Author Topic: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia  (Read 11711 times)

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #60 on: November 22, 2017, 11:22:37 PM »
Glad you're getting into this. Languid funk indeed.

Crozier is mostly benign, just plays tough boss from time to time without real conviction. Desperate to see why he grows a bear by series 8.


BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #61 on: November 23, 2017, 01:10:17 AM »
Pensive


monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #62 on: November 24, 2017, 07:22:22 AM »
By episode 4 Francine is already getting sick of Jim. How fleeting and fickle romance can be.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #63 on: November 25, 2017, 05:16:21 PM »
By episode 4 Francine is already getting sick of Jim. How fleeting and fickle romance can be.

Well, his first few girlfriends, I kind of thought it was none of Jim's fault really - he was a good lover and not clingy.

But the way he treated Susan, you can see there is a dismissive tone to his romances.

Anyway, just finished Series 7 and the shot of Susan and Jim's hands parting before Jim heads off to tour the world on his boat added some poignancy to the end of their relationship, which was sadly lacking in the previous episode where Susan decided to call it a day. To be honest the previous two episodes marked a sudden decline in quality - a return to fairly standard crime plot lines and over reliance on the two minor cops who are proper shit-80s actors. Also the final appearance of the Ice Maiden was a damp squib and showed a schoolboy silliness in Jim as he tried to rebound directly into her arms after the end of his romance with Susan. It was poorly written. Jim is no teenager and I don't like seeing his weak human side sullied for titties and giggles.

However, the season finale, they managed to capture some of that lovely melancholy, probably buoyed by having the fantastic Alec McCowen as a foil to George Costigan's nasty piece of work.

Hoping the Christmas special sees Jim solving a crime on foreign shores and series 8 a further descent into isolation. (Although I note the credits have a new actress, so possibly another love interest for Jim, sadly).

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #64 on: November 25, 2017, 05:17:32 PM »
Might be worth going through the Trivia notes in IMDB as I saw this for the finale:

Quote
Trenchard's car, a yellow Rover 2000, bears the registration EUU 47V. This registration also appeared on a white Mercedes 450SL driven by Rose Mellors in Minder: Diamonds Are a Girl's Worst Enemy (1980). According to DLVC records, the registration has never been used and is therefore fictitious.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2017, 12:08:54 AM »
Looking forward to this 1988 Christmas episode - featuring none other than Chris Langham!

Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #66 on: November 26, 2017, 01:11:05 AM »
This is a terrific thread, Blodwyn P, and I thank you for it.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #67 on: November 26, 2017, 01:50:32 AM »
You are welcome.

OK, thoroughly bizarre Christmas special. To be honest it was literally all over the place. Had to wait half the episode for Chris Langham to turn up and 3/4 of the episode for Andrew "Manuel" Sachs to cameo.

It was like a slow motion, clunky Ocean's Eleven. Hungerford really looked unwell and aged but put in a fine if somewhat stilted performance, Jim largely seemed secondary to the plot and Sergeant Ben Lomas (the weedy one of the two shit-cops) inexplicably had a massive Rambo style rifle AFTER all the action had ended.

Additionally it was rather odd seeing a "high speed" chase feature Jim's roadster, another classic car (didn't see make), two "speed"boats and a Chris Langham piloted helicopter.

One frustrating point near the end. The maniac wronged-villain is about to enter the house where Charlie and his young female "friend" are trying to flee, Charlie tells the woman to call the police - OH, IT'S A FUCKING DIAL PHONE - tension or what, seemingly it takes one minute to dial 999 and then politely asks "Police?". Fuck off with that. I know technology was a bit different back then, but Bergerac had been featuring touch dial car phones for about 4 series already. Fucking idiot telephones in emergencies.

The show seems intent on proving it had jumped the shark by featuring various music scores over the action and some crappy nods to "Hollywood" style directing that don't work - although Grace Jones' Slave to Rhythm rather oddly accompanying a lycra clad female lead doing aerobics brought to mind something out of mid-80s Michael Mann (sadly cut short before the crescendo as well - asshole editing).

I do hope they don't continue this style in the next series.



From Muppets to Bergerac to Pederast...some career arc

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #68 on: November 26, 2017, 01:28:16 PM »
I'll probably be kicking onto Series 1 Episode 5 today.

Francine seems pretty chilled, so I'd have to say that their relationship failure was probably down to Jim.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #69 on: November 26, 2017, 02:52:06 PM »
I'll probably be kicking onto Series 1 Episode 5 today.

Francine seems pretty chilled, so I'd have to say that their relationship failure was probably down to Jim.

Well, the explanation doesn't come until Episode 1 of Series 2, so I won't spoil that thrilling revelation.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #70 on: November 27, 2017, 02:58:36 AM »
Monk - spoiler alert

Series 8 gets off to a flyer. Things have changed for sure. Jim’s piled on the pounds whilst boating down to Gibraltar, Charlie’s got a new butler called Savile no less, and Peggy’s been replaced with a fresh young face.

