Author Topic: Homebrew thread  (Read 7171 times)

Blue Jam

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Homebrew thread
« on: March 24, 2020, 06:20:38 PM »
Been wanting to have a go at homebrewing forever. Now I am in need of a little science project for these uncertain times, the time has come.

Popped out to the excellent Brewstore in Embra before the lockdown was in full effect, asked the owner if he could help out a total n00b and he very helpfully gathered together the basics and threw together a beginner's kit. Got the St. Peter's Honey (flavoured) Porter kit to go with it.

Now the Northern Vole nanobrewery is GO. Got 20 pints of Vole Porter* under primary fermentation and am kicking myself at how quick, clean and painless it all was- I should have tried this years ago. Just brewing half the kit for now because I'm concerned I'll fuck up the sterilisation on my first go, or that I'll end up with a batch too big for a household of two**

Share your stories, tips, and most importantly, brew names here please.

*I know it's really St. Peter's Honey (flavoured) Porter, but THAT’S WHAT I'M CALLING IT. Next up: some sort of golden ale that will be called Glory Vole
**HAHA LOL

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2020, 06:41:26 PM »
Best of luck. Sounds fun. I have never had the space to do it but would like to try it some time. Also it produces a lot of beer, so that's a lot of average batches to consume before you can set off into some more adventurous directions.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2020, 06:54:08 PM »
I've attempted it twice. The first time I either fucked up sterilisation or did a poor job of measuring the sugar into bottles (I bottled for the second fermentation as I've not got a pressure vessel) so a lot of them gushed when I opened them.

The next lot I did I left it too long before kicking it off and the yeast didn't ferment.

I've got a bulldog double strength IPA I bought last year to kick off and have bought a new sachet of yeast from ebay, which arrived today, so I'll be doing that at the weekend.

What steriliser did you use? I've got VWP but Star San is supposed to be better as I think it doesn't need a lot of rinsing or something.

Consignia

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2020, 10:25:49 PM »
Used to do it all the time. The kits where you don't have to add your own sugar are the best, since I always found you ended up with nasty flavour if you weren't careful. Even using proper brewer's sugar.

I loved doing it, but the faff involved in cleaning everything is a real pain. And keeping the pressure barrel sealed. I've been threatening to get back into for a while, but haven't had the arsedness to bother cleaning all the equipment.

Made some reet good stuff, though. Got real experimental for a bit with making flavoured beers, including my favourite where I added ginger essence and it came out a bit like Blandford Fly.

Blue Jam

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2020, 10:39:41 PM »
Used to help my dad with the homebrew back when I was about 10. Seeing the airlock and all the familiar bits of kit brought it all back and I nearly welled up a bit. We used to make elderflower wine too but I hate elderflower, won't be making any of that.

Might make some nice bread to go with it so they can bubble together.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2020, 09:29:45 AM »
We used to use the kits a lot at university - they’re pretty foolproof even for idiot 18 year old boys, so you should be fine. OR WILL YOU

Once we got the taste for it we made a barrel up of nothing but sugar, yeast and water just to see if we could make something strong as fuck. We succeeded and made something close to 20% ABV, but it a) tasted of shit (like bananas, but bad bananas), and b) exploded some of the bottles we used for the final fermentation, which gave us quite the shock as we were in the room at the time. 5/10, would brew again.

My Hungarian friends come from a strong tradition of home stilling, which is a little bit rich for my blood. The government apparently sanctions it, but they limit the amount an individual can distill each year although to a ridiculous level - multiple litres of paint stripping hooch.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2020, 09:42:05 AM »
how do i make free beer appear in my bath

timebug

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2020, 10:10:08 AM »
Chap who worked in the same office as me used to make home brew all the time. His ultimate 'brew' was when he bought a kit of makings one day, decided to 'sample' them for taste quality and ended up eating the whole shebang!

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2020, 10:13:53 AM »
I'm in total lockdown in northern Italy, but I've got a homebrew kit!

I've got a suitable bucket, but I can't get anything else that's not available from the local little supermarket.

I've made myself an airlock, I can knock up a hydrometer, and have got a bottle of sterilising solution.

My problem is bottles. I haven't got any, and even if I did, I can't get any caps or the tool to crimp them on.

I could buy enough beer in bottles with the wire lever and stopper arrangement, drink the beer then use them for the brew, but it kind of defeats the object of saving some money.
Is it possible to use plastic pop/fizzy water bottles? Any other ideas?

