Author Topic: Accent Tag  (Read 349 times)

Captain Crunch

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Accent Tag
« on: June 29, 2020, 12:19:33 PM »
It’s been at least a month since we an accent thread and

Regional accents - love 'em all!

Even though it’s been going for years, I only recently discovered accent tag on youtube.  People chat and read out certain words to show off their accent.  Some are good for a laugh. 

New Orleans.  Or whatever like that.

Broad Geordie.  This girl is great, it’s her laid-back style rather than the accent and check out the book she’s got next to her!

Canadian.  This guy just wants to pick a fight.

Cockney.  They like a laugh.

And this bloke finally snapped (probably after the poxy Olympics) and made a video correcting the pronunciation of SE London place names.  It had to be done, even the recorded voice on the train gets it wrong:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vESWENN0oE0

Anyone done their own or fancy putting it up? 

Most hated accent for me is not really an accent at all it’s affected speech.  Maybe an unfair example because I’m sure she’s a nice enough person but Cathy Fitzgerald here, bloody hell:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p053f0zn

The dreadful garden centre music doesn’t help but it’s the horrible breathy vowels, the New Labour dropped t crap; it sounds like Anne Robinson trying to make an ASMR video and I hate it. 

Thomas

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2020, 12:28:45 PM »
I quite like the old school British Acting Men's Accent.

I love John Hurt's voice-and-accent combo. He was from Derby, but must've picked up his accent in Acting Land.

Similarly, I like Richard Burton's Acting Land-filtered Welsh accent. Same with Tom Baker. Scant traces of Liverpool via Acting Land.

canadagoose

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2020, 12:31:24 PM »
I quite like the whole Accent Tag thing. Ever since BBC Voices dropped out of usability (due to its use of flipping RealPlayer and Flash) it's a useful source of "what a place's accent sounds like". And, of course, it has a worldwide scope rather than just UK-wide. Still needs a lot of contributions, though.

I don't have one up, but I don't even know what I'd call my accent. A mess, probably. The Julian Cope of Scottish accents.

Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2020, 12:51:24 PM »
This is great. "We ain't from no islan's! We is from New Orl'ans!"

Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2020, 01:03:48 PM »
I quite like the whole Accent Tag thing. Ever since BBC Voices dropped out of usability (due to its use of flipping RealPlayer and Flash) it's a useful source of "what a place's accent sounds like". And, of course, it has a worldwide scope rather than just UK-wide. Still needs a lot of contributions, though.

I don't have one up, but I don't even know what I'd call my accent. A mess, probably. The Julian Cope of Scottish accents.

I always enjoy the rural (lowland) Scots pronunciation of the number 7 as ‘seeven’ - you can tell someone is really from out in the sticks if they say that.

In the Highlands, on the other hand, you get the soft, lilting ‘sehven’ .

All more pleasant than people within the Weegiesphere (like me) who bark out a guttural ‘sivvin’.

Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2020, 01:11:45 PM »
This is great. "We ain't from no islan's! We is from New Orl'ans!"

The most intriguing North American accent I’ve heard is the Boston Brahmin accent (not a new Boston Crab sock puppet account, but the accent of the upper crust descendants of English settlers in Massachusetts).

Kind of an old-fashioned upper crust English accent with a curious American twang. Video below is long, but the first couple of minutes give the idea.

https://youtu.be/bXjU60a8dmI

canadagoose

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2020, 01:22:39 PM »
I always enjoy the rural (lowland) Scots pronunciation of the number 7 as ‘seeven’ - you can tell someone is really from out in the sticks if they say that.

In the Highlands, on the other hand, you get the soft, lilting ‘sehven’ .

All more pleasant than people within the Weegiesphere (like me) who bark out a guttural ‘sivvin’.
I say seeven if I'm speaking "in Scots" but more like "siven" in English. So kind of both really.

wosl

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2020, 03:17:33 PM »
The most intriguing North American accent I’ve heard is the Boston Brahmin accent (not a new Boston Crab sock puppet account, but the accent of the upper crust descendants of English settlers in Massachusetts).

Kind of an old-fashioned upper crust English accent with a curious American twang. Video below is long, but the first couple of minutes give the idea.

https://youtu.be/bXjU60a8dmI

Sylvia Plath (born in Boston, brought up in Winthrop, albeit that her folks were not wealthy) indeed sounded like this (some seem to credit the English tones to the fact that she'd been living in England for a while by the time the extant interviews with her were conducted, but I'm betting she always sounded like that - a rather cold haughtiness cut through with some American flint).

Fr.Bigley

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2020, 03:25:30 PM »
I say seeven if I'm speaking "in Scots" but more like "siven" in English. So kind of both really.

Do you say "uh-luv-un" though?

canadagoose

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Re: Accent Tag
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2020, 03:57:31 PM »
Do you say "uh-luv-un" though?
Same sort of thing - "uh-LEEvin" in Scots, "uh-LIVin" in English.

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