Author Topic: People with massive cultural voids  (Read 14749 times)

NoSleep

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #360 on: August 27, 2019, 09:38:30 AM »
I was too young to understand the lyrics.

"I'm a voodoo chile."

Paul Calf

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #361 on: August 27, 2019, 09:39:49 AM »
Slightly OT but hitchhiking out of Scotland once, I got a lift with a lorry driver who kept talking about taking the 'Biggar Road'.

"But we're on the FUCKS SAKE WHY CAN'T I TYPE 'EM EIGHT'?," I thought, "how is there a bigger road?"
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 12:00:22 PM by Paul Calf »

Consignia

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #362 on: August 27, 2019, 10:11:31 AM »
I think being mildly dyslexic has influenced it, but there's been loads of words growing up I thought were two different words because of the disconnect between how I thought they were pronounced. Edition was one. I pronounced it edit-on, as my mind focused on the edit part due it being a publishing word. Another was hiccough, which I thought was distinct from hiccup, but meant the same thing.

On the other side of the coin, I asked to look at a CV for a prospective software developer. They were pretty experienced, at least according to their CV, but in the technical skills section they listed pretty near the top "Jason". Now technical bods among you will know it's JSON, the popular data format. What screamed out to me was this person had probably worked with it, but hadn't read much when dealing with it, which was a real red alarm.

Paul Calf

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #363 on: August 27, 2019, 10:16:05 AM »
"Jason". Now technical bods among you will know it's JSON, the popular data format. What screamed out to me was this person had probably worked with it, but hadn't read much when dealing with it, which was a real red alarm.

Either a chancer or an autocorrecto. There's no way you can be a developer working with JSON and think it's spelt 'Jason'. You wouldn't even be able to get the libraries.

Consignia

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #364 on: August 27, 2019, 10:21:22 AM »
We reckoned it was dictated. But frankly if you didn't check it over and spot something so basic, it looks pretty sloppy. I'll stress there were other problems with the CV in general for fitting in the role, but that left a particular bad taste in my mouth.

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #365 on: August 27, 2019, 11:24:18 AM »

As well as wondering what the song was actually called, I also wondered if "slight return" was some kind of technical music term for...I dunno...feedback?

It means Mark Morriss is doing a wee jig to invest in the problem instead of having a solution


touchingcloth

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #366 on: August 27, 2019, 11:34:37 AM »
We reckoned it was dictated. But frankly if you didn't check it over and spot something so basic, it looks pretty sloppy. I'll stress there were other problems with the CV in general for fitting in the role, but that left a particular bad taste in my mouth.

I'd lean towards the autocorrect theory, but it still looks sloppy and would be a red mark in my books.

I wouldn't be surprised if there's some JSON parser out there called Jason, made by ARGO (which would of course be a recursive backronym for some shite like ARGO's Really Great Okay). The logo would be a golden fleece wrapped around a globe.

touchingcloth

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #367 on: August 27, 2019, 11:57:38 AM »
"I'm a voodoo chile."

As a kid, it can be difficult to wrap your head around the idea of an adult deliberately misspelling a word.

"Well I can hear that he's singing about a voodoo child and it sounds a bit like "chile", but there is no way a grown up would spell it like that on an actual album available for sale in actual shops, so there must be some deeper meaning. Maybe he is from Chile, or wrote the song about the plight of the Chileans viz a viz practitioners of spirit religions."

It wasn't until I learned he had puked himself to death that I realised he might not have been as upstanding as I had formerly assumed all adults to be.

shiftwork2

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #368 on: August 27, 2019, 04:55:48 PM »
Coming very late to the drive-thru topic but I went past a drive-thru Greggs yesterday.  There are apparently a few now.  All very lolGreggs but its existence needs to be recorded on CaB, the forum of record for Greggs.

touchingcloth

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #369 on: August 27, 2019, 10:00:22 PM »
"But we're on the FUCKS SAKE WHY CAN'T I TYPE 'EM EIGHT'?," I thought, "how is there a bigger road?"

u wot

Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #370 on: August 27, 2019, 10:48:57 PM »
^

It looks as though Mr Calf must’ve been trying to type mate but it kept autocorrecting to ‘mate’ (presumably he’d borrowed Legend Gary’s phone)

Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #371 on: August 27, 2019, 10:50:08 PM »
Fuck, M-8 autocorrects to ‘mate’ on CaB? Is Legend Gary admin now?


