Author Topic: Different versions of same album  (Read 4758 times)

Different versions of same album
« on: May 17, 2021, 04:21:35 PM »
I guess this usually happens when bands are rumbled for using unauthorised samples. I really like Wild Nothing's Gemini album and have only just learned that my favourite track on it - Chinatown - has been changed on later pressings, presumably to remove the Chantal Goya sample. Similarly, The Go! Team's debut is now different to when initially released (or had a different release somewhere down the line) due to uncleared samples being removed.

I used to have a promo of Spiritualized's LAGWAFIS which had a bit of an Elvis song playing through it and that was removed from the actual release.

Any other examples, especially for other reasons?

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2021, 04:38:36 PM »
The Avalanches
Some SST records but most obv Double Nickles which lacks songs and has a bad new mix on CD.
ZZ Tops first few albums were changed for CD.
Zappa destroyed his back catalogue.
The Fall's Perverted by Language is a different album than it used to be - some copies start with 4 tracks that were never on the original album and a few songs are, bizarrely, shortened to have Mark's spoken word rants editted out. Real New Fall LP/Country On The Click counts too, not only different mixes but different takes.

markburgle

  • A flavourless mush I call Rootmarm
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2021, 05:07:46 PM »
The Fall's ImperialWax Solvent was also remixed and changed around by MES prior to release. The producer talked up the original as a lost classic and said a lot of the best vox and the best song were missing from the released version, but the original mix is out now and it ain't all that.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2021, 06:07:36 PM »
The Fall's ImperialWax Solvent was also remixed and changed around by MES prior to release. The producer talked up the original as a lost classic and said a lot of the best vox and the best song were missing from the released version, but the original mix is out now and it ain't all that.

Didn't like either of them aside from "50 Year Old Man" (obv) but its clear it could have been something great had the stars aligned. I think the next record was as good as any Fall record. The last good one.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2021, 06:26:32 PM »
I used to have a promo of Spiritualized's LAGWAFIS which had a bit of an Elvis song playing through it and that was removed from the actual release.

I had that promo too. That version was finally cleared for a recentish reissue (with the black sleeve) and replaced the old title track. I'm not sure if that will be the case for the upcoming re-release, but I much prefer it to the compromised version.

I first heard this version of Germfree Adolescents and the proper version has never made as much sense to me. 'The Day The World Turned Day-Glo' is an incredible opening track. Great closing track too, but it has more impact at the beginning.

I have the original Mo Wax edition of the first Dr Octagon album and was confused when a mate played me the more common later version. Not only was it rejigged and had a live track added ('1977') but it was missing two of my favourite tracks, 'On Production' and 'Biology 101'. I'm sure there was a reason these were dropped and not the nasty skit 'A Trip To The Gynecologyst', but it wouldn't be good enough to satisfy me.

An tSaoi

  • The Prodigal Cunt
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2021, 06:40:56 PM »
How many Tubular Bells has yer man done at this stage?

chveik

  • OPEN THE PUBS BOYS
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2021, 08:40:00 PM »
We Can't Be Stopped/The Geto Boys (the cleaner Rick Rubin version is superior)

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2021, 08:44:55 PM »
The first Psychedelic Furs album had a different cover and tracklisting for the US market - they ditched 'Blacks/Radio' (considered a tad lyrically problematic) and threw in a couple of songs they'd recorded with Martin Hannet.

Their third album, 'Forever Now', got a horrendous alternate cover for the US market that apparently made Richard Butler weep, and the tracklisting was switched around a bit. I have the original UK vinyl version and the CD reissue with uses the US order - prefer the latter.

purlieu

  • Gertrude Stein said that's enough.
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2021, 09:18:05 PM »
How many Tubular Bells has yer man done at this stage?
There are three versions of Tubular Bells: the original 1973 version, the obnoxious 2003 re-recording, and the 2008 remix (which, as with the following two albums, is now the only version you can buy from a record shop. He’s an arse)
Then there are various related albums: The Orchestral Tubular Bells, arranged by David Bedford and disliked by Mike; Tubular Bells II, a truly horrible cash-in album which follows the structure of the original and moves a few of the notes around; Tubular Bells III, which has a couple of tracks based on sections of the first, but is otherwise an original album in its own right; Tubular Bells IV, which he announced a few years ago, and is set to be fully remixable by listeners, and will be premiered in a live performance from space[1]. Nothing’s  been heard since.
Then there are two more which aren’t actually Tubular Bells, but just use the name and bell logo to cash in: The Millennium Bell, and Tubular Beats, a terrible eurotrance remix album he recorded with York.
Then there are numerous compilations with the bell logo on the cover, as well as all the singles from TBII that also feature it.

