Author Topic: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia  (Read 14656 times)

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #180 on: February 08, 2019, 02:44:30 PM »
Can't agree, Dudgeon and his sidekick really made me interested in MM - the overwhelming nostalgia and emotion I get from Bergerac trickled into Dudgeon's Midsomer. More of a 90s nostalgia vibe though. Razor sharp and keening.

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #181 on: February 08, 2019, 02:47:18 PM »
Go on, watch an episode with the sound turned down and this playing over the top

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bB59IhmjdsE&frags=pl%2Cwn

monkfromhavana

  • Top one, nice one, get sorted
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #182 on: February 10, 2019, 09:35:17 AM »
This is what you want Blodders


BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #183 on: February 10, 2019, 05:40:17 PM »
This is what you want Blodders



How can I get one of these?

mothman

  • I don't know why
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #184 on: February 10, 2019, 07:16:47 PM »
Perhaps if you write him and ask nicely. Or does the restraining order forbid that, too?

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #185 on: February 10, 2019, 09:11:25 PM »
Perhaps if you write him and ask nicely. Or does the restraining order forbid that, too?

I dont fancy him. In fact i reckon Nettles was the only poor thing in Bergerac - for the most part - the score, scripts, cameos and most of the recurring cast were phenomenal in comparison.

The show could have been called “Bergerac...getting in the way of joyous tears”

biggytitbo

  • WHAT ABOUT THE GODDAM JAFFA CAKES ASSWIPE
    • theunredacted
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #186 on: February 10, 2019, 10:25:55 PM »
What would they call Bergerac is there was no Bergerac? " "?

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #187 on: February 10, 2019, 10:51:12 PM »
What would they call Bergerac is there was no Bergerac? " "?

Charlie's Engels.

Debbie Does Fliquet.

Susan's Homes Under the Hammer.

biggytitbo

  • WHAT ABOUT THE GODDAM JAFFA CAKES ASSWIPE
    • theunredacted
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #188 on: February 10, 2019, 10:57:20 PM »
It'd be good though without Jim, stuff would just happen and probably end up getting sorted out one way or another anyway.




BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #189 on: February 10, 2019, 11:07:45 PM »
It'd be good though without Jim, stuff would just happen and probably end up getting sorted out one way or another anyway.

I reckon, life on the island would be pretty calm, dodgy international criminals getting on with their business, petty local criminals turning up dead but. assumed misadventure, ghosts haunting empty places, no grief for Charlie, no frustration for Debs or Susan, Francine rising to prominence at the local tourist board.

A gap that. could be filled by Cluefarter? The chief will through in a private yacht for accommodation.

mothman

  • I don't know why
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #190 on: February 10, 2019, 11:53:09 PM »
The Naked Gun: From the files of Bureaux des Etrangers!

monkfromhavana

  • Top one, nice one, get sorted
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #191 on: February 11, 2019, 07:30:07 AM »
Perhaps if you write him and ask nicely. Or does the restraining order forbid that, too?

Yep, my girlfriend did it as a joke (I think) for my birthday. I have to maintain a jokey relationship with it, even though I'm secretly a bit chuffed.

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #192 on: February 11, 2019, 01:43:11 PM »
What!? Thats yours!? Youve ... had contact!

Going to email him

mothman

  • I don't know why
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #193 on: February 11, 2019, 03:38:47 PM »
You just SQUEEEE'd, didn't you? Admit it.

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #194 on: February 12, 2019, 12:54:49 AM »
You just SQUEEEE'd, didn't you? Admit it.

Be afraid...this...this is what can happen

http://www.fanmail.biz/79716.html

Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #195 on: June 10, 2019, 11:23:55 AM »
Nice to find somewhere with like-minded individuals!

I’ve been on a Bergerac binge myself for the last few weeks. Started off as a random selection from the second series - the Imrie era. Got sucked in and ended up watching every episode from that year before going back to the first and then forward again.

Now on series four, so still a while away from the chintzy theme tune transition.

For me part of the reason I love the series is the nostalgic setting, the ferry scenes bring back memories family holidays from the early ‘80s. The occasional blast of pop music helps, too.

Last episode I’ve watched is the one with a young Michelle Collins where Jim proves he’s not the brightest cop in the land (if not island) by pretty much forcing two middle-aged crime victims into vigilantism by blatantly ignoring their evidence. He really can be fist-chewingly stupid at times...

It’s amazing in an age before mobile phones that the secretary is able to track Jim down and place a landline call to wherever he is at a certain time, be it a hospital or a country house!

Passing through the seasons, it’s a pleasure to spot a past or present star and be able to easily check them out on IMDB or whatever.

One such person was Alan Lake, who struck me as being someone with a presence about him, so I wondered why he’d disappeared off our screens. Turns out in reality he was the husband of Diana Dors and killed himself the next year a few months after Dors had died of cancer. He did have quite a melancholic expression, even at the time of filming...



Norton Canes

  • The leper heart will see you for what you are
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #196 on: June 10, 2019, 11:24:49 AM »
He's good in the Tom Baker Doctor Who 'Underworld'.

gilbertharding

  • Not even the rudest man in the Beatles
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #197 on: June 10, 2019, 01:02:02 PM »
It’s amazing in an age before mobile phones that the secretary is able to track Jim down and place a landline call to wherever he is at a certain time, be it a hospital or a country house!

That, for me, will become the unspoken mystery at the heart of most drama set in the 20th Century.

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #198 on: June 10, 2019, 02:17:34 PM »
Excellent post Vandiss. We should hold a Bergerac "conference", although I suspect the Island will hold none of the nostalgia nowadays, with its internet (mind you, the computer episode was one of my favourites) and Greggs on every corner.

I too enjoyed reading up on the supporting cast after every episode and Alan Lake was a particularly tragic tale.

Glebe

  • Cheers, thanks mate, nice one.
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #199 on: June 10, 2019, 07:19:43 PM »
This thread has inspired one of my posts in the trivial comedy observations thread, which I'll quote here:

Quote
The Bergerac thread has jogged my memory about something... I've had to do a bit of Wiki/IMDb searching to find his name (and the titles of some of the TV episodes he was in), but the actor John Bennett, who appears as a nazi hunter in the episode 'The Sin of Forgiveness' (which I just caught again on the Drama channel or summit recently), plays the doctor in that classic Porridge scene with the urine sample gag from 'New Faces, Old Hands' ("Can you fill that up for me?" "What, from here?") that Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais reused when they did some script work on Never Say Never Again, apparently.  I also recall him from Blake's 7 episode 'Weapon', in which his character wears a big, silly Ming the Merciless-like collar. And according to Wiki, he later appeared in Spielberg's Minority Report!