Author Topic: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)  (Read 27715 times)

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #480 on: May 19, 2020, 09:29:44 PM »
I think its streaming illegally or 2 quid renting from itunes unfortunately.

Ah thats alright, dont mind paying for non-blockbuster fare (plus good £/hr rate there anyway!). Yeah its tricky with 3hr+ films  though innit, ive kind of resigned myself as often as notto  watching them in 2 parts or i dont think id ever get round to it.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #481 on: May 20, 2020, 04:35:10 PM »
Ah thats alright, dont mind paying for non-blockbuster fare (plus good £/hr rate there anyway!). Yeah its tricky with 3hr+ films  though innit, ive kind of resigned myself as often as notto  watching them in 2 parts or i dont think id ever get round to it.

Its a weird one, I do groan when I see a film is 3 hours plus but often when I get past that shock an sit down and watch it I find it pleasurable turning off from the daily misery for such a long time.

 I watched Love Exposure the other week (a thread about it here} a mere 4 hour effort and found it very enjoyable.

 I think the only time I turned off an epic recently was "An Elephant Sitting Still" after an hour, maybe it was just my mood but I do remember thinking " can't be fucked with 4 hours of misery" and watching some Netflix muck instead.

Small Man Big Horse

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #482 on: May 20, 2020, 05:48:38 PM »
Its a weird one, I do groan when I see a film is 3 hours plus but often when I get past that shock an sit down and watch it I find it pleasurable turning off from the daily misery for such a long time.

 I watched Love Exposure the other week (a thread about it here} a mere 4 hour effort and found it very enjoyable.

 I think the only time I turned off an epic recently was "An Elephant Sitting Still" after an hour, maybe it was just my mood but I do remember thinking " can't be fucked with 4 hours of misery" and watching some Netflix muck instead.

When I saw how long Love Exposure was I instantly planned to watch it in two instalments, but then became captivated by it and watched it one go with the four hours just racing by. It's a shame the subject matter is so dodgy as I love it to pieces, but trying to persuade people to watch a four hour epic about upskirt photography is more than a little tricky.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #483 on: May 20, 2020, 08:56:37 PM »
My local cinema had been planning an all day showing of Satantango, that I'd been half tempted to go see, before Corona fucked it up.. 7 hour 30 minutes! Might have been a bit much that tho.

chveik

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #484 on: May 20, 2020, 08:58:08 PM »
My local cinema had been planning an all day showing of Satantango, that I'd been half tempted to go see, before Corona fucked it up.. 7 hour 30 minutes! Might have been a bit much that tho.

there are some great scenes but it really didn't need to be that long.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #485 on: May 21, 2020, 09:25:18 AM »
All The Presidents Men

I knew how it was going to end but I was still confused as to what was going on.

QDRPHNC

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #486 on: May 21, 2020, 06:45:08 PM »
Yesterday I received the new 4k disc of The Shining I'd ordered, so watched it last night with all the lights off and the sound way up.

Can report it's still utterly brilliant. Girlfriend had never seen it and spent the last half of it in state of extreme tension.

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #487 on: May 21, 2020, 07:37:20 PM »
The Man In The White Suit (1951) - Alec Guiness is a softly spoken Cambridge graduate who keeps on getting fired from the mills he works at because he's conducting experiments he really shouldn't be, as he tries to create a material which is ever lasting. It starts off punchily but then slows down to a rather annoying pace and it's not until 40 minutes in that Guiness's white suit is fabricated and it finally becomes a satire of  industry, as of course many (well, the rich and trade unions at least) are against something which could see the end of clothing manufacturing, or it reduced an enormous amount at least. Guiness is fine in a role which doesn't make many demands on his comic talents, Vida Hope is great as the very earthy Bertha, and Jean Greenwood has some spiky moments and is occasionally amusing, but most of the time it's a bunch of tedious white men bickering with each other and though there's occasional slithers of black humour and satire of capitalism and class as a whole it isn't that funny, to me it felt rather mean spirited and it's a rare example of an Ealing comedy that I just didn't get on with. 5.4/10

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #488 on: May 21, 2020, 08:29:39 PM »
Dogtooth - I thought this was fantastic. A man keeps his three children imprisoned in their large home. Such a surreal film with a nice blend of horror and humour. David Lynch called it a wonderful comedy which I think showcases how warped it is.

