Author Topic: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -  (Read 69285 times)

An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« on: January 20, 2021, 05:43:47 AM »
Welcome to the continuing thread....we're still on 1982

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2021, 05:47:47 AM »
Dolly Mixture - Everything and More

https://youtu.be/uogX4qtizaE



Formed in Cambridge in 1978, this is their third single. They had a number one hit as Captain Sensible's backing band on his reprise of Happy Talk. Dolly Mixture called it a day in 1983 when Rachel, who was going out with the Captain, got pregnant with his child.

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

  • a hopeless vanity... a stupefyingly futile conceit
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2021, 07:52:11 AM »
Welcome to the continuing thread....we're still on 1982

And away we go!

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2021, 07:52:40 AM »
So it doesn't get lost, here's the link to previous thread :

An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 1, 1962 - 1982


shiftwork2

  • pies this is your time
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2021, 09:29:14 AM »
I've been a taker not a contributor but as this is starting afresh I would like to express appreciation for this excellent thread.

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2021, 01:56:29 PM »
3D A Fish In Sea - Houdini
Taken from Peel session, March 1982



An all too familiar tale of early promise stymied by in-fighting, mis-management, indifferent promotion and corporate shittery. Originally a six-piece popular on the Liverpool circuit they managed to secure a couple of Peel sessions, shortened their name to 3D (first big mistake, if you ask me), went through multiple line-up changes (always a danger sign), signed to Mickie Most’s label, recorded an unreleased album, dropped a couple of lacklustre singles that failed to dent the charts and then gave up the ghost. A slick and sickly version of ‘Houdini’ eventually ended up being released as a single in 1985 but, by then, nobody (including, I imagine, half the band) cared. The original ‘Houdini’ is, I maintain, a thing of rare beauty and bollocks to anyone who disagrees.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZbYBBc78kU


Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2021, 02:57:21 PM »
Drumbeat For Baby - Weekend. Released on Rough Trade in 1982.






Weekend were a British Indie Pop PostPunk band formed by Alison Statton following the split of Young Marble Giants in 1981.

You can almost smell damp herringbone overcoats, Old Holborn, rum & black, no ice, and a hint of Christian Dior Poison on this record.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fI0QHRJhG2s&feature=emb_logo

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2021, 04:13:30 PM »
Drumbeat For Baby - Weekend. Released on Rough Trade in 1982.



Weekend were a British Indie Pop PostPunk band formed by Alison Statton following the split of Young Marble Giants in 1981.

You can almost smell damp herringbone overcoats, Old Holborn, rum & black, no ice, and a hint of Christian Dior Poison on this record.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fI0QHRJhG2s&feature=emb_logo

lovely. I was saving this for later but may as well add it here.

Weekend - Summerdays

https://youtu.be/mwBN-TVCK1w



This is taken from their only album, La Varieté, and they split up in 1983.

chveik

  • your rhetoric will smother you!!!
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2021, 05:09:00 PM »
Sun Ra - Nuclear War



a little distraction from post-punk, and the message is still a bit relevant

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2021, 05:27:00 PM »
The Phones ‎– Roboter



Released in Germany in 1982 - did not chart

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2021, 07:12:01 PM »
Sjef Van Oekel ‎– Kwi, Kwa, Kwonika



Released in January 1982 - did not chart

Quote
Sjef van Oekel was a popular TV comedy character created by Dutch artist Wim T. Schippers and played by Dutch comedian, singer and actor Dolf Brouwers. Van Oekel started as a side character in De Fred Hachéshow in 1972, but became such a cult figure that he gained his own television show, Van Oekel's Discohoek, songs and even a comic strip, all written by Schippers.

   

Wim T. Schippers created Sjef van Oekel in 1972 as a Belgian french fries salesman from the village Reet. Schippers had never visited Reet, but had seen the name on a company manufacturing car accessories and enjoyed the double entendre of the name ("Reet" means "crack" or "bumcrack" in Dutch). In line with his character's origin Van Oekel originally used a Flemish accent, but quickly dropped this in favour for his own Dutch accent.

