Author Topic: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.  (Read 1937 times)

icehaven

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Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« on: June 09, 2021, 12:11:46 PM »
I may have mentioned I moved recently, and like everyone who is about to or has just moved am now entertaining thoughts of selling or donating a huge amount of stuff. About 6 years ago I moved from a decent sized flat into a houseshare where I had to fit virtually everything I owned into one room, so I got rid of about 70% of my belongings, and I can honestly say I haven't missed a single item (except a dining table and chairs, but there's no way I could have kept them anyway), I can't even remember most of it. I'm not massively materialistic and don't buy much but what I do buy I tend to keep (apart from the purge of 2015) so this is nearly 30 years worth of accumulated stuff, however the justification I have for keeping things (you never know when you'll want or need it) is rapidly diminishing as time goes on (I never want or need it).

Since moving into where we are now we've shoved most things into the spare bedroom as we don't yet have enough furniture to store it properly, but we've been here for 3 months now and I've barely set foot in there, and even then just to find practical things like coats or particular toiletries. The huge amount of books, records, DVDs, barely worn clothes and knick knacks are just sitting there uselessly, and while it's still fresh in my mind what an absolute ballache it was moving them I'm tempted to just start getting rid (pity I didn't do it before moving...). 

There's a number of things with sentimental value I'd keep of course, but there's way more with very little and it feels more like a burden tbh. On the other hand I was listening to an podcast the other day which mentioned an artist who destroyed everything he owned as a piece of performance art, then promptly had a breakdown. Somewhere in the middle would be good, and I'm not going to destroy it anyway, probably sell whatever's worth anything as I could use the money. Has anyone ever done this and regretted it, found themselves settled years later and wished they'd kept more? Or was it a relief to not have so much clutter and think you could easily move without killing yourself or needing a small army to help?

Edit; I should mention leaving things to people isn't an issue, if anyone bothered about me outlives me I sincerely doubt they'll want any of my books/records etc.

Dex Sawash

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2021, 12:38:37 PM »
We did this in 2017-18 as we prepared to sell our old house, plan was to move to a short term apartment rental as we finished repairs on the old shitter to sell it. Would free us to choose new place to buy more carefully without time crunch as well as not having to sleep in house with fresh wood floor urethane melting our synapses. Got rid of loads of shit. Keep stumbling on carefully packed away garbage that we already replaced in complete certainty that the old one was gone.



Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2021, 12:41:09 PM »
Some stuff can be condensed rather than thrown away. I'm considering getting a folder which fits 400 discs in so that will save lots of space over having all the DVD and CD cases.

If you have some sort of Kindle then you can look through all of your books and find any that you may want to read again in the future. Anything which you would want to read again then check if it is available as an E-book easily and if it is then get rid of the physical book.

Basically just find ways to get rid of things while still having access to them.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2021, 12:55:27 PM »
When I moved back to the UK from Florida (the first time, I ended up going back less than a year later) I left behind over five years of stuff including my CD collection, books, etc. and my friend who came with me left behind about 20 years of stuff including one of her cats (given to a family friend, she brought the other one). Tried to flog a load of stuff before leaving at a yard sale but most stuff ended up in the trash or given away for free. It's amazing how much clutter we accumulate over the years, and I don't really miss any of it although I'd probably have been unwilling to part with it if wasn't forced to by circumstance.

I did bring my cat though, at great expense and a lot of hassle. But material things can be replaced.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2021, 01:03:48 PM »
I got rid of most of my stuff when I moved to Germany a few years ago. My apartment in Germany is fully furnished (and yet the rent is still way cheaper than in my old place in the UK) so I brought very little stuff with me. I paid a local house-clearance company a couple of hundred quid to get rid of all my furniture (it was all cheap stuff and not worth the effort to sell), and my brother helped me sell off my large CD, DVD and book collections, although I did keep a few favourites. I sold my car, and gave away my TV and some gaming consoles that I rarely used to various family members. My remaining possessions amount to pretty much just clothing, a bicycle, and a few electronic bits and bobs. I definitely had second thoughts about getting rid of my CD, DVD and book collections at first, since I had assembled them over 30 years, but can honestly say that I don't miss them at all. It's definitely a relief to know that I won't have to worry about them when I decide to move again in the future, and that all my stuff could fit in a car with a bicycle rack.

My mum is going to move house soon, and it makes me shudder to think about how much old stuff she will have to sort out. This might make me sound like a selfish cunt, but I'm kind of glad that I live in a different country right now, so the responsibility of helping her with the move falls entirely on my brother.

bgmnts

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2021, 01:04:45 PM »
Can I have your liver?