The Lobster - Fantastic cast and very good fun but I thought it lost its momentum towards the end.

The Killing of a Sacred Deer - Another bleakly comic film by Yorgos Lanthimos, it's very disquieting. Would have it above The Lobster but below Dogtooth. Still have to watch The Favourite. I know Colin Farrell gets a bad rep but I thought he was excellent as the almost gormless protagonist.

Bait - I subscribed to the BFI player and heard the likes of Kermode and Scroobius Pip (!) describe it in glowing terms so I gave it a go - excellent film about tourists clashing with locals in a Cornwall fishing village.

The Man Without A Past - I loved this film. It's so sad and upbeat at the same time. A man travels to Helsinki but gets beat up as soon as he arrives in the city. He wakes up but can't remember anything about himself. Aki Kaurismaki is fast becoming my favourite director after watching this and the also excellent Drifting Clouds recently. I will try to watch Ariel next.

A Short Film About Killing - Bleak, bleak, bleak. It's about a man who kills another man seemingly without reason and the attorney who defends him in the ensuing trial. It's very good but obviously a tough watch. I will hunt down more of Kieślowski's films but will prepare myself accordingly.

Once Upon A Time In Anatolia - It shares some of the themes of the above as it chronicles a murder investigation from the viewpoint of the different characters involved including the perpetrator, the police, the prosecutor and the doctor. It's brilliant but exhausting.

What We Do In The Shadows - Amusing film about vampire housemates. It flew by and I was actually a bit sad when it ended because I was enjoying the characters so much. Will have to check out the series and also Hunt for the Wilderpeople which I'm told is excellent.

Saw The Strange Killing of a Sacred Deer in the cinema and really enjoyed it, I was however the only person in the cinema laughing throughout, which was slightly awkward. I used this fact to qualify my constant recommendation of it.
Still haven't seen the Lobster though.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #489 on: May 21, 2020, 08:34:21 PM »
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2apnkt

The Friends Of Eddie Coyle.

Really good, Robert Mitchum does downbeat so well, and then you have a quality supporting cast with Peter Boyle the other stand out.


Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #490 on: May 21, 2020, 08:50:16 PM »
My local cinema had been planning an all day showing of Satantango, that I'd been half tempted to go see, before Corona fucked it up.. 7 hour 30 minutes! Might have been a bit much that tho.
I went to see this in the cinema on my birthday years ago too, I think it really helped being trapped in a room for it. But it was telling when the woman who gave an incredibly impassioned and insightful introduction to the film explained   that she'd written her PhD thesis on it, before rapidly bolting from the room.
Also had to race from Glasgow to Edinburgh immediately after it finished for a David Thomas Broughton gig and the silence between us on the bus through as we tried to process what we'd seen was heavy.

I'm terms of endurance cinema I've always been curious about this https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076147/ but never quite sure if I can face it.

Rizla

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #491 on: May 21, 2020, 10:54:47 PM »
King Ralph

Jesus christ. What the fuck. I remember this coming out, never seen it though. WHAT THE FUCK.

This was written and directed by the same guy that made The Sting.

I honestly don't know where to begin with this film. It's like the film-within-the-film from the Comic Strip's The Strike!

Stunned. Gonna watch it again and make a thread specially for it.

It's like. They've got John Hurt doing a Leslie Phillips impression in scenes with actual Leslie Phillips acting opposite him.

Billie Piper's mum from Dr Who is from south london one minute then the east end 2 scenes later. But she's actually from Sheffield. Unless there was steel manufacturing in London in the 80s?

Guy from Eastenders plays king from Zambezi. When King Ralph meets him, he does jive talk to him because that is how you speak to all black people.

This was made in 1991. By the guy who wrote the Sting.

Proper head injury of a film. Jesus.

Egyptian Feast

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #492 on: May 22, 2020, 01:22:41 AM »
I've spent nearly 30 years not wanting to watch King Ralph and you've just gone and made it sound like a must see. Cheers.

