Author Topic: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...  (Read 1623 times)

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2019, 12:19:58 AM »
I've never seen a single second of The Sopranos. Should I give it a go?


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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2019, 12:34:28 AM »
I think The Sopranos is the best ever too, head and shoulders above The Wire. The Wire is very narrative-based and wears its meaning on its sleeve, whereas The Sopranos is all about character and ambiguity. Twin Peaks season 3 gives it a run for its money but The Sopranos is endlessly entertaining; I could rewatch it a thousand times and never get bored, which I can't say for Twin Peaks.

As far as which seasons are best, I think that it more or less gets better as it goes on, bar a bit of filler with Vito in 6A (6A was already in production as the final season when HBO offered them 9 more episodes, hence why 6A starts strong then treads water for the second half of it). Season 1 is the most dated, the cheesiest and the most conventionally structured. The mafia stuff is more rooted in the cool portrayal of Goodfellas etc than the subsequent seasons, which paint the characters in an increasingly pathetic light.

The final 9 episodes is the best run of TV episodes ever created and will probably never be beaten, almost perfection. And no sitcom can boast as many hilarious and unique comic characters: Chris, Junior, Phil Leotardo, Artie, Carmine Jr... virtually every character is hilarious.

On the subject of the ending, David Chase apparently let it slip what he meant when being interviewed for that new book:

https://www.esquire.com/uk/latest-news/a25830387/we-finally-know-what-happened-to-tony-soprano-in-that-final-diner-scene/

It was always fairly obvious, I thought, though you could infer the thing that happened to be symbolic rather than literal. What I enjoy about that link is that Chase was talking to Alan Sepinwall at the time, who was one of the critics who came out with that moronic "the viewer got whacked" theory the day after the finale and stubbornly stuck to it through all these years. Glad to see him get definitively told that's bollocks. I'm sure he came out with a load of nonsense about Twin Peaks s3 when it finished too. That's the problem with TV "critics" writing to deadlines soon after airdates rather than having time to sit with something.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2019, 12:39:22 AM »
no love for Six Feet Under then? it's just as good as The Sopranos (and The Wire), albeit tonally different.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2019, 12:54:18 AM »
6 Feet Under was alright, but not a patch on The Wire.

I saw the first 2 eps of The Sopranos but wasn’t grabbed. Must give it another go really.

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2019, 01:23:06 AM »
Is it really the greatest show ever? I guess I always watched it rather passively, so any amazing points it may have made about the human condition, or whatever, went over my head. I don't remember it having the narrative scope and ambition of The Wire.

I could have sworn it started earlier than 1999. I must be thinking of Oz, a show which, I think, doesn't get enough credit for helping start the age of golden tellies.

Spoilers.

The thing that makes The Sopranos the greatest TV show ever is that is was not about them but about us. The way they manipulate the viewer into liking the characters and then slowly picking them off one by one as being absolutely awful human beings who we should feel really bad for rooting for. You then think "oh well, he might be a wrong un but she is the victim here" only for them to keep pulling back and keep exposing them. The final pull back is on the audience themselves; it's telling us that we are terrible people for sanitising and glorifying really horrible people. It's a therapy in itself but for people who don't think they need it. It is an absolute masterpiece without parallel.

And Tony Soprano is only the second greatest character in TV history. Carmella is the first!

--

Oz was truely amazing for 3 seasons and then turned into the biggest pile of dogshit ever committed to screen in about 1 and a half episodes (the ageing drugs storyline).

I'll need to look it up but the timing of the big finale where it all kicked off between the Muslims and the Nazis was broadcast days before September 11th 2001 happened. Quite spooky given how it built up the tension and made many of its audience aware that there was an actual issue between some extremists in these groups.

chveik

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2019, 01:37:05 AM »
Spoilers.

The thing that makes The Sopranos the greatest TV show ever is that is was not about them but about us. The way they manipulate the viewer into liking the characters and then slowly picking them off one by one as being absolutely awful human beings who we should feel really bad for rooting for. You then think "oh well, he might be a wrong un but she is the victim here" only for them to keep pulling back and keep exposing them. The final pull back is on the audience themselves; it's telling us that we are terrible people for sanitising and glorifying really horrible people. It's a therapy in itself but for people who don't think they need it. It is an absolute masterpiece without parallel.

there is some truth in this, but David Chase ain't Michael Haneke. The Sopranos is too entertaining and ambiguous to only be about the audience's love/hate relationship with these morally corrupt characters.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2019, 12:31:15 PM »
And Tony Soprano is only the second greatest character in TV history. Carmella is the first!

I would say Edie Falco gives the better performance, but no way is Carmela a greater character than Tony.

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2019, 12:39:07 PM »
On the subject of the ending, David Chase apparently let it slip what he meant when being interviewed for that new book:

https://www.esquire.com/uk/latest-news/a25830387/we-finally-know-what-happened-to-tony-soprano-in-that-final-diner-scene

So Tony really does marry Dr. Melfi.

