Author Topic: you spin me right round baby right round  (Read 1743 times)

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2019, 11:10:32 AM »
It's A Man's Man's Man's World by Brilliant is another great early SAW single, even if it is a bit of a Scritti Politti rip off https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykZhJHjJQMo

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2019, 12:19:07 PM »
If the extent of your contribution is effectively "errr, you don't really like this, do you?" Please direct any forthcoming fuck in the vicinity of "off"

MiddleRabbit

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2019, 12:44:06 PM »
Isn't it a bit of a rip off of Electricity by Captain Beefeheart?

Norton Canes

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2019, 12:48:48 PM »
Which tracks? I love DOA

To be honest, the other eight tracks on Youthquake are all easily the equal of You Spin. From their subsequent LP Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know, Brand New Lover and Something In My House are top tier DOA.

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #34 on: August 10, 2019, 02:52:21 PM »
There are no culture wars. They're all a product of a media with an investment in marking out territory. There is no pop vs. authenticity, there is no punk vs. prog. It is all phony. Social tribes have more in common with one another than they have differences, but there's no pay out in pointing that out.

Agree with bits of your post and disagree with others, but punk vs prog, represented a real divide over what popular music should be like, what its social content should be and its social role (this is despite a few punks actually secretly liking prog). The music press played on it to find new things to promote and market, but there was a genuine conflict there. I wasn't involved in punk at its height and didn't understand what it was about, but when I did I realised it was something that needed to happen. I don't believe most of the best anglo-american music since then would have happened without punk, and its puritan rejection of the prog/pomp trend was essential to that.

Phoenix Lazarus

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2019, 10:02:42 PM »
Didn't DOA do that song that went 'my heart goes bang-bang-bang-bang'?  That one really was abysmal!

Johnny Yesno

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2019, 10:05:22 PM »
Ah now you're going too far. The descent of The Danse Society from grandiose prophets of impending doom to this...thing..., was one of the saddest and quickest falls from grace it's been my misfortune to witness in real time. Still upsets me.

Heh, I know. It was a terrible thing to happen and SAW were clearly going for DOA mark 2. Odd then, that I still really like the song in the OP.

Quote
Is this liking SAW stuff some form of "ironic review" style reevaluation by people who didn't fight in the culture wars of the period? They did produce shitey mainstream pap right, or am i misremembering?

This seems to happen all the time, I'm old enough to remember when ABBA were cheesy shit merchants rather than the pop geniuses they apparently always were. Same goes for Queen and Take That.

I'm with you, man. However, all that makes little sense now that people can try out pretty much any music they want and easily avoid the shite they don't like with minimal outlay. But yeah, I remember being pissed off that we couldn't even have the indie chart Kylie-free.

Better Midlands

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #37 on: August 10, 2019, 10:36:35 PM »
Love this thread thanks for all the recs. Divine is insane good

This Divine- Native Love mix was a big revival track in the early 90s

https://youtu.be/M7cdk4c7px8

Jockice

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #38 on: August 11, 2019, 07:31:35 AM »
Lover Come Back To Me was the best Dead Or Alive single. If we're talking SAW in general, alongside the aforementioned Respectable and Love In The First Degree, can I put a vote in for Sinitta's Cross My Broken Heart as one of their best singles? Oh go on. I sat behind her at a play in Glasgow once you know.

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #39 on: August 11, 2019, 08:10:52 AM »
I fucking hate You Spin Me Round. Everyone I know hated it at the time, seems like a lot of nostalgic revisionism to me. If I wanted to listen to something brilliant coming out of Liverpool why wouldn't I just listen to Julian Cope (I know he's not from Liverpool)?

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #40 on: August 11, 2019, 10:21:39 AM »
I fucking hate You Spin Me Round. Everyone I know hated it at the time, seems like a lot of nostalgic revisionism to me. If I wanted to listen to something brilliant coming out of Liverpool why wouldn't I just listen to Julian Cope (I know he's not from Liverpool)?

why is it always "nostalgic revisionism" and not "realising that tribal thinking influenced you away from something incredibly pleasurable?" I didn't go to clubs, I mainly listen to discordant guitar music. Just sounds like you're old to be honest.

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #41 on: August 11, 2019, 11:34:44 AM »
why is it always "nostalgic revisionism" and not "realising that tribal thinking influenced you away from something incredibly pleasurable?" I didn't go to clubs, I mainly listen to discordant guitar music. Just sounds like you're old to be honest.
Well, since I was a teenager when it came out, I guess I am old. It doesn't make it any fucking good just because people are telling me how good it is. What tribal thinking influenced me, by the waye? You have no idea.