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2020, 10:48:46 AM »
Chap who worked in the same office as me used to make home brew all the time. His ultimate 'brew' was when he bought a kit of makings one day, decided to 'sample' them for taste quality and ended up eating the whole shebang!

Worked in a pharmacy, I reckon

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2020, 10:49:55 AM »

Is it possible to use plastic pop/fizzy water bottles? Any other ideas?

Yeah, lots of brewing places sell ptfe bottles under the claims they can take a higher pressure than glass and crown caps (Although I've always considered buying empty bottles for a similar price you can get full of alright lager from lidl a mugs game). But I've had homebrew served to me where the second fermentation was in a 2l pop bottle.

Blue Jam

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2020, 10:57:55 AM »
Worked in a pharmacy, I reckon

'member when you could get homebrew kit from Boots? That's where my dad got all his from. About time Boots started stocking all that again, make a killing from all the hipsters going in there to buy moustache wax.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2020, 10:58:33 AM »
I made ginger beer once from a kit, it was quite good if I recall.

Where I really got into home-brewing as a teenager was winemaking. I had 21 demijohns in my bedroom at one stage, all bubbling away. Various types- banana wine which was was sweet and seriously strong, some raspberry and blackcurrant rosé, some delicate apple hocks. I had a couple of gallons of potato wine which was cheap, nasty and didn't clear, but got one hammered[1]. I'd go to the greengrocer and buy a whole box of the reduced, going-off fruit, remove the bad bits, and that would be the base for another gallon. I became very good at winemaking; in a familiar pattern for me, I learned everything I could about it, acquired a certain talent, and then never did it again.
 1. at the time I started brewing the potato wine, I had the notion that I'd be able to get the equipment to set up my own distiller and make vodka/moonshine, but this didn't happen.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2020, 11:16:49 AM »
Bamps used to make wine when I was a kid and corn booze before my time. Apparently his corn booze was like rocket fuel. Probably pure ethanol knowing him.

Cuellar

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2020, 11:23:09 AM »
I once made 'wine' from a box of fruit tea bags, some sugar, some yeast and a bit of lemon juice.

It never quite cleared, the resulting hooch was quite cloudy. Horrible horrible hangovers.

boki

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2020, 11:59:31 AM »
'member when you could get homebrew kit from Boots? That's where my dad got all his from. About time Boots started stocking all that again, make a killing from all the hipsters going in there to buy moustache wax.

Wilko's are still keeping that fire burning, and The Range are picking up a bit of the slack.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2020, 12:17:20 PM »
Yeah, lots of brewing places sell ptfe bottles under the claims they can take a higher pressure than glass and crown caps (Although I've always considered buying empty bottles for a similar price you can get full of alright lager from lidl a mugs game). But I've had homebrew served to me where the second fermentation was in a 2l pop bottle.

Brilliant. Thanks very much.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2020, 12:18:29 PM »
'member when you could get homebrew kit from Boots? That's where my dad got all his from. About time Boots started stocking all that again, make a killing from all the hipsters going in there to buy moustache wax.

They still do beer and wine ones in Wilko, in a big bucket. Classy.

Some right stout yeomen of the bar duuuuudes hanging and homebrewing here, bra!

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2020, 12:24:56 PM »
Been brewing for years, will happily answer any queries people have. I’ve written guides for friends who were interested, I’ll see if I can dig one up and post it in here.

Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2020, 12:27:46 PM »
One question I do have, is that I've got some of those sugar drops that are like boiled sweets for the second fermentation. The advice is 1 for ~350ml or 2 for ~750ml, but I've got 500ml bottles. What do?

It's a double strength IPA, so I'm leaning towards using 2 because my limited science brain reckons the yeast will be more 'hungry'.

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2020, 12:42:53 PM »
Guide I wrote a year or two ago.

Sorry for the wall of text. I've tried to cover everything I could think of that a reasonable person would ask. It's all stuff I wish I knew when I started out. If any of it isn't clear or doesn't make sense, let me know and I'll have another go at explaining it.