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2021, 01:11:55 PM »
My apartment in Germany is fully furnished (and yet the rent is still way cheaper than in my old place in the UK)

This was one big headache I found getting apartments/rooms in the US (and probably applies elsewhere), they were never furnished. Some don't even come with a fridge.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2021, 01:12:22 PM »
This was one big headache I found getting apartments/rooms in the US (and probably applies elsewhere), they were never furnished. Some don't even come with a fridge.

Everything appears to be an optional extra in the states.

I'm looking to get rid of 'stuff' as I've become far more outdoorsy in the last 5 years and have an untouched DVD collection of hundreds. What's the best place to sell them off in bulk, Zapper, Ziffit, Music Magpie or another company with a stupid name?

Elderly Sumo Prophecy

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2021, 01:22:40 PM »
Tony Slattery chucked all of his stuff in the Thames once. Are you near a river?

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2021, 01:24:50 PM »
Everything appears to be an optional extra in the states.

I'm looking to get rid of 'stuff' as I've become far more outdoorsy in the last 5 years and have an untouched DVD collection of hundreds. What's the best place to sell them off in bulk, Zapper, Ziffit, Music Magpie or another company with a stupid name?

You'll get more money on eBay, although you're still only looking to get about 10-20p per DVD if you're selling them in bulk so it's barely worth it, factoring in having to parcel them up and send them out as well. Special edition/limited ones/box sets can still get a bit though. If you have time I'd list them individually. At some point there will be someone who wants that battered Sleepless in Seattle DVD and will pay a few quid for it.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2021, 01:36:56 PM »
Not Sure there's a high enough demand for Best of Rowan and Martin (region 1) but I did download one of those apps that you scan the barcode and it gives you all the recent completed ebay sales.

Saying that I've just used ebay to sell for the first time in years (N64 and classic games if you must know) and they are really going for the 'trying to be as much like Amazon' thing than they were the last time I sold.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2021, 01:45:27 PM »
Not Sure there's a high enough demand for Best of Rowan and Martin (region 1) but I did download one of those apps that you scan the barcode and it gives you all the recent completed ebay sales.


I just had a look and one of those sold for 12 quid (albeit in the US). Also noticed that two people bid on Dracula: Dead and Loving It Region 1 (UK sale) for a final price of £6.50. People will buy any old shit. I sometimes buy random stuff like old blank 80s cassette tapes to use as props in videos, sometimes wish I'd held onto things like old VHS movies, cassette albums and such for that reason.

Dex Sawash

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2021, 01:48:47 PM »
Can I have your liver?

Not many good ones among CaBbers

icehaven

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2021, 01:55:48 PM »
I definitely had second thoughts about getting rid of my CD, DVD and book collections at first, since I had assembled them over 30 years, but can honestly say that I don't miss them at all.


Yeah that's the sort of thing I'm concerned about so that's helpful to hear. I think it's something to do with feeling a bit like they've helped make up your identity so getting rid of them and not owning them anymore is like dumping part of yourself, if that isn't too pretentious and overthought. Old clothes less so, I think I've hung on to a lot of them purely because it's easier than carting them to a chazzer.

icehaven

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2021, 01:56:42 PM »
Can I have your liver?

You'd honestly be better off digging up George Best and having one of his.

icehaven

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2021, 01:59:58 PM »
Tony Slattery chucked all of his stuff in the Thames once. Are you near a river?

No but I am near a lot of canals. One of the things that prompted this is when we were looking into living on a barge (before we realised there's no way we could afford it.) Books and clothes float though so it'd look like an Oxfam had sunk.
I do like Slattery though, and surely anything he's done must be a good idea, right?

FerriswheelBueller

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2021, 02:01:49 PM »
This was one big headache I found getting apartments/rooms in the US (and probably applies elsewhere), they were never furnished. Some don't even come with a fridge.

Our place in Toronto came with a fridge and an oven and nothing else. First night we moved in, we slept on the floor with backpacks as pillows.

We got rid of basically everything when moving Edinburgh to Toronto and downsized again moving to our current house. There’s essentially nothing I miss apart from my comic books (largely into the recycling bin) and a few guitar pedals I sold as part of the move. I’m all for downsizing honestly, it’s refreshing to not feel weighed down by stuff. I’d say if you can’t remember what items you have, get rid.

icehaven

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2021, 02:04:45 PM »
I’m all for downsizing honestly, it’s refreshing to not feel weighed down by stuff.

Yep I'm trying to get away from essentially feeling like this;


Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2021, 02:12:34 PM »
This was one big headache I found getting apartments/rooms in the US (and probably applies elsewhere), they were never furnished. Some don't even come with a fridge.