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #42 on: August 11, 2019, 12:24:40 PM »
Didn't DOA do that song that went 'my heart goes bang-bang-bang-bang'?  That one really was abysmal!

Love that record.

Shame cunts have ruined this once-good thread with their snoot-snoot shit, but that's [all music discussion, ever] for you

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #43 on: August 11, 2019, 12:28:38 PM »
used to run a short-lived club night where we'd always finish on 'I'm So Beautiful' by Divine. just amazing.

Hadn’t heard this before. It’s great!

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2019, 12:49:28 PM »
What tribal thinking influenced me, by the waye? You have no idea.

a fair question to ask but you would be similarly stuck for an answer as to what nostalgia the people who like it are indulging in. people just like the song!

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2019, 01:03:35 PM »
There are no culture wars. They're all a product of a media with an investment in marking out territory. There is no pop vs. authenticity, there is no punk vs. prog. It is all phony. Social tribes have more in common with one another than they have differences, but there's no pay out in pointing that out. Even the contemporary culture wars is a product of the right-wing media, in a craven attempt to undermine the simple truth that the arts and humanities settles around the liberal and the left because it is social and concerned rather than of the atomised individual.

So I'm not some modern poptimist (certain things just are bad, but they're bad on universal terms rather than relative ones) nor am I a rockist (there is just no authenticity, and I say this as a fan of Alan Lomax). It's just that you can evaluate things for yourself without whatever publication you read guiding your thoughts. Maybe there's some nostalgia, but SAW had mostly finished by the time I became sentient.

I like, up to a point, the big blocky textures that SAW used, the house-indebted sounds that Waterman was nicking from Hitman & Her, the way the synths often sounded percussive giving the whole record a particularly dry thrust, and their predilection for singers who conveyed both innocence and something...other. They did a load of songs and quite a lot of them, from looking at a list, are toss. But in there they managed some gold. And they smashed opened the door of real proper Butlin's disco pop to the queer in a way no one had managed before, and I think they deserve credit for that.

ABBA and Queen wrote great singles but their albums all fall short (I suppose Q2 is fine). Take That had one or two singles and nothing like a decent album ever.

excellent post

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #46 on: August 11, 2019, 02:51:39 PM »
I fucking hate You Spin Me Round. Everyone I know hated it at the time, seems like a lot of nostalgic revisionism to me. If I wanted to listen to something brilliant coming out of Liverpool why wouldn't I just listen to Julian Cope (I know he's not from Liverpool)?

Do you dislike electronic dance music in general, or just this example? If so, what makes it worse?

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2019, 02:56:00 PM »
I never really considered You Spin me Round actual dance music, even though I knew someone who'd drop it into their techno/electro sets alongside the likes of Optimo (they also liked to chuck in Bizarre Love Triangle).

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2019, 03:27:08 PM »
I fucking hate You Spin Me Round. Everyone I know hated it at the time, seems like a lot of nostalgic revisionism to me. If I wanted to listen to something brilliant coming out of Liverpool why wouldn't I just listen to Julian Cope (I know he's not from Liverpool)?

About ten years ago (maybe a bit longer), I went to an Eric's reunion night in Liverpool Academy and the bill was Julian Cope headlining and Pete Burns supporting. The crowd was essentially all there for Cope but I'd say everybody was quite intrigued as to what version of Burns would show up, bearing in mind loads of people there would remember him from working in Probe Records before he made it.

Anyway, about 10 minutes before showtime a 7ft Pete Burns lookalike, dressed in a ripped, satin, toga/babydoll hybrid with a huge beehive hairdo, came in and went and stood about an inch from the stage. Bearing in mind that this was post Big Brother, he/she had gone to considerable effort and expense to become the spitting image of Burnsy. Who then subsequently wouldn't come on until the lookalike was moved away from the stage, it was announced as 'nerves' but I spoke to the venue manager afterwards and that was the real reason. Can't say I blame him, imagine being as strikingly individual looking as him then walking out to see your doppelgänger? Must be unnerving.

Anyway, the cunt was an hour late on stage so there wasn't much goodwill to him, so when he sang/mimed to a backing track for 15 minutes then made a nasty remark (not a bit of 'bantz', just mean spirited) about Liverpool being a horrible place, he wasn't exactly applauded off the stage.

Cope was awesome though, as he usually is.

