Author Topic: Music documentaries  (Read 6807 times)

Shameless Custard

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Music documentaries
« on: December 10, 2020, 09:03:22 AM »
I watched Little Girl Blue the other night. A well made and quite depressing documentary about Janis Joplin. It's a bit of a tough watch, but she comes across as likeable and, of course, immensely talented. Dead at 27, oof. That's just really depressing

Also watched Eight Days A Week, which focuses on the Beatles' touring years. Was ok, with some nice footage, but offered nothing new really.

Seen any good ones recently?
« Last Edit: December 10, 2020, 12:13:38 PM by Shameless Custard »

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2020, 09:31:33 AM »
Possibly my favourite ever is about a band I've never cared for much. Promises And Lies: The Story of UB40. It was on BBC4 a few years ago and is sporadically repeated. I just found it fascinating (and actually pretty sad) to see a band made up of childhood friends fall apart in such spectacular style with the two Campbell brothers now in totally opposed camps - and another Campbell brother is singing with one of them.

I also think it's interesting that there's no racism involved. They've fallen out for personal and financial reasons and the colour of their skin (or indeed hair, as of course there were two ginges in the band) seems to have nothing to do with it. Personally after watching it several times I'm Team Not-Ali but others may draw different conclusions

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2020, 09:49:09 AM »
I'd recommend "Theory Of Obscurity - A Film About The Residents" on Amazon Prime - I'm not really a fan but found it fascinating. There's also a pretty good one on Captain Beefheart called (I think) "Under Review" that's also on Prime. And if you haven't seen the Miles Davis "Birth of the cool"  doc it's up on iPlayer and is superb.

Neomod

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2020, 10:12:41 AM »
I've mentioned it before but Family Band The Story of the Cowsills is well worth a watch. Sunshine Pop, alcoholism, heroin addiction, paternal abuse and a happy ending .... of sorts.

Oh and they were the original inspiration for the Partridge Family.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btTbG0UZfXE

It's available on itunes I think. Here's a surreal taster of these kids appearing on Playboy After Dark performing the banger Poor Baby.

https://youtu.be/MjlML0HvpPU?t=419

Also Paul Kelly's Lawrence of Belgravia but good luck finding a copy under £80.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18C2rjFiDPU


Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2020, 10:23:37 AM »
You can watch a good documentary about grindcore music here for free, it's called Slave to the Grind.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2020, 10:42:25 AM »
Also Paul Kelly's Lawrence of Belgravia but good luck finding a copy under £80.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18C2rjFiDPU

I have one. Ha!

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2020, 10:46:37 AM »
Feels redundant to say it but Anvil! The Story of Anvil is a must-watch. They're a proto-thrash band that never made it big; they've got the respect of all these top thrash musicians like Metallica and Anthrax but they play for crowds of 20. It evokes lots of This Is Spinal Tap but it's got a very warm heart and great human drama. 

Neomod

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2020, 11:07:42 AM »
I have one. Ha!

aaaaaaand the postcard limited to a few?

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2020, 11:10:18 AM »
The ones about the Jam and the Style Council on Sky Arts were really good.

And the Stiff tour documentary on Amazon Prime is quite the document of the times.

magval

  • Magnum Valentino
Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2020, 11:19:19 AM »
There was band from Cleveland called Chimaira who were around during the big noughties boom of American metal but for whatever reason never 'made it' and sort of fizzled out. I've seen a good few documentaries about metal bands and I still think their first film The Dehumanizing Process is the best film about a touring band.

It covers a good deal of ground, from a key member leaving during a tour and how hard he was to replace (drummer, somewhat typically as far as these things go), struggles with an unsupportive label, studio footage, tour shenanigans. What sets it apart from the usual “bonus DVD with new album” fare is that it seems to be made with one eye on external appeal – it’s not just for fans of the band, it’s a really compelling documentary in its own right.

