Author Topic: Most Rebellious Film Directors?  (Read 1085 times)

Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« on: July 10, 2020, 11:26:23 PM »
(who were also great)

Those who would not compromise their art for any reason.. The first one that comes to mind is John Cassavetes. His first movie "Shadows" was very independent, outside of the studio system, but because many in the film business thought it was a new kind of cinema, a studio hired him to do "Too Late Blues" (best movie on the music business) and "A Child Is Waiting", where he was able to have two stars (Burt Lancaster and Judy Garland), but also had the movie cut by Stanley Kramer behind his back, and was actually fired while Kramer was at Cassavetes' home during Thanksgiving, so John choked him out, and he was fired, but the movie is still great. He went on to make even better movies, using his family, his wife's family, friends, his home, and didn't spend his days doing interviews complaining or being lazy, like Orson Welles (who I like, more for his interviews than movies, though).

Cassavates prioritized his art, acting in movies, to take the money and put them right back into his own movies, putting his home up as collateral, doing whatever it took. Ben Gazzara (and someone else in a different book) were saying how John went a month with no sleep trying to edit and finish the movie.. I don't remember the movie, but John would call theaters himself to get them played (and would eventually get distributors).

As great as it is to be rebellious, he actually was able to do something about it, and his movies speak for themselves, and hopefully inspired others to do the same. I also have a lot of respect for him or anyone else who can write and direct a great movie.

madhair60

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2020, 11:43:58 PM »
LUCIFER FUCKIN VALENTINE

chveik

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2020, 01:49:34 AM »
Uwe Boll

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2020, 03:32:17 AM »

zomgmouse

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2020, 12:19:06 PM »
Jerzy Smolimowski - always makes astounding, original, unusual films that defy expectation, from his more known earlier work like Deep End his later work like 11 Minutes

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2020, 01:29:19 PM »
Michael Bay, he blows everything up.

Old Nehamkin

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2020, 03:41:30 PM »
Ron Howard

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2020, 03:54:45 PM »
I'll add Sam Peckinpah, too.

Brundle-Fly

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2020, 04:01:55 PM »
Derek Jarman, Lindsay Anderson.

I've just realised that b]O Lucky Man![/b] (1973) is unlikely to appear on UK TV anytime again soon. Arthur Lowe would be well and truly cancelled.

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2020, 04:56:51 PM »
Robert Altman had a good line in doing what he wanted rather than what he was supposed to be doing. Like in Popyeye.

In Mr Macabe and Mrs Miller he wanted to give it a grim foggy asthetic, knowing the studio wouldn't approve he had the cinematographer pre-fog the film so there was no way of undoing it.

Absorb the anus burn

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2020, 05:19:30 PM »
Ingmar Bergman?

An erect penis in the opening credits of Persona... Cancer and death in graphic detail in Cries And Whispers... Cabalistic magic and murder in The Rite... The killing and eating of a horse in The Serpent's Egg... The nudity and nonchalant desertion of a child by its Mother in Summer With Monika... The brutal dehumanisation of civilians in war during Shame... Parental abuse leading to incest and insanity in Through A Glass Darkly.... The Virgin Spring rape.... Not to forget his own very public arrest for tax evasion and leaving of Sweden...

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2020, 06:09:14 PM »
Robert Altman had a good line in doing what he wanted rather than what he was supposed to be doing. Like in Popyeye.

In Mr Macabe and Mrs Miller he wanted to give it a grim foggy asthetic, knowing the studio wouldn't approve he had the cinematographer pre-fog the film so there was no way of undoing it.
I've always loved him doing things "his way". Even though many of his movies are "misses" for me, "Nashville"(my #3) and "McCabe and Mrs. Miller" are among my very favorites. Very interesting guy to watch in interviews. And despite being a very independent guy, he made many movies.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2020, 10:11:06 PM »
Not sure who you could view in this regard for the modern era? in the mainstream you've had progressively less leeway given were as in the arthouse scene you've arguably had more leeway given. The likes of Noe, Von Trier, etc seem more like their playing up personas than being genuinely rebellious? maybe Kechiche?

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2020, 10:12:58 PM »
Derek Jarman, Lindsay Anderson.

I've just realised that b]O Lucky Man![/b] (1973) is unlikely to appear on UK TV anytime again soon. Arthur Lowe would be well and truly cancelled.

Arthur Lowe was cancelled after his third role in O Lucky Man.

