Author Topic: Gardening thread 2021  (Read 3096 times)

Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2021, 04:09:48 PM »
Buelligan This is the first year living in the new place where I can try things in the garden and I want to put down some wild grass seed/wildflower stuff. I've tried before in a few different gardens I've had in the past but it's never taken. Is it just bad placement on my part or do you know a trick I'm missing?

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2021, 04:39:19 PM »
Heheh.  It all depends on everything!  When are you planting it, what are you planting, what is the soil like, is the soil bare, did you water it, how old was the seed, how did you keep that seed, what is the aspect like, lots of stuff.  General rule is wildflowers aren't crazy about fertility, so a poor soil is often better for establishing a thriving wildflower meadown, they won't win in a fight between them and say, a lawn.  If you have seed sourced from a reliable place and you haven't kept it for ages and you've got reasonable bare raked soil and you plant either early autumn or early-mid-spring and water it in and water it if you have extended dry periods when the seeds are sprouting or the plants are very young and there is plenty of natural sunlight (you'd need specific plants if it's a shady area) and you don't keep walking on it and you're not plagued by pigeons or other seed-eaters, then you should have some delightful wild flowers.  Fingers crossed!  :)

BTW, Attila - I knew some ancient memory was nagging me about plant controls for uppity men, I've looked it up now, something my grandmother swore by

Quote from: Maud Grieve in A Modern Herbal
Where Rosemary flourished, the woman ruled - the Treasury of Botany says: "There is a vulgar belief in Gloucestershire and other counties, that Rosemary will not grow well unless where the mistress is "master"; and so touchy are some of the lords of creation upon this point, that we have more than once had reason to suspect them of privately injuring a growing rosemary in order to destroy this evidence of their want of authority."

My grandmother said it should always be planted by the gate to make any man passing by aware of how things stand within.  Plant rosemary Attila.

Blue Jam

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2021, 05:21:17 PM »
Back yard is a complete sty, there’s discarded hockey sticks

They're not discarded, hockey sticks just grow naturally in every garden in Canada.

;) Very interested to hear how the hop plants grow, what varieties did you get?

Attila

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2021, 05:33:52 PM »
This sounds amazing.

It had never occurred to me that woad is a thing you grow (always assumed it was like ochre ie something you find in the ground[1]). A whole garden of dye plants is a new one on me.

For things like tansy and wormwood, is there any danger for small kids? I remember being told not to touch the foxgloves (?) at the of the garden because they were poisonous (?), but that may have been my mum just wanting some plants to survive a load of kids running around.
 1. which I suppose in a way it is

Also responding to Buelligan, too, here.

Marigolds were always my go-to yellow plant, because you can freeze the flowerheads and dye with them in the middle of the winter -- great yellow dyes there. I also used to grow coreopsis and bee balm for yellow -- there's loads of yellow dye-plants -- goldenrod cut from the fields in autumn was another great source.

Yep -- I have indeed dyed a lot of fiber, mostly wool (cos cotton is a pain in the ass to prep) from plant dyes, both ones I've grow or gathered and more exotic stuff that I've bough like logwood and Brazilwood. This is the first time I've grown my own madder; in the past I bought the roots or bought cochineal.

I've dyed with woad plenty of times -- it's a noxious weed in some parts of the US (out West, mainly) and you have to report it when you see it. It chokes out pastures, I think. I have three woad plants now that are bolting -- they produce dye in year 1, but then bolt and make loads of seeds in year 2. It smells a lot like cabbage in the dyepot because it's part of that family of plants. Woad, like indigo, gets its blue from the indigen in the plants -- you can't boil the dye water like you do with other natural dyes because too much heat will destroy the indigen. Another interesting thing is that indigen does not bond with fiber the way other dyes do; it lays down molecules of itself like rooftiles on the fibre being dyed, and you can build up layers if you dye something repeatedly.

If you've ever bought a cheap blue shirt from a hippie shop and turned blue while wearing it, or your bluejeans made everything in the wash turn blue, it's because the fabric's been so overdyed that the hot water causes the dye to crock and run off it (and onto you or everything else in the wash). 'Crocking' is just the term for blue dye bleeding, dunno why.