Zetetic

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #372 on: August 27, 2019, 10:53:43 PM »
hey were pretty experienced, at least according to their CV, but in the technical skills section they listed pretty near the top "Jason". Now technical bods among you will know it's JSON, the popular data format.
I don't know why you'd list it in the technical skills section of your CV, mind you.

What else? "My Top 10 Character Encoding Systems"?

touchingcloth

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #373 on: August 27, 2019, 11:20:09 PM »
I'm proficient in web 2.0.

Twed

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #374 on: August 27, 2019, 11:21:25 PM »
I don't know why you'd list it in the technical skills section of your CV, mind you.

What else? "My Top 10 Character Encoding Systems"?
One I often see is "algorithms". Jesus wept

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #375 on: August 27, 2019, 11:43:44 PM »
Our no-deal supporting office Brexiter had no idea about the IRA, the Manchester bombing in 1996 and the significance of the Good Friday Agreement. He's 21.

touchingcloth

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #376 on: August 27, 2019, 11:53:28 PM »
Our no-deal supporting office Brexiter had no idea about the IRA, the Manchester bombing in 1996 and the significance of the Good Friday Agreement. He's 21.

So, in summary, a Brexiter.

Paul Calf

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #377 on: August 28, 2019, 04:27:46 AM »
Our no-deal supporting office Brexiter had no idea about the IRA, the Manchester bombing in 1996 and the significance of the Good Friday Agreement. He's 21.

I work with people who don’t know about the Manchester bombing.

I work in Manchester.

Well, Salford.

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #378 on: August 28, 2019, 02:40:12 PM »
I was talking to this 22 year old hottie the other day, very pretty, incredible arse, I was hoping she would let me slip her one, so I broached the subject of Bernard Bresslaw...

Remember he sang that song about feet.
"You need feet,to kick your friend with" was one of the lines I think.Maybe you should have sang a bit of that and she would have clicked?

Nowhere Man

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #379 on: August 28, 2019, 02:48:50 PM »
I was talking to this 22 year old hottie the other day, very pretty, incredible arse, I was hoping she would let me slip her one, so I broached the subject of Bernard Bresslaw and she couldn't be less impressed.

Whatever incredible arse the 22 year old hottie had is nothing compared to the cracking arse Bernard Bresslaw had at that age, i've seen the snaps.

Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #380 on: August 28, 2019, 02:53:12 PM »
Charles Hawtrey is the name to drop to get all the young hotties going. Bresslaw is passé.

Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #381 on: August 28, 2019, 03:07:21 PM »
Charles Hawtrey is the name to drop to get all the young hotties going. Bresslaw is passé.
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icehaven

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #382 on: August 28, 2019, 03:42:04 PM »
I think the Chile/meme/Camus stuff is fair enough if someone hasn’t heard a word spoken before. I can’t think of any examples off the top of my head, but it probably happens a few times a year that I’ll hear a word I’ve been mentally pronouncing one way for years spoken out loud and realise I was dead wrong. I suspect that's not uncommon for people who were readers as kids in households of people who don't read, or who read books for pleasure rather than just the ones set by teachers.

As the old saying goes: "Never make fun of people for mispronouncing a word. It means they learned it by reading."
I think this is mainly true.

My old best/flatmate listened to Radio 4 all the time, and subsequently used plenty of big words but he rarely read so he couldn't spell for knackers. I've always read a lot and have a reasonable vocabulary but every time I incorrectly pronounced a word (which was fairly often) the cheeky git would mockingly pull me up on it, so the argument about reading is exactly what I'd throw back at him.

Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #383 on: September 01, 2019, 05:45:28 PM »
I think the Chile/meme/Camus stuff is fair enough if someone hasn’t heard a word spoken before. I can’t think of any examples off the top of my head, but it probably happens a few times a year that I’ll hear a word I’ve been mentally pronouncing one way for years spoken out loud and realise I was dead wrong. I suspect that's not uncommon for people who were readers as kids in households of people who don't read, or who read books for pleasure rather than just the ones set by teachers.