There's a load of shit that people "recommend" or say you definitely need. In my experience, most of it is unnecessary. Each new item probably improves the final beer a tiny bit, but who really cares that much? Brew a few times on the cheap and see if you enjoy it - if you do, and you want to make genuinely excellent beer (rather than beer that's just "fine") then you can upgrade as you go. I can recommend bits of equipment to upgrade to based on the ratio of "cheap" to "actually makes a difference". I have a yeast stirplate to propagate my own wild strains and a brix meter among much else daft stuff that don't really bring much to the party, functionally speaking. However 50p worth of flavourless gelatin will make a huge difference to your beer, for example.

Brewing beer is basically making 5 gallons of sugary water, boiling it to sterilize it, then fermenting it. There's not much else to it, though people like to pretend there is. Nowadays, homebrewers typically select one of 3 methods of brewing.
"Extract brewing" - you get the sugary stuff in tins, add water, and ferment. It's technically easier, but it takes about the same amount of faffing about, basically the same amount of equipment, its very dull and anti-climactic, and the beer isn't that good. It's fine to get started.
"Brew in a Bag" - you get a mesh brew bag, fill it with grains and soak that in a giant pot of warm water for 60-90 minutes (like making a giant cup of tea out of grains). You remove the bag (still containing the grain) which leaves you with "grain tea". You boil this for an hour, adding hops at specific times, and then you ferment. It's way more fun, you get to choose what grains and hops go in, you can reuse the bag (and they're cheap anyway), and the whole process is more interesting than "add a shitload of water from the kettle"

"All-grain brewing" - same as the bag, but you don't use a bag. It's for idiots who like to make things too complicated. I have a friend who used to brew like this, but his brewing process became such a chore he stopped bothering altogether. I'd avoid this as well. You can also do a "partial mash" which is a combination of method 1 and 2. It is pointless, and pleases nobody. Also avoid.

So an overview of “brew in a bag” brewing - make sugary water (called "wort") by soaking grains in water at a specific temp for 60-90 mins then taking the grains out (still in the mesh bag), like a giant teabag. You boil the resulting grain “tea” liquid for an hour, and add hops at specific times during the boil. Then you cool it down to room temp, add yeast and ferment the liquid in a fermentor for a couple weeks to turn the sugar into booze. Stick it in a bottle with a bit of sugar and wait for a few more weeks. Done.

But how do you make it interesting?!

Well - all of these variables can be altered which changes the style. Longer "steep" of the grain? More unfermentable sugar in the beer, which the yeast can't convert, so you beer is sweeter (like with a lot of Belgian beers or stouts). Lighter grains = lighter beer. More late addition hops = more intense hop aroma. Different yeast strains convert sugars differently and give you different final flavours in the beer. If there's a variable, some mad bloke in a shed has done it: fermenting temperature variations over the primary ferment time, 2+ strains of yeast, fermenting without a lid, adding no hops at all etc etc etc. I'll describe a standard recipe and go from there to avoid all that.

Ok lemme start with equipment

Big metal pot. Capacity should be how much you wanna make +30%. I used an 8gall pot to make 5gall batches, but it also worked for smaller batches. This is the most expensive thing.
You’ll also need a grain bag for “mashing”. Mashing is just letting the grains steep in hot water like a giant teabag. These are cheap.
Big long spoon
Thermometer. I used a (clean!) meat thermometer.
Fermenting bucket with airlock. 8 gallon capacity.
Starsan sterilizer. Just a specific type of cleaning liquid that doesn't fuck with the brewing process.
A second fermenting bucket/vessel with a tap/spout thing. After the beer is fermenting, it'll have lots of yeast and crap at the bottom. You pour/decant into a second vessel (leaving the yeast and crap in the first bucket as much as possible), and you bottle from there. Means you end up with clearer beer (and there's discussion about whether leaving too much sediment in bottles affects the beer ageing).
Some bottles, enough capacity to contain everything. I collected Grolsch bottles, but reusing a load of plastic bottles is fine.

That's basically it. Aside from the metal pot (50 quid?), that should all be cheap. If you get a smaller 5 gallon pot, that cost goes down to 30 quid which is alright, and you just make 3.5 gallon batches. Nothing wrong with that. After the initial outlay, the cost is just ingredients, which means you can churn out beer for next to nothing if you wanted to. A quick google - I could make 40 pints of decent beer for about $11 (6 quid? about 15p a pint). A typical recipe for me would be around $40 so ~60p a pint. Still not too shabby!