I like dyeing with indigo but it's a real faff -- you can keep a dyepot of it going a long time; it's not unusual for indigo dyepots in India to be decades old, with names. Indigen is not water solutable, so you have to use stuff like urea (or sodium hydrosulphate, which was my poison of choice) to make it water soluble to bond with your fibre. To make this happen, the chemicals drive the oxygen out of the dyepot -- an indigo dyepot is actually clear yellow. The surface will look blue but that's only because you might agitate it a bit. What was fun was dyeing my wool with woad or indigo, carefully removing it -- so a white skein would look yellow, for example, and then re-oxygenating it -- ie swinging it around my head like a cowboy on crack -- the violent motion makes the fibre slowly turn a rich blue. Or if you're overdying a yellow or a red skein of yarn, it turns green or it turns purple. It was a showstopper when people were watching a fibre shows and stuff.

Anyway, indigo needs a really hot and humid and really long growing season -- the British tried to cultivate it in the American south, I think, as a way to avoid having to import dyes from India.

I dunno how it will look in the allotment this year, as I usually sourced my dyeplants at the big Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, but I've got a couple of good contacts online here in the UK.

Wormwood makes an ok yellow dye -- it would be toxic to eat, but not to touch, and it produced pretty little flowers. It tends to walk, so when you plant it, you'll get this amazing shrubby, silvery plant the first year, then the next, the middle's died back and it's sprouting up a foot away from where you planted it originally. I think by the time I escaped my ex my wormwood had travelled about 4 feet away from its original spot.

Tansy makes bright yellow dye, and produces little yellow, button like flowers. It has a strange scent, especially when you cut it. Some people react to it differently -- I knew I'd lose an afternoon when I went out to cut it for dyes, because the cycle was

1. cut the tansy and think, 'Huh! An odd, but not unpleasant little scent.'
2. start running around in circles laughing like a lunatic for about 10 minutes or so
3. fall over, feeling dizzy, then get a mild to pounding headache that put me in a sour mood the rest of the day.

So it does make you feel a but funny, but the extent of the very, very mild high depends on the person. I don't do any drugs or meds, for example, and the sugar in half a pack of Lovehearts has a similar effect on me, too.

You can have most dyeplants, Fenris, but I'd just teach the kiddies not to touch and explain why.

Keep in mind most dyeplants are a serious faff because it's not just chopping them up and putting them on to boil and adding the fibre -- in order to get the dyes firmly to bond with the fibre, you have to either prepare the fibre with a mordant solution. These are metallic salts ranging from the more or less benign alum, which is a pickling agent, to the spectacular potassium dichromate. I can't get the latter in the UK without going through the lab at the university - you could pick it up at spinning/weaving/wool shops in the US 20 years ago. It makes up a pretty orange liquid that looks exactly like an orangeade drink, except it will kill you due to organ failure if you ingest it, inhale it, or absorb it through the skin.) I also like using 'tin' or stannous chloride, although I can't remember if you add it first to water or add water to the powder. I think the latter makes chlorine gas, which would be an exciting day out for the Cub Scouts, I guess.

Anyway, I'm planning a little dye garden -- apologies for the wall of text.

Remind me to tell you about the time the dog ate my $50 chunk of indigo pot stock. (indigo is sold in chunks and bricks, and it's hella expensive -- a little goes a long way, though).

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #34 on: April 07, 2021, 05:38:13 PM »
They're not discarded, hockey sticks just grow naturally in every garden in Canada.

I’d post a photo of the hockey stick directly above the discarded Tim hortons cup[1] but it would look like I’d set it up for some mad reason. It’s a left handed stick so I can’t even forage it for my own hockey purposes. Bullshit.

Quote
;) Very interested to hear how the hop plants grow, what varieties did you get?

Chinook! Good dual purpose hop, unloved in recent years from the beers I’ve seen out there. The plan is to grow the two rhizomes from each end of a wire fence between us and next door to give more privacy because the cost of replacing/building fences is astronomical.

Mrs Ferris has bought lavender seeds from who knows where and apparently they’re dead hardy so we’re going to plant those this week (in pots). I think we’re past the last frost, so once all this stuff gets going we can stick it outside and officially open 2021: The Summer of Garden.
 1. left by a builder when replacing our lead pipes I suspect

Blue Jam

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #35 on: April 07, 2021, 05:46:35 PM »
The hockey sticks should come in handy for the hops to clamber over:



You just need to grow some barley now:


FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #36 on: April 07, 2021, 05:46:39 PM »
Also responding to Buelligan, too, here.

Marigolds were always my go-to yellow plant, because you can freeze the flowerheads and dye with them in the middle of the winter -- great yellow dyes there. I also used to grow coreopsis and bee balm for yellow -- there's loads of yellow dye-plants -- goldenrod cut from the fields in autumn was another great source.

