Author Topic: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music  (Read 22401 times)

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1290 on: October 17, 2020, 12:46:55 PM »
Mansion Of Cards - Trane.  Released on BBC in 1971.





Delia Derbyshire & Co had White Noise, Paddy Kingsland had Trane, a slightly more conventional group from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. I discovered this track by pure chance when I picked up this 7" up at Brighton record fair because I wanted to hear the theme to 'Wagonner's Walk' again on the A Side.  'Mansion Of Cards' feels like the younger sibling to the glorious TV theme 'Ace Of Wands' by Tarot that was posted some pages back by daf(I think)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK26qkRbAl4

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1291 on: October 17, 2020, 01:27:49 PM »
Lee Hazlewood - I'll Live Yesterdays


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erv1WYaBV7c


Easily my favourite Lee Hazlewood song, even though it reminds me of an absolutely terrible time in my life (a rough break-up). Had this album on constant rotation at the time - I later wound up going to the guy's wedding though so it all worked out. Requiem For An Almost Lady is just such a bitter, twisted album lyrically: most songs start with a spoken intro then it's mostly just guitar and bass behind his baritone. "Ride on the wings of a sterile cowboy" is a truly excellent line.

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1292 on: October 17, 2020, 01:31:55 PM »
Shuggie Otis - Ice Cold Daydream



Released, with "Strawberry Letter 23" on the B-side, in October 1971 - did not chart. 

Quote
Shuggie Otis was born Johnny Alexander Veliotes, Jr. in Los Angeles, California, the son of rhythm and blues musician Johnny Otis. The name "Shuggie" (short for "sugar") was coined by his mother when he was a newborn. Otis began playing guitar when he was two years old and performing professionally with his father's band at the age of eleven, often disguising himself with dark glasses and a false moustache so that he could play with his father's band in after-hours nightclubs.

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1293 on: October 17, 2020, 04:17:00 PM »
Yama Yama - Yamasuki Singers   Released on Biram in 1971.





This was the 'in the know' hipster/ rock snob album to namecheck back in 2005 when it was reissued by Finders Keepers records. The key track Yama Yama has more recently been used in the tv show, Fargo which created renewed interest in the oddball act from fifty years ago.

https://aquariumdrunkard.com/2012/09/13/the-yamasuki-singers-le-monde-fabuleux-des-yamasuki/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xE0hmDwzXyw

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1294 on: October 17, 2020, 04:58:03 PM »
Hildegard Knef - Holiday Time



Released as the B-side of "Christina" in France in 1971 -  did not chart

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1295 on: October 17, 2020, 05:36:41 PM »
The Modern lovers – hospital

https://youtu.be/blJldvAPwpQ



Famously not released until 1976 and therefore lumped in with punk, the album was actually recorded in 1971. Keyboard player Jerry Harrison was later a founder member of Talking Heads.

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1296 on: October 17, 2020, 06:04:05 PM »
Fanny - Charity Ball



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYRryKleIUo

Quote
Fanny were an American rock band, active in the early 1970s. They were one of the first all-female rock groups to achieve critical and commercial success, including two Billboard Hot 100 top 40 singles. Charity Ball being one of 'em.

The group has continued to attract critical acclaim for rejecting typical girl group styles and expectations of women in the rock industry generally, and emphasizing their musical skills. Later groups such as the Go-Go's, the Bangles and the Runaways cited Fanny as a key influence.

In a 1999 interview with Rolling Stone, David Bowie revealed his respect for the band: "They were extraordinary: they wrote everything, they played like motherfuckers, they were just colossal and wonderful, and nobody's ever mentioned them."

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1297 on: October 17, 2020, 06:45:37 PM »
Song For The Bearded Lady - Nucleus.  Released on Vertigo in 1971





Fuzzsion?

Pioneering jazz-rock, progressive, psychedelic, funk & pop band from Britain, led by Ian Carr. The band existed from 1969 to 1989, with one-off reformations in 2005, 2007, 2009.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44xW325H2ac&feature=emb_logo

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1298 on: October 17, 2020, 07:18:10 PM »
Design - The Minstrel's Theme

https://youtu.be/n5p-Fu9PRHI



B-side of their third single, Coloured Mile, This is a belter!

