Author Topic: Canterbury schnizzle  (Read 3833 times)

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #30 on: July 09, 2019, 09:28:40 PM »
I didn't know that about Andy Summers. There is another Canterbury connection with The Police: Mike Howlett from Gong was in Strontium 90, a short-lived band with two bass players which consisted of him, Summers, Copeland and Sting. They performed at Gong's 1977 reunion in Paris.

Yep, ive mentioned that on here before - its not great sadly, Nik Turner is on it too and his recordings of it in the 90s are far better (with Pressurehed)

BlodwynPig

  • Throwing two dogs at a goblin
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #31 on: July 09, 2019, 09:30:00 PM »
See, all that stuff really puts me off. I fucking hate The Police. I like Robert Wyatt's voice and the thought of loads of weird young men pootling around Canterbury making records. I don't want to think of the fucking Police.

Martin Clunes hung around with Ozric Tentacles in their early incarnation (Bolshem People), always loved that image

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #32 on: July 09, 2019, 09:30:21 PM »
Andy Summers was in The Animals as well, so they get on the Canterbury family tree, too.

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #33 on: July 09, 2019, 10:03:57 PM »
In 1982 Bill Laswell, who has worked with several Canterbury scene musos (Daevid Allen, Charles Hayward & Fred Frith come to mind) debuted Whitney Houston, singing a song composed by Soft Machine bass player Hugh Hopper that was first sung by Robert Wyatt. The track also featured jazz saxophonist Archie Shepp, so you can add his name to the list, too. Whitney's version of the song (Memories) is the only one existing where all the written verses are sung.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xj4xGiXfW0

Here's Robert Wyatt singing it in 1974 (the b-side of his single I'm A Believer):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvSEPmsgA9w

And Robert singing it earlier on Daevid Allen's album Banana Moon (1971):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlvsBgwn4m0

And even earlier (1966) with the Wilde Flowers (the band that had members of both Soft Machine and Caravan):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyEEGfWw83c


NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #34 on: July 09, 2019, 10:18:02 PM »
Soft Machine appear as the backing band on two tracks of Syd Barrett's The Madcap Laughs. They had to play along to the already recorded Syd on vocals and guitar (with no thought of a band being added later), which explains why they sound like they're having trouble keeping up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1lAbB-wil4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGEDlmPu78

Sin Agog

  • Dogs fucked the pope; no fault of mine
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #35 on: July 10, 2019, 06:27:30 AM »
Brian Eno played drums? nah, it was Simon Phillips. You can have CH's singing.


Yeah, but that was Eno singing Hayward's Rongwrong, and generally infusing the air with Eno odours the way Hayward had done with his Hayward smells previously.  CH is hardly the shy, hide behind the cymbals type when it comes to songwriting and structuring.

Dirty Boy

  • Lemon bloody cola
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2019, 11:35:44 AM »
Don't have much to add beyond saying that this thread is a goldmine of things i've missed or otherwise not got round to, Quiet Sun for instance, as a huge This Heat fan there's really no excuse.

Has Kew.Rhone not been mentioned? What an incredible album that is.

Some of you might have missed that Rock Bottom was recently covered in it's entirety by the North Sea Radio Orchestra in collab with Henry Cow's John Greaves and  Annie Barbazza (who tbh i'm not au fait with) it's on youtube and snotify and apparently has the blessing of your man Mr Wyatt himself. I'm still trying to find a sensibly priced copy though...

Sea Song.

Absorb the anus burn

  • I'll serve raw potatoes at my summer party
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #37 on: July 10, 2019, 11:39:22 AM »
Kew.Rhone not been mentioned?

Sea Song.

Yes, Kew.Rhone is a corker...

Also, a shout out for Fred's Frith's first three solo albums - especially Gravity with support from Samla Mammas Manna who certainly have some Canterbury touches

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #38 on: July 10, 2019, 11:43:20 AM »
Stop singing Hayward's Rongwrong wrong.

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #39 on: July 10, 2019, 01:14:41 PM »
Yes, Kew.Rhone is a corker...

Also, a shout out for Fred's Frith's first three solo albums - especially Gravity with support from Samla Mammas Manna who certainly have some Canterbury touches

Agreed. Worth mentioning that the aforementioned Muffins also acted as backing band on Frith's Gravity - Samla on side 1 and Muffins on side 2. Marc Hollander of the wonderful Aksak Maboul also guested on both sides.

On the subject of Frith, what about Skeleton Crew? Maybe we're straying too far from core Canterbury stylistic elements there, but I think that project shares a lot of the same impish humour and freewheeling energy. It's such a fuzzy border between Canterbury and RIO at times - just goes to show how these labels are really only of use to us anoraks who want to file everything into little boxes.

purlieu

  • Woo-hoo, Lord Nimon!
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #40 on: July 10, 2019, 04:02:21 PM »
Just announced, a Caravan 9CD box with everything studio & live from 'If I Could' through to 'Cunning Stunts'. http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/news/caravan-the-decca-deram-years-an-anthology-1970-1975-9cd-box-set/
That's a good selection of music. It's missing the wonderful and hugely underrated debut, which is far less prog and closer to the psych sound at the time, but otherwise contains all the other Caravan you could ever really want.

Sin Agog

  • Dogs fucked the pope; no fault of mine
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #41 on: July 10, 2019, 04:34:25 PM »
Agreed. Worth mentioning that the aforementioned Muffins also acted as backing band on Frith's Gravity - Samla on side 1 and Muffins on side 2. Marc Hollander of the wonderful Aksak Maboul also guested on both sides.