Puce Moment

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2020, 12:17:34 AM »
would be cancelled


rue the polywhirl

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2020, 12:27:31 AM »
Woody Allen. Laughs at societal norms. Continues to make movies even though loads of people wish he wouldn’t.

Brundle-Fly

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2020, 01:08:30 AM »


Sorry Steve. I hope you didn’t think I was plagiarising you there. Was discussing that insane scene with a mate only the other day.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2020, 01:39:39 AM »
Joel Potrykus

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2020, 05:57:30 AM »
Joel Potrykus

I don't know if I'd say he was especially rebellious, just exists comfortably outside of "the industry" - a bit like John Waters back in the 70s (Waters may not be a bad suggestion for the thread an' all).

Incidentally, it's well worth grabbing hold of this new Limited Edition Blu-Ray of Relaxer if you like Potrykus's films: https://anti-worldsreleasing.co.uk/products/relaxer-le

It contains Relaxer and Buzzard, as well as a whole wealth of special features (of varying interest/quality). His early short films are interesting to watch, and it also has an entire "rehearsal run" of Buzzard that they seem to have shot at home on a dodgy camcorder. I haven't listened to the commentaries yet, but I've not found Potrykus to be especially engaging in interviews or Q&As, despite generally admiring his ethic and approach to filmmaking. Same with Rick Alverson.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2020, 06:11:12 AM »
It might seem an odd choice since they're more known for their TV work, but I think Trey Parker (and Matt Stone) fit the bill pretty well; in the sense that every film they've done since finding fame has been a big battle between them and various producers/studios/the MPAA etc. I think there's a story about them quite literally holding the master tapes for Bigger Longer & Uncut hostage until Paramount agreed to drop some alterations, and they deliberately threw a bunch of absurdly graphic shagging into Team America to distract the studio/MPAA from other content they might be concerned with.

Then there's all the "turning up to the Oscars in drag whilst tripping on LSD" antics, farting on celebrities at Hollywood parties etc. I'd imagine they've mellowed now, but I know a man who worked at Comedy Central during the height of South Park and he remembers them being incredibly difficult to work with due to how uncompromising they were, but he also sincerely thought Trey was a genius.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2020, 04:04:10 PM »
would be cancelled



Why would he be canceled? I've seen about 20 of his movies (which is about half maybe), and the only thing that was taboo was homosexuality, which would be congratulated today.

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2020, 04:13:11 PM »
Ken Russell?

Absorb the anus burn

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2020, 04:16:01 PM »
Peter Watkins?

Sin Agog

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2020, 05:52:11 PM »
Seem to recall a few old-skool directors like Raoul Walsh and John Huston being the types who'd casually illegally swim across some Latin America border, impregnate half the village daughters, kill some/and/or join up with the banditos, free a herd of mustangs, spend the weekend fighting in the Spanish Civil War whilst off their gourd on moonshine scotch, and somehow make it home on Monday morning before their porridge has cooled down.  Meanwhile I just read about people with full lives instead because there's less opportunity for social awkwardness.

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2020, 05:54:12 PM »
Not sure who you could view in this regard for the modern era?

A few rebellious directors hired for Star Wars or Marvel have occasionally tried to film scenes in an original, creative way. They tend to get fired for it, though.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2020, 06:16:15 PM »
Why would he be canceled? I've seen about 20 of his movies (which is about half maybe), and the only thing that was taboo was homosexuality, which would be congratulated today.

Just look at the 100,000 word entry on ‘Personal Life’ on his Wikipedia page. Domestic abuser, several lovers killed themselves, probably anti-Semitic. And more.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2020, 07:19:17 PM »
I think in terms of doing what the fuck you want then PT Anderson has to be in with a shout. Following the sprawling, melodramatic Magnolia with the short, funny, romantic Punch Drunk Love. Then a film about a feud between and oil man and a preacher, then a scientology pic, a shaggy dog detective film and finally a film about a high class dressmaker and the psychodrama with his live-in lover and matronly sister.

Pretty much all his films defy description and, for me, never turn out how I think they will

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Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #27 on: July 12, 2020, 07:57:39 PM »
Just look at the 100,000 word entry on ‘Personal Life’ on his Wikipedia page. Domestic abuser, several lovers killed themselves, probably anti-Semitic. And more.

Thank you for doing that for me.

Re: Most Rebellious Film Directors?
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2020, 10:32:21 AM »
I'm impressed by the career of Jan Němec, who made some brilliant films about brutality, sadism, and political violence in Czechoslovakia (as was) in the 1960s then when they stopped him making any more, moved to the USA and set up a business making wedding videos.

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