Mind how the film Dig! Was just treated as its own thing as opposed to being seen as a project tied to its subject? I think The Dehumanizing Process is like that. It helps that it’s really, really well made and the cast/band are really likeable.

I’m recommending this to you directly JaDanketies as I’ve seen the films you mentioned as well so there must be some crossover of taste here. Then, YOU come back and recommend it!

They were the subject of a few subsequent releases too, that documented something of a career resurgence, and the first of these is especially good too. The rest are more directed at fans of the band, but The Dehumanizing Process is definitely worth a look if you’re the sort who watches music programmes on BBC4 no matter who they’re about.

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2020, 11:26:39 AM »
aaaaaaand the postcard limited to a few?
I've a feeling my copy did have the postcard, but I shrugged and put in the paper recycling.

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2020, 11:31:37 AM »
Possibly my favourite ever is about a band I've never cared for much. Promises And Lies: The Story of UB40. It was on BBC4 a few years ago and is sporadically repeated. I just found it fascinating (and actually pretty sad) to see a band made up of childhood friends fall apart in such spectacular style with the two Campbell brothers now in totally opposed camps - and another Campbell brother is singing with one of them.

I also think it's interesting that there's no racism involved. They've fallen out for personal and financial reasons and the colour of their skin (or indeed hair, as of course there were two ginges in the band) seems to have nothing to do with it. Personally after watching it several times I'm Team Not-Ali but others may draw different conclusions

It's a pretty sad state of affairs.  Although the band are much maligned now and lazily described as a covers band they were once one of the biggest bands in the world, in fact they are probably one of the most world known bands still judging by the fact that the band can still draw in huge crowds in even the smallest outpost countries.
They should be sitting pretty with a huge pension behind them but due to mismanagement they still have to gig to pay their wages.
Ali Campbell is a pretty horrible individual by all accounts.
Astro who joined him in his rival ub40 is just as despicable.  A week before he left the original band he begged his band mates for money claiming he was skint.  The band gave him the last 70k in their account, how did he repay them?...he quit the band 2 days before a massive gig in Liverpool to join Ali and his backing band on stage in London. 

Neomod

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2020, 11:59:07 AM »
I've a feeling my copy did have the postcard, but I shrugged and put in the paper recycling.

PROVE IT.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2020, 12:36:45 PM »
aaaaaaand the postcard limited to a few?

Oh aye, Of course. I got my order in very early.

NoSleep

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2020, 12:59:05 PM »
Chicago Blues (1972) directed by Harley Cokliss is a gritty warts and all look at the blues scene in the battered-looking Chicago of that time. Includes some awesome footage of Muddy Waters onstage with Buddy Guy & Junior Wells as well as a look at some of the less well known blues artists like Johnie Lewis, who makes a living as a (house) painter. Dick Gregory eloquently explains the the economics of the racism and poverty that is the backdrop to all we behold.

You can find it on iPlayer, otherwise there's a VHS rip of it (with the beginning and ending slightly missing) on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzAySaWy9sc

I notice in the comments there's people recalling some of the featured players who had lived in the same neighbourhoods.

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2020, 01:02:17 PM »
I’m recommending this to you directly JaDanketies as I’ve seen the films you mentioned as well so there must be some crossover of taste here. Then, YOU come back and recommend it!

Will check it out!

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2020, 02:02:14 PM »
Finding Joseph I, the documentary about H.R. from Bad Brains. I think it's on Amazon Prime. He's such a fascinating guy, I don't think it could be boring if they tried but it is really good.

Shameless Custard

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2020, 02:39:36 PM »
Excellent recommendations from everyone, that I'll deffo be seeking out!

