Author Topic: driving away from an RTA  (Read 2458 times)

driving away from an RTA
« on: November 08, 2020, 06:50:52 PM »
anyone heard of this? anyone know about this?

mrs 7d got a surprise in the mail on Saturday - a letter from the police saying she'd driven away from a road traffic accident.

she says she overtook a cyclist and then had to slam on as a van came around a blind turn, and then the cyclist hit her wing mirror. he started banging on the bonnet and screaming, so she scarpered bcs she was scared AND the covid implications. i believe her on this score although i reckon she probably didn't overtake him terribly well.

anyway: anyone ever done this and what is the punishment?

BlodwynPig

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2020, 06:58:47 PM »
Could be up to life imprisonment depending how self-important the uninjured cyclist is

RickyHamster

  • And Love for All!
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2020, 07:01:38 PM »

icehaven

  • Marmalade's reared it's head in every course
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2020, 07:02:18 PM »
If the police have written a letter rather than turned up on the doorstep or called, they can't be taking it terribly seriously. What have they asked her to do?

dex

  • Maybe, but there again maybe not.
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2020, 07:07:14 PM »
https://www.highwaycodeuk.co.uk/answers/what-to-do-if-i-am-in-an-accident


Sounds like Icehaven is right, probs non injury and the cyclist has called old Bill.

touchingcloth

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2020, 07:13:42 PM »
Not much use to you, but what was she doing overtaking a cyclist coming up to a blind bend? She should take whatever (hopefully small) punishment the police might be seeking, and count herself lucky that things didn’t end up worse for her and the cyclist.

Harrumph.

Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2020, 07:23:28 PM »
Hopefully she will be banned from driving for 24mths.

Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2020, 07:26:25 PM »
Big mistake leaving living witnesses, these are the basics of criminy.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2020, 07:35:59 PM »
This happened to me about five years ago. I was turning a bend near my home and I scraped into the side of a car parked there. Not a major thing, but for some reason I panicked and drove off. Which was one of the most stupid things I've ever done in my life as there were probably a dozen or so witnesses. It took place outside a department of one of the local universities at a time when people were having a lunch/fag break. It may even have been one of their cars.

I pulled up down the road and thought 'should I go back?'' but I was too embarrassed and also thought I might get away with it, as hopefully it would have happened too fast for anyone to write my number down. Forgetting there are such things as mobile phones with cameras on these days. I did go back later that day intending to leave my number on the car but it had gone so I hoped for the best.

That weekend I went away and came back on the Sunday night to find a note attached to my door asking to call PC Drury (I remember the name because there was a Drury in my year at school. But she's not in the police) and my heart sunk. My neighbour gleefully informed me there had been two officers.

I tried numerous times to get hold of him but it was just the station number and he never seemed to be about. Meanwhile I read up on this https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bradford-west-yorkshire-28658217 and quite frankly shat my pants. In fact I'd say that the stress of this indirectly led to me dropping out of my PhD. I literally couldn't believe I'd been so stupid.

PC Drury (and a colleague) finally appeared over a week later (and almost a fortnight after the accident), turning up at my flat while I was eating my breakfast. I was so nervous I fell over on the way to the door and one of my shoes fell off (I just knew it was him as soon as the bell rang) but after him reading me the riot act I asked if I was to be charged and he said: "Not this time." I could have kissed him. And his much more attractive female colleague. I was warned not to do it again though, received a letter noting that I had admitted the offence and when I phoned up my insurers they weren't too happy about it.

Still, phew! I don't know what would have happened if it had been a moving car with someone inside it. But in this case it was a pretty minor thing. I got the damage to mine repaired privately. It cost a few hundred quid. And the car I hit was a much older one, so it probably was only worth a few hundred quid in total. If I'd just left a note on the windscreen and/or asked the people who saw it happen if it belonged to one of them, I'd have suffered much less stress. I'll know better next time. Although of course I've had things like cars back into me several times. Once when I was parked up in the thing. But I let the woman off in that case because she was incredibly apologetic and I'm nice. Although when I did something similar a couple of years earlier the wankers in the other car (two strapping lads in their early 20s) claimed I'd left them injured. Despite not even damaging their paintwork. I sincerely hope they've died in high-speed cop chases since then.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 08:10:01 PM by Jockice »

Inspector Norse

  • I bash the Bishop well.
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2020, 07:39:00 PM »
A bus hit me in the shoulder with its wing mirror a couple of years ago, after it overshot the bus stop I had just walked past.