Van Oekel is typically dressed in a fine black tuxedo and always talks and behaves in a refined manner, complete with archaisms. However something always went wrong during his presentations, either on the set or he himself tripped or went nauseous. Situations like these always lead to his well-known catch phrase: "Ik word niet goed!" ("I'm starting to feel not well!"). In one controversial episode he threw up in the bicycle bag of his sidekick Evert van de Pik, which outraged Dutch journalist Henk van der Meyden so much that he started an unsuccessful campaign to get the program banned.

   

Brouwers recorded many Schippers-penned and other songs, most of which comic and dramatic. With Manke Nelis he recorded "Vis wordt duur betaald" (#46 in the Dutch charts in 1988), but his best known song is probably "Vette jus" ("[Sauerkraut with] greasy gravy"), a dish still associated with him in a song that is little more than a list of Dutch dishes.

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2021, 07:37:27 PM »
Haina- Haila - Masami Tsuchiya. Released on Epic in 1982



My mate was a massive Japan freak and bought this album because of the association. We all took the piss, especially with this track with our racist renditions of it.  Hey. We were sixteen-year-old 2Tone/ The Jam fans, of course, we would be twattish and nervous of it. Secretly, I loved this album and felt very 'confused', (shall we say?) about Tsuchiya's image on the sleeve

Masami Tsuchiya is a Japanese guitarist, vocalist, songwriter and producer born in Fuji City, Shizouka. Made his debut with a very short stint with The Golden Cups aged 15 after running away from home, working as a roadie for the group before being tracked down by his father and taken home (sources, Tsuchiya's tribute to Masayoshi Kabe in October 2020 and "The Golden Cups One More Time" movie).

Returned to Tokyo as a university student aged 18 in 1970, quickly recruited by Nobu Saito as a guitarist which led to session and performing work with Lily, Junko Ohashi and Show Yamamoto. Formed Ippu-Do in 1978, leading to his appearances with the band Japan, session work for Arcadia (the Duran Duran offshoot) and eventual solo career.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTJ-syDN3nI

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2021, 07:38:17 PM »

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2021, 07:40:03 PM »
Sun Ra - Nuclear War



a little distraction from post-punk, and the message is still a bit relevant

Love that!

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2021, 07:53:53 PM »
Transparents - Afraid Of Mice

Liverpool band who I'd totally forgotten about until a Scouse mate mentioned them recently. Apparently he used to know them. I didn't.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4refolVb_uQ

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2021, 07:55:21 PM »
Sun Ra and pals might think nuclear war is a motherfucker, but, conversely, Washington DC go-go hitmakers Trouble Funk are IN FAVOUR of dropping the bomb!!!!!!

Trouble Funk-Drop the Bomb
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buXt-yyZEss&feature=emb_logo


chveik

  • your rhetoric will smother you!!!
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2021, 08:02:33 PM »
Super Djata Band - Batila



another gem from Mali

Quote
Bringing together bambara traditions, Wasulu hunter music, Kenedugu's balafon music, and bozo fishermen dances, mandingo chants and fula repertoire, mixed with a spicy, and at times even psychedelic guitar, Zani Diabaté's Super Djata Band came to the forefront of the emerging world music scene in the early 1980s as one of Mali's strongest bands.

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2021, 08:06:21 PM »
XOYO - The Passage.

Manchester band formed by Richard (or is it Dick?) Witts, who was apparently previously in the Halle Orchestra. I think I first heard this on the Pillows And Prayers compilation and later bought the album, Degenerates, which I was quite fond of.

I saw them play at the local art college around this time and a large hardboard display at the back of the stage toppled over and landed on one of them. Which amused me greatly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jpk2rFXZYi0

Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2021, 08:11:29 PM »
My Face Is On Fire - Felt.

