Author Topic: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases  (Read 5678 times)

kalowski

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2018, 05:36:40 PM »
The phrases that pop into mind regularly include:

"You've got nice tits... Denise."

"Who wants to shag Bamber Gascgoine? Not even Mrs Gascgoine."

"It made me laugh." "I agree. It made me laugh. A lot."

"Have you ever noticed...?"

"I'm doing it, I'm doing it!"

"Bleeding radiators!"

"Not being rude. I'm being funny."

I watched that Coogan video a lot when I was younger.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #31 on: November 07, 2018, 05:54:37 PM »
I say "I'm doing it I'm doing it" in Duncan Thickett's voice a few times a week.

I also always say "I'll have two from the top and one from the bottom" before engaging in sex .

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #32 on: November 07, 2018, 06:09:48 PM »
A girl at work picked up the phrase “it’s a pain in the padded ass” from an ex and didn’t realise it was a makes-more-sense-in-context line from Mrs Doubtfire

kalowski

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #33 on: November 07, 2018, 08:51:00 PM »
I say "I'm doing it I'm doing it" in Duncan Thickett's voice a few times a week.

I also always say "I'll have two from the top and one from the bottom" before engaging in sex .
Ha ha.

Occasionally, when I'm happy I shout out "Stockport Viaduct!" or "Rochdale Multi storey car park!" But if I do the latter I can't help following it with, "But who's this hiding here. It's our old friend, Barry White." (Not the singer, but an orphans of the same name).

purlieu

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2018, 09:03:26 PM »
Several times I've spoken about 'Peter's Mad Thoughts' before realising that, actually, not many people have read the Fist of Fun book, and won't know what the fuck I'm talking about.

Another 'proof if proof be need be' here too.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2018, 11:39:49 PM »
‘The Rise of the Idiots’

neveragain

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2018, 11:11:48 AM »
Tree fiddy.

Dannyhood91

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2018, 11:24:23 AM »
Gay as a window

AsparagusTrevor

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #38 on: November 09, 2018, 12:36:11 PM »
Tree fiddy.
That's one that seems to have transcended South Park, along with "that makes me a sad panda" which I've heard said by people I know don't watch the show.

Better Midlands

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #39 on: November 09, 2018, 03:12:01 PM »
I'm pretty sure "moon on a stick" was around long before Lee & Herring.

Someone could Mandela me otherwise though.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2018, 11:52:57 AM »
I'm pretty sure "moon on a stick" was around long before Lee & Herring.

Someone could Mandela me otherwise though.

Now I want to know. Can anyone find an earlier instance?

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2018, 07:14:48 PM »
I'd always assumed it was something from Herring's schooldays. He was never shy about mining that for material.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2018, 02:35:19 AM »
'To ask / cry for the moon' has been around for a long time, but I can't find any instances of 'moon on a stick' before 1996, when it shows up in largely self-conscious contexts in a number of UK Usenet groups. If Lee and Herring didn't actually coin it, they're certainly responsible for popularising it.

New Jack

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2018, 02:47:52 AM »
I assume Popcorn did look themselves, buuut I did find an amusing Italian question about the meaning of the phrase. They have something similar, about wanting the moon.

But aye, the stick part. Nowt. No etymologies or owt. It's Lee and Herring. Unless it's super obscure, but I love googling idioms to see what the hell they meant originally, just seems there's nothing more to find on moon on a stick.

Ergo wanting to know its full history is like wanting the moon on a stick!... Soz.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2018, 07:39:09 AM »
That's one that seems to have transcended South Park, along with "that makes me a sad panda" which I've heard said by people I know don't watch the show.

Ah, that's where that sad panda thing comes from. If only I'd known before beheading and burning them all.

kalowski

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #45 on: November 11, 2018, 07:54:35 AM »
Not a stick but...

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #46 on: November 11, 2018, 11:16:03 AM »
'To ask / cry for the moon' has been around for a long time, but I can't find any instances of 'moon on a stick' before 1996, when it shows up in largely self-conscious contexts in a number of UK Usenet groups. If Lee and Herring didn't actually coin it, they're certainly responsible for popularising it.