I just gave the driver the middle finger and everyone went about their business, seemingly satisfied with how it had panned out.

So in conclusion, I think your partner should tell the police that the cyclist is clearly a petty arsehole and she couldn't care less about the accident and why aren't they dealing with more important matters like all them muslamic knife bombs.

BlodwynPig

  • The Last Living Member of COVID-20
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2020, 07:41:41 PM »
This happened to me about five years ago. I was turning a bend near my home and I scraped into the side of a car parked there. Not a major thing, but for some reason I panicked and drove off. Which was one of the most stupid things I've ever done in my life as there were probably a dozen or so witnesses. It took place outside a department of one of the local universities at a time when people were having a lunch/fag break. It may even have been one of their cars.

I pulled up down the road and thought 'should I go back?' but I was too embarrassed and also thought I might get away with it, as hopefully it would have happened too fast for anyone to write my number down. Forgetting there are such things as mobile phones with cameras on these days. I did go back later that day intending to leave my number on the car but it had gone so I hoped for the best.

That weekend I went away and came back on the Sunday night to find a note attached to my door asking to call PC Drury (I remember the name because there was a Drury in my year at school. But she's not in the police) and my heart sunk. My neighbour gleefully informed me there had been two officers.

I tried numerous times to get hold of him but it was just the station number and he never seemed to be about. Meanwhile I read up on this https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bradford-west-yorkshire-28658217 and quite frankly shat my pants. In fact I'd say that the stress of this indirectly led to me dropping out of my PhD. I literally couldn't believe I'd been so stupid.

PC Drury (and a colleague) finally appeared over a week later (and almost a fortnight after the accident), turning up ay my flat while I was eating my breakfast. I was so nervous I fell over on the way to the door and one of my shoes fell off (I just knew it was him as soon as the bell rang) but after him reading me the riot act I asked if I was to be charged and he said: "Not this time." I could have kissed him. And his much more attractive female colleague. I was warned not to do it again though, received a letter noting that I had admitted the offence and when I phoned up my insurers they weren't too happy about it.

Still, phew! I don't know what would have happened if it had been a moving car with someone inside it. But in this case it was a pretty minor thing. I got the damage to mine repaired privately. It cost a few hundred quid. And the car I hit was a much older one, so it probably was only worth a few hundred quid in total If I'd just left a note on the windscreen and/or asked the people who saw it happen if it belonged to one of them, I'd have suffered much less stress. I'll know better next time. Although of course I've had things like cars back into me several times. Once when I was parked up in the thing. But I let the woman off in that case because she was incredibly apologetic and I'm nice. Although when I did something similar a couple of years earlier the wankers in the other car (two strapping lads in their early 20s) claimed I'd left them injured. Despite not even damaging their paintwork. I sincerely hope they've died in high-speed cop chases since then.

Fuck property

Blue Jam

  • Some problems in the theory of molecular vibration
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2020, 07:46:02 PM »
Not much use to you, but what was she doing overtaking a cyclist coming up to a blind bend? She should take whatever (hopefully small) punishment the police might be seeking, and count herself lucky that things didn’t end up worse for her and the cyclist.

Harrumph.

Had a driver seemingly deliberately ram me off my bike before fleeing the scene when I was cycling round a roundabout in London. Cost me a £50 insurance premium to get the bike repaired, my no claims bonus, some tooth enamel and the price of some emergency dental work. Also a few hours of my life hanging about in A&E before getting checked out for brain injuries and cranial nerve damage. That was ten years ago and to this day I am still very nervous about cycling on roads.

Harrumphing here too tbh.

SpiderChrist

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2020, 07:47:21 PM »
[tag]It’s Immaterial consider re-write[/tag]

touchingcloth

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2020, 08:04:40 PM »
Had a driver seemingly deliberately ram me off my bike before fleeing the scene when I was cycling round a roundabout in London. Cost me a £50 insurance premium to get the bike repaired, my no claims bonus, some tooth enamel and the price of some emergency dental work. Also a few hours of my life hanging about in A&E before getting checked out for brain injuries and cranial nerve damage. That was ten years ago and to this day I am still very nervous about cycling on roads.

