Author Topic: Films To Be Buried With  (Read 1727 times)

St_Eddie

  • *The Patron Saint of Scallywags*
  • Silver Member
  • ****
  • LIKES: Deviled eggs DISLIKES: The Devil & bad eggs
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #60 on: April 03, 2019, 11:11:30 PM »
Alien 3 is fucking perfect(obviously not the 1993 CGI alien head explosion), sorry I've not filled out the form correctly to say so.

I adore Alien 3 (the assembly cut) and like Shit Good Nose, consider it to be a minor masterpiece but it's definitely not "perfect".  There's too many objective flaws for it to reach that particular status, or come close to it (for example, the terrible composition of the rod puppet onto the sets, or the mysterious appearing-out-of-nowhere-and-with-no-explanation egg on the Sulaco - which serves as the basis for the entire film's plot).

samadriel

  • WHA' HAPPEN?
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #61 on: April 04, 2019, 12:28:31 AM »
I'm (not) Brett Goldstein and I'm very sorry but you've died.

The good news is that there is a Heaven and they all watch films up there. Here are some questions...

What's the first film you remember seeing?
I don't remember with any certainty, but the first VHS we rented from the video shop, so probably one of the earliest I saw (my family pretty much never went to the pictures until I was older), was 1985's Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend, a movie about dinosaurs living in Africa.  I don't remember much except for the image of a cute baby brontosaurus in the jungle.  The Wikipedia entry makes it sound a bit grim and violent, and it is poorly regarded on RT.

What is the film that made you cry the most?
I had successfully failed to cry at any movie, apart from being a bit choked up at one point in Forrest Gump, until I saw Pixar's Coco last year, when I shed a tear or two and had a bit of a lump in my throat.  The character of Coco made me think about my grandmother, who passed away only yesterday -- so, as you might guess, I'm not feeling great at the moment, but obviously I'm composed enough to write posts, so here we are.


What is the film that scared you the most?
When I was very young, the part in Michael Jackson's Moonwalker where he suddenly looks up with glowing eyes and turns all metal and robotic scared the hell out of me.  This bit here.  I saw a few seconds of it without context on TV, and for years afterwards I would compulsively think about a figure with glowing eyes and a white suit trying to grab my feet if my legs were over the edge of the bed.

What film did you used to love, but you watched it recently and gone “Oh dear this does not hold up”?
The rarity with which I rewatch movies makes this difficult to answer, but I get the feeling that Tank Girl, while I'd probably still have a chuckle at it, would go down in my estimations.

What is the film that you love that most people hate?
Considering it bombed and attracts a lot of venom in discussions, I think I'll have to go with Scott Pilgrim vs the World.  I despise the comic it came from, and accordingly boycotted the movie, which I greatly regret now, as it would've been a fantastic film to see in the cinema.

What is the film that you love the most not because of the film itself but because of the experience you had around it?
Not that there's anything wrong with the film, but I first saw Starship Troopers on a tiny portable TV set in the midst of a raucous house party when I was still young and enjoyed raucousness. I met many friends-of-friends at that party, who I would later form more direct connections with, and it was a palpable delight to be socialising away from the dickheaded companions who had blighted my highschool years.  When I think of Starship Troopers, I think of my friends, and that's why I love it.


What is the film that you thought was the sexiest?
I might have to go with Mulholland Drive, 'cos that Naomi Watts, dear me.  I think she might've been why I liked Tank Girl at first blush.

What is the film that you relate to the most?
Art School Confidential.  The depiction of studying fine arts was so accurate, the good stuff, the bad stuff, the baffling classroom consensus, the baffling art-world consensus, going out with girls who had a screw loose, the fantasy of cheating your way into acceptability...  I'll never understand why this movie so devastated Terry Zwigoff's career; I think it's wonderful.

What’s the worst film ever?
I'm trying to think of a movie I found more painful than Empire Records, and I think I'll have to go with... Chasing Amy.  God, so fucking shit.  I didn't get all the way through, so I could be convinced that maybe Dogma is worse, but as far as I know, Chasing Amy su-diddly-ucks.


What’s your favourite film?
Airplane.  The only thing I'd take out of the movie is well... Johnny (incredibly loud and completely witless).  The rest is a grand ol' time. 

What is objectively the greatest film ever made?
I'm trying to think of the films that impressed me most, and what keeps popping up is Dr Strangelove.  I'm not a Kubrick tragic, but he does a great job, that movie is just terrific, rivalling Airplane and This Is Spinal Tap for my funniest movie.

What’s the film you’ve watched the most?
Wayne's World.  I gave WW a spin daily for a week or so in the early '90s, so it easily leaps ahead of the pack.  Romeo + Juliet is probably the runner-up.

What’s the funniest film?
Already mentioned Airplane, so why not This Is Spinal Tap?  A riot throughout, for so many reasons.

