Author Topic: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music  (Read 13076 times)

kalowski

  • Maclunkey
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #120 on: April 26, 2021, 09:26:45 PM »
Pretty sure this is a mocked-up picture from a story on Newsthump:

I knew it was fake. I was trying out the famous "kalowski humour".

zomgmouse

  • I love carrots
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Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #121 on: April 27, 2021, 01:19:12 AM »
I've just read that 'The Dreaming' was originally titled 'The Abo Song' until 'Bush and EMI were informed that "Abo" is a racial slur in Australia'. The promo copies in circulation were recalled and the track was renamed.

https://www.discogs.com/Kate-Bush-The-Dreaming-Abo-Song/release/6919933

I think it's just Kate trying (perhaps a little clumsily) to empathise creatively with the suffering of a culture far removed from her own. As the recall cited above demonstrates, she wasn't trying to be deliberately insensitive (rather the opposite) - but it also demonstrates the weaknesses in the idea that an artist can write about anything they like, from any perspective.[1]
 1. not an idea I'm necessarily opposed to. After all, the (heavily researched) script for the brilliant Four Lions, penned by the distinctly white Chris Morris, Sam Bain, and Jesse Armstrong, features a lot of slurs that you wouldn't want to hear from their own mouths.

Yeah that's more or less my own thoughts on the matter. Plus the fact that Rolf Harris plays the didgeridoo.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #122 on: April 27, 2021, 05:03:37 PM »
I knew it was fake. I was trying out the famous "kalowski humour".

No worries, are there any nice AirBnBs near this famous historical site post lockdown?

kalowski

  • Maclunkey
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #123 on: April 27, 2021, 06:40:24 PM »
No worries, are there any nice AirBnBs near this famous historical site post lockdown?
Tickets are cheap.

kngen

  • Member
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  • Fighting sleep's deathlike grip
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #124 on: April 28, 2021, 01:46:28 AM »
McLaren was just (as with so many things) pretending to have come up with something that he'd actually seen on his holidays (in this case, Ron Asheton of the Stooges wearing SS uniforms on stage).

I find Siouxsie's posturing hilarious, though, as she would go onto become incandescent about punk (which she whined was about 'art and bondage') being hijacked by oiks from the football terraces (e.g. Sham, the Subs and the Rejects), and singing about living on council estates. Yes, that's much worse than wearing a fucking swastika isn't it, you poncy arsehole.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #125 on: April 28, 2021, 09:24:34 AM »
Gasp! Not council estates!

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #126 on: April 28, 2021, 04:24:52 PM »
McLaren was just (as with so many things) pretending to have come up with something that he'd actually seen on his holidays (in this case, Ron Asheton of the Stooges wearing SS uniforms on stage)….

Re: lifting ideas - Matlock commented that if you came up with an idea (e.g for the King’s Road shop), McLaren would be dismissive, but in say a couple of weeks, the idea was realised and no acknowledgement ever given where it had come from. That said, various people have said that McLaren was essentially obsessed with Nazi imagery and symbols, so suspect there was something at play deeper psychologically than nicking an idea he thought was good.

That kind of gear had wider currency - e.g. One of the members of The Sweet indulged in ‘Nazi chic’ and on one Top of the Pops performance wore a Swastika armband - so would be loathe to state a single example as a sole influence.

McLaren and Westwood made costumes for films - one of their creations was the short dress adorned with crucifix and swastika for Ken Russell’s Mahler and which so features so predominantly in stills and posters, which I suspect influenced the clothes later sold at SEX.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #127 on: April 28, 2021, 04:43:00 PM »
One in a Million by Guns n Roses would be a good song, if only we could see about changing some of those lyrics.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #128 on: April 28, 2021, 09:56:22 PM »
One in a Million by Guns n Roses would be a good song, if only we could see about changing some of those lyrics.

To be fair to Axl Rose (and I don't like being fair to Axl Rose), isn't that written from the PoV of a kid from a hick town arriving in the big city for the first time?

kalowski

  • Maclunkey
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #129 on: April 28, 2021, 10:02:48 PM »
To be fair to Axl Rose (and I don't like being fair to Axl Rose), isn't that written from the PoV of a kid from a hick town arriving in the big city for the first time?
Quote
I used words like police and n****rs because you're not allowed to use the word 'n****r.' Why can black people go up to each other and say, 'n****r,' but when a white guy does it all of a sudden it's a big putdown? I don't like boundaries of any kind. I don't like being told what I can and what I can't say. I used the word 'n****r' because it's a word to describe somebody that is basically a pain in your life, a problem. The word 'n****r' doesn't necessarily mean black. Doesn't John Lennon have a song "Woman Is the N****r of the World"? There's a rap group, N.W.A. – N****rs With Attitude. I mean, they're proud of that word. More power to them.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #130 on: April 28, 2021, 10:05:48 PM »
To be fair, ol' W. Axl appears to be on the side of the righteous these days, and I'm sure would repudiate those lyrics now. (If you had told 1990 me that Axl would be the good one and Morrissey... well, say no more...)

