Author Topic: Your favourite obscure local slang  (Read 2911 times)

Cuntbeaks

  • Guess who's coming to dinner?
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #90 on: March 12, 2019, 01:16:43 PM »
As mentioned previously, 'Rocket', is a great descriptor for someone who is a pain in the arse. But I had to laugh laugh when i heard it taken to another level.

"Bolt ya rocket before ah launch ye"

gib

  • weak and wobbly
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #91 on: March 12, 2019, 05:54:59 PM »
I've heard people say tatty bye, and have liked it.

Quote from: Wiktionary
Phrase coined, or made popular, by comedian Ken Dodd in the 1970s, but persisting in the language.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #92 on: March 12, 2019, 08:36:37 PM »
My favourite midlands one is “it’s gone black over Bill’s mother’s” when dark clouds are gathering in the distance. Rarely heard though.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #93 on: March 12, 2019, 08:37:50 PM »
Crenners - rubber johnnies

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #94 on: March 12, 2019, 08:42:22 PM »
My favourite midlands one is “it’s gone black over Bill’s mother’s” when dark clouds are gathering in the distance. Rarely heard though.

'round the wrekin' is a good one.

Morrison Lard

  • the author of The Story of Magic
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #95 on: March 12, 2019, 08:51:35 PM »
mard arsed

gorra cob on

gorra monk on

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #96 on: March 12, 2019, 08:54:01 PM »
Gambol, meaning a forward roll rather than general frolicking about. Also donnies = hands.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #97 on: March 13, 2019, 03:12:16 AM »
Any of you cunts Kentish men (or men of Kent)? I found this on Wikipedia and like it; Kentish dialect:

Alleycumfee - a non-existent place.
Better-most - the best, something superior
Cheesy bug - woodlouse
Dabster, a dab hand - somebody very skilled at something
Fanteeg - to be flustered
Ha'ant - "Haven't." For example, "Ha'ant yew sin 'im yet?"
Jawsy - a chatterbox
March-men - people from the borders of two counties
'Od Rabbit It! - a minced oath
Ringle - to put a ring in a pig's nose
Scithers - scissors (clippers may have been "clithers.")
Tutt - clutter (noun)
Twinge - an earwig
Wrongtake - to misunderstand
Yarping - to complain, applied to children
Addle - to be dazed or confused
Allow - to think of, consider or regard
Dumbledore - bumblebee
Dunes - sand hills or hillocks near the sea
Heft - weight
Oast - kiln for drying hops
Peaky - unwell, ill-looking
Pikey - traveller on the turnpike, i.e. a vagabond or ruffian
Radical - a troublemaker or rebel.

Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #98 on: March 13, 2019, 03:19:22 AM »
https://youtu.be/sPJxS43ByYE

I think a lot of those words make more sense if you listen to this. The older rural accents rather than esturary / public school accents that are wiping out our linguistic heritage.

kngen

  • Member
  • **
  • Fighting sleep's deathlike grip
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #99 on: March 13, 2019, 04:08:36 AM »


Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

Kind of. 'Allow' is yootspeak for wanting very little to do with something. 'Allow that bare butters girl with her chattin shit' - no idea of the etymology, but I feel it comes from 'I'll allow it to happen, but I'm not getting involved'

Lisa Jesusandmarychain

  • ...to stab you with!
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #100 on: March 13, 2019, 07:33:17 AM »




gorra monk on

You're not from Wigan, are you ?

northernrebel

  • Desperate but Not Serious
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #101 on: March 13, 2019, 11:55:50 AM »
'Antwacky' - used in the Liverpool and Cheshire area to mean 'old fashioned and naff'. Often shortened to 'twacky' but now the word is oddly dated and naff itself, ironically.

'Rorm' - to wiggle around a lot under the bedclothes. Often used by my mother in some distant era - 'will yuz lot stop rorming about' when all the inevitable siblings were in one bed in a council 'ouse. Was shocked to find it was not a proper word in the dictionary.

Also 'slutch' for mud. Yet again, it sounds muddier than any other real word.

Cuellar

  • Push off my wire
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #102 on: March 13, 2019, 12:03:00 PM »
Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

That was very current when I was in school in the home counties, circa 2000, meaning 'can't be bothered', or 'I will not be doing that'.

"you coming out tonight?"
"nah allow that"

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #103 on: March 13, 2019, 03:32:12 PM »
The only one local to me (North Somerset) that still gets used a lot, even by the younger folk and interlopers from larger towns, is " 'ow be yon?" (as in "how are you?"), typically pronounced as "am be on?" by the older folk.

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #104 on: March 13, 2019, 03:49:27 PM »
A Black Country expression probably not used by anyone under sixty nowadays: “Keep out the ‘oss road”, meaning “mind how you go”.

Jerzy Bondov

  • get sum!!
    • Wrongfully Adapted
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #105 on: March 13, 2019, 04:14:58 PM »
The best bit of Cornish slang is the insult 'tuss'. BLEDDY TUSS. Feels nice to say.

ToneLa

  • Kill your masters
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #106 on: March 13, 2019, 04:42:00 PM »
The best bit of Cornish slang is the insult 'tuss'. BLEDDY TUSS. Feels nice to say.

Aphex Twin alias gains meaning!