An obvious choice maybe, but Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck I thought was excellent too. Made me appreciate Nirvana and his songwriting even more

The Devil and Daniel Johnston is essential viewing. Such a unique and brilliant talent, with a great story. Even more poignant now he's passed away

Joy Division (2007) is excellent. Really transports you to that time and place, and the living band members manage not to snipe at each other

Another obvious choice, but Some Kind Of Monster is great. Metallica falling apart at the seams, and for some reason filming it

Ramones: End Of The Century is excellent. And I found the lengthy Queen doc, Days Of Our Lives a great watch. Another film that made me appreciate the artists involved even more

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2020, 02:43:03 PM »
Joy Division (2007) is excellent. Really transports you to that time and place, and the living band members manage not to snipe at each other
The final falling out hadn't happened by that point - I went to a screening of it at the Lowry in Salford, and Hook and Morris did a small Q&A together afterwards.

Shameless Custard

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2020, 02:45:48 PM »
Ah ok, that makes sense! I guess I'm just so used to hearing Sumner and Hook slating each other, by this point

Shameless Custard

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2020, 02:57:13 PM »
Brian Eno - 1971 - 1977 - The Man Who Fell To Earth is on Amazon Prime, and although it's pretty long it's well worth the watch

New York Dolls: All Dolled Up was really enjoyable. New York Doll however focuses purely on Arthur Kane, though I've not managed to see that one yet. Meant to be very good

Has there ever been a good Blondie film?

Neomod

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2020, 03:02:27 PM »
Has there ever been a good Blondie film?

I enjoyed One Way or Another. It documents the early interesting stuff right up to the awkwardness at their Induction to the Hall of Fame.

Shameless Custard

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2020, 03:05:45 PM »
Brilliant, thanks!

Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2020, 03:17:08 PM »
Quote
Anvil! The Story of Anvil

Fantastic - genuinely funny and heart-breaking too.

Quote
Ramones - End of the Century

Another goody. Well worth checking out the DVD for the deleted scenes and commentary too.

chveik

  • vampires have it easy
Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2020, 03:49:02 PM »
Scott Walker: 30 Century Man

The Outsider: The Story of Harry Partch

Neomod

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2020, 04:10:19 PM »
Who can forget Rags, Spider and the gang from Tesco Value Wonderstuff, FMB in The Next Big Thing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21HE5h2qhlI

Available on the youtube.


Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2020, 04:21:04 PM »
Amazon Prime has/had the Brainiac documentary Transmissions After Zero which was good, if you remember them. Pretty sad though, finding out about what really caused Tim Taylor's fatal car crash.

bigfatheart

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2020, 04:33:36 PM »
Cosmic Psychos - Blokes You Can Trust is one of those I reckon would be appealing whether or not you're a fan. Aussies who got lumped in with noise rock/early grunge, but truth be told they're more of a punk band with Motorhead/Hendrix influences. Lead singer Ross Knight's a fascinating figure - he's got some interesting and unusual facets and interests, but at the same time he's such a stereotypically blokey Australian that you almost think he's a Paul Hogan character or summat. The bit where he gets pissed at an ex-bandmate's graveside and seems too embarrassed to articulate his feelings about it all is heartbreaking.

Dirty Boy

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #28 on: December 10, 2020, 05:28:51 PM »
Quote from: Shameless Custard
An obvious choice maybe, but Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck I thought was excellent too. Made me appreciate Nirvana and his songwriting even more

I haven't seen it, but according to Buzz Osbourne it's a load of made up bollocks.

The new Swans Doc is the best one i've watched for a while. It's as lengthy as you'd expect and has shitloads of rare footage covering 30 odd years from Gira's early Joy Division soundalike bands through to the uber gruelling 2016-17 tour. He's also disarmingly honest about his own music (describing Swans pre-reformation as "a failure") as well as admitting what a cunt he often was. Dictatorial would possibly cover it.

Anyone seen the Amphetamine Reptile one? Been meaning to get round to that.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2020, 05:39:14 PM by Dirty Boy »

Shameless Custard

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Re: Music documentaries
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2020, 06:01:04 PM »
Oh really? Do you remember what he said was bollocks in Montage Of Heck?

Anyone seen Once Were Brothers? A new doc on The Band. Looks really appealing. Had it downloaded for a few weeks now

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