Jim Bob

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #493 on: May 22, 2020, 01:24:08 AM »
King Ralph...

Your first and biggest mistake was pressing 'play'.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #494 on: May 22, 2020, 10:42:49 AM »
Marathon Man

I thought I'd seen this before but had no memory of 80% of it. For a 2 hour film it felt like it skipped by with nary a second wasted.

Also the actor who plays the Nazi's brother who dies in the car crash at the start of the film is called Ben Dova.

Rizla

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #495 on: May 22, 2020, 11:05:40 AM »
Your first and biggest mistake was pressing 'play'.
It came on TV while I was eating and I was tranfixed by its bizarre and committed terribleness. I just woke up thinking about it. When King Ralph is living in Buckingham Palace he has some synthesisers, electric guitars and a Simmonds drum kit set up, just so Uncle Monty can be seen playing the Simmonds kit, thus shaking off his repressed stuffy englishness. There are also a few fruit machines, a pool table and a pinball table that are set up in the opulent surroundings, as though a royal household wouldn't have leisure activities on site anyway. King Ralph has to learn Cricket (all royals play cricket, don't they? That's a posh thing to do!) so he can hit it like it was a baseball. Then he plays darts with Eastenders king of Zambeze, so that they can cut to them playing "spear darts" on a massive board because he is a black african man so can throw a spear well. The newspapers somehow get hold of a picture of Billie Piper's mum from Dr Who in what we were led to believe was her one and only foray into exotic dancing, which we saw earlier in the film.
The main setpiece of the film, clips of which I remember on TV all the time when it was released, has King Ralph blow some stuffy minds at a royal dinner by playing rock'n'roll piano (harpsichord, in fact, because that's all they have in the palace). People in england have, apparently, never heard Little Richard. One of the chamber orchestra who he gets to accompany him, the sax player(!), is a black man, so you know he's going to stand up and rock out a solo. The filmmakers  have seen Back to the Future and want a scene like when Marty plays rock'n'roll guitar at the dance.

It's so fucked. Why did it get made? John Goodman was sort of a big name at the time I guess, from Roseanne, and he'd done Arachnaphobia the year before, and Raising Arizon and small parts in various decent pictures, but this was really his first big starring role, surrounded by all these big name british thesps, it's just so bizarrely awful. It might be as bad as the previous year's Nuns on the Run, which also starred Billie Piper's mum from Dr Who. Plus it was based on a novel that wasn't even a comedy. That plot had to be obtained from a novel.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #496 on: May 22, 2020, 11:32:39 AM »
Quote
Then he plays darts with Eastenders king of Zambeze, so that they can cut to them playing "spear darts" on a massive board because he is a black african man so can throw a spear well.

that's the bit I remember.

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #497 on: May 22, 2020, 12:26:32 PM »
Saw it when it came out, can't remember much about it but I know I never had any compunction to watch it again so can't have been great. Funny thing is I can still remember I only saw it because I was a big fan of Norm from Cheers and for some reason I always got him and John Goodman confused and thought it was going to be him. I think I also thought he was literally going to play the role as Norm from Cheers.

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #498 on: May 23, 2020, 12:13:39 PM »
High Life Enjoyed this though I didn't think it was entirely successful. Atmospheric, handsome and thoughtful, and given Denis' past work it's easy to convince yourself that she knows what she's doing and what she's about, though there are a few weird oddities and flaws here (why does the girl speak with an English accent given that she's spent her entire life alone with an American? What actually happens to Andre 3000? Why are all the girls tied down when sleeping while the men, including a rapist, are roaming free?). But lots of memorable scenes and plenty to chew over.

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #499 on: May 23, 2020, 01:25:38 PM »
Just watched Easy A, a comedy thankfully not "based on" The Scarlet Letter in that Cruel Intentions sort of way, but which uses references to the novel to build on its own story. I really liked it -- Emma Stone was fucking terrific, a real charmer on top of being quite a looker too, I just ate up every scene she was in, and that's pretty much all of them. I'd seen her in other movies, but she's only ever been a pretty face to me until I saw her in this. The family dynamic was nice, without the cliche prudish parents for her to get into trouble with, and I liked the film's total focus on feminism and virginity and slut-shaming, while still being light and funny. 7.8 I think.