What’s the one film you’ll take to show when it's your turn at the film night in Heaven?
The Castle.  Working Dog blessed us with a touching, funny comedy that brings us a rare and enjoyable depiction of a certain stripe of the Australian people, can't let it go to waste.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #62 on: April 04, 2019, 12:46:13 AM »
What is the film that you love that most people hate?
... Scott Pilgrim vs the World.
There are dozens of us. Dozens!


What’s the film you’ve watched the most?
Every morning i wake up and open palm slam a vhs into the slot. its Chronicles of Riddick...

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #63 on: April 04, 2019, 12:56:46 AM »
Scott and his friends are just typical youths as far, as I'm aware.

I'd love to live wherever you live (& get spat at less)

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #64 on: April 04, 2019, 07:13:50 AM »
Most of Scott Pilgrim went WAY over my head, and it's the only film I've ever seen which made me feel old and completely out of place - it's aimed at a very specific and niche group of people, and my problem with it is that, instead of being (or, at least, trying to be) inclusive of others, it seems to purposely alienate those who aren't in the same clique, and take great delight in doing so.  It's an incredibly smug piece of work, to the point where it basically sneers at anyone who isn't in on the "joke".  I think it's Wright's worst film by miles, even worse than the dreadful World's End - at least that had a decent turn from Nick Frost.

To me it actually felt like what it was, a film made by a man in his late 30's, a few quite straight forward modern references like the L-word but really the biggest reference point seemed to be late 80's and early 90's gaming.

samadriel

  • WHA' HAPPEN?
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #65 on: April 04, 2019, 08:19:15 AM »
I couldn't sleep last night so I watched Scott Pilgrim again this morning to reflect on it, and I don't feel like it's too dense a headfuck for the older gentleperson; a lot of the silly imagery is just scrawled effects and captions appearing as required, which reminded me a bit of Ang Lee's Hulk, the bringing of the comic book look (and in this case, also the videogame look) to screen.  It feels unusually intense because of Wright's many quick cuts, which pile on the stuff that I guess you would call gimmicks if they rub you the wrong way (and sure, they are gimmicks, but they're fun, so I'm not complaining).  The particularly videogamey stuff like the ninja game, the coins, the extra life, the way the fighting is taken for granted by everyone, I guess that's a bit freaky for some, but I don't see how it's really much more alienating than the song and dance that decorate a musical.  I'm in my mid-30s now, is it just that I am (and in 2010, was) the right age to have internalised the vocab of games?  Is this an 'MTV generation' thing?

edit:  I really don't feel the movie is aiming to 'smugly' alienate anyone, it just takes for granted a certain kind of media literacy.  It's perhaps a little surprising that it was Edgar Wright who took such a thing for granted, rather than maybe someone closer to the cast's age, but hey, I'm glad he went for it, he exercised his skills very well in SPvtW.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2019, 08:43:26 AM by samadriel »

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #66 on: April 04, 2019, 09:10:54 AM »
I adore Alien 3 (the assembly cut) and like Shit Good Nose, consider it to be a minor masterpiece but it's definitely not "perfect".  There's too many objective flaws for it to reach that particular status, or come close to it (for example, the terrible composition of the rod puppet onto the sets, or the mysterious appearing-out-of-nowhere-and-with-no-explanation egg on the Sulaco - which serves as the basis for the entire film's plot).

Sounds like I allow it a bit more wiggle room than you, but yes - thank you for clarifying my position.  I always prefer to refer to it as a "minor" rather than "flawed" masterpiece.  I think its flaws, though they are there, are overtaken by its style, tone and performances - all of which very much hark back to Alien, rather than continue with the B-movie feel of Aliens.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #67 on: April 04, 2019, 10:26:45 AM »
Try as you might, you're not going to get me to give you wiggle room in your favoured position.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #68 on: April 04, 2019, 10:38:24 AM »
I couldn't sleep last night so I watched Scott Pilgrim again this morning to reflect on it, and I don't feel like it's too dense a headfuck for the older gentleperson; a lot of the silly imagery is just scrawled effects and captions appearing as required, which reminded me a bit of Ang Lee's Hulk, the bringing of the comic book look (and in this case, also the videogame look) to screen.  It feels unusually intense because of Wright's many quick cuts, which pile on the stuff that I guess you would call gimmicks if they rub you the wrong way (and sure, they are gimmicks, but they're fun, so I'm not complaining).  The particularly videogamey stuff like the ninja game, the coins, the extra life, the way the fighting is taken for granted by everyone, I guess that's a bit freaky for some, but I don't see how it's really much more alienating than the song and dance that decorate a musical.  I'm in my mid-30s now, is it just that I am (and in 2010, was) the right age to have internalised the vocab of games?  Is this an 'MTV generation' thing?

edit:  I really don't feel the movie is aiming to 'smugly' alienate anyone, it just takes for granted a certain kind of media literacy.  It's perhaps a little surprising that it was Edgar Wright who took such a thing for granted, rather than maybe someone closer to the cast's age, but hey, I'm glad he went for it, he exercised his skills very well in SPvtW.

