Author Topic: Punk documentary on Sky Arts  (Read 1944 times)

Jockice

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Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #30 on: August 06, 2019, 08:55:05 AM »
I always felt like the later American punk scene was like some weird cargo cult version where they got it all wrong because they used the UK Subs as their template.

There's nothing wrong with the UK Subs. And as for ska, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones are one of the best live bands I've ever seen in my life. Not mad about their records though, but there we go.

My burst of enthusiasm for the American punk scene was fairly-short lived though, inspired by Let Them Eat Jellybeans, but yes it did become very samey and horribly macho with only the odd bit of humour in it (like The Meatmen's Crippled Children Suck). By the end of the 80s I'd almost totally lost interest. I don't own a single Green Day record you know.

New page American idiots

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2019, 09:01:40 AM »
Yes, and yes.

Some of that stuff really only exists outside of its own time and place tho', don't you think? I mean, I hate to sound like an old fart, but super-fast three-note riffs with someone shouting a two-word slogan? not any kind of music, as far as I'm concerned. Most Black Flag stuff they played just sounded shit. And that DKs thing - can't remember the title - really really bad.


Nazi Punks Fuck Off? I want that played at my funeral.

the science eel

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Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2019, 10:26:01 AM »
well at least you won't have to hear it

Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2019, 10:44:03 AM »
I relistened to it properly last week and I was really struck by how reliant it is on Lydon’s delivery for impact. Most of the music is basically amped up ‘rock n roll’ and to my ears sounds remarkably stodgy now. I grew up with this as a sacred text so I was very biased towards it in terms of sentiment but musically it now sounds a bit dull. I found it telling that there was almost exactly one year between Bollocks and Public Image and the latter still sounds remarkably fresh and vibrant.
I came to NMTB in the late 90s, and had similar conclusions in that when you took Lydon out of it, it didn't sound that shocking/different. However, when I first heard 'Metal Box/Second Edition' a little later, it felt like music from a different planet*.

Can't remember who it was that said it (Andy McCluskey?), but I always chuckled at the line that went something like Steve Jones "was the last holdout for the Chuck Berry guitar riff".

I did watch the first episode of this punk series, wondered if they would bring up the "punks = racist" angle that (I think) Lester Bangs wrote about. Not surprised that they didn't.

Beagle 2

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Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2019, 10:57:43 AM »
Never Mind the Bollocks is amazing from start to finish. What's the point in saying it wouldn't be as good without the lead singer?

Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #35 on: August 06, 2019, 03:35:27 PM »
I came to NMTB in the late 90s, and had similar conclusions in that when you took Lydon out of it, it didn't sound that shocking/different. However, when I first heard 'Metal Box/Second Edition' a little later, it felt like music from a different planet*.

Can't remember who it was that said it (Andy McCluskey?), but I always chuckled at the line that went something like Steve Jones "was the last holdout for the Chuck Berry guitar riff".

The older people said that kind of thing at the time Anarchy in the UK came out, saying it was just warmed over Small Faces (presumably 1966 guitary Small Faces), which was pretty much true, however exciting it felt at the time. Tbh I would rather listen to to them than the Sex Pistols now. The Pistols were trad, man. I see all that as a stripping down so things could be built up different again, as the Pil record you mention did for example under the influence of reggae and dub. Mark Perry was saying the same thing pretty soon.

The reactionary side of punk that saw it as pretty much an extension of pub rock and liked it that way were pissed off by Pil, The Gang of Four, The Raincoats and all those groups, but they were a minority.

Re: Punk documentary on Sky Arts
« Reply #36 on: August 06, 2019, 07:35:00 PM »
I relistened to it properly last week and I was really struck by how reliant it is on Lydon’s delivery for impact. Most of the music is basically amped up ‘rock n roll’ and to my ears sounds remarkably stodgy now. I grew up with this as a sacred text so I was very biased towards it in terms of sentiment but musically it now sounds a bit dull. I found it telling that there was almost exactly one year between Bollocks and Public Image and the latter still sounds remarkably fresh and vibrant.

It's trad dad, but I'd say it was the great last (trad) rock album.