Yep -- I have indeed dyed a lot of fiber, mostly wool (cos cotton is a pain in the ass to prep) from plant dyes, both ones I've grow or gathered and more exotic stuff that I've bough like logwood and Brazilwood. This is the first time I've grown my own madder; in the past I bought the roots or bought cochineal.

I've dyed with woad plenty of times -- it's a noxious weed in some parts of the US (out West, mainly) and you have to report it when you see it. It chokes out pastures, I think. I have three woad plants now that are bolting -- they produce dye in year 1, but then bolt and make loads of seeds in year 2. It smells a lot like cabbage in the dyepot because it's part of that family of plants. Woad, like indigo, gets its blue from the indigen in the plants -- you can't boil the dye water like you do with other natural dyes because too much heat will destroy the indigen. Another interesting thing is that indigen does not bond with fiber the way other dyes do; it lays down molecules of itself like rooftiles on the fibre being dyed, and you can build up layers if you dye something repeatedly.

If you've ever bought a cheap blue shirt from a hippie shop and turned blue while wearing it, or your bluejeans made everything in the wash turn blue, it's because the fabric's been so overdyed that the hot water causes the dye to crock and run off it (and onto you or everything else in the wash). 'Crocking' is just the term for blue dye bleeding, dunno why.

I like dyeing with indigo but it's a real faff -- you can keep a dyepot of it going a long time; it's not unusual for indigo dyepots in India to be decades old, with names. Indigen is not water solutable, so you have to use stuff like urea (or sodium hydrosulphate, which was my poison of choice) to make it water soluble to bond with your fibre. To make this happen, the chemicals drive the oxygen out of the dyepot -- an indigo dyepot is actually clear yellow. The surface will look blue but that's only because you might agitate it a bit. What was fun was dyeing my wool with woad or indigo, carefully removing it -- so a white skein would look yellow, for example, and then re-oxygenating it -- ie swinging it around my head like a cowboy on crack -- the violent motion makes the fibre slowly turn a rich blue. Or if you're overdying a yellow or a red skein of yarn, it turns green or it turns purple. It was a showstopper when people were watching a fibre shows and stuff.

Anyway, indigo needs a really hot and humid and really long growing season -- the British tried to cultivate it in the American south, I think, as a way to avoid having to import dyes from India.

I dunno how it will look in the allotment this year, as I usually sourced my dyeplants at the big Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, but I've got a couple of good contacts online here in the UK.

Wormwood makes an ok yellow dye -- it would be toxic to eat, but not to touch, and it produced pretty little flowers. It tends to walk, so when you plant it, you'll get this amazing shrubby, silvery plant the first year, then the next, the middle's died back and it's sprouting up a foot away from where you planted it originally. I think by the time I escaped my ex my wormwood had travelled about 4 feet away from its original spot.

Tansy makes bright yellow dye, and produces little yellow, button like flowers. It has a strange scent, especially when you cut it. Some people react to it differently -- I knew I'd lose an afternoon when I went out to cut it for dyes, because the cycle was

1. cut the tansy and think, 'Huh! An odd, but not unpleasant little scent.'
2. start running around in circles laughing like a lunatic for about 10 minutes or so
3. fall over, feeling dizzy, then get a mild to pounding headache that put me in a sour mood the rest of the day.

So it does make you feel a but funny, but the extent of the very, very mild high depends on the person. I don't do any drugs or meds, for example, and the sugar in half a pack of Lovehearts has a similar effect on me, too.

You can have most dyeplants, Fenris, but I'd just teach the kiddies not to touch and explain why.

Keep in mind most dyeplants are a serious faff because it's not just chopping them up and putting them on to boil and adding the fibre -- in order to get the dyes firmly to bond with the fibre, you have to either prepare the fibre with a mordant solution. These are metallic salts ranging from the more or less benign alum, which is a pickling agent, to the spectacular potassium dichromate. I can't get the latter in the UK without going through the lab at the university - you could pick it up at spinning/weaving/wool shops in the US 20 years ago. It makes up a pretty orange liquid that looks exactly like an orangeade drink, except it will kill you due to organ failure if you ingest it, inhale it, or absorb it through the skin.) I also like using 'tin' or stannous chloride, although I can't remember if you add it first to water or add water to the powder. I think the latter makes chlorine gas, which would be an exciting day out for the Cub Scouts, I guess.

