Author Topic: Your favourite obscure local slang  (Read 3256 times)

xxxx xxx x xxx

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #60 on: March 11, 2019, 04:08:14 PM »
Desolation.


Not particularly, he's just made that up.

Blinder Data

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #61 on: March 11, 2019, 04:32:27 PM »
Not particularly, he's just made that up.

What a Leeds thing to do.

Shit Good Nose

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #62 on: March 11, 2019, 04:57:00 PM »
Is it Bristolians who use "Gurt lush"? I like that.

Yes, but less and less - it's been falling out of fashion for quite a while and a lot of Bristolians younger than 30 don't use it, and many of those haven't even heard of it before.

Pingers

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #63 on: March 11, 2019, 07:22:36 PM »
I forgot "mashing" which in Sheffield is the act of making a pot or a cup of tea: "Ah've just mashed". Gives rise to "a reyt bag o' mashings" meaning a proper assortment.

Also, your grandmother is your nanan, but only in Sheffield as far as I can tell. Certainly not anywhere else in South Yorkshire, where she's your nana.

Shoulders?-Stomach!

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #64 on: March 11, 2019, 08:13:27 PM »
Not particularly, he's just made that up.

Quote
“That’s Leeds is that”

Translation: “That’s fantastic

https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/ten-phrases-you-ll-only-hear-in-leeds-1-7451643


Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #65 on: March 11, 2019, 08:27:21 PM »
I love 'nowty'. Is 'seeing your arse' (in a strop) a regional thing or is it nationwide?

Also, I have friends from Flint and they use the word 'burmo' to describe something that tries really hard to be fashionable but never will be, like Next.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #66 on: March 11, 2019, 08:49:57 PM »
I love 'nowty'. Is 'seeing your arse' (in a strop) a regional thing or is it nationwide?

Also, I have friends from Flint and they use the word 'burmo' to describe something that tries really hard to be fashionable but never will be, like Next.

I can’t quite do justice to “seen yer arse“ in writing as it needs that Wrexham town centre accent to really make it sing. Could be NE Wales thing.

It’s sister saying “I wuz ohright till I seen yo” is another mangling of language I only hear in Wrexham.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #67 on: March 11, 2019, 09:04:34 PM »
One I remembered, but I suspect may also be common in the North East, is "hoying ya ring" as in vomiting to a very extreme degree.

"I was fucked last night, ars'say, marra."
"Ya wuz hoying ya ring, aye?"

I remember one from Cleator Moor where a terrible haircut or hat was described as a "clip".

"Look at the clip on that cunt!"

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #68 on: March 11, 2019, 09:58:04 PM »
One I remembered, but I suspect may also be common in the North East, is "hoying ya ring" as in vomiting to a very extreme degree.

"I was fucked last night, ars'say, marra."
"Ya wuz hoying ya ring, aye?"

I remember one from Cleator Moor where a terrible haircut or hat was described as a "clip".

"Look at the clip on that cunt!"

Again both correct. Hoy just generally means throw.

Long shot but anyone here got any knowledge of speaking French in Marseille. I’ve stumbled across the word “Fada“ which i think is a general nickname for people or things from Marseille but I think it might also mean crazy and can’t work out of the headlines in France Football about which usage they are using in reference to Balotelli (both possibly).

buzby

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #69 on: March 11, 2019, 10:36:56 PM »
I can’t quite do justice to “seen yer arse“ in writing as it needs that Wrexham town centre accent to really make it sing. Could be NE Wales thing.
Common in Liverpool too, similar meaning to 'got a cob on'. On a related note, we have 'face like a wet Echo/like a burst welly'.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #70 on: March 11, 2019, 10:57:03 PM »
someone I knew would say 'face like a slapped arse'

alan nagsworth

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #71 on: March 11, 2019, 11:01:29 PM »
Saying "mom" instead of "mum" - something I've been widely derided for on this forum over the years - seems to be strictly limited to very select parts of the West Midnlands. My home town Tamworth is one, as are places like West Bromwich and Walsall, but other nearby places like Burton-on-Trent and Derby do not, and absolutely nowhere else in the country does it. I've always found that really odd.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #72 on: March 11, 2019, 11:03:39 PM »
Certainly I would say "seen his/her/your arse" is a common expression across the North West of England to mean someone who has been showed up somehow. Always assumed it was an Emperor's New Clothes type thing - ie they're so humiliated it's like they're bollock naked.

im barry bethel

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #73 on: March 11, 2019, 11:14:30 PM »
Nowty- someone who is both moody and aggressive. Manchester, possibly obselete.

