing is the absolute control of the more conventional dramatic elements. Faulkner gets so inside his characters and is such a master of voice that he can write out a very sparse bit of dialogue, just 'he said' and 'she said's, and it be movie-vivid and deeply emotional and probing. Mrs Compson and Jason are appalling, some of the best villains in fiction. Despite having essentially no redeeming qualities at all, they never feel cartoonish but are eminently real and historical in their pathetic malevolence, avatars for every human failing you can name.

I love how the childlike simplicity of Benjy's chapter semi-accidentally lapses into Biblical grandeur and intensity, fitting his role as a kind of unassuming 'seer' of events: 'We went along the fence and came to the garden fence, where our shadows were. My shadow was higher than Luster's on the fence. We came to the broken place and went through it.' And when Quentin recalls the ambiguous details of his incestuous relationship with Caddy, the prose pure blooms with the madness of adolescent sexuality, and despite its abjection and violence is queerly erotic.

Fuck, it's good. Now i'm reading By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept by Elizabeth Smart, which is so far navel-gazing, melodramatic prose-poetry bollocks with no room to breathe in it at all, but I guess it had a lot to live up to.

Really good post! Must read The Sound and the Fury again - what a book!

Currently reading Silas Marner and really enjoying it; it's one of those classics that I've wanted to read but have constantly felt a bit embarrassed about never having read before. I'd like to give Middlemarch a crack when I have some time.

Small Man Big Horse

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #756 on: October 09, 2019, 08:35:41 PM »
Just finished The First Bad Man by Miranda July, a very odd but pretty funny read all about a quiet and very passive woman whose life changes when her employer's daughter comes to stay, I was fond of it right up until the ending which was a bit of a disappointment. I'd still recommend it (especially if you like July's films) because it made me laugh a good few times, and it's a very easy and fast read too.

H-O-W-L

  • Turn me on, yeah. Electric bill all over.
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #757 on: October 09, 2019, 08:55:59 PM »
IT by Stephen King, and it's sort of doing a number on my psyche just because of how dense it is in terms of content.

grassbath

  • Crocker was too green to see it
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #758 on: October 09, 2019, 10:22:52 PM »
Really good post! Must read The Sound and the Fury again - what a book!

Thanks mate. Always nice to have longer posts vindicated, when you feel driven enough to put them together. And yes, you really must!