QDRPHNC

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #500 on: May 23, 2020, 03:09:26 PM »
Isle of Dogs. Really didn't like it, and I love Wes Anderson. Wanted to love it, because it looked beautiful, but no.

It's clear that he needs Owen Wilson as a co-writer to do the emotional stuff, while he does the visual stuff. It goes beyond that though, bear with me.

Anderson doesn't seem to get how emotional beats work in a movie. And you can see this going all the way back to Bottle Rocket, although in that case, it didn't matter so much because BR is just a hang-out movie with characters we enjoy spending time with. One example - Luke Wilson suddenly bolts from a restaurant to run back to find the woman he loves, and it's set and scored like a triumphant return, like a finale. But it occurs about halfway through, he had just seen her that morning, and was probably going to see her again after he returned from lunch anyway. The audience knows this and so it's a confusing way to present the scene. BR has three or four other scenes like that, oddly-time moments where we get we're supposed to be feeling something, but don't, because it hasn't been earned.

Isle of Dogs is full of scenes like that, and the plot is completely overstuffed. You could have removed 3 of the 5 or so main threads and it still would have completely worked from a plot point of view.

Somewhat related, is that Anderson often seems a bit muddled about what his own point is, and leaves me as a viewer confused. Another example from a much better film, Fantastic Mr. Fox. Mr. Fox used to be a great athlete and his son Ash, a wound-up little weirdo, resents living in his father's shadow. Just before the climactic action scene, we have a nice quiet part where Fox tells Ash he accepts him for who he is. It's a lovely scene. Sorted. I get it, let's move on.

But then, during the final action scene, Ash suddenly breaks out this amazing physical feat (which we have seen has has no aptitude for at all), and Mr. Fox turns to him and says, "I'm proud of you - you're an athlete."

So what was the point there? That we should strive to be accepted for what our parents want us to be? Or hope that they can accept us for what we are? Anderson seems to want to have it both ways, and doesn't seem to know or care that the second, tone-deaf emotional climax, completely undermines the perfect first one.

Again, Isle of Dogs is just terrible for that. What is the point? Anderson seems so keen on shoehorning in unearned emotional climaxes, that he rarely seems to consider if they actually make sense in the context of the story he's trying to tell. You look at the lightness of touch that Owen Wilson (as a writer) brought to arguably his two best movies, Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums - there is nothing in all of Isle of Dogs' "emotional" ups and downs to compare to the moment Bill Murray realizes he's talking to Max's dad for the first time in the former,  or "I've had a rough year dad" in the latter.

Sorry, just had to get that off my chest.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 03:19:46 PM by QDRPHNC »

Jim Bob

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #501 on: May 23, 2020, 06:12:06 PM »
High Life Enjoyed this though I didn't think it was entirely successful. Atmospheric, handsome and thoughtful, and given Denis' past work it's easy to convince yourself that she knows what she's doing and what she's about, though there are a few weird oddities and flaws here (why does the girl speak with an English accent given that she's spent her entire life alone with an American? What actually happens to Andre 3000? Why are all the girls tied down when sleeping while the men, including a rapist, are roaming free?). But lots of memorable scenes and plenty to chew over.

I have dyslexia and this film was the most disappointing videogame adaptation ever.

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #502 on: May 23, 2020, 07:20:23 PM »
King Ralph...

Both of your posts on King Ralph were a fantastic read, and I too now want to see it again. I did catch it at the cinema when it was released as it came to the small town I lived in back then and there was fuck all else to do and remember it being oddly naff but occasionally funny, but from your post it sounds like it's aged terribly so, yeah, I definitely will see it again sooner or later.

Just watched Easy A, a comedy thankfully not "based on" The Scarlet Letter in that Cruel Intentions sort of way, but which uses references to the novel to build on its own story. I really liked it -- Emma Stone was fucking terrific, a real charmer on top of being quite a looker too, I just ate up every scene she was in, and that's pretty much all of them. I'd seen her in other movies, but she's only ever been a pretty face to me until I saw her in this. The family dynamic was nice, without the cliche prudish parents for her to get into trouble with, and I liked the film's total focus on feminism and virginity and slut-shaming, while still being light and funny. 7.8 I think.

