Author Topic: "F**k my Hat, I didn't know that!" Amazing things you've only just found out  (Read 161101 times)

Sebastian Cobb

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Did his personality not give it away?

Re-watched US comedy Rules of Engagement and I've discovered two things I never knew.

1. Oliver Hudson's mother and father are Goldie Hawn & Kurt Russell



2. David Spade is reportedly worth $60 million dollars



$60 million!

Sebastian Cobb

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Re-watched US comedy Rules of Engagement and I've discovered two things I never knew.

1. Oliver Hudson's mother and father are Goldie Hawn & Kurt Russell



2. David Spade is reportedly worth $60 million dollars



$60 million!

You've watched it twice but haven't found out it's shit yet?

You've watched it twice but haven't found out it's shit yet?

David Spade has some good one liners. It's easy on the brain watching.

This is true, I should clarify that it rained all over Pangaea for 2 mil years.

I don't want to be the [citation needed] guy but how is it possible that we know that?

NoSleep

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Fossil puddles. And umbrellas.

touchingcloth

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I don't want to be the [citation needed] guy but how is it possible that we know that?

I don’t think it rained constantly all over Pangaea for two millions years, but bgmnts is probably talking about the Carnian Pluvial Event, which was an extended period where the climate tended to be much wetter than at other points in history. You could probably compare it to ice ages, where it’s never true that the entire planet was a big block of ice, but much more of it was much colder than at other periods.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnian_Pluvial_Event

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03699-7

The Nature piece gives a good overview of the evidence for the widespread wetness, but it seems to hinge on a) soils and sediments in rich layers which point to a wetter climate, and b) extinctions which are plausibly related to a wet climate. Wiki suggests that the “widespread presence of amber” is another line of evidence, but I haven’t found a good summary of why that might be.

Kiev is actually pronounced Keev and not Key-Ev like I thought. At least according to the Winds of Change podcast

NoSleep

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It's actually pronounced more like "Kay-ew", with emphasis on the K, in Ukraine.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/13/us/politics/kiev-pronunciation.html

sirhenry

  • That worked out well...
Whereas in Russia it's pronounced more like "Keef'


touchingcloth

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And in Chechen it’s pronounced Kush.

NoSleep

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Clearly written by an American, I would guess, from their attempt at writing down Estuary English. Americans really find it hard to copy the glottal stop on T so they've written it pretty much the way they try to imitate it (e.g. snor'een = snortin'). I guess they don't hear that phoneme so clearly.

On the other hand, I've mentioned before that Americans like to pronounce "solder" as "sodder". But I've recently started to notice that they do manage to slip in the missing "L", but it's at lightning speed. I can't manage to add this superfast "L" in imitation; it always comes out as "sodder".

touchingcloth

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^ “mo’” for “more” is a giveaway, as are the Brummified “oi” for “eye” sounds, which Americans overdo for Southern accents, as it doesn’t really feature in Southern accents in any meaningful way. The closest you’d get from a Brit’s lips is probably an exaggerated “stroike a loight”, but I half reckon that might have its genesis in Dick Van Dyke’s turn in Mary Poppins.

Also “kep’ insistin’” - I cant imagine a native speaker dropping that particular T because it makes the words harder to say, and the glottal stop after kept would only come before a consonant - “he kep’ badgerin’ me”. I’d never write it like that even if I was trying to convey an accent, as it’s a very minor stop in all of the accents I can think of.

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
It's a weird amalgamation of Yorkshire (tha') and Brummie (Oi)

NoSleep

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I think it's more of a mishearing of Estuary but probably has few other regions inadvertently amalgamated into a generic, non-posh english accent for Americans.

John Ennis does a classic amalgamated non-posh english on occasions in Mr Show. There's a bunch of bad english accents here, his is the comedic best @1:40:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNzYqzHmJss


I brought this up in another thread, but that reminds me of how, in Love Will Tear Us Apart, Ian Curtis sings "is my timing that flawed" but pronounces with an R as "floored". I think this is a giveaway that consciously or unconsciously he was trying to do an American accent, because Brits tend to over-pronounce Rs in things when we do American accents, often incorrectly - so "mother and farther". An American would pronounce it "flawed" without an R.

The Lurker

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Flakes don't melt

touchingcloth

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Some flakes do, famously snow.

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