Author Topic: Vaccine Progress  (Read 50396 times)

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #90 on: July 21, 2020, 09:54:31 AM »
Have they tried setting their ant carriers on fire too?

New page fiery ant cunt

Pingers

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #91 on: July 21, 2020, 09:58:36 AM »
If they find a working vaccine, we can have lots of fun logging into redpill sites and telling them it contains proteins that make you have socialist thoughts, so that only they die of the 'vid

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #92 on: July 21, 2020, 10:24:51 AM »

gib

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #93 on: July 21, 2020, 10:39:56 AM »
I think America has attempted something similar using ants as carriers but obviously it's too early to know how effective that will be.

I heard the human test subjects ended up with a thorax and abdomen as they developed anty-bodies

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #94 on: July 21, 2020, 11:23:24 AM »
I think vaccines work by giving you a little bit of the virus to train your immune system. Therefore what they need to do is find some COVID, and just take a little bit of it. Job done

There was some discussion of cat owners having some immunity due to exposure to various feline corona virus types.

Bernice

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #95 on: July 21, 2020, 06:28:06 PM »
It would be interesting to see some sort of comparison between the money poured worldwide into finding a vaccine for this and other vaccine development programmes. By the sounds of it the taps are on and the well bottomless in every developed nation on earth.

Vaccine by Paddy's day '21, have a Guinness and kiss your friends.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #96 on: July 21, 2020, 08:39:34 PM »
It would be interesting to see some sort of comparison between the money poured worldwide into finding a vaccine for this and other vaccine development programmes.

We have been lucky with the way the cards have fallen on this, so it has been worthwhile pursuing a vaccine.

Away from pathogens and into general health for a moment, if we look at, say air pollution from fossil fuels, they cause a lot of health problems.  Thankfully we are moving to cleaner solutions, but, we have fossil fuel billionaires with lobbyists fighting change every step of the way.  I don’t see a similar situation with SARS-CoV-2, other than anti vax and Jehovah’s Witnesses..

In the case of Pfizer, they basically decided to fund the work themselves, because they can.

For one, there is previous work, which has been relevant, SARS-CoV-1, (which died out on its own) is rather similar to SARS-CoV-2, (our current problem).  They both target the same surface proteins to gain entry to cells, ACE2 and TMPRSS2.

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/receptors-for-sars-cov-2-present-in-wide-variety-of-human-cells-67496

SARS-CoV-1 vaccine work got as far as studies in ferrets, (which are quite similar to humans in some ways).  There were problems though, the vaccine induced an autoimmune disease.  This can happen with infections too, the immune response to the STI chlamydia can lead to reactive arthritis.  SARS-CoV-1 disappeared though, and that was that.  But the research already conducted has been a springboard for SARS-CoV-2

Piece on the CoV-1 version and comparison to CoV-2

https://theconversation.com/the-mysterious-disappearance-of-the-first-sars-virus-and-why-we-need-a-vaccine-for-the-current-one-but-didnt-for-the-other-137583

Another useful feature of SARS-CoV-2 is that it is a disease which produces a noticeable immune response.  This is good for us.  Diseases which don't do this are hard to produce a vaccine for because the immune system does not seem to particularly notice them.  HIV is stealthy like this.

Imagine this, again dodgy analogy..

You are in charge of security at an airport and think you might be attacked by a violent cult.
The Cast:  Security = Immune System, Dangerous Cultists = Virus or Bacterium, Actors = Vaccine, Airport = Body.

Lucky for you, there is some intel on them and you know that they always have green mohawks and wear orange jump suits.  So you hire actors, dress them up as cultists and stage an exercise where they attack the airport.

Your security people learn to easily spot and respond to these dangerous cultists, so in the event of an attack they mount a robust response and repel the cultists.  This is the situation for diseases which cause a robust immune response, (often demonstrated by elevated temperature, swellings, sneezing etc..).

But, now imagine that the intel on your cultists says that they are masters of disguise, they will look like regular passengers.  So you hire actors who dress and act like regular airport clients.