Anyway, I'm planning a little dye garden -- apologies for the wall of text.

Remind me to tell you about the time the dog ate my $50 chunk of indigo pot stock. (indigo is sold in chunks and bricks, and it's hella expensive -- a little goes a long way, though).

Appreciate the detailed response - my wife does a lot of knitting and has always gone on about making her own yarn and I thought it might be a cool project to spin and dye our own stuff but that sounds like it might be more complicated than I’d really thought about. Whooping and running around then being in a bad mood all day is not something a 2 year old needs help with though, so dye plants might be something I save for a few years’ time.

I’m super intrigued by oxygenating skeins of wool by whizzing them about to change colours. Used to love growing and making things prior to having a child (which I suppose is the ultimate craft project), I find just hearing about this kind of stuff fascinating.

Will continue to update this thread if/when I get more green shoots but other than a single fava bean we are at Sprout Point: Zero. The mission continues.

Edit to reply to Jam - I used to read a regular blog by someone brewing their own beer “grain to glass” somewhere in the US (want to say... Oklahoma? Or Kansas maybe). I seem to remember him prescribing 1 sq ft’s worth of grain per beer so if I can annex 6 sq ft for a project, I might try it this year or next to grow my own sixer.

Attila

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2021, 10:54:30 PM »
Appreciate the detailed response - my wife does a lot of knitting and has always gone on about making her own yarn and I thought it might be a cool project to spin and dye our own stuff but that sounds like it might be more complicated than I’d really thought about. Whooping and running around then being in a bad mood all day is not something a 2 year old needs help with though, so dye plants might be something I save for a few years’ time.



Easier (and non toxic!) way to dye wool: pop it in a glass microwavable bowl (with lid), and fill with water & several packets of Koolade. Nuke for about 5 mins. Rinse, and there you go. Grey wool will give you more muted, heathery colours; adding a bit of salt to the dyebath will help the colours set.

I miss being able to buy Koolade on the cheap; back in the 90s was some horrible blueberry flavour that gave the best blue colour. If I have a chance tomorrow, I'll take a photo of the gloves I knitted yonks ago with Koolade dyed yarn (it's a safe and fun project to do with the kiddies, as long as an adult is handling the hot water/microwave part).

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2021, 12:02:51 AM »
Easier (and non toxic!) way to dye wool: pop it in a glass microwavable bowl (with lid), and fill with water & several packets of Koolade. Nuke for about 5 mins. Rinse, and there you go. Grey wool will give you more muted, heathery colours; adding a bit of salt to the dyebath will help the colours set.

I miss being able to buy Koolade on the cheap; back in the 90s was some horrible blueberry flavour that gave the best blue colour. If I have a chance tomorrow, I'll take a photo of the gloves I knitted yonks ago with Koolade dyed yarn (it's a safe and fun project to do with the kiddies, as long as an adult is handling the hot water/microwave part).

Well now you’re just having me on! Would love to do this - koolaid comes in such luminous colours I can’t imagine how it looks afterwards.

I’m trying to divert my “make and do” energy into gardening and now I want to refurbish the old spinning wheel at the in-laws and get to work...

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2021, 01:07:47 AM »
Garden/wildlife twofer, the Carolina Jessamine on my pergola with butterfly


FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2021, 01:49:30 AM »
I had legitimately never heard the word “pergola” until about 2 months ago and now I hear the fucker everywhere.

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #41 on: April 08, 2021, 06:16:17 AM »
Garden/wildlife twofer, the Carolina Jessamine on my pergola with butterfly



Wow, that's really beautiful, where do you live Dex, is it Carolina?  Wherever, it must be nice and gentle weather-wise.  That butterfly is a swallowtail btw, like the ones I prattle about in the wildlife thread.  We only get them in the warm months, March - October.

Dex Sawash

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #42 on: April 08, 2021, 10:43:04 AM »
Durham,  North. That is supposed to be a native plant but I've never seen one outside a nursery or garden. It does thrive with no care in poor clay soil. It's not bloomed that well before. Was very wet winter but dry for last month.

bgmnts

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #43 on: April 08, 2021, 10:53:12 AM »
I thought they were daffodils for a moment but they are quite nice.

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #44 on: April 08, 2021, 10:54:14 AM »
It's so beautiful, has a fantastic, rather memorable, scent.  I'd love to live somewhere where you can grow those sorts of things reliably.  You have Spanish moss too, don't you (if that's not too personal a question)?