Shockingly Susan is murdered within the first ten minutes and I was a bit dismayed to see a relative lack of emotion from Jim apart from a stroke of the chin, a ramble across deserted rock pools and a Criminal Minds type acting out of the murder. Thankfully Charlie’s spiel about bottling it up tethers the episode to some reality.

It’s noticeable also how shit cars look in this period of British history. Bloody awful boxy lumps of metal with names like Montego and Alhambra

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #71 on: November 27, 2017, 07:24:26 AM »
I attempted to watch episode 5 'Something About. Moscow" last night in bed. It wouldn't load, so I thought I'd try without ad blocker on which ended with me in pop-up hell, all of them attempting to get me to install viruses. Given the subject matter of the episode is this Putin suppressing anti-Russian sentiment online?

Should I send this information to the Democrats, or inform Biggy or something.

gilbertharding

  • Not even the rudest man in the Beatles
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #72 on: November 27, 2017, 09:50:35 AM »
Additionally it was rather odd seeing a "high speed" chase feature Jim's roadster, another classic car (didn't see make), two "speed"boats and a Chris Langham piloted helicopter.

Unless there's two car chases (or more than one car in the same chase), it was a black Jaguar XJS convertible. A classic now, but a modern car then.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #73 on: November 27, 2017, 02:31:24 PM »
Unless there's two car chases (or more than one car in the same chase), it was a black Jaguar XJS convertible. A classic now, but a modern car then.

Mr. Bergerac there, enlightening us all with the details Blodwyn could not be bothered to check.

Cheers! Was that from memory alone?

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2017, 02:33:00 PM »
I attempted to watch episode 5 'Something About. Moscow" last night in bed. It wouldn't load, so I thought I'd try without ad blocker on which ended with me in pop-up hell, all of them attempting to get me to install viruses. Given the subject matter of the episode is this Putin suppressing anti-Russian sentiment online?

Should I send this information to the Democrats, or inform Biggy or something.


Strange, there is one episode that doesn't work from the early series, but I think its season 2. Series 7 is a bit hit and miss too and had to migrate to put locker - but episode 6 can only be found on watchseries.

Anyway, I hope you managed to watch the Russian one - its a corker. 

BlodwynPig

  • R.I.P. The Waxwork René
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #75 on: November 27, 2017, 02:35:27 PM »
I am wondering if the Series 7 Christmas special was in fact the Series 8 Christmas special as S8 Ep1 Jim just returns back from his voyage, whereas the Chrimbo special he's already back on the island, Charlie looks old and Crozier seems well settled into his senior position, and no Susan. 

gilbertharding

  • Not even the rudest man in the Beatles
Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #76 on: November 27, 2017, 03:31:05 PM »
I had to check - I sensed a chance to flash my car identification skills. Disappointingly easy, I'm sorry to say. Nice motor though. They'd only just brought out the full convertible XJS in 1988.

Didn't the first few series have a lot of psychodrama flashbacks to the accident which made Jim limp? And did they forget about his terrible injuries when they made him run about a lot in the later series? Like Gordon Jackson in the Professionals?

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #77 on: November 27, 2017, 03:37:19 PM »
I had to check - I sensed a chance to flash my car identification skills. Disappointingly easy, I'm sorry to say. Nice motor though. They'd only just brought out the full convertible XJS in 1988.

Didn't the first few series have a lot of psychodrama flashbacks to the accident which made Jim limp? And did they forget about his terrible injuries when they made him run about a lot in the later series? Like Gordon Jackson in the Professionals?

The flashbacks were I think only in episode 1 and maybe one other episode - quite gruesome - boat crushing leg against harbour wall.

Yes, all that was forgotten pretty much by series 2, although in series 6 or 7 his fitness is called into question once more.

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #78 on: November 27, 2017, 10:13:30 PM »

Strange, there is one episode that doesn't work from the early series, but I think its season 2. Series 7 is a bit hit and miss too and had to migrate to put locker - but episode 6 can only be found on watchseries.

Anyway, I hope you managed to watch the Russian one - its a corker.

Watched episode 5 on Dailymotion as part of a double-header tonight. Episode 5 is pretty good, Gerry O'Hara who write it used to (IIRC) write episodes of The Professionals, which is why I half expected Bodie & Doyle to be sent over at any moment. Francine in a bra was also a high point for the 12-year old-minded me.

Episode 6 was rubbish.

Crozier seems to have warmed up to Jim though, and things seem to be going swimmingly between Jim & Francine. Wonder how he blows it.

Where's Deborah got to? Is she always out when Jim calls?

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #79 on: November 27, 2017, 10:16:41 PM »
Deborah turns into a real vamp in about series 4 when the mid-80s excesses start to reach the fair Isle. Much better than the Ice Maiden for surreptitious fantasies.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #80 on: November 28, 2017, 02:51:34 AM »
Dear oh dear, what a fuzzled episode. Baldrick turns up with the worst Israeli accent imaginable, more inspector clouseau than shylock. He then has the audacity to pose as Bergerac whilst being the polar opposite with a late 80s mullet and shoddy silver suit.

