Author Topic: bread baking  (Read 1844 times)

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #30 on: March 18, 2021, 05:32:52 PM »
That's a real thing of beauty!

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #31 on: March 20, 2021, 06:49:21 PM »
What's nice about baking your own bread is that you can get the crispiest possible result, so that it makes a real racket to eat it. At the moment I'm munching away and I can't understand a word coming out of the TV because of the volume.

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2021, 09:46:11 PM »
Dear Dr. CaB,

I might have given myself indigestion after eating my first ever sourdough bread made from my own starter. Or if not, then it's a big old coincidence, because I never had a stomach ache like this in recent memory, and it happens to be the first day I eat this new thing for me, home-made sourdough bread. Well it tasted amazing but could it actually be harming me? The loaf didn't rise much and has a really strong smell, almost like cheese. Am I just a victim of a dangerous trend that is silently killing? I actually don't know if I want to risk trying again if I recover soon... it's got a bit of an association for me now. Stools: type 5 on the BSFS.

Regards,
Retinend



P.S. I actually feel fine right now - the aches lasted for about 60 minutes at a slightly uncomfortable intensity.   

hamfist

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2021, 10:31:33 PM »
that sounds like when my starter went a bit weird, I was feeding it on organic white flour and somehow it made it produce less yeast and more bacteria, it took on a weird smell and failed to rise.

I binned most if it, gave it boggo Allinsons strong white bread flour to eat and even added a sprinkle of bicarb (to reduce the acidity which may gave been killing the yeast) and a sprinkle of dried yeast.

It came back to full vigour, now I only feed it Allinsons and it’s thriving.

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2021, 07:52:03 AM »
I chucked it in the bin. I gave it a sniff and the smell that I was initially proud of creating - since it is now so unfortunately associated with sickness - just instinctively repulsed me.

That is, the sourdough loaf-that-barely-rose went in the bin - not the starter. I didn't chuck the starter in the bin, but I'm putting it on the backburner for a while and, using myself as a human experiment, will see if I feel sick again the next time I dare eat the product. To be honest, I'm not exactly looking forward to it, but I feel obliged, as a bread-lover, to master the dark art of sourdough, all the same.

Question: the starter can live forever, like a plant, so long as it is fed, right? It doesn't ever expire, right?

hamfist

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2021, 09:07:06 AM »
correct, just feed it regularly (like daily if at room temp, weekly if in the fridge) and remember you discard some before feeding. I bake twice per week - 2x2 loaves, each loaf I take 100g starter and add 100g water and 100g flour to it and let that bubble up. When not baking I discard 100g of starter from the jar and feed it 50g water / 50g starter.

Re: bread baking
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2021, 10:00:46 AM »
I usually bake 1 loaf a week but I've left the starter un-fed in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, as long as you refresh it the day before feeding it seems to work fine.

I am doing hybrid leavening at the minute though.  Still, you only put yeast in the final dough and the starter takes the flour/water well enough before then.

MojoJojo

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #37 on: April 28, 2021, 10:33:00 AM »
I binned most if it, gave it boggo Allinsons strong white bread flour to eat and even added a sprinkle of bicarb (to reduce the acidity which may gave been killing the yeast) and a sprinkle of dried yeast.

I'm too lazy to bake bread myself properly, but I do have a bread machine, and one tip I would give is get your strong flour from Aldi/Lidl. Tesco charge around £1.30* for 1.5kg, but Aldi/Lidl sell the same for 67p, which means it actually started to get price competitive with cheap supermarket bread.

I mean, flour isn't a major expense so it's not a big deal really, but flour keeps well so easy to bulk buy.


(*they only seem to have whole ground available on my internet shop at the moment)

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #38 on: May 04, 2021, 12:04:47 PM »
You can't keep a baker down. I let the starter feed for five days before giving it another try. That time, the bread rose decently and it no longer had the heavy cheesy smell once baked. The resulting bread dough tasted precisely like a nice pancake, much denser, but without the need for egg, milk or butter. Needless to say, it didn't make me feel sick.

It's sourdough 101, I am aware, but I'm only just learning now how perfect this stuff would be instead of self-raising flour in a pancake.

Today was my second successful attempt at a sourdough. I didn't want such dense product this time, so I went for half and half - two big spoonfuls of starter, and half a normal (7g?) packet of yeast for 2/3 of a kilo of flour. I'm really happy with the flavour and texture result, and I think I will settle for this recipe as standard for the time being:



The "Swirl" is a bit annoying. I will knead harder next time.


hamfist

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #39 on: May 04, 2021, 12:40:24 PM »
wow that looks deliciously fluffy ! nice nice nice !!!

DolphinFace

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #40 on: May 04, 2021, 12:59:40 PM »
To celebrate Orthodox Easter, I made Tsoureki. Thought I was going to be defeated by it because it took about 5 hours to prove and I assumed my yeast was fucked but got there eventually (I assume the sugar content retards it a bit or something). It is an excellent bread not too disimilar to brioche but importantly flavoured with (hard to find?) ground cardamom, mahlab and mastic. It's hard to persuade someone to make something but if you want to try something different and can find these spices, it's worth a try because it's fucking stunning.

https://akispetretzikis.com/categories/glyka/tsoyreki-to-enamisi

This guy's recipe/video is worth following because it's important to knead the dough (with kitchenaid) for almost 20 minutes then after the first prove, there's a roll and fold thing that helps acheive the correct texture. However, this recipe calls for far too much mahlab (3-4g is enough).

There's enough dough for 2 loaves. The first I plaited and the second I rolled into loads of little balls and layered up a loaf tin with these, chocolate chips and a mixture of brown sugar/mahlab/cinnamon to create something like monkey bread. Most importantly, it will fill your house with the most amazing smell. But yeh, mahlab. Where you gonna find it.

Retinend

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Re: bread baking
« Reply #41 on: May 04, 2021, 10:39:19 PM »
I was wondering what would happen if you bunged a bunch of spice into a dough, presuming you had some sort of dish in mind that would complement it.

Re: bread baking
« Reply #42 on: May 04, 2021, 11:10:38 PM »
Looking good there, Retinend.

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