Author Topic: Mark Hollis  (Read 3167 times)

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #60 on: February 27, 2019, 09:52:26 PM »
Never mind all that - how are her breasts holding up?

(Terrible new page post, damn it all. I am deeply gutted at Hollis' passing. Smallish catalogue, indelible work. RIP.)

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #61 on: February 27, 2019, 11:20:04 PM »
Her PR crew have nice, eclectic taste in critically acclaimed, cred-boosting indie?

Or maybe it's an opinion she formed on her own, you patronising twat.

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #62 on: February 28, 2019, 09:45:49 AM »
Yeah, this isn't the first time she has shown herself to be ace. I wasn't surprised that she was so great because she was a girl. More that being a child star, in classical (sort of) music no less, isn't the best breeding ground for interesting opinions and progressive politics. She seems to have come through all that though with her opinions and ideals intact

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #63 on: February 28, 2019, 09:46:36 AM »
it's overall a beautifully crafted and textually rich pop record (and relatively warm sounding too, given in 1984 we were approaching peak digitised production).
Nowhere near peak. It's My Life was recorded in 1983 at Scorpio Sound (one of the last albums to be recorded there before it closed and the studio was taken over by Capital Radio for doing live sessions). It was a middle-tier studio with a Cadac G-type mixing console from the mid-70s (parts of Bohemian Rhapsody were recorded there, and George 'Porky' Peckham was one of their house producers when it opened in 1973). There's a good story from Phil Spalding about recording the bass part for 'The Last Time' there the day after he had played Wembley with Mike Oldfield here.

Mitsubishi and Sony's digital multitrack tape machines only came out in 1982. Although 3M's machines had been around since 1980, and Neve's first iteration of their DSP digital console came out in 1983, they were very rare and expensive beasts (only 8 first generation DSP consoles were ever made, the only one outside a broadcast company was at film soundtrack studio CTS in Wembley and development problems meant it was unusable until 1985 - one of the first 'pop' recordings on it was New Order's Elegia, as they were given free studio time as a way for CTS to test the system).

It wasn't until 1985 that most of the major UK studios started installing digital multitracks, and Neve's next (and more successful) iteration of the DSP family, the Capricorn, became commercially available in 1987. Even then it wasn't until the early 90s that most studios started switching over to digital consoles.

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #64 on: February 28, 2019, 10:25:02 AM »
Her PR crew have nice, eclectic taste in critically acclaimed, cred-boosting indie?

You prize plum.

When she took on Murdoch that was her PR crew too, the brainless pop star.

McFlymo

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #65 on: February 28, 2019, 03:28:13 PM »
Me seeing this thread last night: Oh! I love Mark Hollis, I'll look at that a bit later when I've more time. I'll probably get some decent links and recommendations to chase up! I wonder if he's putting out anything new.

...

More mentions for the emotional / psychological significance of Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock here!

Twed

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #66 on: February 28, 2019, 04:40:52 PM »
Her PR crew have nice, eclectic taste in critically acclaimed, cred-boosting indie?
I think she's capable of autonomy, despite once being a famous singing child.


Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #68 on: March 02, 2019, 06:20:32 PM »
Various interviews with those involved in the recording of Spirit of Eden are starting to crop up online, and 6 music.

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #69 on: March 02, 2019, 10:33:36 PM »
Nowhere near peak. It's My Life was recorded in 1983 at Scorpio Sound (one of the last albums to be recorded there before it closed and the studio was taken over by Capital Radio for doing live sessions). It was a middle-tier studio with a Cadac G-type mixing console from the mid-70s (parts of Bohemian Rhapsody were recorded there, and George 'Porky' Peckham was one of their house producers when it opened in 1973). There's a good story from Phil Spalding about recording the bass part for 'The Last Time' there the day after he had played Wembley with Mike Oldfield here.

Yes I was being a bit lazy there and thinking more about the deluge of digital synths and studio outboard that was about to hit. Of course the recording path in 83 was mostly still all analogue, and perhaps the fact it was recorded at a studio with old gear helped provide its relatively warm sound. And my point is pretty moot anyway as in 83 the DX7 had only just been released and digital synths hadn't yet gone mainstream.



Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #72 on: March 05, 2019, 10:26:33 AM »
Spent all of yesterday with Laughing Stock playing over and over.  Its delicate melancholy seems like what I need right now.  RIP Mark, your amazing music will live on and on.  It helped to shape me spiritually and artistically.  It saw me through dark times and euphoric times.  Thank you.

Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #73 on: March 07, 2019, 06:22:38 PM »
His 1998 solo album, which I've just heard for the first time, is an incredible piece. Could be Messiaen mixed with Eric Dolphy. Tone poems. Definitely bleak:

Feel my skin, Lord
Feel my luck tumbling down
Left no life, no more
Turn my seasons turn
Lived in much younger times
Left no life, no more
For me to shine

purlieu

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #74 on: March 07, 2019, 06:31:58 PM »
Feel my skin, Lord
Feel my luck tumbling down
Left no life, no more
Turn my seasons turn
Lived in much younger times
Left no life, no more
For me to shine
Mm, 'Inside Looking Out' is one of my favourite songs ever. I've never heard an album half as intimate sounding as that record.

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #75 on: March 17, 2019, 07:03:09 PM »
the new album Drift Code by the former Talk Talk bassist is worth checking out






Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #76 on: March 18, 2019, 09:22:50 AM »
it's very Robert Wyatty, late Bowie-ey, innit?

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #77 on: March 18, 2019, 11:10:10 AM »
Absolutely and still quite unique

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Re: Mark Hollis
« Reply #78 on: March 25, 2019, 11:06:08 AM »
Talk Talk smashed into my life a couple months back during a dark patch and I am now completely obsessed. I listened to the whole discography on a 7 hour coach journey with lots of red wine and it was beautiful. Felt genuine sadness at Mark Hollis passing. Now one of my favourite musicians.