Author Topic: Wildlife spotting  (Read 55867 times)

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1710 on: September 12, 2020, 11:21:55 AM »
We get a handful of those goofy faces several times a week -- s/he's looking up at the bedroom window. I'm convinced it's because they hear Mr Attila snoring.

Poor beast, must give them the creeps. Like when we hear the fox screams.

Menu

  • It's exactly how I want it.
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1711 on: September 13, 2020, 03:17:20 AM »
Thank you for those pictures, Attila. Loved them. Especially the beautiful fox and fat hedgehogs.

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1712 on: September 13, 2020, 08:45:54 AM »
After being disappointed by the lack of wildlife captured on my new camera recently I saw rather too much ‘red in tooth and claw’ for my delicate sensibilities yesterday. I didn’t know it at the time but when I was taking these pics the pigeon was still alive. It wasn’t for much longer but it played on my mind for the rest of the day. Voltan (Man of Steel)? Man of Putty, right?




Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1713 on: September 13, 2020, 09:18:26 AM »
Awww, Voltan -- that is rough...I admit, I like all of the David Attenborough animal docos, but make Mr Attila switch over as soon as you know it's going to be one of 'those' scenes...

I haven't checked this morning's photos, but the funniest thing from last night won't be on them. I was reading before I went to bed last night, and heard 'crunchmmmffcrrunchcrunch' from just below the window. Hedgehog dining sounds like a rodent gnawing on wood, but this was much louder, open-mouthed crunching of foxes.

They have incredibly sharp hearing, so by the time I'd pulled open the blinds and curtain, he'd fled, but then he slipped back out of the shadows. I watched him eat for a while -- snatching a mouthful of kibble, pausing at every, single, tiny sound and looking up with great caution -- at the kitchen window below me, up at me (even as I stayed as still as possible), glancing backwards through the garden gate where someone down the street was having a party (yeah).

As he was eating, I saw Mr Gus slip in through the garden gate; Gus patrols the garden nightly, so we get lots of photos of him every night. He's not fussed about the foxes, but we have no photos of them together.

Mr Fox decided to slip away just at the moment Mr Gus came around the  corner of the back step. You know how when you startle a cat it will yoink up in the air like a puppet and dance off? That was foxey's reaction at being startled by Gus -- a clumsy, sideways ballerina's leap in the air with a startled snore-oink-snarl that sent him crashing into the backdoor, a snap of the teeth in Gus's general direction, then leap over Gus to vanish down the drive.

I went downstairs to see if Gus still had a head, and he was sauntering around the driveway like it was no big deal; normally if he's been startled or threatened himself, he's got a hell of a warcry and his tail explodes out in a brush about 3x its normal size. But he was in a fine fettle, and greeted me as usual. While I was playing with him, a couple of hedgehogs came through the highway hole between the garden fences, as they don't seem to give a toss if someone is out in the garden anymore, either; we've got loads of photos with them and the foxes, them and the cats.

Fox came back a few minutes later.

Mr Attila heard none of this, despite it happening about 10 feet away from him on the other side of the door, as he listens to stuff so loudly on headphones, it's clearly audible by anyone else in the house. He'll be deaf before he's 55.

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1714 on: September 13, 2020, 09:20:53 AM »
Why don't you get a bivouac and sleep out with the wildlife one night?

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1715 on: September 13, 2020, 09:44:34 AM »
Thanks for the stories and pics, Attila, (I assume Mr Attila calls you Hun) I always enjoy them. It seems that as much as I think I love nature I’d actually prefer a Disneyfied version where majestic eagles still soar in cloudless skies but no fluffy bunnies get hurt.

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1716 on: September 13, 2020, 10:23:29 AM »
Why don't you get a bivouac and sleep out with the wildlife one night?

I've been out late at night on Perseids nights -- I doubt the foxes would come around if a person were in the garden. I've heard the hedgehogs bumbling about when I've done late night star- and ISS-gazing on the back lawn, but none get close. Lots of bats, though -- always glad to see them flapping over head. Kinda irritated that my neighbours took down their enormous butterfly bush yesterday afternoon, as it overhung our garden wall, and attracted lots of butterflies, birds, and even the bats and sometimes owls at night. It also acted as an excellent barrier between our bedroom window and the horrendously shitty cigarettes Mr Neighbour chimney smokes all day.