Harrumphing here too tbh.

I’ve had everything from “definitely deliberate” to “probable accident, but just not arsed about cyclists”.

I ride very defensively because of cunts like this, so if, say, I’m riding with a car doing a similar speed just ahead of me and spot a left turn coming up, I’ll hang back on the off chance they’re going to take the left without signalling and wipe me off my bike. I think if I were being overtaken by the OP’s partner I’d have slowed down just in case something came at them round the blind bend, but that really shouldn’t be a decision I have to take.

Buelligan

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2020, 08:12:08 PM »
Don't worry, they do it to motorcyclists too.  I followed one home once, asked him if he remembered me.  He said he didn't.  I said, well you probably would have if you'd killed me about twenty miles ago.  Hope you'll remember me next time and LOOK IN YOUR FUCKING MIRRORS WHEN YOU WANT TO OVERTAKE.  Thx.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2020, 08:19:49 PM »
But then I once had a cyclist try to spit on me through the open window of my car seemingly because I'd turned right onto an otherwise deserted street when he was approaching but at least 200 metres away. Oh sorry sir, I didn't realise that it was your private road. Take it from me, if I'd put him in any danger whatsoever, I doubt if he'd have been composed enough to steady himself and aim some gob at me. Good job it missed though. I would have been less than happy if it had made contact.

Shit Good Nose

  • Several bags of balls
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2020, 08:22:02 PM »
I had one of these a few years ago saying a traffic rozzer had witnessed me driving away from an accident in Grasmere despite the fact that at the time I was actually at home over 260 miles away tucking into a curry, with my car locked up in the garage (turned out it was another red Ford Fiesta with one letter different on the number plate).

Anyway, I remember the letter assumed guilt by default and there was no space given to say anything other than what the letter was accusing me of (I responded rather sarcastically providing my phone number and wrote something like "as you haven't allowed a space for me to claim my innocence, perhaps you'd like to phone me to save both of us postage costs" [the officer himself did phone me and after I told my side of it and sent him a photo of my undamaged car he was apologetic]).

In your missus' case it sounds like she has admitted to some level of guilt.  She's probs best off writing down exactly what happened and explaining why she didn't stop and putting her phone number on there asking someone to contact her so she can explain further.  At that point either the police or the cyclist will in all likelihood drop the complaint.  IF they don't, at worst it will be a fine and possibly points, more likely just the costs of repair if there was any damage to the bike.  Given that she did drive away and has admitted as much, I would suggest she doesn't counter-complain regarding any damage to her car (if there was any), otherwise it could end up being a petty back-and-forth that goes on for months.


But then I once had a cyclist try to spit on me through the open window of my car seemingly because I'd turned right onto an otherwise deserted street when he was approaching but at least 200 metres away. Oh sorry sir, I didn't realise that it was your private road. Take it from me, if I'd put him in any danger whatsoever, I doubt if he'd have been composed enough to steady himself and aim some gob at me. Good job it missed though. I would have been less than happy if it had made contact.

As I've said on here before several times, in my personal experience as a driver, cyclist and pedestrian in roughly equal measure, cyclists do tend to be the more commonly worst behaved of the three.  But, admittedly, far too many drivers lack spatial awareness and don't use their mirrors anywhere near enough.

Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2020, 08:34:51 PM »

Anyway, I remember the letter assumed guilt by default and there was no space given to say anything other than what the letter was accusing me of (I responded rather sarcastically providing my phone number and wrote something like "as you haven't allowed a space for me to claim my innocence, perhaps you'd like to phone me to save both of us postage costs" [the officer himself did phone me and after I told my side of it and sent him a photo of my undamaged car he was apologetic]).

yeah she just has a letter with no space for remonstration, just provided some details and is awaiting a call.

