Author Topic: Streaming my own DVDs  (Read 1726 times)

easytarget

  • five gas lighters for a pound
Streaming my own DVDs
« on: December 23, 2020, 05:07:30 PM »
Like most of you nerds, I have a collection of DVDs.
I'd like to play them but our house has gone 'all streaming', there's a DVD player somewhere but I'd have to hook it up, find the remote control etc.

I want to stream my DVDs.

The guides I've found online seem to be focused on ripping DVD content (usually a film) to a single MKV or AVI file and using Plex to stream it. But I want all the DVD extras (bonus content, commentary tracks).

Does anyone know how to do this?

I thought there would exist something that would: copy the DVD to a harddrive, allow your TV to 'see' the DVDs on the harddrive and play them back as if they're real, shiny, spinning disks (bonus content, obnoxious menus etc. all intact) - but if it's out there I have not found it.


Famous Mortimer

  • War - it's fantastic!
    • International Syndicate of Cult Film Critics
Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2020, 05:14:10 PM »
VLC should be able to play a full DVD image, but in terms of ripping it to your PC...is DVD Decrypter still a thing?

BeardFaceMan

  • Safely ensconced on top of the bathroom cabinet
    • mixes'n'mashes
Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2020, 05:23:22 PM »
I use Freemake to rip the extras from DVDs, commentary tracks etc, does a lovely job. I think you can copy DVDS too if you want the vob/sub files so you get all the menus and stuff.

Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2020, 05:41:47 PM »
Like most of you nerds, I have a collection of DVDs.
I'd like to play them but our house has gone 'all streaming', there's a DVD player somewhere but I'd have to hook it up, find the remote control etc.

I want to stream my DVDs.

The guides I've found online seem to be focused on ripping DVD content (usually a film) to a single MKV or AVI file and using Plex to stream it. But I want all the DVD extras (bonus content, commentary tracks).

Does anyone know how to do this?

I thought there would exist something that would: copy the DVD to a harddrive, allow your TV to 'see' the DVDs on the harddrive and play them back as if they're real, shiny, spinning disks (bonus content, obnoxious menus etc. all intact) - but if it's out there I have not found it.

DVD Shrink works for me - and it's free!

Sebastian Cobb

  • bad opinion haver
Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2020, 06:39:40 PM »
Not sure about menus but handbrake will let you grab the extras.

easytarget

  • five gas lighters for a pound
Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2020, 07:53:10 PM »
These all sound good, VLC might be the closest.

Ideally I wanna just rip the DVD to a .VOB (.ISO?) file (whatever the raw un-converted format for a DVD is) and have a client that lives on my TV that can read all those files off the harddrive of some computer on my network.

(I want Plex to support .ISOs but it doesn't).

[sad music plays, easytarget walks into the distance]

Sebastian Cobb

  • bad opinion haver
Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2020, 01:21:39 AM »
I think Kodi can play VOB/ISO formats. If you have an Android-based smart tv you might be able to do that.

I assume if you're wanting to store DVD's directly, you're not short on storage, so another option might be to rip it, store it "as is" for preservation then convert the main and extras to a more friendly (efficiently compressedwith little lost in quality, plus better metadata support) format for plex to deal with. That way you get your preserved copy, in case stuff gets missed or better codecs become available and a more versatile copy.

Re: Streaming my own DVDs
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2020, 05:31:44 PM »
I think Kodi can play VOB/ISO formats. If you have an Android-based smart tv you might be able to do that.

I assume if you're wanting to store DVD's directly, you're not short on storage, so another option might be to rip it, store it "as is" for preservation then convert the main and extras to a more friendly (efficiently compressedwith little lost in quality, plus better metadata support) format for plex to deal with. That way you get your preserved copy, in case stuff gets missed or better codecs become available and a more versatile copy.

I haven't tried it but supposedly Emby can serve ISOs to clients that can play them, including Kodi.

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