First sub-5/10 episode

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #81 on: November 30, 2017, 04:07:34 AM »
Roots of Evil is a really top episode with lots of double bluffs, a hirsute Phil Mitchell, Geoffrey Palmer as a terrorist funder and Lynsey Baxter as the sort of posh student so prevalent in shows like Morse and Boon in the late 80s and early 90s.

Zero melancholy apart from the gradual drift from 80s nostalgia into an even starker 90s reverie. But plenty to chew on, like the proverbial Hungerford cigar - a fine cameo by Charlie as he wins the Jersey croquet finals against a humorous Major “remember Bergerac, keep ORF the blasted grass”

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #82 on: November 30, 2017, 01:26:33 PM »
Watched another two. I enjoy seeing into Crozier' private life which seemingly consists of living in the box room of his parent's house making model aeroplanes.

Francine told the elderly German couple that "her friend" worked for the police. Jim's been friendzoned and he doesn't
even know it. 


BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #83 on: November 30, 2017, 01:31:16 PM »
Watched another two. I enjoy seeing into Crozier' private life which seemingly consists of living in the box room of his parent's house making model aeroplanes.

Francine told the elderly German couple that "her friend" worked for the police. Jim's been friendzoned and he doesn't
even know it.

It happens more than once with several girlfriends. It is vicious.

You finally get to see Crozier's wife in Series 6 I think - she's particularly well-written and well-acted for the few episodes and scenes where she features.

Wish you had joined me earlier on this journey. Would actually be better watching with someone (sad music) and experiencing the rollercoaster of loss together.

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #84 on: November 30, 2017, 06:34:44 PM »
It happens more than once with several girlfriends. It is vicious.

You finally get to see Crozier's wife in Series 6 I think - she's particularly well-written and well-acted for the few episodes and scenes where she features.

Wish you had joined me earlier on this journey. Would actually be better watching with someone (sad music) and experiencing the rollercoaster of loss together.

We're watching together in spirit, Blodders.

You know what irks me? Diamante Lil getting her name in the credits when she does only slightly more than nothing in every episode. The Royal Barge looks like a horrible place to have a meal / pint in, no wonder Jim turned to the booze.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #85 on: November 30, 2017, 10:02:15 PM »
We're watching together in spirit, Blodders.

You know what irks me? Diamante Lil getting her name in the credits when she does only slightly more than nothing in every episode. The Royal Barge looks like a horrible place to have a meal / pint in, no wonder Jim turned to the booze.

You'll come to see her as the heralding of Jim's descent into isolation. Once she tumbles off the credits, they all follow.

Plus, series 1 The Barge was shit, what happened to that cook - got rid of him fast (probably shipped off to Allo Allo). However, it became a bit more cosy in later series and then the BIG CHANGE - you'll miss it after you see where Lil goes next.

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #86 on: December 01, 2017, 03:21:27 AM »
Bergerac En Provence!

You’ll love this one Monk. Sun drenched, nostalgia soaked, pastoral funk score (leading up to the inevitable introduction of potential new French love interest). Great to see Michael Cronin (Grange Hill’s Bullet Baxter) doing a fine French accent. It’s odd that the show largely uses English actors on French roles. Most pull it off, but the rogue Legion deserter in this one ended up low-talking and coming across as Sly Stallone doing the Godfather - it worked brilliantly and his scenes were straight out of another series entirely!

I thought the production had developed quite a lot, perhaps the French summer light gave a modern glow to the episode, rather than new film stock.

Hope Madame Liotard reappears again. Jim certainly does - still doing his puppy dog impression when he meets beautiful ladies. We all know now that’s just a temporary act. A thoroughly 80s man.

monkfromhavana

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #87 on: December 01, 2017, 07:29:56 AM »
Episode 10-  Poor Jim, Francine getting uppity because Jim won't hold her hand whilst he accompanies a prisoner so she plays away with some fat bloke. "He is being a peasant".

Jim still takes her back, but inside he knows it's over.

First ever appearance of Greta Scacchi and teases of boob everywhere. Excellent disguises by Jim and the other cop, who are the worst tails ever.

I always love nightclub scenes, this one didn't disappoint. DJ dropping 'Hard Times' by The Human League. A forewarning regarding rocky times ahead for Jimbo?

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #88 on: December 01, 2017, 12:38:00 PM »
Fantastic. It wasn't a bad nightclub scene, cf. Morse's Rave, but certainly hilarious.

The show is consistent, teases of boob and shit tailing still abound in series 8. Fucking shit cop 2 tailing fake Irish from airport, gets clocked immediately and is never more than 3 paces behind...still loses the guy (this is after getting bollocked a few episodes earlier when his car breaks down tailing another guy).

BlodwynPig

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Re: The haunting melancholy of Bergerac - a study of loss through nostalgia
« Reply #89 on: December 01, 2017, 12:38:35 PM »
I'd love a soundtrack CD of the show. Languid funk, pastoral funk, theme tune - would be excellent.