Quote
In your missus' case it sounds like she has admitted to some level of guilt.  She's probs best off writing down exactly what happened and explaining why she didn't stop and putting her phone number on there asking someone to contact her so she can explain further.  At that point either the police or the cyclist will in all likelihood drop the complaint.  IF they don't, at worst it will be a fine and possibly points, more likely just the costs of repair if there was any damage to the bike.  Given that she did drive away and has admitted as much, I would suggest she doesn't counter-complain regarding any damage to her car (if there was any), otherwise it could end up being a petty back-and-forth that goes on for months.

she's only admitted as much to me - no official confession. i've just told her to get her story straight and be reasonably honest. she was scared. her kid brother was there. no one was injured and nothing was damaged (the cyclist pounded on the bonnet a bit but that's fine).

it's happened to both of us as cyclists so we get it and understand why he's peeved.

thanks all, even those suggesting fatal punitive measures.

Sebastian Cobb

  • bad opinion haver
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2020, 08:46:04 PM »
Someone bumped into the back of me at some traffic lights, I waved to acknowledge it then followed the lights onto the main road then indicated onto a side-street expecting matey who'd damaged their Subaru Impreza far worse than my £500 Astra (that I'd had for several years at that point) as I pulled away I could see they'd burst their headlight and wing.

I was sort-of relieved because I'd been in the pub the night before, and whilst I've never gotten drunk then driven, I'm not 100% sure I'd have passed a breathalyser (you probably only need 4 pints the night before to fail). It changed me though, although not my relationship with booze, I just walked or got taxis the mornings after.

touchingcloth

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2020, 09:21:14 PM »
I had one of these a few years ago saying a traffic rozzer had witnessed me driving away from an accident in Grasmere despite the fact that at the time I was actually at home over 260 miles away tucking into a curry, with my car locked up in the garage (turned out it was another red Ford Fiesta with one letter different on the number plate).

Anyway, I remember the letter assumed guilt by default and there was no space given to say anything other than what the letter was accusing me of (I responded rather sarcastically providing my phone number and wrote something like "as you haven't allowed a space for me to claim my innocence, perhaps you'd like to phone me to save both of us postage costs" [the officer himself did phone me and after I told my side of it and sent him a photo of my undamaged car he was apologetic]).

In your missus' case it sounds like she has admitted to some level of guilt.  She's probs best off writing down exactly what happened and explaining why she didn't stop and putting her phone number on there asking someone to contact her so she can explain further.  At that point either the police or the cyclist will in all likelihood drop the complaint.  IF they don't, at worst it will be a fine and possibly points, more likely just the costs of repair if there was any damage to the bike.  Given that she did drive away and has admitted as much, I would suggest she doesn't counter-complain regarding any damage to her car (if there was any), otherwise it could end up being a petty back-and-forth that goes on for months.


As I've said on here before several times, in my personal experience as a driver, cyclist and pedestrian in roughly equal measure, cyclists do tend to be the more commonly worst behaved of the three.  But, admittedly, far too many drivers lack spatial awareness and don't use their mirrors anywhere near enough.

As someone who has done all three in equal measure, I think you need a multiplier for behaviour by potential damage.

I agree that cyclists tend to play more fast and loose than drivers, but the stakes are lower - it’s a lot harder to kill someone other than yourself by cycling like a prick. Also cyclists are legally entitled to be on roads with zero legal obligations about the rules of the road - that’s probably not a great thing, but it’s the reality of the situation, so when I drive near a cyclist I just assume they have no sense of self preservation and drive accordingly, because if some idiot has a death wish I don’t want to ruin my own life because of that.

Thomas

  • please describe an encounter with a squirrel
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2020, 09:23:07 PM »
Rule of thumb: if you can drive away from it, it's not an RTA. She's in the clear.

Sebastian Cobb

  • bad opinion haver
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2020, 09:33:31 PM »
As someone who has done all three in equal measure, I think you need a multiplier for behaviour by potential damage.

I agree that cyclists tend to play more fast and loose than drivers, but the stakes are lower - it’s a lot harder to kill someone other than yourself by cycling like a prick. Also cyclists are legally entitled to be on roads with zero legal obligations about the rules of the road - that’s probably not a great thing, but it’s the reality of the situation, so when I drive near a cyclist I just assume they have no sense of self preservation and drive accordingly, because if some idiot has a death wish I don’t want to ruin my own life because of that.