Selections from last night -- i gnore the time stamp, as I keep forgetting to reset it!

Fox around the time I was watching from the bedroom window



Mid-crunch and cautious



Many photos of fox 'n' 'hog last night, as usual



Fox watches a bug or a slug? We get lots of photos of fat slugs hanging around the party palace, too.







Morning robin trying to steal the last of the wild strawberries



Morning magpie caught in take-off mode



Voltan heh. We don't have any nicknames for each other, strangely enough, even though I get called a whole variety of things by folks at work (there are only three Americans in my dept, all women, but I'm the only one who's been saddled with various nicknames or people endlessly trying to make me laugh during meetings or a lot of mick-taking. I cannot imagine the reaction of the other two Yankeedoodledandettes in response to the sorts of things that get said to me). I'm with you -- I know it's a rough world out there in nature; I had a little farm carved out of a rather wild expanse of woods in southern Virginia for a while, and we saw some shit, even there (not being able to stop my dogs from flushing out a den of feral cats and kittens being one of the worst memories I have). So when it comes to nature documentaries...yeah...I tend to stick with the tamer ones. Just can't do footage of penguins separated from their mates and falling into crevices and all that :(

I did like, though, that mad segment showing all of those snakes rising up like something out of a Ray Harryhausen film.

[s for anyone just getting started with their camera -- these selections from last night are from out of around 200 -- since May, we've caught well over 9700 photos on this sd card -- the majority of them empty of creatures, blurry, many cats, our legs as we walked past, etc. So don;t worry if you still haven;t had interesting ones yet.

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1717 on: September 13, 2020, 10:54:23 AM »
Yes, that snakes clip was like something out of a nightmare. I’ll hopefully post some pics as soon as I get something nocturnal that’s not the mysterious, extravagantly fluffy black cat that paid us a couple of visits to scoff the doggy kibble last week.

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1718 on: September 13, 2020, 10:58:47 AM »
Yes, that snakes clip was like something out of a nightmare. I’ll hopefully post some pics as soon as I get something nocturnal that’s not the mysterious, extravagantly fluffy black cat that paid us a couple of visits to scoff the doggy kibble last week.

So many neighbour cats drop by ours at night. Unless we know them, we've given them all new names. Mr Jingles and Blackie are two we don't know except from the camera. Loads of Mr Gus, who lives next door, and occasionally a visit from Arthur, the geriatric ginger & white cat from down the street. (He was being a street cat again after the renter-neighbours who took him in were evicted last xmas, but another neighbour has built him a wonderful cat-house, with a raised ramp for him to walk into it, and lots of soft cushions/blankets to sleep on. So he sleeps in the pile of leaves next to it :3. It's much closer to his actual owner's house, so he doesn't have to go as far to get fed, kibble, shelter, etc. as coming up to our house.)

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1719 on: September 13, 2020, 11:05:19 AM »
I've left the camera out near the swan pond, by the hawthorn hedgerow where I found the swan foot. It looks like a trail for foxes/badgers in and out of the cow field that is adjacent. Dumped a load of chopped apple and some kibble, so hope there may be something when I retrieve it, although the battery was on 1 bar and it was windy, so probably loads of images of blowing grass before the battery gives up.

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1720 on: September 13, 2020, 11:42:04 AM »
... another neighbour has built him a wonderful cat-house, with a raised ramp for him to walk into it, and lots of soft cushions/blankets to sleep on. So he sleeps in the pile of leaves next to it :3. It's much closer to his actual owner's house, so he doesn't have to go as far to get fed, kibble, shelter, etc. as coming up to our house.)

Ha! Some people really do go overboard in their cosseting of pets.

This coming from someone who bought his dog a set of soft steps so he could get on our bed more easily. He’s never used them, preferring instead to get my attention so I’ll get out of bed and lift him on.

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1721 on: September 13, 2020, 11:52:44 AM »
Ha! Some people really do go overboard in their cosseting of pets.

This coming from someone who bought his dog a set of soft steps so he could get on our bed more easily. He’s never used them, preferring instead to get my attention so I’ll get out of bed and lift him on.

Thing is, Arthur isn't even their cat! The woman who owns him is in her 90s, and doesn't take care of him at all. He's looked after by several of us on the street, poor old guy.

My mom had a set of soft steps for her dogs when they got too stiff and elderly to climb up into her high bed; then later one of her cats used it.