Design started as a 'sunshine pop' folk band but quickly became a standard on UK variety tv shows of the early 70s, think a Shakin New Seekers 🙂

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1299 on: October 17, 2020, 09:38:42 PM »
Elvis Presley - Life



Released as a double A-side with "Only Believe" in May 1971 - both songs were included on the album 'Love Letters from Elvis'.

The single reached #53 on the US Billboard charts - his lowest chart position for a single since "Almost in Love" had tanked at #95 in late 1968.

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1300 on: October 17, 2020, 11:05:40 PM »
Another couple from Tudor Lodge - Tudor Lodge



Help Me Find Myself

https://youtu.be/RM1c6YAZAVM

It All Comes Back To Me

https://youtu.be/LjQIFvV_bpo

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1301 on: October 18, 2020, 12:00:01 AM »
The Kinks - God's Children



Released in April 1971 on a four track 'Maxi-single' - did not chart

Quote
God's Children was written by Ray Davies and included on the soundtrack album of the film Percy.

Dave Davies : "phenomenal, an amazing song which is timeless and if you play it now it could sit quite comfortably in any decade."

     

The film was based on a book by Raymond Hitchcock about a penis transplant. Producer Betty E. Box discovered the novel when she and director Ralph Thomas were meeting a publisher about optioning the film rights for another book. They were not available at the time, but the publisher gave them the manuscript of Percy.

Betty E. Box : "I zipped through it, laughing aloud as I read. Very unusual. I might sometimes smile at a book, but I hadn't laughed like this since I read Richard Gordon's Doctor in the House."

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1302 on: October 18, 2020, 12:45:00 AM »
Gene Clark - With Tomorrow

https://youtu.be/tJOR4crL2ws



Writer of many of The Byrd's best songs, this is from his second solo album, White Light, and is one of my favourite songs ever. Another one later covered by This Mortal Coil, who showed remarkably good taste in the songs they covered.

famethrowa

  • mere rhetorical frippery
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1303 on: October 18, 2020, 01:39:40 AM »
Elvis Presley - Life

I don't want to see my ghost
It's the sight that I fear most
I'd rather have a piece of toast
Fuck it, deep fry the whole loaf

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1304 on: October 18, 2020, 04:20:41 AM »
Another couple from Fresh Maggots - Fresh Maggots



Rosemary Hill

https://youtu.be/MuJSC0o_egI

Spring

https://youtu.be/o2quiHztG3Q

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1305 on: October 18, 2020, 09:45:44 AM »
Bee Gees - Don't Wanna Live Inside Myself



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpQa4wRlMf4

Released as a single from their Trafalgar album. Didn't chart. Which is odd, as it's a prime piece of desolate brothers G balladry (and it sounds a bit like Helpless by Neil Young).

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1306 on: October 18, 2020, 10:33:32 AM »
Karen Dalton - Something on Your Mind



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNIHvRKzpD0

Quote
Karen Dalton was an American folk blues singer, guitarist, and banjo player. She was associated with the early 1960s Greenwich Village folk music scene, particularly with Fred Neil, the Holy Modal Rounders, and Bob Dylan. Although she did not enjoy much commercial success during her lifetime, her music has gained significant recognition since her death. Artists like Nick Cave, Devendra Banhart, and Joanna Newsom have noted her as an influence.

Dalton's bluesy, world-weary voice is often compared to jazz singer Billie Holiday, though Dalton loathed the comparison[5] and said Bessie Smith was a greater influence. Dalton sang blues, folk, country, pop, Motown—making over each song in her own style. She played the twelve string guitar and a long-neck banjo.