I spose you could argue that someone Wrights age was actually quite well placed to make a film like this as his cultural experience in areas like gaming was nostalgia for the younger generation. To me it actually feels the most Wrightian of Wright films and I think shows considerable ability as an action director which we saw again with Baby Driver.

In terms of favourite films I gave Marketa Lazarova another watch yesterday and that really is worming its way up in my expectations as I become more accustomed to its style.

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #69 on: April 04, 2019, 10:53:53 AM »
Try as you might, you're not going to get me to give you wiggle room in your favoured position.

They've all got wiggle room in my favoured position by the time etc.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #70 on: April 04, 2019, 11:19:16 AM »
Sounds like I allow it a bit more wiggle room than you, but yes - thank you for clarifying my position.  I always prefer to refer to it as a "minor" rather than "flawed" masterpiece.  I think its flaws, though they are there, are overtaken by its style, tone and performances - all of which very much hark back to Alien, rather than continue with the B-movie feel of Aliens.

Whats always held it back rather for me though is that whilst it does clearly move back towards the original in those aspects I don't think it quite gets there. Bar perhaps Zodiac I'v always felt Fincher had a bit too much slickness to him to reach the top tear of cinematic greatness, indeed more akin to the latter day Scott than the earlier one albeit more consistent.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #71 on: April 05, 2019, 03:56:45 PM »
I say Aliens is far closer to the original in style, tone and performances than Alien 3 is. And, when it comes to the Alien films, what I say goes. The first two have a fly-on-the-wall feel to them, whereas the third is very much a movie, with it's operatic bombast and big speeches.

St_Eddie

  • *The Patron Saint of Scallywags*
  • Silver Member
  • ****
  • LIKES: Deviled eggs DISLIKES: The Devil & bad eggs
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #72 on: April 06, 2019, 01:50:43 AM »
I say Aliens is far closer to the original in style, tone and performances than Alien 3 is.

I'm sorry, what language are you speaking?  It appears to be bollocks.

(*One Foot in the Grave reference*)
« Last Edit: April 06, 2019, 02:10:26 AM by St_Eddie »

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #73 on: April 06, 2019, 02:20:36 AM »
I think Claude is pretty clear here Eddie.

And, when it comes to the Alien films, what I say goes.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #74 on: April 06, 2019, 10:09:25 AM »
That's right. I won a quiz.

Better Midlands

  • I'm not internationally known
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #75 on: April 06, 2019, 10:11:17 AM »

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #76 on: April 06, 2019, 10:43:31 AM »
I say Aliens is far closer to the original in style, tone and performances than Alien 3 is. And, when it comes to the Alien films, what I say goes. The first two have a fly-on-the-wall feel to them, whereas the third is very much a movie, with it's operatic bombast and big speeches.

HAAAAAAAAA-HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA

AH-HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

Ohhhhhh, man.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #77 on: April 06, 2019, 10:46:14 AM »
Do you have an actual counterpoint, or are you just laughing at nothing, like the confused incontinent old timer that you are?

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #78 on: April 06, 2019, 12:09:29 PM »
Do you have an actual counterpoint, or are you just laughing at nothing, like the confused incontinent old timer that you are?

(Holds ear trumpet up to ear with one hand whilst steadying self on zimmer with the other)
WHAAAAAAAAT?

Conssarnit young 'uns with your mumbling and Richard Clayderman records.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #79 on: April 06, 2019, 12:17:29 PM »
YES, MR. GOODNOSE, IT'S ALL THE YOUTHS' FAULT. NOW HERE'S A NICE CUP OF BOVRIL FOR YOU.

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #80 on: April 06, 2019, 12:38:50 PM »
I do actually genuinely like Bovril, although it's best on toast with shit loads of butter.  Dead soon.  Old now.

Re: Films To Be Buried With
« Reply #81 on: April 06, 2019, 03:35:58 PM »
Off the top of my head, the only references to specific games are the use of music from the Zelda series. Otherwise it's all generic stuff, like the baddies turning into coins, which is basic magical realism type stuff.

But then, looking for logic in the opinions of a man that thinks Alien 3 is a masterpiece is a fool's errand.

Maybe I understood more than I thought. I just assumed SPvTW had a ton of gaming references that I didn't get but could still enjoy in the same way that an ex-GF absolutely loved Spaced (I'd rate those two Edgar Wright projects as closest in terms of style) but she'd never seen a Star Wars or Indiana Jones film so all those references must've gone over her head. Don't think she ever saw a Woody Allen film, either, so Daisy's whole Manhattan parody at the start of one of the episodes would presumably have been lost too.