Blue Jam

  • Crabs is sewage-proof
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1722 on: September 13, 2020, 05:45:33 PM »
Cygs update:



Daddy Swan LIVES! Don't know where he buggered off to last time, presumably he wasn't off philandering because swans mate for life, but the wife and kids weren't happy so it was nice to see him back.

Today the swans and cygs seemed much happier and were being all friendly and gladly gobbling up the pumpkin seeds I brought for a change. Turns out pumpkin seeds are better than sunflower seeds because they float. Peas are even better but Saino's only do snack packs of wasabi peas and I'm not giving wasabi to wildfowl.

Cygs are starting to get their big boy plumage now and are almost as big as the fuckin' unit that is their dad.

Two of the lochs here apparently have otters. Didn't see any today but will keep an eye out.

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  • It's exactly how I want it.
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1723 on: September 15, 2020, 04:18:15 AM »
This is the best bit of this entire website. Love it. I just wish I might one day meet a hedgehog. I think the gardens round here are too cookie cutter. :@<

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1724 on: September 15, 2020, 07:37:58 AM »
Ooh, lovely swans, Blue Jam. I did a conference one summer in Lincoln, and the river there had several swan families, little beepers swimming around after the mother ship.

I've moved the camera to a slightly different part of the back garden to capture all the comings and goings out of the garden gate. The first night I moved the fox bowl, but they were really unhappy with its new location and didn't eat much; too exposed, I think. I put it back in its original shadowy spot and they've eaten everything. I'm curious to see what we got last night, as the first night we got photos of the foxes playing around on the back step and standing on the catflap! (it pokes out of the back door a bit, like a narrow ledge).

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1725 on: September 15, 2020, 08:12:36 AM »
Ooh, lovely swans, Blue Jam. I did a conference one summer in Lincoln, and the river there had several swan families, little beepers swimming around after the mother ship.

I've moved the camera to a slightly different part of the back garden to capture all the comings and goings out of the garden gate. The first night I moved the fox bowl, but they were really unhappy with its new location and didn't eat much; too exposed, I think. I put it back in its original shadowy spot and they've eaten everything. I'm curious to see what we got last night, as the first night we got photos of the foxes playing around on the back step and standing on the catflap! (it pokes out of the back door a bit, like a narrow ledge).

can they fit through the flap? put some kibble the other side and you might have an invasion of creatures

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1726 on: September 15, 2020, 09:22:58 AM »
The flap is currently closed and locked (and we have a block across its window to keep from tormenting cats who can see in or out -- at the moment, we can't have our three roaming).

But if it were operational, the foxes could easily get through it -- there are a couple of bigger foxes who come by, but there are one or two who are clearly about the size of the larger cats who visit the party palace.

(It's one of those flaps that the cats need a keyed chip to open, so not worried about vulpine visitors once we're back in operation. That said, when I was living at my mother's about 10 years back, she had a flap on the greenhouse to the outside, and from the greenhouse into the house itself, and we had a fox come in to the greenhouse through the flap. The resident cats went nuts at the intruder, and in its haste to get back out of the flap, took the entire greenhouse door with it.)

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1727 on: September 15, 2020, 09:48:08 AM »
In Canada during the summer I left the door open as I snoozed on the sofa. When I woke up there was a black squirrel and a chipmunk rummaging through a pile of nuts from an overturned bag on the floor. I was in no hurry to get them out but I was subsequently warned by the landlady that rodents weren't allowed in the house.

Attila

  • gif made by hedgehog90
Re: Wildlife spotting
« Reply #1728 on: September 16, 2020, 10:00:14 AM »
Catch up from the past couple of days; still been too lazy to correct the time on the camera, soz.

Some reverse angles from the usual party palace cam:

The camera is sat on a tripod just to the right of the party palace, as we were curious about the comings and goings through the garden gate.



The foxes didn't like their bowl out in the open next to the bins, and were a lot more skittish in the photo set from that night.



He's stood right up against the back door here, and other photos show him stood on the ledge of the catflap



Looking up towards the bedroom



The hedgehogs didn't give a toss about the fox bowl being moved, and chowed down on dog kibble all night







Last night was a reverse angle -- the party palace is out of sight, just to the right of that square dish in the background



Fox hears the camera (it makes a slight click when it photographs.






Big crow






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