In short: too many.
 1. No, really

An tSaoi

  • The Prodigal Cunt
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2021, 09:23:31 PM »
Jesus Christ. Is the "obnoxious 2003 re-recording" the one with John Cleese as the MC? That made me do a proper Lyndhurstian double take when I first heard it.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2021, 09:23:39 PM »
ZZ Tops first few albums were changed for CD.

Oh. Didn't know that, how?

purlieu

  • Gertrude Stein said that's enough.
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2021, 09:30:06 PM »
Jesus Christ. Is the "obnoxious 2003 re-recording" the one with John Cleese as the MC? That made me do a proper Lyndhurstian double take when I first heard it.
That's the one. He redid the whole thing from scratch because he was unhappy with the original album, and in the process made it sound dull, digital, lifeless and just totally lacking the feel of the original. He didn't even try to replicate some of the original effects, which is most obvious on the "basses" section near the start, which is utterly horrible. John Cleese hamming it up is a really unpleasant replacement for Vivian Stanshall's wonderful off-the-cuff original.

An tSaoi

  • The Prodigal Cunt
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2021, 09:36:12 PM »
Yes, dreadful. I've heard that Oldfield has some perfect version of Tubular Bells in his head, and he's never been able to get it out properly, and nearly went mad doing loads of takes and overdubs and messing around with it.

purlieu

  • Gertrude Stein said that's enough.
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2021, 09:58:08 PM »
The Amorphous Androgynous - The Isness. By far the most confusing release I've ever come across. I'm currently working on a blog (that might become a book) covering the entire FSOL back catalogue, and they've always been a bit of a nightmare for making unnecessarily complicated decisions when it comes to releases, contradictory titling, etc., but this one takes the cake.

Version 1. Announced in late 2001 under the title Galaxial Pharmaceutical. 14 tracks.
Version 2. Name changed to The Isness, some promo versions circulate, although to whom remains a mystery, as no published review has ever referred to this tracklist. Mastered at Abbey Road and informally known as the Abbey Road Version. 13 tracks.
Version 3. A very different version: missing two tracks from Version 2, adding another (an edit of a song which had been released under the FSOL name the previous year), and half of the remaining tracks present as alternate mixes, including two as radically different versions. Sent out as promos, albeit in the same sleeve as Version 2, thus most reviews (and the leak) got all the titles wrong. The major changes were due to Gaz Cobain believing Version 2 to be "too masculine". The tracklist actually runs closer to Version 1. 12 tracks.
Version 4. The general retail CD release, the same as Version 3, only with an added title track, and a very slightly edited version of one track. Limited edition burgopak sleeve, standard edition in jewel case, US edition in jewel case. Released as Amorphous Androgynous, except in America where the label decided to put The Future Sound of London on the front to boost sales (their press release also made no reference to the change in style to psychedelic rock). The US label also put out the 2,500 copies of Version 2 they'd made because they didn't want to scrap them, later claiming it was an accident. It's become a bit of a collector's item. 13 tracks.
Version 5. The 2LP edition (UK only, the US label being as lazy as possible again) is the same as Version 4, only with a totally different running order to fit it onto the format's limitations, and with an added track not on the CD version. This bonus track was never mentioned anywhere. 14 tracks.
Version 6. A 2CD edition with a bonus disc called The Otherness. The Otherness brings together two alternate mixes and an exclusive track from Version 2, as well as the bonus track from Version 5, as well as some remixes and otherwise unreleased tracks. Released as another burgopak, later re-released in a jewel case without the band's knowledge. In the US, the bonus disc was licensed to a different label from the original album as a standalone release. 27 tracks.
Version 7. Gaz later acknowledged that his main problem with Version 2 was the mastering being too loud, and that it was musically far superior (a belief backed up by general fan opinion). And so a newly mastered Version 2 was released for Record Store Day, under the name Abbey Road Cut, despite the new mastering meaning it wasn't actually mastered at Abbey Road. And, of course, it turned out to be a different mix. One track is missing, two more are subtly different, two more are very noticeably different, some of the bloody track titles are different. 12 tracks.

