Author Topic: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs  (Read 4105 times)

Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #60 on: January 24, 2019, 10:30:41 PM »
I'm hopeless on subtext stuff and had no clue what the last part was about. Had no clue half of Cagney and Lacey was still alive either.

I worked with the other one of Cagney and Lacey in the summer.  I was an extra on Casualty and there was a white-haired American actress on set.  I didn't twig who it was until I walked past a trailer with 'Sharon Gless' on it and thought, hang on...

Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #61 on: January 24, 2019, 11:09:51 PM »
Interesting article about how some of the stories aren't originals, but adaptions of old short stories. The originals are now online to read: https://www.indiewire.com/2019/01/coen-brothers-buster-scruggs-oscar-nom-adapted-screenplay-not-original-1202037160/


Ah, good info! So were any of these adapted authors credited?

I've long suspected that everything they do is cut-and-paste pastiche. Like how Miller's Crossing is basically The Glass Key - that doesn't stop it from being great though, the Coens totally nail it their way.

St_Eddie

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Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #62 on: January 25, 2019, 05:27:34 AM »
You're all a bunch of Buster Scruggs as far as I'm concerned.

Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #63 on: February 02, 2019, 11:15:58 PM »
Watched it last night, by the end of the fourth short(the gold digger) I thought its been on for hours should have ended it there, it hadn't even been on an hour, but glad I stayed awake as I enjoyed the skits that followed. The cinematography was captivating, especially in the gold digger scenario.

Also great to see Chris Finch.

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Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #64 on: February 02, 2019, 11:42:07 PM »
Watched it last night, by the end of the fourth short(the gold digger) I thought its been on for hours should have ended it there, it hadn't even been on an hour, but glad I stayed awake as I enjoyed the skits that followed. The cinematography was captivating, especially in the gold digger scenario.

Also great to see Chris Finch.

I laughed out loud in the theatre when I saw Finchy.

“What the fuck is Finchy playing haha legend”

Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #65 on: February 02, 2019, 11:53:53 PM »
Ha, lovely stuff. I am pretty damn good at spotting faces, this film covered everyone in dust and grime as it would have been back in them good o'l days, but Chris 'Ralph' Finch enabled instant recognition.

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Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #66 on: February 04, 2019, 10:35:35 AM »
Thought the Gal Who Got Rattled and the Tom Waits one were the best. The former could (maybe should) have been a film all of its own.

The opener is also great but sets a goofy tone completely at odds with the morose follow ups. Found my mind wandering during the Liam Neeson one; the James Franco one just seemed like a couple of good scenes they had but didn't know what to do with, and count me among those befuddled by the final segment.

Nevertheless I enjoyed the whole thing immensely. I'd like to find out at what stage in the development they abandoned the plan for a six-part series. Are there entire scripts out there that beef up most of the segments?

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Re: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
« Reply #67 on: February 04, 2019, 06:05:56 PM »
I'd like to find out at what stage in the development they abandoned the plan for a six-part series. Are there entire scripts out there that beef up most of the segments?

That was always a bullshit.  It was never going to be a six-part TV series...

Quote from: The Hollywood Reporter
When the Coen brothers' Western anthology film The Ballad of Buster Scruggs was initially announced, it was believed to be a TV series, with Annapurna's president of television, Sue Naegle, producing the project that was later acquired by Netflix.

But Joel and Ethan Coen, and their cast, insist that the project was always intended to be a film.

When asked about the possibility that Buster Scruggs was going to be a TV series, Joel Coen told a press conference at the New York Film Festival, "That's an artifact of just what a strange animal it was. They didn't know, none of us really knew what to call it, or how to classify it. But aside from the confusion about the classification, the actual what we were going to shoot — the length of each of the stories, all of which vary — there was never anything that we were considering doing any differently. There were never any more stories and they were always intended to be seen as a group."

Stephen Root, who appears in the film's James Franco-starring second installment, "Near Algodones," told The Hollywood Reporter ahead of Buster Scruggs' New York film festival premiere, "I think it was always conceived as [a movie that consists of different stories]. People say that it's going to be chopped up by Netflix and shown as separate parts. That was never going to happen. It's always been a film of different vignettes loosely set in the 1870s."

Grainger Hines explained that even though he only appears in one section, titled "The Gal Who Got Rattled," he, like other castmembers, was able to read the full script, containing all of the various stories featured in the film.

"It was a movie script when I read it. It was always a movie script, and my piece is most of the second half of the film," he said. "I mean everybody talks about it being a series. I never even thought of that when I looked at it. It was never edited down or any of that stuff either. It was always a movie."

"They follow, with kind of a couple exceptions, in chronological order in terms of when they were written, roughly," Joel Coen said of the stories. "And they just got put in a drawer. They were short movies and we didn't know what we would do with them. We probably didn't expect to make them until maybe eight or 10 years ago, when we started thinking, 'Well, maybe we can do these all together.'"

Ethan Coen added, "We didn't really think of an order. They kind of fell into an order by virtue of the way we wrote them. We looked at 'em and we thought, 'OK, that's a good order.'"

Tim Blake Nelson, who plays the eponymous Buster Scruggs in the film's first story, first got involved with the project in 2002.

"[Joel and Ethan Coen] said, 'We're going to be writing some other ones over the ensuing years, and when we have enough we're going to make a film out of it,' and I said, 'Alright, I'm in whenever you do it.' You know it would nag on my mind now and again. I'd wonder what was going on with that, and then Joel called me about a year and half ago and said, 'Alright, we're going to do it.' We need to meet you for dinner to talk about everything you're going to need to start preparing: playing the guitar, pistol twirling, dancing — plus all of the words. Then I started preparing."

While the Coen brothers said they never considered merging the different stories together to make a more cohesive larger narrative, they did notice connections between the various tales, which Joel Coen compared to songs on an album.  "We had all of these stories and they were all Westerns and then they all started to relate to each other but kind of retrospectively, not consciously when we started doing it," Joel Coen said.

Bill Heck, who stars in "The Gal Who Got Rattled," said the film is "an ode to storytelling and different ways to tell story, and each one bleeds into the next and opens up the gates for the next one and feels very of a piece to me. I don't think they'd do nearly as well on their own as they do as a whole."

His co-star in that section, Hines, added, "The theme is that nobody gets out of here alive: We're all stuck. That kind of permeates throughout it, and that's what the film is about."

Nelson, meanwhile, called Buster Scruggs a "classic anthology movie."

"I think what separates this one is that a) all of them are really great, in my opinion, so there's not a weak vignette in there," Nelson said. "And b) the final story … ties all the stories together and gives you a real reason for watching them … so I think it holds together gorgeously as a cohesive film."