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #131 on: April 29, 2021, 12:25:18 AM »
Without wishing to rehash the Morrissey thread, 'Bengali In Platforms' and "all reggae is vile" and "you have to be black to get played on daytime Radio 1" were all before 1990.

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #132 on: April 29, 2021, 09:03:19 AM »
Without wishing to rehash the Morrissey thread, 'Bengali In Platforms' and "all reggae is vile" and "you have to be black to get played on daytime Radio 1" were all before 1990.

I'll only defend Morrissey on one of those crimes. There is a beloved poster on CaB who thinks all reggae is vile but they're vehemently anti-racist. Some people just really really don't like reggae. I feel sorry for them.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #133 on: April 29, 2021, 09:11:56 AM »
I'll only defend Morrissey on one of those crimes. There is a beloved poster on CaB who thinks all reggae is vile but they're vehemently anti-racist. Some people just really really don't like reggae. I feel sorry for them.

Am I beloved? Shucks guys.

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #134 on: April 29, 2021, 11:07:07 AM »
Sorry, there are two beloved posters who think etc

Johnboy

  • Dreams they complicate my life
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #135 on: April 29, 2021, 12:34:22 PM »
Japanese Boy by Aneka

ah, those 1981 chart toppers, eh?

xxxx xxx x xxx

  • Can we have a quick burn, sir?
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #136 on: April 29, 2021, 02:27:23 PM »
I'll only defend Morrissey on one of those crimes. There is a beloved poster on CaB who thinks all reggae is vile but they're vehemently anti-racist. Some people just really really don't like reggae. I feel sorry for them.

Also, he didn’t say all reggae is vile - it was one of those end-of-year questionnaire things in the NME, and for ‘favourite reggae record’ he answered ‘reggae is vile’.

There’s sort of a subtle difference, but I’m darned if I can put my finger on it.

Brundle-Fly

  • "Why don't you do something to help me?"
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #137 on: April 29, 2021, 03:21:58 PM »
He later claimed he was misheard and he'd actually said, 'Reggae is wild'.  You wag, Moz.

boki

  • Summat pithy that'll also be a bangin' Twitter bio
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #138 on: April 29, 2021, 05:31:14 PM »
He was saying "Boooooo-yaka"

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #139 on: April 29, 2021, 05:43:07 PM »
He actually said "all reggae is Kurt Weill".

However, as The Beatles noted about Enoch Powell, he "don't dig no Pakistani." Infact, even pre-Smiths he wrote to a pen-pal that “I don’t hate Pakistanis, but I dislike them immensely.”

xxxx xxx x xxx

  • Can we have a quick burn, sir?
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #140 on: April 29, 2021, 06:15:45 PM »
Speaking of the P-word...I hate to grass The Slits up because they were fantastic, but the Peel Session version of ‘Shoplifting’ had the line “Mr Paki won’t lose much, and we’ll have dinner tonight” (amended to “Babylon won’t lose much” for the album).

kalowski

  • Maclunkey
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #141 on: April 29, 2021, 07:20:45 PM »
Actually reggae is fairly dull. That's a sweeping statement because there's some great music that's come out of Jamaica and the surrounding islands, but for me as it gets slower post Blue Beat it gets duller. I love the uptempo Ska stuff of the 60s and the funky rock steady sounds of the early 70s, like Toots, but I always felt that through the 70s the music got slower, duller, and swamped with echoing guitars.

I should point out that I'm a bigger racist than Morrissey.

xxxx xxx x xxx

  • Can we have a quick burn, sir?
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #142 on: April 29, 2021, 09:39:23 PM »
There’s a bit of a difference between ‘fairly dull’ and ‘vile’ though.  Anyone who could genuinely call reggae vile is a bit of a wrong ‘un in my book.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #143 on: April 29, 2021, 09:58:36 PM »
Yeah but it's Morrissey innit?

I heard that Nick Griffin reckons Tuvan Throat Singing "sounds awful to these Anglo-Saxon ears". Bit suspect.

Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #144 on: April 29, 2021, 11:12:54 PM »
Mozza also said all reggae is black supremacism, which would be a shock to white or mixed reggae acts.

gib

  • Logistics Assistant
Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #145 on: April 29, 2021, 11:47:19 PM »
struggling to think of a single example of black supremacism in reggae

kngen

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Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #146 on: April 30, 2021, 03:48:31 AM »
struggling to think of a single example of black supremacism in reggae

Well, if you were to interpret 'uhuru' as being 'freedom' but from a specifically black/African perspective (e.g. the liberation of African countries from British colonial rule, such as Kenya in 1963) then Black Uhuru suggests a kind of tautological 'super-double freedom from whitey' that could be interpreted as black supremacist if you're as drunk and bored as I am now, and also not entirely serious. 


Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #147 on: May 02, 2021, 09:54:42 AM »
Ryan Cooder, fresh from exploiting the living shit out of the Buena Vista social club - appropriated "Chinito, Chinito" a racist Mexican folk song calling on Chinese to "toca la malaca" and "lava la lopa".


Re: Dated Casual Racism In Popular Music
« Reply #148 on: May 02, 2021, 10:01:46 AM »


Err..


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