Author Topic: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)  (Read 1773 times)

Fambo Number Mive

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I've never watched much Dr Who until recently, so please be gentle if my comments on the subject are rather naive and/or incorrect.

I watched a few episodes of the newer Dr Who episodes but have discovered that most (all?) of the still available classic Dr Who adventures are on Britbox. So I've been snacking from them. I'm not really interested in any Dalek episodes, they seem a bit sameish to me (unless I'm missing something).

The episodes I've watched so far are as follows (spoilers in black)

 The Mind of Evil - although the prison setting and the initial premise was interesting, after 3 episodes I just got bored of it, I have to admit.

Carnival of Monsters - I thought this episode was brilliant, a really clever premise and a great contrast between what was happening within the machine and outside it. Felt like there was real peril for the Doctor and companion in this.

The Happiness Patrol - wasn't a big fan of this one, only watched two of the three episodes. The concept was good but it felt a bit silly really, the Kandy Man wasn't as scary as I thought he would be either.

Paradise Towers - a clever episode with lots of twists. It's impressive how much world-building specific to the episode goes into some of these episodes.

Robot - very interesting, although I found the robot itself a bit naff. Bit of a lazy parody of a scientist in the story.

The Mind Robber - watching this at the moment, it's very good so far. More sinister than I would have expected one of the very early episodes to be.

So far I've seen Jon Pertwee, Sylvester McCoy, Tom Baker and Patrick Troughton as the Doctor. They all seem excellent in the role, all very believable yet very different as the eccentric Doctor.

Which episodes of classic Dr Who do you recommend? Do my views on the episodes so far make me worse than Hitler? Do you have a favourite Doctor from among the classics?

Personally, the only Doctor I didn't like was the one played by David Tennant in the modern episodes - I've mentioned this before, but I found Tennant annoying in the role.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2021, 07:46:26 PM »
Which episodes of classic Dr Who do you recommend?

I'm going to include some but not all Dalek stories even though you said they're all the same, because some are really good and shouldn't be missed. Also, I'm only mentioning ones that exist in their entirety. If I don't say anything after naming them, that's mostly because of the desire to avoid spoilers.

William Hartnell:

An Unearthly Child - it's where it started, so you should watch it. The actual story part after the first episode is a bit naff, but it's important as we get to see the characters for the first time.
The Daleks - where the series took off when it was in danger of early cancellation.
The Aztecs
The Dalek Invasion of Earth
The Romans
The Time Meddler

Patrick Toughton:

Tomb of the Cybermen
The War Games - long, but worth it.
(the reason for the small number of Troughton stories I'm recommending is that very few complete stories exist that are that good)

Jon Pertwee:
Spearhead From Space
Doctor Who and the Silurians
Inferno
Frontier in Space
[Carnival of Monsters - you've already watched it and yeah, it's great so I'm listing it here]
The Time Warrior
(others will add stuff here, I'm less than an average fan of the era.)

Tom Baker:
Genesis of the Daleks
Terror of the Zygons
Pyramids of Mars
The Brain of Morbius
The Seeds of Doom
The Hand of Fear
The Deadly Assassin
The Face of Evil
The Robots of Death
The Talons of Weng-Chiang [warning: dated attitudes to race]
Horror of Fang Rock
The Ribos Operation
The Pirate Planet
The Androids of Tara
City of Death
City of Death, again because it's so good
The Horns of Nimon [bite me]
The Leisure Hive
Full Circle
State of Decay
Warriors' Gate
The Keeper of Traken
Logopolis

Peter Davison:
Kinda
Snakedance
Enlightenment
The Caves of Androzani

Colin Baker:
Revelation of the Daleks. Maybe. But looking at the list now, it's a stunningly inessential era.

Sylvester McCoy:
Delta and the Bannermen
Remebrance of the Daleks
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy
Ghost Light
The Curse of Fenric
Survival

Although really, you should watch everything in order from the start of Jon Pertwee because  a)it does make a coherent whole when watched in order and b)no two Doctor Who fans would make the same list, it's very subjective.


Quote
Do my views on the episodes so far make me worse than Hitler?

No, but referring to stories as "episodes" might.

Quote
Do you have a favourite Doctor from among the classics?

Tom Baker, obv.

Gurke and Hare

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2021, 07:50:39 PM »
b)no two Doctor Who fans would make the same list, it's very subjective.

In fact, let's face it, I probably wouldn't make the same list if you asked me tomorrow.

Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2021, 07:56:53 PM »
I have a similar connection with classic Who - only seen relatively few stories, preferring to stick to what people regard as the highlights. I feel there's some good stuff, it's just a matter of finding it amongst how ever many episodes it came to. A lot of it is of its time - slow and padded, wobbly sets, etc. No favourite Doctor as I think all the Doctors were great in their own ways. Your views on episodes are not wrong, in fact they seem to be consistent with the vague consensus of which stories are good/bad (though in this day and age that consensus gets increasingly blurred with every YouTube video saying a story is overrated or underrated). Some recommendations and personal thoughts on what I have seen, in case it's useful:

The War Machines - barring a very abrupt companion departure, this has aged very well, the pace was fairly good and I liked the general concept, though it may be a bit route one.

The Seeds Of Death - promising but would have worked better with tighter pacing, four parts rather than six.

Inferno - oddly, this one zips along despite being seven parts. Good plot and characterisation, works well as a Sunday afternoon war movie-type thing.

City Of Death - written by Douglas Adams under a pseudonym. I'll leave that with you.

Did get the season 18 Blu-Ray but very little of it stuck with me.