Dex Sawash

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2021, 11:10:20 AM »
Spanish moss likes Live Oak and Bald Cypress, both of those like sand/swamp so we don't get the moss.

bakabaka

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #46 on: April 08, 2021, 11:19:44 AM »
Atilla - there is reasonable evidence that the ancient Britons used madder rather than woad to dye themselves and their clothes blue. The only classical reference to the practice uses a word that isn't found anywhere else[1] to describe the plant and although it was translated as 'woad', there's no reason to believe it's right. Madder would make a lot more sense because, depending on the mordant you use, it can dye things a huge range of colours from yellowy orange through reds to purples and blues, so would have been much more useful to collect and cultivate.
 1. sorry, I can't remember what the word is or the name of the text it came from

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #47 on: April 08, 2021, 12:23:36 PM »
Quite interestingly I think, Caesar says the Britanni colour themselves with vitrum, which I believe, means glass in latin but glas in welsh means blue/green.  Woad or pastel was grown widely here in the Languedoc, you still see it growing wild and cultivated.  The balls of pastel paste that were made for transport were called cocagnes and many people believe that it was the Languedoc, with it's wealth from dye, wool and rich agriculture, that was the original Land of Cockaigne, where even the peasants lived high on the hog.  Lovely thought.

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #48 on: April 08, 2021, 05:11:08 PM »
Urgent update: carrots have sprouted.

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #49 on: April 08, 2021, 05:31:00 PM »
BTW, meant to say Ferris, fava beans is broad beans innit?  What you doing planting beans like that now?  Heheh, very interested to know, if they are, how you get along with them.  In UK, so you're probs a bit colder, broad beans go in early winter or early January.  Aquadulce Claudia - they're the best.  Don't know why it's traditional to plant them then, I assume it's to do with temperatures and flowering times.  I suspect you planted yours now simply because you've got them and you want to plant them (or is it hugely colder where you are?).  I am very interested to know what happens.

Congrats on the carrots.

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2021, 05:45:08 PM »
BTW, meant to say Ferris, fava beans is broad beans innit?  What you doing planting beans like that now?  Heheh, very interested to know, if they are, how you get along with them.  In UK, so you're probs a bit colder, broad beans go in early winter or early January.  Aquadulce Claudia - they're the best.  Don't know why it's traditional to plant them then, I assume it's to do with temperatures and flowering times.  I suspect you planted yours now simply because you've got them and you want to plant them (or is it hugely colder where you are?).  I am very interested to know what happens.

Congrats on the carrots.

I cannot stress how little I know what I am doing - I may well be doing this incorrectly or at entirely the wrong time (with the amount of stuff I’ve planted, it’d be a miracle if I wasn’t). I thought about what friends have planted in their gardens/allotments and they always seem to have beans for some reason. There were two varieties on offer and one mentioned string them on a line (“fuck that”) and one said “grows in a bush” and I thought ‘that’s more like it’.

My philosophy is to throw a lot of stuff at the wall and see what sticks - now I know I’m doing unconventional bean-growing, if anyone asks in future I will nod knowingly and refer to it as “my little experiment”.

We get sun basically all day (south facing and other houses far back enough to not impede sunlight) so I’m hoping that will paper over any ludicrous missteps I have made.

When does one plant potatoes? Have I missed the window there? I feel like that’s a gardening staple.

Buelligan

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #51 on: April 08, 2021, 05:55:30 PM »
You're OK for potatoes - I'm assuming your climate is similar to UK (around early May from memory but do check).  But you probably should buy seed potatoes - rather than planting ones you've got lying about.  I think this is for two reasons, some (all?) shop tatties are treated with something to stop them sprouting (you want them to sprout) also I believe there's some nervousness about planting healthy/clean ones - because potato blight is a bugger and once you've got it in your soil it may come back forever or at least fuck your potato growing for a long old time.  If you do buy seed potatoes - I suggest something like Ratte or the wonderful Pink Fir Apple, I suggest these because they are delicious and expensive and hard to get in the shops - they're both the sort that are great for having boiled with butter or using in a salad, not mashers or chippers. 

And you're so incredibly right about experimenting, nothing like it for learning, nothing like it for stirring the artistry of gardening in a soul.  Do it and enjoy the fuck out of it.