Ingredients (in general)
Grain - 2lbs per gallon of beer you want to make for something that's about 5% ABV (see ref 1). You can increase that grain amount and make stronger beer (more grain = more sugar = more stuff to ferment and turn into booze). Grain is cheap as fuck, I used to pay $1 per pound. Probably more than that now, but not more than a quid a lb i would have thought. Get them to mill it for you at the store so it is pre-crushed and ready to go.
Hops - 2 or 3 oz is plenty. You want an ounce of something dull like Magnum, and 2 ounces of Goldings or whatever. $3 per oz maybe. These can be expensive if you pick popular ones or depending on season etc. If you aren't making a hop-forward beer, you can get away with using cheaper hops.
Yeast - the dried stuff in packets is fine. US-05 is the "industry standard" strain. $4 or so? Not much anyway. Liquid yeast starts to get a bit complicated - it is more interesting and varied but a bit of a pain.

Ferris recommends brewing his classic "Nothin' Fancy" common ale. 5% ABV. Copper ale, clean and nutty, should come out and crisp. If you want it “spicier”, switch the cascade for pacific jade hops.

(Recipe for 5 gallons)
5lbs 2-row grain (milled)
5lbs Maris Otter grain (milled)
1/2 lb Carafoam (not strictly needed if they won't sell you a half lb)
1oz Magnum hops (Any high Alpha% hop will do, ask them for their cheapest bittering hop - as long as the Alpha is over 8% itll be fine)
3oz Cascade hops (Goldings will do if cheaper in the UK)
1 package of US-05 dry yeast (don't bother with liquid yeasts for now)

The process.
Fill your large pot with however much water you want to make into beer +15% because it'll boil off. I used the measurements on my fermenting vessel - 5 gallon batch meant filling the fermenter up to 23 litres, then pouring that straight into my metal pot. Saves you having to count the litres in one by one.

Heat the water up to 68c. This is probably the only area you have to be exact. Everything else you can be close enough and you'll still get something good at the end, but you need to be fairly accurate with this - 72c is too warm, 64c won't get the job done. This is where your meat thermometer comes in - set it to "Beef - medium" which i think is around 68c. Once the water reaches temperature, turn off the heat.
Place yer bag in the pot, and open it around the top, like this:

image.png

...and pour in all your grain. Use your long spoon to stir it all around so the grains are mixed with the water and not clumpy etc. Leave for an hour minimum to infuse. I usually do 90 minutes.
Once 60-90 minutes is up, take the bag with all the grains out (it'll be really fucking heavy), and try to get as much of the liquid back into the pot. You'll never get it all, but each squeeze is an extra pint of beer you'll get out of your brew. I used to put the bag between two mixing bowls, squeeze the top bowl down and pour off the stuff that came out. You should now just have sweet yellow/brown sugar water in your pot.

Ok, now it is time to boil. Turn the heat back on, and crank it to full. Lid on (if your pot has a lid).

Once the water is boiling, add the 1oz of Magnum hops. Set a timer for 55 minutes. Add 2oz of cascade. Set timer for another 5 minutes, and add the final oz of cascade hops when done. Your total boil should be an hour.
Now your beer is basically done. Just need to ferment it. Cool that sucker down by filling your sink with cold water, then lift the metal pot with the hot pre-beer liquid into the sink so it is getting a cold bath. Every few minutes, replace the water in the sink with new cold water so the pre-beer cools down rather than your sink water warming up. This usually took about 30 minutes.

At this point, you have to sterilize things because your pre-beer won't be boiled again so it won't be re-sterilized. Anything that comes into contact with the liquid has to be sterilized with starsan. In practice, I'm pretty sloppy and I've never had a batch of beer go wrong due to weird stuff growing in it. There isn't a microbe that can grow in beer that is harmful to humans (which is why homebrewers are still alive), but it can make your beer taste like shit if you aren't careful.
Sterilize your fermenting bucket with starsan (follow instruction on bottle - its basically "pour some starsan in and add cold water"), and rinse it out. Pour the pre-beer liquid (which should now be at room temperature) into the fermetor. Add the yeast sachet directly into the liquid, add the lid to your fermenting bucket and seal up the airlock.
Leave for 2 weeks minimum, though I typically do 3 weeks.

