Author Topic: PlayStation 2 (2000 sequel to the popular console from the Sony Corporation)  (Read 2366 times)

biggytitbo

  • WHAT ABOUT THE GODDAM JAFFA CAKES ASSWIPE
    • theunredacted
That's not true is it?  I don't think the Saturn could render textures perspective correct - and what's more, the basic primitive was a quad instead of a triangle, which often resulted in much worse distortion.  It also mapped from texture pixels to the screen, rather than screen pixels to the texture, meaning that if you plotted a shrunken quad semi-transparent, it could overwrite some screen pixels multiple times, and just leave you with a mess.

The wobbliness of PS1 graphics is definitely a signature feature, partly due to the affine texture mapping, but also due to everything being done with low-precision fixed point arithmetic, and the inaccuracies that it leads to.  Back when I used to develop PS1 games, we used to try to work round it by subdividing big polygons, but you could never work around the arithmetic limitations.


There are some ps1 games that avoid the the trademark warping wonkiness by using a software renderer - I think the Duke nukem port among them.

Twed

  • What, prick? That's my child. My Johnson's child
Yeah, those are raycasting engines. Pretty much just drawing lots of vertical slices.

biggytitbo

  • WHAT ABOUT THE GODDAM JAFFA CAKES ASSWIPE
    • theunredacted
I do still play it and in fact replaced my one recently after it broke. Probably mostly play PS1 stuff on it these days; considered replacing it with an original model PS3 but decided against it. I bought my originalinal Slimline one first hand but quite late in the day (2007). As someone who mostly likes cartoonish games of one stripe or another (platformers in particular) it was never going to be my favourite system but worth keeping around to be able to play my favourite PS1 stuff, the Ratchet and Clanks etc.

I do broadly agree with St Eddie on PS1 Vs PS2, but I do wonder if in a couple of years I'll inevitably be talking about "the retro charm" of games I think look like garbage now. That said I suspect PS2 will never raise quite the level of retro enthusiasm Atari, NES, SNES, Game Boy, Mega Drive etc. have enjoyed.


I do wonder if the ps2 might be due a bit of a revival in interest due to its ludicrously deep library of obscure but great games, bigger than any other system and probably less familiar due to the amount of well known popular titles it has. That generation does sit somewhat uneasily between the timeless look of the 16 bit titles and modern games though, most of the teething problems of the early 3d era have been overcome but graphically they just look like very bad versions of modern games rather than their own unique thing like the snes or megadrive.