Author Topic: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels  (Read 3148 times)

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #30 on: March 03, 2020, 01:51:09 PM »
In this safely established popular classic song, that bit was really great

'Why, Rick?'

It uses a diminished chord

'So where does that fact lead us?'

That bit was really great

Yeah, Rick Beato is knowledgeable and many of his videos are informative, but a blow by blow account of any song, or a "top 20 greatest intros, drum fills, guitar solos, etc", is a fairly pointless exercise (aside from being clickbait) compared to his videos on modes and symmetrical scales, or how computers have screwed rock music, and why audiences have abandoned rock music. I wish he'd focus less on rock, actually, and let us see more of his jazz roots, but that's also not clickbaity enough for him.

Adam Neely is impeccable, though.

Likewise, 12tone, the musicological scribbler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y4T9SkNYFo

Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #31 on: March 03, 2020, 02:26:10 PM »
Likewise, 12tone, the musicological scribbler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y4T9SkNYFo

I couldn't watch that, the speeded up fiddly scribbling hand just makes me tense right up.

Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #32 on: March 03, 2020, 02:28:57 PM »
Technically production, but I greatly enjoyed this channel's interviews with a few producers - particularly Michael Beinhorn talking about producing Soundgarden (and Manson).

On the topic of Soundgarden he goes into some of the writing, and makes some really great points. I've always loved Black Hole Sun (SG generally), being both anthemic yet unnerving at the same time, and there's some discussion of the composition on this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng4f_fj9Lfc

One thing I've never really conciously noticed is how there's no real sense of resolution apart from the big D chord at the end of the early choruses. Sometimes picking music apart like this can ruin the magic, but in this case absolutely not.

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2020, 03:10:10 PM »
I couldn't watch that, the speeded up fiddly scribbling hand just makes me tense right up.

But the visuals are mostly secondary to the commentary, which is always great.

Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #34 on: March 24, 2020, 11:46:51 AM »
I forgot to mention the Strong Songs podcast. It will take stone cold classic pop songs and analyse the shit out of them, as well as passionately talking about why the songs are great. Imagine NoSleep's post above extended to an entire song, with clips.

It's the perfect podcast for me, somebody who has a reasonable musical education but no practical real practical application of it outside of casually playing instruments.

Have  you tried the "Why Do I Like This" podcast? It is Martin Rossiter and his wife discussing why she likes particular songs. Rossiter will be given an hour to figure out the song and then he comes back and goes through all the theory stuff to try and explain why it is good. It is interesting in and of itself but an extra bonus is that he sounds exactly like Greg Davies, both in how he sounds and how he speaks. That was unexpected

https://www.patreon.com/whydoilikethis

NoSleep

  • feat. Keith Jarrett and his singing parrot
    • Space Is The Place
Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
« Reply #35 on: Today at 09:46:40 AM »
More Beefheart-related goodness, this time from Samuel Andreyev. Here's an interview he conducted with Bill Harkleroad (Zoot Horn Rollo) in which Bill is revealed to be a wonderful human being (well, I knew this already, from his music and his book "Lunar Notes"):

Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWgfVVbK4bA
Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfeKBp6OJdQ

I've just discovered this account and I see he's interviewed other members of the Magic Band - Mark Boston (Rockette Morton), John French (Drumbo), Jeff Cotton (Antennae Jimmy Semens), which I'm looking forward to viewing.

Here Andreyev breaks down the opening track of TMR, Frownland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FhhB9teHqU

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