Knew someone 25 odd yes ago who used that, also mithering to keep pestering for something

alan nagsworth

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #74 on: March 11, 2019, 11:28:10 PM »
Yeah, "mithering" is one my nan still uses!

Another I've not heard in years is "rigmarole" (see also, "palaver") meaning a lengthy, tiresome procedure. I just looked up the etymology and it appears it comes from "ragman roll":

Quote
Any of a collection of legal documents in which the nobility and gentry of Scotland subscribed allegiance to King Edward I of England

Cute.

One that's native to Shropshire and the black country which made its way to Tamworth was "round the Wrekin", which means taking the long way around (the Wrekin is a big hill in Shropshire). If your taxi driver went an indirect route you'd say "£6 it cost me! Cunt had me going right round the Wrekin."

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #75 on: March 11, 2019, 11:40:35 PM »
Thought of another one (again) from growing up: "vanya", as in nearly.

"That arsehole vayna clipped me in his Capri!"

im barry bethel

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #76 on: March 11, 2019, 11:41:17 PM »
Another one that's just sprung to mind is mardy, along the same lines as nowty but a bit more aggressive you n it's use "ya mardy arsehole"


Edit: another one to tie in with mithering was leathering, "if I kept mithering me mam for sweets like that I'd get leathered

alan nagsworth

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #77 on: March 11, 2019, 11:44:11 PM »
I always thought "mardy" quite widely known since Arctic Monkeys made a hit out of it, but down south it doesn't seem as recognised. "Having a brat mard" was common back home to describe a temper tantrum.

Jockice

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #78 on: March 12, 2019, 09:35:46 AM »
I always thought "mardy" quite widely known since Arctic Monkeys made a hit out of it, but down south it doesn't seem as recognised. "Having a brat mard" was common back home to describe a temper tantrum.

Yeah, I had to explain to a relative in Scotland what it meant. Crabbit arse basically.

Jockice

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #79 on: March 12, 2019, 09:37:36 AM »
Knew someone 25 odd yes ago who used that, also mithering to keep pestering for something

My favourite Fall song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgA6v3DORY4

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #80 on: March 12, 2019, 10:20:12 AM »
When I lived in Norwich my driving instructor if I'd managed to pick up any of the local twang yet and it was only later that I realised this did not mean women.

Cuellar

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #81 on: March 12, 2019, 10:22:37 AM »
No obscure local slang from St. Albans, as far as I can tell.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #82 on: March 12, 2019, 10:36:30 AM »
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.

ToneLa

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #83 on: March 12, 2019, 10:38:01 AM »
I don't know if it's just local but I absolutely love getting, being, and describing my drunken self as banjaxed

Mr Banlon

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #84 on: March 12, 2019, 10:54:28 AM »
West/North West London :
What's the koo ? (What's been going on)

Lordofthefiles

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #85 on: March 12, 2019, 11:15:35 AM »
Getting hit in the “knackers”.
N/E England

xxxx xxx x xxx

  • Can we have a quick burn, sir?
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #86 on: March 12, 2019, 12:07:18 PM »
https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/ten-phrases-you-ll-only-hear-in-leeds-1-7451643

Fair enough, but they're all made up apart from the third one.  Never read such pointless unLeedsness in my life.

ToneLa

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #87 on: March 12, 2019, 12:16:53 PM »
You are all meffs

And beauts

buzby

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Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #88 on: March 12, 2019, 01:10:40 PM »
I don't know if it's just local but I absolutely love getting, being, and describing my drunken self as banjaxed
Irish, innit (it also appears in Waiting For Godot). There used to be an irish folk band who played the pubs in Liverpool (on Sunday afternoons The Dart, which used to be on Gildart St, where a lot of the Irish Republican community hung out after the Irish Club closed) ) called Banjax.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #89 on: March 12, 2019, 01:11:30 PM »
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.

Shit version of 'tarrarabit'.