My partner always pronounces "cache" like from off of browsers to rhyme with the first syllable of "geisha" rather than "cash", but I don't bother to correct her cos I'm not entirely sure I'm right. She also puts the stress on "palatable" on the second rather than first syllable, but again I'm not sure which way is "quote unquote" correct.

Yeah fair point. Quinoa is the one for me. My default is still 'Kay-noah' even after learning the proper way. Also thought cache was 'cash-ay', the guy i corrected meekly accepted until the horrifying moment we verified it with google translate and it came out with 'cash'.

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #384 on: September 01, 2019, 06:18:13 PM »
Walk-in fridges in Aussie bottle-os have been my salvation many a time on a hot day. Like a weird inverse of jakeys hingin aboot in libraries for the free heat.

Can confirm that these walk in fridges are absolutely incredible.

A few weeks ago we went to our village's summer event and the maypole competition (which little Nose was in) was being judged by, what I was told were, Bath rugby's top two players (they both play for England as well).  I was stood right next to them and just thought they were two local villagers until the mayor introduced them.  Even now I couldn't tell you who they were.

Nah no-one knows who rugby players are. Wouldn't worry about it, for 98% of the population the only rugby players they can name are like Johnny Wilkinson and thingy, the other one, you know. And that one who married her from the royal family. You know who I mean.

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Re: People with massive cultural voids
« Reply #385 on: September 01, 2019, 09:33:17 PM »
Last time I was going through a McD's drive-thru it was about 1am and these two lads lurking near the entrance asked us if we'd get them something as they wouldn't serve them because they were on bikes rather than a motor vehicle, which I thought was a bit mean. I suppose it's a safety thing (same reason you can't walk through them) but it's not as if it was busy. Jobsworths.

me & the lads were doing a session on a late-night radio show in bethlehem, philadelphia, about eleven years ago. having set-up & soundchecked, we decided we needed coffee, but the station's canteen was shut & the vending machine was raxed. "there's a macdonalds over the road" says the DJ, so off we go... but it's past midnight, so only the drive-thru bit is still open. we walk through it, & are refused service. "can't you just pretend there's a car here?" but no, & meanwhile some locals in an actual car behind us are yelling "there's a dunkin donuts just down the street!", which (inevitably) became the catchphrase for the remainder of that trip.


I think the Chile/meme/Camus stuff is fair enough if someone hasn’t heard a word spoken before. I can’t think of any examples off the top of my head, but it probably happens a few times a year that I’ll hear a word I’ve been mentally pronouncing one way for years spoken out loud and realise I was dead wrong. I suspect that's not uncommon for people who were readers as kids in households of people who don't read, or who read books for pleasure rather than just the ones set by teachers.

My partner always pronounces "cache" like from off of browsers to rhyme with the first syllable of "geisha" rather than "cash", but I don't bother to correct her cos I'm not entirely sure I'm right. She also puts the stress on "palatable" on the second rather than first syllable, but again I'm not sure which way is "quote unquote" correct.

a bloke here says 'cache' like that, & also 'row-ter' instead of 'router'. he's a kiwi though. only some of it can be excused by the phenomenon of vowel-sound rotation. the truth is, sometimes, people just love the sound of their own voices saying jargon in an affected or slightly american (or both) way.

when I was a naif, in my first job... I was 21, brought up in teesside but now living & working in the relatively cosmopolitan surroundings of 80s liverpool... me & my media-twat buddies would go boozing on lark lane, & frequently in keith's wine-bar, where I once & once only asked for a glass of "ree-oh-zha", to a mixture of pity & hilarity.

'girl' here at work (mid 30s but acts & speaks as if she's 18) had never seen '2001', so I dragged her & another colleague to see the nolan print late last year.
what a fucking waste of time, but most annoying was her insistence that this chasm in her cultural experience was nothing to be ashamed of, & that I was the one who should be ashamed for a) living in the past & b) ignorance-shaming her.
"when was this made?"
"1967-8..."
"ah-hah.... long before I was born!"
"yes but you know who beethoven was, right?"
"no..."

& then fucks off to her grime-step club.