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #49 on: August 11, 2019, 03:40:08 PM »
Do you dislike electronic dance music in general, or just this example? If so, what makes it worse?
It's a dull pop track, to me, nothing exciting and certainly doesn't make me want to dance. I don't see it as "electronic dance" just electronic-influenced pop music. I was always a bit of a soul boy (despite a hard rock period) so didn't like a lot of electro-pop. It's not all Kraftwerk, unfortunately.

Johnny Yesno

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #50 on: August 11, 2019, 05:45:08 PM »
I fucking hate You Spin Me Round. Everyone I know hated it at the time, seems like a lot of nostalgic revisionism to me. If I wanted to listen to something brilliant coming out of Liverpool why wouldn't I just listen to Julian Cope (I know he's not from Liverpool)?

Nah, it's a good record. It fitted right in DJ sets with stuff like Love Action by The Human League, Rip It Up by Orange Juice and Living on the Ceiling by Blancmange. I think the fact that it was produced by SAW went over my head.

On the other hand, I appear to be in a minority of alternative music fans who can't abide Julian Cope, which is a feat given that on paper he should be a shoo-in.

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #51 on: August 11, 2019, 05:54:00 PM »
Nah, it's a good record. It fitted right in DJ sets with stuff like Love Action by The Human League, Rip It Up by Orange Juice and Living on the Ceiling by Blancmange. I think the fact that it was produced by SAW went over my head.

On the other hand, I appear to be in a minority of alternative music fans who can't abide Julian Cope, which is a feat given that on paper he should be a shoo-in.
Well, I like those songs, especially Love Action and Rip It Up, but I can't put that DoA song in the same bracket.

Johnny Yesno

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #52 on: August 11, 2019, 05:59:51 PM »
Well, I like those songs, especially Love Action and Rip It Up, but I can't put that DoA song in the same bracket.

The DJs at the goth/alternative nights I used to go to would have disagreed with you (although I will say that DoA is my least favourite).

kalowski

  • the Zone of Zero Funkativity
Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #53 on: August 11, 2019, 06:01:04 PM »
The DJs at the goth/alternative nights I used to go to would have disagreed with you.
They probably played it at The Limit in Sheffield, but if they did I'd have gone to the bar.

Johnny Yesno

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #54 on: August 11, 2019, 06:03:02 PM »
They probably played it at The Limit in Sheffield, but if they did I'd have gone to the bar.

I was probably already lurking at the bar :-(

Phoenix Lazarus

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Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #55 on: August 11, 2019, 06:53:28 PM »
Didn't DOA do that song that went 'my heart goes bang-bang-bang-bang'?  That one really was abysmal!

Even worse than Culture Club, War is Stupid.  At least the verses to that were a little catchy. The chorus, though, plumbed the depths of banality-and the break in the middle, where BG goes 'wa-wa-wa' ('war-war-war'?) over and over sounds like a three-year old.

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #56 on: August 11, 2019, 09:04:12 PM »
It's A Man's Man's Man's World by Brilliant is another great early SAW single, even if it is a bit of a Scritti Politti rip off https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykZhJHjJQMo

Bergerac theme?

Re: you spin me right round baby right round
« Reply #57 on: August 11, 2019, 09:22:35 PM »
Agree with bits of your post and disagree with others, but punk vs prog, represented a real divide over what popular music should be like, what its social content should be and its social role (this is despite a few punks actually secretly liking prog). The music press played on it to find new things to promote and market, but there was a genuine conflict there. I wasn't involved in punk at its height and didn't understand what it was about, but when I did I realised it was something that needed to happen. I don't believe most of the best anglo-american music since then would have happened without punk, and its puritan rejection of the prog/pomp trend was essential to that.

I think part of the disagreement here is that the importance of music as a social indicator has almost completely disappeared. In the 80s, your choice of music was a marker for a much larger selection of social attitudes and therefore you could and certainly did judge people on their taste in music, not simply because of the music but because it told you about the lifestyle and beliefs they attached themselves to. For example, indie kids tended to be left wing, socially progressive, less violent and more intellectually curious. Kids that liked mainstream stuff tended to be more conservative, more hedonistic, went to clubs called “shaggers” or “bonkers”, dressed nicely in suits and enjoyed a good punch up of a night.

Obviously I’m exaggerating for affect but this “tribal” feeling was really powerful in a way that is perhaps difficult to understand now when music means so little beyond “it’s a nice tune”.

Johnny Yesno

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