I'm just glad I became a FSOL megafan rather than, say, a MBV one. I would have been so bored as a teenager without this sort of stuff going on.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2021, 10:30:32 PM »
Does a substantial re-record of most of the tracks on an unreleased album count?

   

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2021, 11:00:22 PM »
Rubber Soul: the Fab Four's early albums were all mutilated by Capitol, usually to cut the song count and cobble the unused songs together with singles on later cut'n'shut albums. But on this one they ditched four songs ("Drive My Car", "Nowhere Man", "What Goes On" and "If I Needed Someone") and replaced them with two songs from the UK version of Help! ("I've Just Seen a Face" and "It's Only Love"). It gives the record a much folkier, acoustic sound, and it's this US version that Pet Sounds was trying to surpass.

UK:

A-side
1.   "Drive My Car"
2.   "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)"
3.   "You Won't See Me"
4.   "Nowhere Man"
5.   "Think for Yourself"
6.   "The Word"
7.   "Michelle"

B-side
1.   "What Goes On"
2.   "Girl"
3.   "I'm Looking Through You"
4.   "In My Life"
5.   "Wait"
6.   "If I Needed Someone"
7.   "Run for Your Life"

US:

A-side
1.   "I've Just Seen a Face"
2.   "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)"
3.   "You Won't See Me"
4.   "Think for Yourself"
5.   "The Word"
6.   "Michelle"

B-side
1.   "It's Only Love"
2.   "Girl"
3.   "I'm Looking Through You"
4.   "In My Life"
5.   "Wait"
6.   "Run for Your Life"

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2021, 11:01:54 PM »
There are loads of Guided By Voices albums that were altered a bit or completely reworked during production. Lots of the working versions are available on bootlegs and documented on gbvdb.com

I had a weird one. I have Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde on vinyl and Passing My By is very slightly different between that and the CD version. The line "she can be my broad, and I can be her n****" is changed so the last word is replaced by a repeat of "I can be her". Also the line "she was a flake like corn and I was born not to understand" has a slight pause between "like" and "corn".

Then there is The KLF...

Magnum Valentino

  • Formerly magval
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2021, 11:02:51 PM »
Oh. Didn't know that, how?

There's reverb added to the guitar and the drums sound like they've been mapped to (and replaced by) a drum machine, like on later albums.

Suffocation didn't like the production on their second album, so from their third album onwards they included one song per album (usually reserved for Japanese editions) that had been re-recorded from said release, reassembling the album over the course of about 15 years and several different drummers.

The initial pressings of HIStory by Michael Jackson had racial slurs on They Don't Care About Us that Jackson had to remove and repress at cost. Apparently the original CD issue of Bad has different versions of a few tracks.

Orbital's first album is different on each of the three formats it was pressed on.

My Dying Bride's second has different art for each format.

The Fragile by NIN has extra tracks on vinyl.

And Taylor Swift's recent re-record campaign springs to mind.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2021, 11:08:28 PM »
Oh, and early verions of Squirrel and G-Man Twenty Four Hour Party People Plastic Face Carnt Smile (White Out) originally had Desmond on it until it was replaced with Twenty Four Hour Party People, after Apple's[1] legal people got in touch.
 1. Or whoever owned the rights to Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da at the time.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2021, 11:52:26 PM »
Oh. Didn't know that, how?

Drum were sweetened with electronics and reverb. I think some of the bass was re-recorded too. The shitty electronic drum versions of "Waitin' For the Bus" and "La Grange" you sometimes hear on dadrock and supermarket radio are from this. Yuck.

Magnum Valentino

  • Formerly magval
Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2021, 12:23:30 AM »
Slipknot's first album was reissued with a track removed because it had a sample they thought was from a documentary (and thus free to use) that was actually from a hoax website full of sort of torture porn stories supported by audio snippets which, as works of fiction, were protected by copyright.