You now have 5 gallons of uncarbonated beer, so you have to carbonate it by adding sugar. The logic here is that there is still yeast in the beer (there's yeast in all beer, it is impossible to filter it out) so if you give it more sugar, it will "wake up" and start fermenting again. Because it will start doing this in a sealed bottle, the CO2 that's produced will be forced into the beer rather than escaping out the airlock, and the beer will become carbonated. Too much sugar, and the beer will be mondo fizzy so you have to add the right amount, and distribute it evenly throughout the beer.

Pour the uncarbonated beer into your other fermenting bucket (the one with the tap/spout), leaving as much of the yeast and sediment behind. You can pour the yeasty sediment down the sink/loo as you don't need it. You should end up with about 5 gallons of proto-beer in your fermenting bucket with tap - check how much you have (the buckets typically have volume markers on the side), and add sugar. I use this calculator (http://www.brewunited.com/priming_sugar_calculator.php), and typically only carbonate to ~2.3 atm of pressure. Best method is to add the sugar to a pint of water, wait for it to dissolve, then pour the pint of sugar-water in as it spreads more evenly throughout the beer. Don't add too much as the beer can over-carbonate and be way too fizzy. If you want really clear beer, put 1/2 tsp of clear gelatin into a small bowl of water, and microwave for 20 seconds, then stir that mixture into the beer at the same time as the sugar.

Add the newly-sugared beer mixture to your sterilized bottles (I put the bottles in the dishwasher on high rather than sterilize each one individually) by pouring the liquid into each bottle using the tap on the fermenting bucket. Leave an inch or so of air in the bottle and screw the tops on or seal them however (I had about 45 Grolsch bottles that I used for this because you could pop the tops back on so easily), and leave for 3 weeks.

Pop in the fridge for 24 hours prior to opening to settle the sediment. Open and enjoy x 40
It sounds like a lot of work, but it really isn't. You have one fun day of brewing, one less fun day of bottling, one fun day of opening and drinking beers, and 3 weeks in between each step. I don't bother measuring things like fermentation levels, sugar amounts, fermenting temperatures etc because it has so little effect. Who cares if the beer is 4.7% instead of 5%? Or it is done fermenting after 10 days but you leave it for 2 weeks? Or its a little cloudy or not exactly the style you expected? Not worth bothering to me, but some people are mad for that kind of stuff.

But Ferris, this all sounds very involved! If I want to start a little bit, and stay super cheap - is there an alternative?

Yeah, you can make cider for nothing. 1 gallon fermenting jug, 4 litres of nice apple juice (no preservatives), an airlock, some yeast. Yeast in fermenting jug, pour apple juice on top, add airlock. Wait 10 days. Your apple juice is 8 pints of uncarbonated cider now. Decant into another vessel and bottle or just drink straight from there. My advice - pour it all into a large jug (leaving as much sediment behind as you can), add a pint of unfermented apple juice for flavour, drink the lot. Yum. I use champagne yeast on mine (Lalvin EC-1118 is the strain, its pretty common and any homebrew store should have loads in packets). You can get the bits for that for about 6 quid all in, which is pretty good. You can carbonate in bottles using the steps above if you like, but flat cider is legit. I used to have a formula written down somewhere on how to work out the cider ABV based on the grams of sugar per ml, but I can't find it now. Top of my head, most apple juice ferments out to about 6% without any help, but you can add sugar/maple syrup/any other sugar source to increase the ABV if you want - EC-1118 has an alcohol tolerance up to about 18% (I think?) so fill yer boots.

Ok that's a long enough email for now. I can help with anything else if you need - turns out I have more opinions on brewing than I thought I did. If you want my opinion on specific bits of kit, send me a link and I'll have a look - I don't know the UK brewing scene but I know the North American one pretty well so will try and help however I can.

Your pal

Ferris

x

References
1 - The quick formula i used when designing recipes is (LBs of grain/Batch size in gallons) x 2.5 = approx ABV
So a 5 gallon batch with 11 LBs of grain would be (11/5) x 2.5 = ~5.5% ABV
A 3 gallon batch with 9lbs of grain would be 7.5% ABV etc
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 12:56:23 PM by FerriswheelBueller »

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2020, 12:52:24 PM »
One question I do have, is that I've got some of those sugar drops that are like boiled sweets for the second fermentation. The advice is 1 for ~350ml or 2 for ~750ml, but I've got 500ml bottles. What do?

It's a double strength IPA, so I'm leaning towards using 2 because my limited science brain reckons the yeast will be more 'hungry'.