I used to take the approach of "when I drive I get angry about other cyclists and pedestrians, when I cycle I get angry about cars and pedestrians, and when I walk I get angry about cars and pedestrians" but the more I've lived in built-up areas and driven less, it's fucking mental how much space we cede to the car.

And as long as you're not pissed, you can probably pan a pedestrian or cyclist and have it chalked up to a mere 'accident'.

touchingcloth

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Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2020, 09:39:21 PM »
I used to take the approach of "when I drive I get angry about other cyclists and pedestrians, when I cycle I get angry about cars and pedestrians, and when I walk I get angry about cars and pedestrians" but the more I've lived in built-up areas and driven less, it's fucking mental how much space we cede to the car.

And as long as you're not pissed, you can probably pan a pedestrian or cyclist and have it chalked up to a mere 'accident'.

I’ve never lived in London, but even when I drive there I’m vicariously terrified for the cyclists. Manchester was awful as a cyclist, and Bristol - Britain’s first “cycling city” - was little better.

It is mental just how car-centric British cities are. Berlin is much larger than Manchester or Bristol, but cyclists are properly catered for, and small things like having dedicated lights for bikes make a massive difference. I know there are bits of London which have switched that way in recent years, but they feel few and far between.

And aye I reckon you could get off with smushing a cyclist and blaming it on them. Too much admin, though.

Sebastian Cobb

  • bad opinion haver
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2020, 09:45:05 PM »
I’ve never lived in London, but even when I drive there I’m vicariously terrified for the cyclists. Manchester was awful as a cyclist, and Bristol - Britain’s first “cycling city” - was little better.

It is mental just how car-centric British cities are. Berlin is much larger than Manchester or Bristol, but cyclists are properly catered for, and small things like having dedicated lights for bikes make a massive difference. I know there are bits of London which have switched that way in recent years, but they feel few and far between.

And aye I reckon you could get off with smushing a cyclist and blaming it on them. Too much admin, though.

Yeah. Dedicated cycling lanes are what's needed, rather than strips of paint that generally happen to be in the part most fucked by lorries.

I'm not even sure furniture makes the whole difference though, the road culture of the place matters. Ostensibly narrow roads are supposed to be good for cyclists as they enforce people not 'squeezing' on overtakes and the like. But I maintain Glasgow, with its multiple lanes, terrible road layouts and horrid traffic density is way more respectful of cyclists than Aberdeen ever was, glasgow should be a more hostile environment, but it wasn't just because most motorists didn't drive like complete entitled pricks. And many people dub it not cycling friendly at all.

Blue Jam

  • Some problems in the theory of molecular vibration
Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2020, 09:47:34 PM »
I used to take the approach of "when I drive I get angry about other cyclists and pedestrians, when I cycle I get angry about cars and pedestrians, and when I walk I get angry about cars and pedestrians" but the more I've lived in built-up areas and driven less, it's fucking mental how much space we cede to the car.

YES.

Buelligan

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PC GONE MAD
« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2020, 09:55:53 PM »
Anyway, it's incorrect to refer to an RTA.  It's an RTC, please don't use the wrong name.  Thanks.

touchingcloth

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Re: PC GONE MAD
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2020, 09:58:53 PM »
Anyway, it's incorrect to refer to an RTA.  It's an RTC, please don't use the wrong name.  Thanks.

Cunts. Twats. Rodneys.

Sebastian Cobb

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Re: PC GONE MAD
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2020, 10:00:22 PM »
Anyway, it's incorrect to refer to an RTA.  It's an RTC, please don't use the wrong name.  Thanks.
Why do they change the name and ruin it?

Tony Tony Tony

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Re: PC GONE MAD
« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2020, 11:43:45 PM »
Why do they change the name and ruin it?

An ex Rozzer, of my sometime acquaintance, told me the change from Road Traffic Accident to Road Traffic Collision was to reflect the fact "there is no such thing as an accident" as there is always at least one party at fault so it isn't accidental, it's carelessness to some degree.

I would argue that he obviously hadn't stood outside the bathroom waiting for a teenage stepson to exit the morning after a curry and a few bottles of Kingfisher, then he might have a different view of what counts as an accident.   

Re: driving away from an RTA
« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2020, 12:07:13 AM »
Chris Rea considers rewrite

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