Jazz albums sometimes get conflated for reissues. The two LPs Buddy Rich and Harry Edison did together were reordered and lumped together on one CD with a generic title like 'The Complete 1955 Sessions' but there's no new material, and no original artwork. This probably happens a lot with very old stuff that's not popular enough to be properly re-released.

The Smiths and Meat is Murder have arguably each album's biggest song (This Charming Man and How Soon is Now respectively) on the CD versions, but both are absent on the original and reissued LPs.

Carnivore's first album was completely remixed and the original removed from sale. Not sure if I've ever heard that version.

Vapor Trails by Rush was brickwalled and a remixed album was eventually released but cost the album a lot of its energy despite the improved clarity of the playing.

Most of AC/DC's earliest albums exist in different formats inside and outside Australia with different tracks and covers, and their first two albums were combined to create their international 'first' album, leaving about an album's worth of tracks not released outside Australia.

Type O Negative's second album was re-released to replace the cover photograph of their singer's splayed asshole. I also suspect this photograph was designed to annoy Glen Danzig who might have made a bit of noise and got his way. Also, their THIRD album was reissued a year later with a few tracks removed, the rest reordered, a different closer and an alternate shot from the same cover shoot. I'd quite like a copy of that.

That Miles Davis album they reissued with a different title and a photo of him playing to replace the glamour shot of his wife because they didn't think people wanted an LP cover with a black woman on it.

The Sugababes, Atomic Kitten and Divine Heresy albums that were reissued with re-recorded vocals to accommodate new singers mid-tour.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 12:33:58 AM by Magnum Valentino »

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2021, 03:45:35 AM »
Deathchants, breakdowns and military waltzes by John Fahey is one of the only albums I have never paused at any point once it's hit what could be technically counted as bonus trscks, both versions recorded 10 years apart, only the first having the incredibly raucous flute tune. (Tried to find a playlist of both together but there was nothing in the right order or not including separate versions of the same songs., But 1963 and 1974 and they are available elsewhere).
On another note, just read this
https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.loc.gov/static/programs/national-recording-preservation-board/documents/OKEH%2520LAUGHING%2520RECORD.pdf&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwjOosCymNLwAhXkCGMBHT3BCuAQFjAAegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw0grkLTY4CSFkyWMQ7Uiaf_
About
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BavE2cFUT54



But the reason I've been thinking about it for the last 8 years is because in a Mississippi records talk I went to he (he? Yeah, him) claimed  they were forced to record that over and over again for about 24 hours and after it at least half of each of them committed suicide.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2021, 08:22:04 AM »
Bobby Conn's first album is completely different on vinyl than it is on CD.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2021, 09:01:13 AM »
There is an extra 30 second track at the end of the vinyl version of REMs Reckoning that isn't on any other format (though it might have been reinstated on the re-issues)

What about tracks with locked grooves on the vinyl versions, like Taking Tiger Mountain by Eno? I think some CD/tape versions have an amount of the repeated sound before ending and some miss it off completely

buzby

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Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2021, 09:01:32 AM »
Then there is The KLF...
The White Room OST, scrapped in 1989
Reworked into The White Room (UK & Europe) in 1991
Edited for the  US release for sample clearance, and also to replace LTTT and Justified & Ancient with the later single versions
2021 'Directors Cut' streaming version, a hodge podge of tracks from the previous releases with some further edits, most likely due to clearance issues.

