Author Topic: Your favourite obscure local slang  (Read 2384 times)

Your favourite obscure local slang
« on: March 09, 2019, 10:17:19 PM »
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"

touchingcloth

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2019, 10:23:25 PM »
Not obscure, but I wish I could get away with using “gegging”. It’s a great word and concept.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2019, 10:25:36 PM »
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"
Over the other end of the A69/66 in Cumbria, we used "brayed" for that.

Other random Cumrbian slang words:

Lowp - jump
fettle - feel ("aars fettle?" "aars reet, marra")
jameater-  some wanker from Workington

BlodwynPig

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2019, 10:29:33 PM »
I'm from the North East and I've always liked the word "pagger" for having a punch up.


"I paggered that cunt and no mistake about it, he was looking at 'wor pint!"

Pagger? Hartlepool?

BlodwynPig

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2019, 10:30:23 PM »
Over the other end of the A69/66 in Cumbria, we used "brayed" for that.

Other random Cumrbian slang words:

Lowp - jump
fettle - feel ("aars fettle?" "aars reet, marra")
jameater-  some wanker from Workington

In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2019, 10:35:00 PM »
In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.

Guilty. I'm from Richmond Nth Yorks.

Brayed was also used a lot in our lexicon, that's why I said it has to be obscure. Pagger is a word I've only heard in certain circles, my guess is that it's a Newcastle word as I've seen it in Viz way back when.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2019, 10:41:19 PM »
Yampy - daft, losing it.

"Ee's proper yampy, ay ee?"
"I'd keep out of Gaz's way if I were you - ee's gooin' fuckin' yampy"

BlodwynPig

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2019, 10:43:21 PM »
Guilty. I'm from Richmond Nth Yorks.

Brayed was also used a lot in our lexicon, that's why I said it has to be obscure. Pagger is a word I've only heard in certain circles, my guess is that it's a Newcastle word as I've seen it in Viz way back when.

Posh southerner too!

I may have heard pagger as a child - whenever I hear local slang that is unfamiliar, I try and imagine my cousin saying it and if it sounds right coming out of his mouth then I agree it's genuine.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2019, 11:03:03 PM »
A sleeping child is said to be "hard on" in Hull.

Danger Man

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2019, 11:09:10 PM »
'duck' is usually thought to be an East Midlands term of affection but it's also used by the yokels in Buckinghamshire. What's left of them.

biggytitbo

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2019, 11:26:20 PM »
Duck in Hull is used for a kind of small meatloaf (the food, not the fat singer).


My favorite Hull one is patty, which is colloquial slang for a ladies american back fanny.

canadagoose

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2019, 11:26:35 PM »
Lowp - jump
Quite common over the border, too, at least amongst my granny's generation. "Lowpin ower the dyke" and all that.

I tend to end up picking up words from wherever I'm living. I'm not sure if it's due to being a linguistic obsessive or just wanting to fit in. In terms of where I'm from, I still manage to use "platchin"/"drookit" (very wet) and "plitter" (muck about) now and then.

gib

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2019, 11:48:21 PM »
Quite common over the border, too, at least amongst my granny's generation. "Lowpin ower the dyke" and all that.

I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

Quote
Old Saxon hlopan, Old Norse hlaupa, Old Frisian hlapa, Dutch lopen, Old High German hlouffan, German laufen

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625

canadagoose

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2019, 11:51:10 PM »
I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625
Huh, I hadn't made the link between "leap" and "lowp". Makes sense, mind.

biggytitbo

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2019, 11:57:04 PM »
I heard today in some parts of the country a croggy goes by the name of 'pegging', which I always thought was the act of a lady giving a man a good seeing to up the arse with a strap-on dildo.

gib

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2019, 12:13:55 AM »
Huh, I hadn't made the link between "leap" and "lowp". Makes sense, mind.

mind = remember, that's country slang. This is fun.

canadagoose

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2019, 12:16:09 AM »
mind = remember, that's country slang. This is fun.
Oh yeah, I'd say most Scots speakers would say "mind" for "remember". "Div ye mind..." I always find it funny when people try to speak "properly" and drop that in there. "Oh yes, I definitely do mind of that".

gib

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2019, 12:22:41 AM »
I heard today in some parts of the country a croggy goes by the name of 'pegging', which I always thought was the act of a lady giving a man a good seeing to up the arse with a strap-on dildo.

Not sure about this one but etymonline has this
Quote
Middle Dutch pegel "little knob used as a mark," Dutch peil "gauge, watermark, standard"), of uncertain origin; perhaps from PIE *bak- "staff used as support" 

Cuntbeaks

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2019, 12:25:18 AM »
Weapon - Used to describe someone who is not only a danger to themselves, but others.

"Settle doon you ya fucking weapon, yir gonna get jailed"

Twed

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2019, 12:43:11 AM »
Was calling people "extra" around 1994/1995 a South-East regional thing? Also can anybody explain how that slang made a resurgence on American Twitter around 2017? Were my kinfolk saying it 25 years ago because they got it from American TV or something?

Large Noise

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2019, 02:02:03 AM »
“Ticket”- a tough guy.

As in “think yer a fuckin ticket wee man?”

Glasgow slang, but most weegies don’t know it.

Shoulders?-Stomach!

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2019, 04:12:37 AM »
Quote
. “That’s Leeds is that”

Translation: “That’s fantastic”


Oh yes. Some of the more hardcore locals love Leeds so much they regularly use it as a positive adjective. An attractive woman? She’s Leeds. How’s your day going? Pretty Leeds, ta.. You get the picture. Only really used by the most Leeds of Leeds folk.

Fucking mental

Twed

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2019, 04:13:57 AM »
"Muggy bonehead" was local to a single TV show.

Shoulders?-Stomach!

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2019, 04:18:14 AM »
Always liked "sen" for self.

There's no better use than for "shat mesen"

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2019, 04:30:04 AM »
Fud like a punched lasagna

Shoulders?-Stomach!

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2019, 04:38:43 AM »
Anyone heard "liggered" as in

"Ah wer proper liggered" ?

H-O-W-L

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2019, 07:46:22 AM »
Duck in Hull is used for a kind of small meatloaf (the food, not the fat singer).

WOULDNT BE SMALL IF IT WAS HIM WOULD IT OIIIIIIII

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2019, 09:59:05 AM »
I've drawn a blank with this cos I've realised I speak in an incomprehensible Scouse patois at all times and only get to use the proper version of the language when I'm posting on here, it's ridiculous. I think that's why everybody around town is on the cusp of a fight, nobody has got the slightest fucking clue what anybody else is talking about.

Shoulders?-Stomach!

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2019, 10:19:32 AM »
I'm betting that goes wayyyy back

https://www.etymonline.com/word/leap#etymonline_v_6625

A chance "eloping" has the same origin?

Pingers

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2019, 10:52:19 AM »
Plenty of good Sheffield ones:

Clumpit - daft person
Loppy - dirty (a lop is a flea, in old Norse I think)
I'll stand hanging - I'm amazed
I'll go t' foot o' our stairs - I'm amazed
It's like plaiting fog - this is impossible
You've shit yer pot full - I am not giving you any more chances (a personal favourite)