I really enjoyed that too, thought it was a strong indie comedy and there's sadly not many of those of a decent quality around these days.

Rizla

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #503 on: May 23, 2020, 07:37:40 PM »
Both of your posts on King Ralph were a fantastic read, and I too now want to see it again. I did catch it at the cinema when it was released as it came to the small town I lived in back then and there was fuck all else to do and remember it being oddly naff but occasionally funny, but from your post it sounds like it's aged terribly so, yeah, I definitely will see it again sooner or later.


It's on Sky Comedy again, right now. RIGHT NOW!

Moribunderast

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #504 on: May 24, 2020, 01:53:10 AM »
Last night I watched VIOLENT - a Norwegian/Canadian film from 2014. Absolutely adored it. Crazily beautiful cinematography and a great performance from the lead actress (Dagny Backer Johnsen) who has to carry the whole film by virtue of being in pretty much every scene. It's a weird one because looking at the trailer AND even the short IMDB "premise" description feels like too much of a spoiler story-wise but I'll just say it's about a young woman and various important relationships in her life. I thought it was quite phenomenal and I imagine had I seen it in 2014 I would have been close to calling it my favourite film of that year.

Inspector Norse

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #505 on: May 24, 2020, 09:17:38 PM »
Burning (2018) Excellent suspense film, based on a Murakami short story, examining class and social mobility in Korea a good year before Parasite did the same.
It's very different to Parasite, though: this follows a repressed young man from the sticks who hooks up with a childhood acquaintance only for her to then meet a supercilious young city slicker (played magnificently by Glenn from The Walking Dead). The three start hanging out but there's always an air of unease right from the start.
One of those excellent, vital films where every little detail and scene has its own significance and symbolism, where every line is telling and where the direction from Lee Chang-Dong is perfectly poised.

rue the polywhirl

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #506 on: May 25, 2020, 01:26:16 AM »
The Man Who Fell To Earth (1976) So I was watching this movie with my young family who are all massively into David Bowie and big fans of Labyrinth but this is not the movie we were expecting.[1] It’s deathly slow and ponderous and doesn’t make any sense. David Bowie shines like a golden shining icon in the movie (about 80% of the time) but everything around him is ridiculous and beige. The opening flurry of love scenes with professor Rip Torn and various students are properly gag-inducing. The actress who plays Mary Lou - Bowie’s love interest - is ok to begin with, endearing and innocent, but soon enough turns into Steve Brule, particularly at the mid point of the movie when she finds out he’s an alien and then widdles herself and later when she has a domestic with Bowie and randomly flips over a baking tray of cookies. Bowie does look cool most of the time except when he is standing fully narkers playing with his nipples and when he is dressed as an alien with his family in some weird silver teletubby gear outside a gingerbread house on a monorail in the middle of the desert. Overall score 0/10.
 1. Disclaimer: I do not have a young family

Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #507 on: May 25, 2020, 02:50:13 AM »
Richard Jewell - Clint Eastwood

A lot of the criticism of Clint recently has been how obvious his politics is (Sully was a libertarian wankfest) , however that's a red herring as so much of his stuff is right leaning and quite good, the problem with American Sniper etc is these films are really fucking bland.

Jewell the more recent effort is 3/5 personified, passable with some performances etc, but nothing remarkable about it whatsoever.

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #508 on: May 25, 2020, 06:20:05 AM »
Both of your posts on King Ralph were a fantastic read, and I too now want to see it again.

I really enjoyed Rizla's King Ralph posts too. I have never seen King Ralph, and I have no desire to rectify that situation, especially as the reality of experiencing the film won't be nearly as funny as Rizla's bewildered description of it.

QDRPHNC

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Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2020 Edition)
« Reply #509 on: May 25, 2020, 03:02:50 PM »
Just watched Blues Brothers in 4k, and for the first time noticed that a woman in the audience at their big performance is wearing an Eraserhead t-shirt.

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