Author Topic: Not being able to correct someone because you'll sound like a know-it-all wanker  (Read 3121 times)

H-O-W-L

  • Front Toward Enemy
Not really a correction but I said "caveat emptor" at work to a colleague and I had a whole hallway full of people who did not know what it meant basically calling me a swot tory cunt for knowing latin. Am I a prototory cunt or are they just dumb as bricks?

Cerys

  • Bionic-Arsed
  • Golden Member
  • *****
  • Cyber Engineered Ravaged Yakking System
    • The Brainwrongs of Cerys
They're dumb as bricks.

Without googling I don't know what caveat emptor means. And I like to think of myself as a complete idiot. Hope that clears that one up.

Also bolognese.

You could say they are now anglicised pronunciations and therefore not wrong. Do you correct every time a foreign person mispronounces an English word?

You could say they are now anglicised pronunciations and therefore not wrong. Do you correct every time a foreign person mispronounces an English word?

People also have a very scatter gun approach to this authenticity too. They apply it selectively and never identify which part of the country they're doing the accent for they've chosen to come from.

I have yammer friends who practically turn themselves inside out saying the word "chorizo" but elect not to do a Peter Ustinov as Charlie Chan impression whenever Chinese food is ordered, they say poppadom and puri, and rasmalai choosing not to sound like they are on Goodness Gracious me.

All over the place. No consistency.


Had to contact a safeguarding worker at a school yesterday and rang the receptionist for the email address. I sent the email and it bounced back.

"Did you put a capital C after the 'Mc'?"
"No, I don't think that matters"
"ooh, it does. Put a capital C after the 'Mc' and send it again."

Had to go through this fucking charade of sending the email with a capital C after the 'Mc' and then it bounced back. Rang receptionist back and explained.

"Did you put a capital as the first letter?"
"No, I really don't think that matters."
"ooh, it does. Put a capital as the first letter and send it again".
"Honestly, I really don't think the issue is with capital letters."
"It is. Put a capital letter as the first letter and send it again."

Then had to go to a meeting where the education caseworker kept referring to a child as a non-refuser when she meant non-attender.


Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
You could say they are now anglicised pronunciations and therefore not wrong. Do you correct every time a foreign person mispronounces an English word?

No, I anglicise it to the extent that I pronounce it bolonyaise and not bolonyais-eh. I certainly don’t pronounce it bolog-naise, in the same way you hopefully don’t pronounce lasagne, lasag-ne.

I'm feeling this pretty hard this evening... :-)

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Not really a correction but I said "caveat emptor" at work to a colleague and I had a whole hallway full of people who did not know what it meant basically calling me a swot tory cunt for knowing latin. Am I a prototory cunt or are they just dumb as bricks?

I once used the phrase 'bread and circuses' in a headline and had the bombastic twat of an assistant editor shouting at me from the other side of the office because he'd never heard it and didn't know what it meant.

Ironically the story was actually about bread being on sale at the local circus. Possibly.

That's weird, Laura Pidcock just tweeted something about bread and circuses and I actually looked at the responses to see if there were any mentions of where the phrase came from. I've only heard of it from the Durutti Column LP.


No, I anglicise it to the extent that I pronounce it bolonyaise and not bolonyais-eh. I certainly don’t pronounce it bolog-naise, in the same way you hopefully don’t pronounce lasagne, lasag-ne.

That's how you and I anglicise it. Others are different. How much do you look into the pronunciation of all foreign words you come into contact with?

People who say "waivered" instead of "waived".

Partly because I'm not sure I'm right.

Sony Walkman Prophecies

  • Chatto & Windus
Bloke at work (who’s just left) loved correcting people for minor slip ups. But when you pinged him an email he’d say it was “awesome”, even though he never looked overcome with awe, and he pronounced assume as “ashume”. Hope he’s dead now.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
I once used the phrase 'bread and circuses' in a headline and had the bombastic twat of an assistant editor shouting at me from the other side of the office because he'd never heard it and didn't know what it meant.

Ironically the story was actually about bread being on sale at the local circus. Possibly.


The same bombastic twat also had a go at a colleague of mine for subbing a story about our local RSPCA trying to find homes for moggies with a headline about a 'stray cat glut.' So not only was he unaware of Latin phrases, he didn't know anything about early 80s rock'n'roll revival groups either. The bombastic and now thankfully dead twat.

and he pronounced assume as “ashume”

Awesome for something underwhelming is just an irritating American contagion but a-shoom for assume? What the fuck is that about? I've quite literally never heard of that before.

Voltan (Man of Steel)

  • 8% English, apparently
That's how you and I anglicise it. Others are different. How much do you look into the pronunciation of all foreign words you come into contact with?

I don't because it really isn't that important to me. I merely responded to a comment about the pronounciation of the g in tagliatelle with an observation about the same in bolognese. Why are you so interested in what I do?

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
And on a similar subject to my above posts I've spent literally hours and hours trying to explain to people that a sub-editor is NOT the same as an assistant or deputy editor. To no avail whatsoever.

Only last week I received a reference request for an old friend who has applied for a job (incidentally in the same building I do voluntary work.) I emailed her saying I was happy to do it but I hadn't actually had a proper job for most of this decade and was never a high-flyer even when I did, so if she wanted to look for someone more suitable as a reference that was fair enough.

Her reply? "But you were one of the bosses at the paper!"  No. I wasn't.  I ended up a downtable sub. I hardly ever even did any page planning because I was crap at it. Just because I occasionally wrote stuff (something I've always been far better than at subbing but for health reasons I ended up having to do a desk job) and got bylines it doesn't mean that was I was in a position of power.  I'm sure that I've explained this to her several times already. But whoosh, straight over her head.

Sony Walkman Prophecies

  • Chatto & Windus
That’s rife in recruitment/HR. I get all sorts of requests for jobs where I have zero experience simply because my C.V. contains a stray word that partly relates to a job title. I think the most recent one was “Would I like to be a bookings agent?” Just because I happened to have the word “booking” in my resume. The modern recruitment consultant is essentially and actually a keyword-scraping bot.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
And I have a Motability car. Not 'one of those Mobility ones.'
« Last Edit: November 28, 2019, 01:54:59 PM by Jockice »

Jim Bob

  • (aka Right Said Brett)
...he pronounced assume as “ashume”.

Are you positive that he wasn't a tripper and talking about "a 'shroom"?

Sherringford Hovis

  • (ᵔᴥᵔ)
Awesome for something underwhelming

"Awesome" is a great minced oath reply when someone asks you how you are and the first syllable of "Awful" slips out.

Bennett Brauer

  • I'm not "likeable"
The indisputable leader of the gang
He's the boss, he's the pip
He's the championship

Hello, I'm a know-it-all wanker. I know you were just copying it from a lyrics site, but it's not he's the pip, it's he's a vip.