Another one from Pillows And Prayers. My first exposure to Lawrence, later to become my favourite recording artist of all time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejj0CevY8RY


Jockice

  • I really have red hair. And a **********.
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2021, 08:13:54 PM »
Repetition. Ignore.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2021, 08:45:37 PM by Jockice »

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2021, 08:38:17 PM »
Killing Joke - Empire Song

https://youtu.be/eoTNOb76LV4




Sixth single and biggest hit so far, reaching number 43 in the UK charts in March. In also placed number 20 in Peel's festive Fifty. In February 82, singer Jaz Coleman moved to Iceland to survive the apocalypse, which he predicted was coming imminently. As a result  "Empire Song" was performed at Top of the Pops with drummer Paul Ferguson miming vocals and a dummy was placed in front of a keyboard. Just a normal day in KJ land.

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #21 on: January 20, 2021, 08:50:59 PM »
Fun fact - though it was #43 in the chart, it wasn't even the lowest charting song on that weeks show!

Quote
25 March 1982: Presenters: Peter Powell & Garth Crooks

(41) ALTERED IMAGES – See Those Eyes
( 3 ) JULIO IGLESIAS – Quiereme Mucho (Yours) (video)
(33) BUCKS FIZZ – My Camera Never Lies
(28) FOSTER & ALLEN – A Bunch Of Thyme
(44) THE BOOMTOWN RATS – House On Fire
(26) THE NOLANS – Don’t Love Me Too Hard (video)
(43) KILLING JOKE – Empire Song
(22) PLUTO – Your Honour
(14) CHAS & DAVE – Ain’t No Pleasing You (video)
( 1 ) THE GOOMBAY FUCKING DANCE BAND – Seven Tears
( 9 ) THE ASSOCIATES – Party Fears Two (crowd dancing and credits)

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2021, 09:40:50 PM »
Tom Waits - Broken Bicycles



This song was written during a transitional time for Waits who was chafing against the demands of his label & management, and the limitations of the persona he'd created for himself. In fact it was during the recording of the One From The Heart sessions Waits met his future wife Kathleen Brennan, who would play a huge part in shaping Waits' future musical direction from that point on.

One From The Heart(the film), was a monumentally disastrous flop that nearly bankrupted Frances Ford Coppola's production company Zoetrope Productions and caused the director financial struggles for years afterwards.

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2021, 10:00:00 PM »
Tin Tin - Kiss Me



Released in October 1982 - did not chart

Quote
Stephen Anthony James Duffy was born in Alum Rock, Birmingham. While attending the School of Foundation Studies & Experimental Workshop at Birmingham Polytechnic Duffy met John Taylor. Together they formed the group Duran Duran, along with Taylor's childhood friend, Nick Rhodes. While Taylor was the guitarist (later switching to bass) and Rhodes played the synthesizer, Duffy was the band's vocalist/lyricist and bassist. When bass player Simon Colley joined, Duffy moved to drums. He left both the school and the band in 1979, before Duran Duran signed with EMI in 1980.

He went on to form Obviously Five Believers, sometimes known as The Subterranean Hawks or The Hawks, and he made his first four-track recordings. The Hawks' only single, "Words of Hope", was released in 1981.

 

In 1982, he created the band Tin Tin, with John Mulligan and Dik Davis (from the band Fashion), Andy "Stoker" Growcott (of Dexys Midnight Runners) and Bob Lamb (original producer of Birmingham band UB40). Originally called Holy Tin Tin before being shortened, the band was signed with WEA Records in the UK, and released the single "Kiss Me" in 1982 but was unsuccessful. By 1983, Tin Tin had signed with Sire Records in the US, who re-released "Kiss Me". Another single, "Hold It", was also released in 1983 which peaked at no.55 in the UK.

 

After a stint of working in the US, Duffy returned to England and signed a deal as a solo artist with Virgin 10. Now working under the name Stephen "Tin Tin" Duffy, he recorded a new version of "Kiss Me" which was released in 1984, this time only in the local West Midlands area, followed by a nationwide release of "She Makes Me Quiver" which peaked at #88 in September 1984.