Most of New Order's Factory albums differed for their US cassette and CD releases, and sometimes for the UK cassette releases too.
Movement's US release used different colours on the sleeve artwork (burgundy on white rather than dark blue on light blue)
PC&L had Blue Monday and The Beach added for the US cassette and CD releases.
Low Life is unusual as the UK cassette version was different to the LP and CD releases - it used the full length single version of The Perfect Kiss instead of the album edit, and also included the B-sides The Kiss Of Death and Perfect Pit. The US cassette release used the normal LP/CD version of the album.
Brotherhood had State Of The Nation added for the UK CD release, and the Canadian CD release also added the Shep Pettibone mix of Bizarre Love Triangle. Qwest didn't release the album on CD in the US for two years, and then they used the LP/cassette master without State Of The Nation.
Substance is different for each of the formats it was released on. The double LP only collects the A-sides of the singles (but omits Murder). The double cassette includes Murder and all the B-sides (minus Perfect Pit, which wasn't included on any version). The double CD was limited by running time of a disc, and so the A-sides disc doesn't include Murder and The Perfect Kiss is edited by 45 seconds. The B-side disc includes Murder but omits Shellcock and True Dub. Basically the cassette version was the one to go for if you wanted everything, but not in the US where it was cut down to a single cassette with just the A-sides (minus Murder again - it was basically the LP master used for the cassette release). All versions also replaced the original 12" versions of Temptation and Confusion with 1987 re-recordings as Bernard didn't like his vocals on the originals (this was after John Robie had taught him about singing in his natural key).
All this madness ended with Technique, which was the same everywhere.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 09:11:57 AM by buzby »

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2021, 09:08:37 AM »
Most of AC/DC's earliest albums exist in different formats inside and outside Australia with different tracks and covers, and their first two albums were combined to create their international 'first' album, leaving about an album's worth of tracks not released outside Australia.

I prefer the international version of High Voltage, but dropping 'Jailbreak' from Dirty Deeds... was scandalous. I'd love an Aussie pressing just for that (and the weird cover).

Bobby Conn's first album is completely different on vinyl than it is on CD.

I didn't know about this. Is it an improvement?

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2021, 09:11:59 AM »
The White Room OST, scrapped in 1989
Reworked into The White Room (UK & Europe) in 1991
Edited for the  US release for sample clearance, and also to replace LTTT and Justified & Ancient with the later single versions
2021 'Directors Cut' streaming version, a hodge podge of tracks from the previous releases with some further edits, most likely due to clearance issues.


And wasn't 1987: What The Fuck Is Going On? edited to remove all the samples with instructions on how to add them in yourself?


Then there is Chill Out/Come Down Dawn which is different versions of the same album

Then there is Space, which is all the Cauty bits from his collaboration with Alex Patterson, the latter bits becoming the first Orb album, though that is a bit different I suppose. I would love to hear what the original tracks with both their input were like


buzby

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Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2021, 09:25:04 AM »
And wasn't 1987: What The Fuck Is Going On? edited to remove all the samples with instructions on how to add them in yourself?
1987 - The Jams 45 Edits was released as a 12" single (JAMS 25T) rather than an album (1987 was JAMS LP1) as the edited out samples reduced the running time enough that it qualified as a single. Also they didn't want people paying album prices for a record that was silent for a large part of it's runtime.
Quote
Then there is Chill Out/Come Down Dawn which is different versions of the same album
Like the White Room Director's Cut, there's that much that's been changed or replaced between Chill Out & Come Down Dawn that I don't really consider them to be different versions of the same album. They are more like what Capitol used to do with the early Beatles stuff, compiling singles and album tracks together to make up their own albums for the US market.

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2021, 09:41:27 AM »
I see them as different versions of the same album, the latter being the former with all the uncleared samples removed. I know there is a bit more to the changes but I think ultimately it is all in the service of making the album releasable

Re: Different versions of same album
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2021, 10:52:48 AM »
We talked about a couple of these on the Musical F*** my Hat thread.

Seal's debut album was silently replaced by a different version, with no outwardly visible way to distinguish the two.  The replacement was replete with even more Trevor Horn beige production than the original, with reduced dynamic range, and a completely new MOR recording of the song "Wild" which did away with all the guitars and added that ubiquitous tinny 90s synth percussion.  In the other thread, buzby theorised that bad blood between Horn and the session guitarist on that album might have led to them re-recording it, which is a nice idea.  Here's the folks from the Steve Hoffman forums talking about it.

And, as per that other thread, Jacko's Bad was another album which was updated without ceremony, removing all the binaural effects (basically a big flounce because the owner of the tech wouldn't sell it to Jackson), including the removal of the creepy "I just wanna lay next to you for a while" intro from I Just Can't Stop Loving You.

In each case I prefer the original versions of the albums, but they're pretty hard to find these days.

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