The fake cultist actors now enter the airport undetected by security and the security are no wiser on how to recognise them.  This is what happens with diseases which do not have a strong immune response, like HIV.

So after your exercise with actors, if REAL cultists attack, dressed as passengers, the security are STILL unable to spot them, they learnt nothing from the exercises.  There is no response from them and the cultists can take over the airport without opposition from security.

Finally, the SARS-CoV-2 seems to be reasonably stable to mutation, which means that a vaccine training the immune system to recognise a particular feature of the virus is hopefully going to keep working because the virus will keep having that feature.

The common cold is notorious for its rapid mutation, so while you might learn to recognise it by its green mohawk, the next time it comes around it has long pink hair and slips right by your security.  So we don't have a common cold vaccine.

Sorry for this long post, what I am getting at is that pursuing drug or vaccine development will happen if there is a chance of success.  Combined with a need for that treatment of course.  SARS-CoV-2 has both, hence the development efforts.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2020, 09:13:08 PM by tao of wub »

Bernice

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #97 on: July 22, 2020, 08:45:15 AM »
That's interesting - I'd only taken into account the fact that this thing fucking the global economy and affecting everyone meant that funding was a bit of a no-brainedrfor those who can, hadn't even considered that there would be inherent features of the virus that made doggedly pursuing a vaccine a sensible path to take. Thanks for the explanation and for pitching it at my woefully ignorant level.

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #98 on: July 22, 2020, 09:15:26 AM »
If they find a working vaccine, we can have lots of fun logging into redpill sites and telling them it contains proteins that make you have socialist thoughts, so that only they die of the 'vid

Is it wrong that I actually, genuinely think this is a good idea, and that I'd feel no guilt whatsoeer if it worked?

imitationleather

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #99 on: July 22, 2020, 09:21:20 AM »
Have they tried testing it on animals? Might get sorted a bit quicker if they do that.

Chedney Honks

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #100 on: July 22, 2020, 09:23:10 AM »
Heard they gave it to rats and the rat grew a five inch RASMUS

imitationleather

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #101 on: July 22, 2020, 09:24:05 AM »
Heard they gave it to rats and the rat grew a five inch RASMUS

Then they let the rat out of the lab and it ran off with my missus. :'(

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #102 on: July 22, 2020, 10:46:51 AM »
Is it wrong that I actually, genuinely think this is a good idea, and that I'd feel no guilt whatsoeer if it worked?

Not at all. The planet's overpopulated, someone has to make room.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #103 on: July 22, 2020, 11:01:19 AM »
Have they tried writing the virus down, then looking at it in a mirror?

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #104 on: July 29, 2020, 02:08:08 AM »

Pingers

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #105 on: July 29, 2020, 06:04:30 PM »
Not at all. The planet's overpopulated, someone has to make room.

Edit: I mentioned this to my OH the other day in a sort of jokey, almost-makes-you-want-to-troll-people-on-conspiracy-websites-so-only-they-die-of-it sort of way, and she was appalled. Appalled, I say. So if I do it, better make sure I use Tor

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #106 on: August 16, 2020, 02:48:33 PM »

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #107 on: October 12, 2020, 03:40:13 PM »
Was anyone aware that China has been releasing its vaccine to certain members of the public since July?

I wasn't. It bodes well for global progress, I suppose. But nothing beats a traditional British vaccine from Oxford!

China rolls out experimental Covid vaccine as it eyes global market

Medical experts question safety of programme before phase 3 trials are completed

Christian Shepherd in Beijing OCTOBER 4 2020


Beijing is set to expand a programme that administers experimental coronavirus vaccines as Chinese developers chart a risky path to dominating global supplies.

In a surprise announcement last month, a representative from state-owned China National Biotec Group, or Sinopharm, revealed that hundreds of thousands of Chinese had already taken the company's two leading experimental Covid-19 vaccines.