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #38 on: January 13, 2019, 11:07:52 PM »


https://www.esquire.com/uk/latest-news/a25830387/we-finally-know-what-happened-to-tony-soprano-in-that-final-diner-scene/

It was always fairly obvious, I thought, though you could infer the thing that happened to be symbolic rather than literal. What I enjoy about that link is that Chase was talking to Alan Sepinwall at the time, who was one of the critics who came out with that moronic "the viewer got whacked" theory the day after the finale and stubbornly stuck to it through all these years. Glad to see him get definitively told that's bollocks. I'm sure he came out with a load of nonsense about Twin Peaks s3 when it finished too. That's the problem with TV "critics" writing to deadlines soon after airdates rather than having time to sit with something.
"fairly obvious" is an understatement, there's no other way to read the scene that makes any sense.


Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #40 on: January 15, 2019, 10:50:22 AM »
New interview with a few of the cast members reflecting on the show after 20 years, Junior has aged well.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #41 on: January 15, 2019, 11:03:36 AM »
New interview with a few of the cast members reflecting on the show after 20 years, Junior has aged well.

Is that the Today ABC one? Meadow has still got it. Edie Falco has barely changed. Paulie appears to have dementia, unfortunately

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #42 on: January 15, 2019, 11:40:10 AM »
For me The Sopranos is the only one of the ‘golden era’ shows that remained consistently great from start to finish. Breaking Bad and Mad Men are both a couple of seasons too long. The Wire shits the bed with that ropey final season.

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #43 on: January 15, 2019, 12:35:14 PM »
New interview with a few of the cast members reflecting on the show after 20 years, Junior has aged well.

You should listen to his episode of the Gilbert Gottfried podcast.  Not only is he very funny and sweet, he is a fabulous singer.

As to his looks, probably one of those Patrick Stewarty bald optical illusions.  If you go bald early in life, by the time you get to the age when reasonable people go bald everyone starts commenting on how young you look.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #44 on: January 15, 2019, 12:50:25 PM »
It is a fantastically entertaining drama and probably holds the crown as greatest TV show, particularly in the context of how influential it became. Coming out at the end of the 90s, I also think it was pretty ahead of its time in its treatment of masculinity, anxiety, and family.

I agree with the poster above that Oz deserves some recognition for its contribution to the golden age of TV, coming as it does just prior to The Sopranos and paving the way for expansive, series arc  focused TV drama. However, it is not even remotely close to the consistency of quality that we get with The Sopranos.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #45 on: January 15, 2019, 12:51:36 PM »
Haven't watched this yet. Doubt it is better than Hey Arnold!

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #46 on: January 15, 2019, 10:42:51 PM »
I've got tickets to see some of the lads in the flesh in a couple of months. Quite excited!

For the first time in Australia, Steven Schirripa (Bobby ‘Bacala’), Michael Imperioli (Christopher Moltisanti), and Vincent Pastore (‘Big Pussy’ Bonpensiero) will take us behind the scenes of the legendary show - the stories, the dramas, the laughs – not to mention the countless theories about the show’s controversial finale.

Shameless Custard

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #47 on: January 16, 2019, 12:16:16 AM »
Some casting news for the prequel film - https://www.denofgeek.com/uk/movies/the-sopranos/62762/the-sopranos-prequel-casts-jon-bernthal-and-vera-farmiga

Wonder if they'll play Livia and Johnny?

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #48 on: January 16, 2019, 12:22:26 AM »
Here's an Aussie journalist interviewing some of the cast the other day:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAiWUgmeehg

And yeah, Tony Sirico does seem to be losing it a bit, but on the upside Edie Falco actually looks younger than she did 20 years ago while Robert Iler is surprisingly funny.

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #49 on: January 16, 2019, 01:40:35 AM »
Sopranos, Oz, Six Feet Under, The Wire and Twin Peaks to me are all very different things but function on about the same level in terms of gripping entertainment. I'd rank the X-Files up there as well, although its drop-off in terms of quality is far more noticeable (seasons 8-11 had some outstanding episodes though).

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #50 on: January 16, 2019, 04:54:13 PM »
Here's an Aussie journalist interviewing some of the cast the other day:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAiWUgmeehg

And yeah, Tony Sirico does seem to be losing it a bit, but on the upside Edie Falco actually looks younger than she did 20 years ago while Robert Iler is surprisingly funny.

Has the thing they were there to film been uploaded?

Edit: Here it's. https://youtu.be/cSUFaSVPCRQ
« Last Edit: January 16, 2019, 05:20:35 PM by magval »

Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #51 on: January 16, 2019, 05:28:02 PM »
Is it on any streaming sites?

Was sure someone had asked this as I sat in traffic staring at a billboard advertising Now TV with a young looking Tony Soprano staring back at me.

So - Now TV (not sure if that counts as a streaming site - it probably doesn't does it? I've typed all this now so am posting it)

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Re: Twenty years ago today, a guy walked into a psychiatrist's office...
« Reply #52 on: January 16, 2019, 05:32:16 PM »
You can get the dvds second hand for cheap. Though I'd recommend splashing out on the blu ray set, as it's bloody lovely looking. You won't regret it