Known as "the folk singer's answer to Billie Holiday" and "Sweet Mother K.D.", Dalton is said to be the subject of the song Katie's Been Gone (composed by Richard Manuel and Robbie Robertson) on the album The Basement Tapes by The Band and Bob Dylan, who wrote of Dalton that "My favourite singer...was Karen Dalton. Karen had a voice like Billie Holiday and played guitar like Jimmy Reed... I sang with her a couple of times." Fred Neil once remarked, "She sure can sing the shit out of the blues."

The stunning Something on Your Mind, from her second and final album In My Own Time, was written by Dino Valenti, who is best known for writing the hippie anthem Get Together by The Youngbloods.

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1307 on: October 18, 2020, 11:00:56 AM »
Vivi Bach & Dietmar Schoenherr - Molotow Cocktail Party



Both German actors, this was from their album "Wünsch Dir Was", released in August 1971.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 11:14:45 AM by daf »

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1308 on: October 18, 2020, 01:30:20 PM »
Wheeling & Dealing - Daddy Longlegs. Released on Vertigo in 1971.





The album cover belies the music within. I bought this LP on spec imagining some quintessentially English autumnal folk that whiffed of a damp bonfire and chestnuts, instead, I got an Eastside country rock/ bluesy affair with numbers that wouldn't sound too out of place on The Rolling Stones 'Beggars Banquet' I bet Bobby Gillespie has this in his record collection.

This US outfit initially comprised of Steve Hayton (guitar/vocals), Cliff Carrison (drums) and Kurt Palombaki (bass/clarinet/vocals). The trio spent its early months on a farm in New York state, before moving location to New Mexico. The promise of work in films brought the group to Europe in 1969, and although such plans were later aborted, they decided to settle in England. Daddy Longlegs showcased their appealing brand of good-time, country-influenced rock.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sS30fumSCac


daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1309 on: October 18, 2020, 01:40:57 PM »
The Jean Monet Orchestra  - Sky Diver



Written by Heinz Kiessling, this appears on one of four albums released all with the same 'Radio Program Music' title and same cover in 1971 (the mad bastards!)

The other three were by 'The Oscar Brandenburg Orchestra' which was a pseudonym used by Neil Richardson, Alan Moorhouse and Johnny Pearson.

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1310 on: October 18, 2020, 02:10:35 PM »
That's proper backstage lineup at the Royal Variety Performance commentary music.

"And there's The Brother Lees and the light-heavyweight boxer, John Conteh sharing a joke with Her Majesty. And a little Lena Zavaroni hiding behind Leslie Crowther."

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1311 on: October 18, 2020, 02:16:38 PM »
Haha, perfect. That is exactly what it sounds like. "Here in the heart of London's glittering west end..."

Brundle-Fly

  • *Jooolie Andreeeews!! Thhhrrrrp!!!!*
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1312 on: October 18, 2020, 04:19:49 PM »
Henry - CMU  Released on Transatlantic in 1971





Another melancholic song about some poor soul. Open Spaces is a great album.

Cambridge-based CMU (Contemporary Music Unit, apparently) were a sort of folky bluesy prog psych outfit,like so many at the turn of the '70s, and they managed a couple of albums. Their debut, Open Spaces (1971) is a stunning, complex, melodic progressive album with exceptional female vocals, great fuzz guitar and strong keyboards.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKfpzy0tgYc&list=RDlKfpzy0tgYc&start_radio=1&t=0&t=0

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1313 on: October 18, 2020, 05:40:06 PM »
Doris Troy - Kill Them All!



Written by Berto Pisano and Jacques Chaumont, and featured in the 1971 Italian film "Kill!".

Quote
Doris Elaine Higginsen was born in the Bronx, the daughter of a Barbadian Pentecostal minister. Her parents disapproved of "subversive" forms of music like rhythm & blues, so she cut her teeth singing in her father's choir. At age 16, she was working as an usherette at the Apollo where she was "discovered" by James Brown [I BET SHE WAS, THE DIRTY OLD BOLLOCKS!!]. Under the name Doris Payne, she began songwriting and earned $100 in 1960 for the Dee Clark hit "How About That".