The drugs were dispensed as part of a limited use programme that began with little fanfare by the Chinese government in July. The vaccines were administered even though final stage, or phase 3, trials designed to confirm overall effectiveness had not been completed.

Details of the programme's scope remain unclear, but government statements suggest use was originally restricted to frontline health workers and state employees travelling overseas to high-risk areas, including to work on projects along China's Belt and Road infrastructure investment scheme.

The programme now appears to be expanding to include large portions of the population, in what experts said was a high-risk strategy for vaccine developers to distribute and test products before they hit global markets.

Health authorities in one Chinese province have asked enterprises and government departments to gather details of employees willing to receive emergency use vaccines ahead of winter, according to a government notice issued last month seen by the Financial Times.

Apart from health workers and other target groups 'guaranteed' to get vaccines, the document, which has not been made public, also had a long list of additional 'target suggested recipients'.

Included among the recipients were transport workers, people travelling to countries with high Covid-19 infection rates, frozen food logistics workers, staff in supermarkets or other enclosed spaces, and employees of schools, orphanages, jails and elderly care homes.

After the vaccine was administered, tests for 'adverse events following immunisation' should be conducted.

When Qin Xin, an employee at a state-owned financial institution, saw the offer to receive a Covid-19 vaccine in her work WeChat group, she assumed the message had been sent in error.

'I didn't think about it much, just thought that sooner or later I would have to be inoculated,' she told Guancha.cn, a popular online media outlet.

Ms Qin said she had felt an 'inexplicable' heat on the first night but returned to normal by the second day after taking the shot. 'I think that if the nation is willing to let normal people take it, then the side effects can't be all that bad.'

Chinese health officials have defended their decision to distribute the vaccine, saying the move was sanctioned by the World Health Organization.

But the scale and opacity of China's programme have raised safety and ethical concerns from medical experts, especially given China's claims that it had halted almost entirely transmission of the virus within its borders.

Arthur Caplan, professor of Bioethics at New York University Langone Medical Center, said China appeared to be acting irresponsibly by stretching the definition of emergency use beyond previous applications.

Historically, approval for emergency use was given for vaccines that had a record, perhaps in other countries, and was used on a focused population, such as a college campus, during an emergency with imminent deaths.

China's approach, according to Mr Caplan, was closer to 'throwing something up against the wall to see what sticks'.

'We need to go quickly, but there is no point in going so quickly that we can%u2019t answer basic questions about safety and efficacy,' he said.

Jerome Kim, director-general of the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, said the overall risks for the programme would hinge on whether high standards of consent, data collection and follow-up testing were applied. The drug companies have not made those details public.

'If you are sending workers off to, say, Africa how would you know if they have a side effect outside of China?' he asked.

Last month, during a government-organised tour of Sinovac, chief executive Yin Weidong said the company had provided tens of thousands of doses of its vaccine to the Beijing government for emergency use.

Sinovac and Sinopharm along with CanSino Biologics, which has developed a common cold virus-vectored vaccine with China's military are the country's best contenders to corner a portion of the vast global demand for immunising shots designed to slow the spread of Sar-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. The disease has killed more than 1m people worldwide.

This month, the United Arab Emirates became the first foreign country to approve a Chinese vaccine from Sinopharm for limited use.

Owing to the lack of positive cases in China, its vaccine developers have been forced to carry out phase 3 trials overseas and some of these agreements include pledges to distribute vaccines in the host country. Sinovac, for example, has promised to supply 40m vaccines to Indonesia by March 2021.

China's health officials reckon the country will be able to produce more than 600m doses of vaccines by the end of this year and 1bn by the end of next year.

Mr Yin told reporters that Sinovac had begun developing its drug with a strategy 'designed for China'. But after the country controlled the spread of the virus, its goal became 'to provide the vaccine to the world'.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #108 on: October 12, 2020, 04:01:10 PM »
A Chinese vaccine would certainly get the conspiracy theorists working overtime!

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #109 on: October 12, 2020, 09:44:03 PM »
The trouble with the Chinese vaccine is that you need another after as you're still hungry or something put me on News Quiz please.