     

At the end of 1984, Duffy recorded a third version of "Kiss Me", produced by J.J. Jeczalik and Nicholas Froome, which was released in February 1985. It debuted at #22 and peaked at number 4 in the UK Singles Chart and stayed in the UK Top 10 for five weeks altogether. This version was featured on his debut album 'the ups and downs' - released in April 1985.

 

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2021, 11:12:02 PM »
I've been a taker not a contributor but as this is starting afresh I would like to express appreciation for this excellent thread.

Same here. I only began browsing the first thread the other night but have already found a few great songs that I'd not heard before.

Don't 'spose anyone's put all the suggested songs on a Sp*t*fy Playlist?


Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2021, 11:32:40 PM »
Life Goes On - The Damned. Released on Bronze in 1982.



Favourite Damned album.  My best friend from university who knew he was dying chose this number as his funeral song.
Not a dry eye in the house. Still miss ya, Lloydy. x

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0tA4MvnlOY&feature=emb_logo

daf

  • Fudgeknocking Bananas
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2021, 12:00:00 AM »
Ted Rogers With The Young'uns ‎– Dusty Bin



Released in 1982 - did not chart

Quote
3–2–1 was a British game show that was made by Yorkshire Television for ITV. It ran for ten years, between 29 July 1978 and 24 December 1988, with Ted Rogers as the host. It was based on a Spanish gameshow called Un, dos, tres... responda otra vez and was a trio of three shows in one: a quiz, variety and a game show. The show occupied a Saturday early evening slot for most of its run.

 

Dusty Bin was both the show's mascot and its booby prize. Dusty would appear at the very opening of the show's titles, coming to life by the pre-titles Yorkshire Television chevron logo, flying into him outside of the studios in Leeds. Dusty would also appear at the start of each show, dressed in the style of that week's theme.

The cartoon character of Dusty Bin was created by freelance designer John Sunderland, who developed the character based on the show producers' brief for a booby prize which would work on the British version of the show. The original Spanish version had a pumpkin as a booby prize. Sunderland's concept for the shows' original titles, which were shown on the original series, included the birth of the bin. The character came to life as YTV's chevron logo falls to earth after shooting up into the sky like a rocket above the studios, exploding in a dustbin standing by the studios stage door. The bin contained a clown's costume, parts of which become one with the bin, bringing it to life as the character Dusty Bin; part dustbin, part clown, part enduring iconic character.

   

The original robotic Dusty Bin, and his Yorkshire Terrier, Dog Garbage, was put together by Ian Rowley, in his converted chapel workshop in Rodley, Leeds. He used over 73 microprocessors, at a cost around £10,000 to manufacture to control Dusty and Garbage.

   

The final Christmas special, broadcast on 24 December 1988, attracted 12.5 million viewers, but an eleventh series was not commissioned. A bitter Ted Rogers claimed in an April 1996 interview that "The Oxbridge lot got control of TV and they didn't really want it. It was too downmarket for them. We were still getting 12 million viewers when they took it off after ten years. These days if a show gets nine million everyone does a lap of honour."

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2021, 12:06:04 AM »

Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #28 on: January 21, 2021, 12:07:31 AM »
New Order - Too Late

https://youtu.be/sySXyLHEM1o



1982 was a quiet year for New Order, their only release was the Temptation single, but they did record their second Peel session featuring a couple of early versions of songs that would appear on their second album, Power, Corruption & Lies, in 1983. Also included was this rarity, a song they never played live, but nonetheless, one of their best in my opinion.

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: An Alternative History of "Pop" Music: Part 2, 1982 -
« Reply #29 on: January 21, 2021, 12:14:44 AM »
I Could Have Crushed A Grape - Stu Francis Released on Lunar in 1982.








Cunt.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiZP-27-PJw&feature=emb_logo

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