I think that's the norm here as well. I didn't have much trouble finding a furnished place but the vast majority were unfurnished.  Apparently it's common for properties to be rented out completely without kitchens (no appliances or cabinets, literally nothing), so tenants will either tend to move their entire kitchens around with them, or sell them on to the incoming tenant. Sound like a pain in the arse to me, and I think that's changing these days, but you still can't assume anywhere you rent will have a functioning kitchen.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2021, 02:18:50 PM »
Not many good ones among CaBbers

That's true: Good livers, these days, like good hearts in the 80s, are hard to find (but livers, unlike hearts, can regenerate, so... yeah, it's all good)

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2021, 02:32:52 PM »
Yeah that's the sort of thing I'm concerned about so that's helpful to hear. I think it's something to do with feeling a bit like they've helped make up your identity so getting rid of them and not owning them anymore is like dumping part of yourself, if that isn't too pretentious and overthought. Old clothes less so, I think I've hung on to a lot of them purely because it's easier than carting them to a chazzer.

I had the same feelings. This probably sounds a little pretentious, but I found it somewhat helpful to remind myself that this stuff will still exist, it's just going to be enjoyed (hopefully) by different people. As soon as they were gone, I stopped thinking about them completely.

Sebastian Cobb

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2021, 02:38:32 PM »
Some stuff can be condensed rather than thrown away. I'm considering getting a folder which fits 400 discs in so that will save lots of space over having all the DVD and CD cases.


Might as well download hd versions of the ones that are available online (quicker) and rip the rest with handbrake. It's quite quick and easy to do if you can be bothered setting up a bit of software like radarr (and it can index your existing films and pull in better quality versions if you want).

I digitised my cd's a while ago as and I felt I had a bit of a sentimental attachment to them in a way I don't with dvd's I decided to keep them, although they're all in a box packed away.

The Mollusk

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2021, 02:43:02 PM »
I don’t think I could ever part with my CD collection. It’s still being added to every month, plus I’m more attached to it than any of my other possessions except for my cats.

I could quite easily live without a lot of the things I own but I like them and I’ve got space for them so they can stick around for now.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2021, 02:45:16 PM »
I did this after watching a documentary about Minimalism on Netflix. It's not easy, as you soon get rid of a shelf of CDs or books you then accumulate replacement stuff. Plus when you get into a hobby or interest you tend to get all kinds of bits and bob's. I've found that this summer with gardening, and that is despite acquiring free stuff and things from family and friends.

Sebastian Cobb

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2021, 03:28:09 PM »
Yeah I know some people who didn't have any clutter, but I think they were still into conspicuous consumption in some ways, so it really just meant they were buying things and throwing them out. It seemed quite hollow and superficial versus keeping stuff around that actually means something to you.

However I find these threads a bit bleak sometimes because the 'liberation' people seem to have from not having things can also be less-charitably interpreted as parting with possessions to make moving between precarious living situations easier, which by rights shouldn't be necessary for anyone.

I don't have ridiculous amounts of stuff but have lived in one-bed flats and wouldn't have managed without lofts to put some lesser-used stuff in.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2021, 03:34:23 PM »
Tony Slattery chucked all of his stuff in the Thames once. Are you near a river?

His white stuff?

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Elderly Sumo Prophecy

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2021, 03:38:40 PM »
Nah, he'd put that up his nose for safekeeping.

Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2021, 04:48:22 PM »
Bagsy yer records

Johnboy

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2021, 05:00:19 PM »
Recently ot rid of a load of books, a lot of which we'd never read which we had for over twenty years - felt great.

DoesNotFollow

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Re: Getting rid of nearly everything you own.
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2021, 05:29:10 PM »
I'm looking to get rid of 'stuff' as I've become far more outdoorsy in the last 5 years and have an untouched DVD collection of hundreds. What's the best place to sell them off in bulk, Zapper, Ziffit, Music Magpie or another company with a stupid name?

I shopped around and used Ziffit, Music Magpie and WeBuyBooks. It's a little more time consuming entering in the barcode into several different sites (probably quicker if you scan with a smartphone), but also a slight rush when you see Ziffit might give you £1.50 for something Music Magpie might only give you 60p for, as an example.

Made a tidy sum over the past couple of years and I didn't even have mountains of stuff to get rid of. I find it's a decent trade-off between convenience (free shipping, no eBay listings to worry about, guaranteed sales) and getting something back for your stuff, even if it's a fraction of what it's worth new.

There are few things I like more than a good clear out, and am probably missing my calling as one of those de-hoarder type people you see on the telly.

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