Sweeney Todd (Sondheim, 1979) has "Had her chance for the moon on a string." I expect the phrase "moon on a string" has been around longer than that (the line in It's a Wonderful Life alluded to by the above cartoon seems to reference the idea), although that's the earliest example I can find with a perfunctory Google.

I assume Lee and/or Herring either mis-remembered the phrase having heard it in their youth, or (more likely) altered it to make it funnier (we all know that timeless rule of comedy, that words with a "k" sound in them are funnier, right?)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 02:10:25 PM by olliebean »

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #47 on: November 11, 2018, 11:28:40 AM »
“Hello, I am David Dimbleby.”

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #48 on: November 11, 2018, 11:40:49 AM »
Has anyone any idea where to see that "Lee and Herring meet Moon Unit Zappa" interview?

She looks mighty perplexed by that phrase, if memory serves.


Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #49 on: November 11, 2018, 04:19:52 PM »
I assume Popcorn did look themselves

In fact I did, though not very hard. The best clue I could find was an Urban Dictionary entry saying that Lee and Herring "popularised" it. Which still doesn't mean they didn't invent it.

And aye, there are lots of moon-related idioms of similar meaning, but it's the stick we need.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #50 on: November 11, 2018, 04:21:13 PM »
Here's one I'm wondering about at the moment: does "dicks in the wind" originate with the movie JFK?

"Khrushchev sent the missiles to resist the invasion, Kennedy refused to invade and we were standing out there with our dicks in the wind."

It feels like something I've heard a lot, but when you google "dicks in the wind" you mainly get JFK clips.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #51 on: November 11, 2018, 04:40:03 PM »
BOMBSHELL

Just asked Richard Herring on Twitter if they invented "moon on a stick" and he said "We didn't. It was an existing phrase."

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #52 on: November 11, 2018, 07:02:11 PM »
Which doesn't rule out the possibility that they were misremembering "moon on a string."

Better Midlands

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #53 on: November 11, 2018, 07:07:40 PM »
Which doesn't rule out the possibility that they were misremembering "moon on a string."

Follow this link and it references a 1994 biography of Billie Holiday written by a guy from Wisconsin born in 1940.

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/moon_on_a_stick

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #54 on: December 03, 2018, 08:27:07 AM »
Not sure if this is the right thread for this but, now I've had my coffee, I've just seen a quick reply email I'd sent about an hour ago to someone called Bob which was sitting atop my 'Sent' folder.



Like I said, I hadn't had my coffee...

Lordofthefiles

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #55 on: December 03, 2018, 09:55:13 AM »
"That's the kind of guy I am"

- Kirk St Moritz off of Dear John (...and me whenever someone points out that I'm being obnoxious or suchlike).

Norton Canes

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Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #56 on: December 03, 2018, 10:53:42 AM »
"Ooh, pardon!" (or rather, I forget it's from a spoof comedian and not a real one)

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #57 on: December 03, 2018, 12:19:08 PM »
"As soon as is likely" from the Mr Dalliard "brothels" sketch. I use it all the time without thinking. Nobody ever picks up on it.

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #58 on: December 03, 2018, 12:32:48 PM »
Not so much aren't real phrases, but ones that enter my head as standard figures of speech all the time.

"There's something wrong!" as screamed by Dan Ashcroft at the crowd of baying Idiots at the end of that Nathan Barley episode.

"That don't matter. None of this matters." as dejectedly muttered by Carl Brutananadilewski. Works in so many situations in my life.

"Never talk to your neighbours. They're all NUTTERS." - Vince Clark, 15 Storey's High

and of course....

"Pissing's just horseplay"

Re: Comedy Phrases you forget aren't real phrases
« Reply #59 on: December 03, 2018, 01:28:15 PM »
As others i'm sure have mentioned on here previously, I am fond of describing people as "scum, subhuman scum," which may come across as judgemental to non-Partridge liking types (scum, subhuman scum).