Space ghost

  • The manay, joost the manay
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #107 on: March 14, 2019, 04:57:49 AM »
Any of you cunts Kentish men (or men of Kent)? I found this on Wikipedia and like it; Kentish dialect:

Alleycumfee - a non-existent place.
Better-most - the best, something superior
Cheesy bug - woodlouse
Dabster, a dab hand - somebody very skilled at something
Fanteeg - to be flustered
Ha'ant - "Haven't." For example, "Ha'ant yew sin 'im yet?"
Jawsy - a chatterbox
March-men - people from the borders of two counties
'Od Rabbit It! - a minced oath
Ringle - to put a ring in a pig's nose
Scithers - scissors (clippers may have been "clithers.")
Tutt - clutter (noun)
Twinge - an earwig
Wrongtake - to misunderstand
Yarping - to complain, applied to children
Addle - to be dazed or confused
Allow - to think of, consider or regard
Dumbledore - bumblebee
Dunes - sand hills or hillocks near the sea
Heft - weight
Oast - kiln for drying hops
Peaky - unwell, ill-looking
Pikey - traveller on the turnpike, i.e. a vagabond or ruffian
Radical - a troublemaker or rebel.

Some of my more trendy type London mates have been using ”allow” recently meaning (I think) “chill out” or ”leave it”. Can see how it’s root comes from “consider“ or contemplate.

Man and boy and I've never heard any of these ever apart from peaky and pikey. Sounds like someone has pulled them straight out their Chatham pocket to me.

gib

  • weak and wobbly
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #108 on: March 14, 2019, 11:20:11 AM »
Man and boy and I've never heard any of these ever apart from peaky and pikey. Sounds like someone has pulled them straight out their Chatham pocket to me.

You never said something heavy was 'hefty'? What about 'dunes', surely you heard that one before.

Space ghost

  • The manay, joost the manay
Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #109 on: March 14, 2019, 12:08:07 PM »
Course. I own and operate my own hefty dune buggy. I just thought they were so common as to be automatically struck from the list.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #110 on: March 17, 2019, 04:44:33 AM »
In Newcastle we use brayed too, so I reckon NRP is a "southerner", i.e. Teeside or below.

well, at least fucking spell it right, you geordie twat. teesside. you geordie twat.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #111 on: March 17, 2019, 06:01:25 AM »
How about "sken" for have a look at. As in "gis a sken at yer bike"
Local to NW Lancs or more common?

Or "tit" for petrol
I've only ever heard that from Rochdaliens, anyone/where else?

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #112 on: March 17, 2019, 07:32:28 AM »
Quist - wood pigeon

Bellock - shout

Ronk - sly

Browse - rhymes with louse but means twigs

Nithered - cold

Nogman - twat

Squit -  talking nonsense

Only the old use words like this in my part of rural Gloucestershire and it’s only young fogeys like me that understand them. Hang on just thought of another one ....

Ooot - rhymes with foot but means ought to

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #113 on: March 17, 2019, 09:28:55 PM »
'Antwacky' - used in the Liverpool and Cheshire area to mean 'old fashioned and naff'. Often shortened to 'twacky' but now the word is oddly dated and naff itself, ironically.


"twacky" cropped up in brookside scripts a fair bit, often for tracy corkhill to say (& I'll have to go on fb now & remind justine of this). I was puzzled by this at the time, because I'm from teesside & we have our own regional affectations in smoggy-land. turns out that "antwacky", its full form, is just a mispronunciation of 'antique'.

"bifters" was another one I heard on the set a lot, in the script or otherwise. I knew the word as slang for a joint (reefer), but it would be applied to anything where some considerable effort had been applied to a task, e.g. making an ordinary car look like a police car for the purposes of a shoot.

the scousers I worked with were adaptable, & coped quite well with the things I imported from teesside, like 'skeg'; "let's have a skeg at that" = "permit me to examine that object whilst holding it".  I'll remember more presently.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #114 on: March 17, 2019, 09:42:33 PM »


the scousers I worked with were adaptable, & coped quite well with the things I imported from teesside, like 'skeg'; "let's have a skeg at that" = "permit me to examine that object whilst holding it".  I'll remember more presently.

Skeg is one I use to this day even though I haven't lived within 200 miles of Teesside for 20 years.

Re: Your favourite obscure local slang
« Reply #115 on: March 18, 2019, 07:20:35 AM »
Skeg is one I use to this day even though I haven't lived within 200 miles of Teesside for 20 years.

whereabouts? I was born in bradford ("bratf'd") but raised dragged up in marske-by-the-sea, where (as a teenager) my careers advisor would point out of the window of the classroom at the not-very-distant ICI & british steel complexes up the road & say "or you could become a teacher".
exile, via liverpool, to london & points beyond, soon followed.

so did you give people croggies on your bike?

I work in broadcast engineering, & briefly ended up at chrysalis in camden, while Mtv were still clients there- I went with them when they moved over the road into the TVam building & stayed 17 years, travelling all over europe while the viacom empire grew. but at chrysalis, I ran into another engineer who had a smoggy accent.....

"are you from the north east?" I asked.
"teesside, aye."
"where in teesside?"
"little village called mask" [that being how we say it]
"where in mask?"
"the kirklands. why?"
"fuckin' 'ell! what number, like?"
"eleven. why?"
"I used to live at number eight!"

I mean, I wouldn't want to paint it, but...