Yeast is always hungry, it’ll keep fermenting until it creates too much alcohol and dies. You only want it to ferment a little more to carbonate the beer. I’d use 1 per bottle, but to be honest they’re a bit of a swizz. This is what I do for bottle carbing - I find it is much more accurate.

Quote
You should end up with about 5 gallons of proto-beer in your fermenting bucket with tap - check how much you have (the buckets typically have volume markers on the side), and add sugar. I use this calculator (http://www.brewunited.com/priming_sugar_calculator.php), and typically only carbonate to ~2.3 atm of pressure. Best method is to add the sugar to a pint of water, wait for it to dissolve, then pour the pint of sugar-water in as it spreads more evenly throughout the beer. Don't add too much as the beer can over-carbonate and be way too fizzy. If you want really clear beer, put 1/2 tsp of clear gelatin into a small bowl of water, and microwave for 20 seconds, then stir that mixture into the beer at the same time as the sugar.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2020, 07:06:06 PM »
Just racked a gallon of Root Beer mead. Not only is it delightfully, dangerously strong, but I think I may have accidentally discovered the secret recipe for Cinzano.

Not sure if this is a good thing...

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #23 on: March 25, 2020, 07:35:01 PM »
.
Is it possible to use plastic pop/fizzy water bottles? Any other ideas?

Yes! A little tip I would give in less demanding times is to buy cheap fizzy water bottles and pour away the water. Fizzy, because they need to hold the pressure, and water so they don't taint the flavour. 2l is the best amount so you don't have so much waste with dregs.

Blue Jam

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #24 on: March 25, 2020, 08:52:24 PM »
I'm pretty sure my dad used to do his secondary fermentation in those 3-litre pop bottles that used to be common in the 80s and 90s.

Ferris- thanks so much for that guide! 40 pints of foaming nut-brown karma to you.

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2020, 08:54:57 PM »
I'm pretty sure my dad used to do his secondary fermentation in those 3-litre pop bottles that used to be common in the 80s and 90s.

Ferris- thanks so much for that guide! 40 pints of foaming nut-brown karma to you.

I mean, no chance anyone read all that (though i tried to make it funny/approachable), but appreciate it anyway.

I may have accidentally left my real name in the middle of it so be cool if I did.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2020, 08:56:29 PM »
http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Kveik

Start at the furthest end of the spectrum ^ and work backwards until you are buying premix Woodfordes Wherry from Wilko.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2020, 08:57:11 PM »
I'm pretty sure my dad used to do his secondary fermentation in those 3-litre pop bottles that used to be common in the 80s and 90s.


You can do, but if you use used bottles, you are going to clean them or accept the cross-contamination of flava. 3L are pretty good though, very going for that White Lighting look.

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2020, 09:01:54 PM »
Btw Ferris you're a hero for posting all that x

Not like those NHS slags

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Re: Homebrew thread
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2020, 09:51:07 PM »
http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Kveik

Start at the furthest end of the spectrum ^ and work backwards until you are buying premix Woodfordes Wherry from Wilko.

Never brewed with kveik though it is all the rage these days. There%u2019s an excellent blog of a Norwegian chap who goes from remote farmhouse to remote farmhouse collecting and propagating the unique strains. I used to be an avid reader of his blog before I had a child and spare time went out the window.

Re non sacch yeast strains: I avoid brett yeasts like the plague - you typically have to propagate them with a stir plate to get the cell count up to a point where it is viable to brew with, they like warmer temps so turn up your heating or get a brew heater belt (I mean, I have one but it isn%u2019t standard equipment), and it contaminates every piece of equipment it touches. Sour beers in general are best left to the experts who can afford to brew 10 batches and throw 3 of them away, though that%u2019s just my opinion. I bet it would be possible to make consistently good ones (and I%u2019ve done an ok red Flemish ale using a bog standard kettle sour in the past), it just takes more time/energy than I have available.

Btw Ferris you're a hero for posting all that x

Not like those NHS slags

Being a middle class alcoholic beer nerdery and brewing in general are things I%u2019m passionate about. I%u2019ve written a number of those guides over the years for friends who invariably don%u2019t bother getting into it (that one above went to a friend who thought about it but %u201Dcider at the shop is so cheap already%u201D). It%u2019s nice to be able to post it somewhere it will actually be useful.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 11:08:07 PM by FerriswheelBueller »

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