On the subject of Frith, what about Skeleton Crew? Maybe we're straying too far from core Canterbury stylistic elements there, but I think that project shares a lot of the same impish humour and freewheeling energy. It's such a fuzzy border between Canterbury and RIO at times - just goes to show how these labels are really only of use to us anoraks who want to file everything into little boxes.

I dug the Skeleton Crew, and all of Frith and Cutler's forays into almost-pop music, really.  You heard The Science Group's A Mere Coincidence?  One of the best things he did since his Henry Cow/Art Bears/News From Babel salad days. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jk3OEp2Z1x0

I did meet him once at a posh friend's mum's house.  He was kinda aloof and more interested in the cheese platter he had in front of him than talking to me, which is understandable.

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2019, 04:59:46 PM »
It's missing the wonderful and hugely underrated debut, which is far less prog and closer to the psych sound at the time

One of their best. They never became too po-faced either when they switched over into prog 'proper', unlike say Yes/Floyd.

Having said that, they did do an orchestral collaboration concert (the first?): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQbmHa6Qz7Q

Gilgamesh as another (minor) entry, I'd say they occupied territory half-way between Hatfield and national health.

purlieu

  • Woo-hoo, Lord Nimon!
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #43 on: July 10, 2019, 05:23:17 PM »
Having said that, they did do an orchestral collaboration concert (the first?): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQbmHa6Qz7Q
I've never heard this album, because... well, because it sounds like a bad idea. I was enjoying this until the great bit, but the brass totally ruins in there. Let's have that scuzzy organ to the fore please.

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #44 on: July 10, 2019, 05:43:19 PM »

Having said that, they did do an orchestral collaboration concert (the first?): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQbmHa6Qz7Q


Do you mean were they the first band to share a stage with an orchestra? There's Deep Purple (Concerto For Group & Orchestra - 1969 - recorded live at the Albert Hall) which is actually quite fun. Pink Floyd did Atom Heart Mother live at Hyde Park with an orchestra in 1970 (went to this and support acts Kevin Ayers and Edgar Broughton were tons more fun). Kevin Ayers recorded a live BBC session with his band and an orchestra in 1972 (Kevin Ayers BBC Radio 1 Live In Concert). And Zappa of course.

Gilgamesh as another (minor) entry, I'd say they occupied territory half-way between Hatfield and national health.

I saw Gilgamesh as the support act at a very early Hatfield & The North gig; must have been organised by the bands themselves as H&TN's Dave Stewart was running the box office. I saw their guitarist Bill Gilonis years later in Tim Hodgkinson's band The Work, which was one of the best gigs I've witnessed: extremely powerful band.

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #45 on: July 10, 2019, 10:44:40 PM »
My only knowledge of all this is a bit of early Soft Machine but enjoying this thread.

The Polite Force is really good, thanks for that.

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #46 on: July 10, 2019, 11:08:16 PM »
Early Robert Wyatt thing - lovely.

Wilde Flowers - Impotence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iPPBZBVbMs


Maurice Yeatman

  • His Reverence won't like it
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #47 on: July 10, 2019, 11:51:30 PM »
The Polite Force is really good, thanks for that.

A Visit to Newport Hospital is bloody brilliant for a start.

I think I've linked before to this impressionistic biographical video that a fan put together, but I still like it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7_xdm_CJ_k

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #48 on: July 14, 2019, 08:54:44 AM »
Inspired by this thread, I found a very affordable copy of Triple Echo, a three album retrospective of Soft Machine's career up to 1977. I already had all the recordings but the accompanying booklet contains a family tree for the entire early Canterbury scene focussed around the band. Interesting to note that Quiet Sun are in there (naturally) but no mention, as yet, of the early This Heat, although Radar Favourites gets noted, and was where Charles Hayward and Charles Bullen met up so far as I know.

Enjoy: SMFT.jpg
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 09:10:01 AM by NoSleep »

Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #49 on: July 25, 2019, 01:39:54 PM »
The BBC Session version of Moon In June, which is on Triple Echo, would be one of my Desert Island Discs I think. Have always loved that track. With its name checks for Pink Floyd, John Peel, John Cage, Caravan and "jazz groups" it conveys so perfectly how I assume it felt to be 19 years old in the late '60's (I was actually 9 years old and still listening to my Thunderbirds 7" 33rpm mini-albums).

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #50 on: July 25, 2019, 02:11:22 PM »
Art Bears. they don't really belong to this scene, but they're great.

Although all the members of Art Bears did an entire tour with Robert Wyatt sharing lead vocals with Dagmar when they were still Henry Cow, which makes up the best part of Henry Cow's "Concerts" album (dimedozen.org is a good place to find further recordings from this tour). They played Matching Mole and Robert Wyatt tunes as well as stuff from the Henry Cow repertoire. Also Chris Cutler (H.Cow, Art Bears) and Dave Stewart (Egg, H&TN, National Health) both worked together, before going on to join the bands we know them for.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 02:25:42 PM by NoSleep »

Sin Agog

  • Dogs fucked the pope; no fault of mine
Re: Canterbury schnizzle
« Reply #51 on: July 25, 2019, 03:40:22 PM »
Although all the members of Art Bears did an entire tour with Robert Wyatt sharing lead vocals with Dagmar when they were still Henry Cow, which makes up the best part of Henry Cow's "Concerts" album (dimedozen.org is a good place to find further recordings from this tour). They played Matching Mole and Robert Wyatt tunes as well as stuff from the Henry Cow repertoire. Also Chris Cutler (H.Cow, Art Bears) and Dave Stewart (Egg, H&TN, National Health) both worked together, before going on to join the bands we know them for.

Wyatt seemed right at home on that lovely last News From Babel album.  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FhL1hpjFuIY