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2021, 06:02:28 PM »
Oh interesting, thanks! Didn’t know that about potatoes, I did sort of assume I could just plant the elderly ones in the fridge (like I planted a few elderly garlic cloves) but I’ll avoid that now.

Yeah for me even if my total harvest is 2 tomatoes and a mis-filed lavender plant I won’t care. We’ve done it on the cheap, and I’ve had two afternoons playing with seeds and soil (aka ‘dirt’) with the nipper (“fank’oo dirt!!”) so I’m already ahead of the game.

That said, it would be lovely if I could get the hop rhizomes to take and get something off them this summer but absolutely not worth worrying about - let’s give this a whirl and see what works.

Attila

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #53 on: April 08, 2021, 06:42:39 PM »
Atilla - there is reasonable evidence that the ancient Britons used madder rather than woad to dye themselves and their clothes blue. The only classical reference to the practice uses a word that isn't found anywhere else[1] to describe the plant and although it was translated as 'woad', there's no reason to believe it's right. Madder would make a lot more sense because, depending on the mordant you use, it can dye things a huge range of colours from yellowy orange through reds to purples and blues, so would have been much more useful to collect and cultivate.
 1. sorry, I can't remember what the word is or the name of the text it came from
Interesting!

I lecture on Roman history and read Latin, so if you can remember the source, I can have a look at it. Any excuse to get out my Big Dictionary is welcome by me.

It's interesting, as madder does all the reds, rather than blue (even with the diff mordants, although you can get a fairly dark red -- Rita Buchanan's books on natural dyes and dye gardens are excellent resources if anyone is interested either in the gardens, the dyes, or just reading a few cool books on the subject -- really accessible and good illustrations of the colour results on both wool and cotton).

Somewhere around here I have the gloves I kntted away back with kool-ade dyed wool. Can I find them when I want to take a photo of them? Of course not.

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #54 on: April 08, 2021, 07:45:47 PM »
According to the first result on google, I’ve only gone and nailed it with the timing of my fava beans!!

Quote
In mild climates, USDA Zones 6 and up, they are planted in the fall and grown through winter; the plants can handle some frost. In colder zones with snowy winters, they are planted in the spring once the soil has dried out, usually sometime in April.

I’m in USDA Zone 6b and we definitely have snowy winters so another triumph for the lazy man! Though tbh I suspect you plant everything around now if you have snowy winters so I don’t suppose I’ve stumbled on some amazing garden-hack.

https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-grow-fava-beans-1403460

Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #55 on: April 08, 2021, 08:36:11 PM »
My mum told me that my granddad used to enjoy going to the garden centre during Easter and the March/ April bank holidays so he could laugh at all the people buying plants which would inevitably die as the last frosts hadn't passed yet. What a horrible cunt. Having said that, I will hold back on buying the Thalictrum that I want. Going to plant some Honesty and Korean Mint soon too.

DolphinFace

  • Put it in me
Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #56 on: April 08, 2021, 08:52:43 PM »
Then he'll be looking down on me and having a right laugh. It snowed on my new plants the other day. It all still looks healthy so I'm taking that as a hopeful sign.


My next job is to work on the lawn. Just going to aerate and overseed it tomorrow and pray it achieves something. I've got a leaking kitchen tap and need something positive to balance out the negative.

Buelligan

  • STOP being afraid
Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #57 on: April 08, 2021, 09:12:02 PM »
My mum told me that my granddad used to enjoy going to the garden centre during Easter and the March/ April bank holidays so he could laugh at all the people buying plants which would inevitably die as the last frosts hadn't passed yet. What a horrible cunt. Having said that, I will hold back on buying the Thalictrum that I want. Going to plant some Honesty and Korean Mint soon too.

I have a story that will make you have Thalictrum envy.  As you know I like my plants and one thing I do is walk around this whole wild place every chance I get and stare at 'em.  Remember where they live and what they do and when. 

Near me, there's a very lovely old dolmen, up on the escarpment and I go up there pretty often.  Last April went up there and for the first time noticed all around that grave and nowhere else on all the mountains and mountains, the most beautiful creamy white large flowered thalictrum I've ever seen, a veritable carpet of them.  And they're only doing it again this year, saw the first buds couple of days ago.  Fill your boots.

Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #58 on: April 08, 2021, 09:33:58 PM »
Yeah? Well I live near a shop so fuck you.

How lovely.

Buelligan

  • STOP being afraid
Re: Gardening thread 2021
« Reply #59 on: April 08, 2021, 11:05:53 PM »
This made me laugh a lot.

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