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #110 on: October 13, 2020, 03:10:14 AM »
I like Chinese vaccines, but I couldn't eat a whole one.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #111 on: October 13, 2020, 05:01:11 AM »
Quote
Beijing is set to expand a programme that administers experimental coronavirus vaccines as Chinese developers chart a risky path to dominating global supplies.

In a surprise announcement last month, a representative from state-owned China National Biotec Group, or Sinopharm, revealed that hundreds of thousands of Chinese had already taken the company's two leading experimental Covid-19 vaccines.

The drugs were dispensed as part of a limited use programme that began with little fanfare by the Chinese government in July. The vaccines were administered even though final stage, or phase 3, trials designed to confirm overall effectiveness had not been completed.

So they're having a big stage-3 trial, you're saying? Like the Russian one? ;)

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #112 on: October 13, 2020, 02:22:43 PM »
Eagerly awaiting the feel good stories emerging just before Christmas, giving big hopes for early next year.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #113 on: October 13, 2020, 04:05:17 PM »
It's weird how when Russia rush-approved its vaccine, most media outlets wrongly reported it as the first of its kind, giving the dirty reds exactly the accolade they wanted in their antiviral space race. The Chinese vaccine was already being rolled out across the country's military, so why was everyone ignoring this? Furthermore, advanced studies show it to be looking as promising as the Oxford vaccine...

pancreas

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #114 on: October 14, 2020, 11:20:32 AM »
It's weird how when Russia rush-approved its vaccine, most media outlets wrongly reported it as the first of its kind, giving the dirty reds exactly the accolade they wanted in their antiviral space race. The Chinese vaccine was already being rolled out across the country's military, so why was everyone ignoring this? Furthermore, advanced studies show it to be looking as promising as the Oxford vaccine...

Yes, AIUI the Chinese one is bog standard vaccine. Just an attenuated virus. Like all the other ones that work. The Oxford and US ones are New Technology. So they'll be extremely expensive and will somehow only be made available for the rich. I think I'd rather take a trip to Beijing.

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #115 on: October 14, 2020, 01:08:58 PM »
The Oxford vaccine will be well worth waiting for. First edition comes in an individually-numbered collectable pine box, with a full-colour booklet and commemorative broach.

H-O-W-L

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #116 on: October 14, 2020, 01:21:35 PM »
The Oxford vaccine will be well worth waiting for. First edition comes in an individually-numbered collectable pine box, with a full-colour booklet and commemorative broach.

It'd be a coin, wouldn't it? THE GREAT BRITISH MINT HAND CRAFTED THIS COIN IN LIMITED NUMBERS OF ONLY 250,000! And it has Diana on the back!

Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #117 on: October 14, 2020, 01:54:27 PM »
From: indiegogo.com
Subject: Update #27 from Oxford Vaccine

Dear Contributors,

We have to inform you that due to a quality control issue with the numbering on the collectable pine box, there will be a further delay until we ship your reward. It is important to us that you are guaranteed to receive a perfect quality product, but our inspectors have spotted a 0.1mm misalignment in approximately 0.2% of the finished products so we have had to scrap all the existing vaccine packs and will need time to retool our production facility and create new prototypes.

Our current estimates are now as follows:

Early Birds - August 2022
Special Edition with gold lettering - November 2022
All other tiers - March 2023

We hope you understand the reasons for this delay, and thank you for your support!

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Norton Canes

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #118 on: October 14, 2020, 02:44:59 PM »
an individually-numbered collectable pine box

Measuring 6ft by 2ft

BlodwynPig

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Re: Vaccine Progress
« Reply #119 on: October 14, 2020, 02:49:31 PM »
Yes, AIUI the Chinese one is bog standard vaccine. Just an attenuated virus. Like all the other ones that work. The Oxford and US ones are New Technology. So they'll be extremely expensive and will somehow only be made available for the rich. I think I'd rather take a trip to Beijing.

the rich and the military

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