Taking her stage name from Helen of Troy, she sang backup vocals for Solomon Burke, the Drifters, and Dionne Warwick, before she co-wrote and recorded the US Top 10 hit "Just One Look" in 1963. Troy's only foray into the UK Singles Chart, "Whatcha Gonna Do About It", peaked at No. 37 in December 1964.

After moving to London in 1969, she was signed by The Beatles to their Apple Records label, and released the Doris Troy album the following year, co-produced by Troy and George Harrison. Troy worked in the UK throughout the 1970s, appearing at Ronnie Scott's Club and recording a live album, The Rainbow Testament.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 05:52:31 PM by daf »

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1314 on: October 18, 2020, 06:32:52 PM »
Bread, Love And Dreams - Amaryllis Part 3 Light

https://youtu.be/KQ5V-mzstsc



From their third and final album, Amaryllis, the first side of which comprised a three part suite.

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1315 on: October 18, 2020, 09:38:37 PM »
Wallace Collection - My Way Of Loving You



From the French-Italian film 'Un Beau Monstre' released in 1971

Quote
Wallace Collection were a Belgian band founded from the ashes of the group Sylvester's Team. Three of the original members : Sylvain Vanholme, Freddy Nieuland and Marc Herouet then went on to form the band 16th Century, together with bass-player Christian Janssen and the classical musicians Raymond Vincent and Jacques Namotte. These two were members in the Belgian National Philharmonic Orchestra, but had been flirting with popular music already in a band called Stradivarius.

Based in Britain, they were named after the famous 'Wallace Collection' museum adjacent to the headquarters of its record label, EMI. The single "Daydream" became a hit in 21 countries, including going #1 in Belgium. After a few more Belgian hits, the group split up in 1971.

 

After the split, Sylvain Vanholme joined songwriters 'Pipou' and Lou Deprijck to form Chart Music's favourite Latin influenced pop-combo Two Man Sound!!

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1316 on: October 18, 2020, 11:42:59 PM »
Brigadune - I'll Cry Out From My Grave (God I'm Sorry)

https://youtu.be/BAKkmK2uF84



Brigadune's (their spelling), entire recording career comprised this solitary single.

daf

  • some weirdo taking the piss
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1317 on: October 19, 2020, 12:00:00 AM »
Dando Shaft - Till The Morning Comes



Released in 1971 on their second album 'Dando Shaft'

Quote
Dando Shaft were formed in Coventry in 1968 by guitar/vocalists Kevin Dempsey and Dave Cooper, multi-instrumentalist Martin Jenkins, bassist Roger Bullen, and tabla/percussionist Ted Kay. The band's name was taken from that of the title character of a 1965 novel by Don Calhoun.

They recorded their debut, 'An Evening With Dando Shaft' in 1970. The album was well-received, drawing immediate comparison to the work of fellow folk revival musicians Pentangle. Comparisons to Pentangle were only enhanced when, after moving to London in 1970, the band grew in October of that year to include Leamington Spa singer Polly Bolton, who had previously sung with June Tabor. Creating an even more favorable impression on critics, Dando Shaft were soon signed to RCA's progressive offshoot Neon, and in 1971 they created the eponymous album, Dando Shaft.

 

In 1972, they released their third album 'Lantaloon', and the band began to move in the direction of mainstream rock. This shift, however, caused internal dissension and the band soon broke up with Dempsey and Bolton forming a duo for a time in the USA, and Jenkins joining Hedgehog Pie.

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1318 on: October 19, 2020, 12:26:36 AM »
oooh, very nearly another 'snap' scenario....

Dando Shaft - Kalyope Driver

https://youtu.be/IPeanuV6Mq0



Formed in Coventry in 1968, they released three albums before splitting in 1972. This is from their eponymous second album.

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music
« Reply #1319 on: October 19, 2020, 08:25:07 AM »
Giorgio Moroder - Underdog



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh5B8s78aVc

Just a few short years after this, Moroder would change the course of popular music forever with his pioneering electro disco stylings, but in 1971 he was a bubblegum hitmaker (on the continent anyway, I don't think his singles were ever released in the UK).

Benny and Bjorn must've been listening...

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