Watch Warriors Of The Deep, it's great. Everyone loves it.

The Caves Of Androzani - grim and thus an acquired taste. I like it though, like most stories written by Robert Holmes, it's very compelling. (Talons of Weng-Chiang is one of those stories and might be worth checking out, but it's been so long since I last saw it, and, oh yeah, prosthetics to make English actors look Chinese).

Attack Of The Cybermen - Give me a fucking break

Vengeance On Varos - didn't like the last ten minutes, thought the rest of it had some good ideas and world-building.

Remembrance of the Daleks is overrated simplistic fan service, with little going on to keep you invested on repeat viewings.

The Greatest Show In The Galaxy and much of season 26 are incredibly strong - I enjoy the surreal atmosphere of stories like Ghost Light and Survival, they don't make a lot of sense but that somehow makes them more compelling as you try to piece together their internal logic, which clearly exists. Some interesting themes, presented in very striking ways.

The best Dalek stories are Genesis and Revelation (ironic as they either hardly feature the Daleks or focus on interesting themes that are independent of them).

purlieu

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2021, 08:10:03 PM »
Trying to recommend two stories per Doctor so it's not too overwhelming. I almost managed to avoid Dalek stories (although there are plenty of great ones like the first, Invasion of Earth, Evil, Genesis, Revelation and Remembrance).

Hartnell:
The Time Meddler
The War Machines

Troughton (the Best Doctor to all discerning Who fans):
Tomb of the Cybermen
The Web of Fear (as long as you don't mind there being a telesnap reconstruction or animation for the missing episode 3)

Pertwee:
Spearhead from Space
The Green Death

Tom:
Horror of Fang Rock
City of Death

Davison:
Kinda
The Caves of Androzani

Colin:
Vengeance on Varos
Revelation of the Daleks (although it works best if you have prior Dalek knowledge...)

McCoy:
Ghost Light
The Curse of Fenric


I mostly agree with your assessments, except Paradise Towers which I think is a superb idea utterly ruined by appallingly cheap sets, terrible acting and hideous music.
Watch Warriors Of The Deep, it's great. Everyone loves it.
Don't be cruel.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2021, 10:16:41 PM »
So far I've seen Jon Pertwee, Sylvester McCoy, Tom Baker and Patrick Troughton as the Doctor

The obvious thing to say then is that you need see some William Hartnell as the first Doctor, and there's no better place to start than the first episode of his first story, the episode which started it all in 1963: An Unearthly Child. In fact the first episode is really all you need to watch of that story, as it's a standalone that introduces the idea of the Doctor as a cosmic nomad, his TARDIS and the concept of travel through time and space. And it also happens to be one of the best things made for television ever.

Stuck with the next three instalments if you want, but that first episode of An Unearthly Child is electric and unmissable.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2021, 10:25:49 PM »
I'll try the recommend two stories for each Doctor bit:

The Reign of Terror
French revolution escapade, lots of tension and action, nice and grimy. Try to stick out the horrendous animation for the two missing episodes.
The Space Museum
On paper, a bit of a boilerplate facists-v-rebels runaround, but with some interesting ideas about time travel thrown in and some subverting of cliches even at this stage - the Doctor taking the piss out of the bad guys and the companion being dismayed by the crappy rebels and taking charge.
The Macra Terror
Largely on the strength of the fantastic animation. A spooky Prisoner-like colony secretly ruled by giant crabs with BBC accents.
The Enemy of the World
Kind of dismissed until all the episodes turned up in Nigeria in 2013, it's actually great - a thriller about a would-be dictator who happens to look like the Doctor, so we get a brilliant dual performance by Troughton (but really four performances when they start pretending to be each other as well) and the James Bond style settings of Hungary and Australia. Also Doctor Who's greatest ever supporting character, Griffin the Chef.
Day of the Daleks
It's The Terminator, but with Daleks, crossed with Day of the Jackal, but where the assassins are time-travellers from the future. it's fucking BOSS.
The Sea Devils
The Master at the height of his powers, with Roger Delgado threatening to steal the entire programme. Loads of sea-faring action and some monsters wearing fishing nets because the producer was worried about them being nude.
Image of the Fendahl
Very late-period Hammer pastiche, crossed with Nigel Kneale by mixing hard science with creepy monsters from the dawn of time and the origins of superstitions.
Logopolis
Tom Baker's last story, and like the rest of his last season very dour in tone. It's actually justified here, with the whole thing a very doom-laden funeral march. Suitably oppressive.
Mawdryn Undead
Odd one, in that the main plot doesn't have a villain but rather a central dilemma that can only be solved at high cost. Blows a hole in Who mythology by rearranging the history of the show's last decade, but nothing that can't be easily ignored.
Warriors of the Deep
No, really. A great script, massively cut down to fit the slot and then suffering a range of production issues and stupid directives from the sixth floor. There's a seed of something great, and the last line's a killer.
Vengeance on Varos
The only story that justifies the brutal mid-80s tone and the only Colin Baker story I'll recommend. A world built on a culture of cruelty and violence is a trangressive idea for Who, and it almost works. One of the great villain performances from Nabil Shaban as the slug-like Sil.
Silver Nemesis
I know it's not great, and I've only seen the broadcast version once - there was an extended edit on VHS that the DVD ignores - but if you want a Jacobian sorceress, her terrified manservant, some neo-Nazis led by Anton Diffring and the Cybermen to all have a fight over a living statue, this is for you.
The Curse of Fenric
I don't know if BritBox offers the movie edit, but that should be the default. Pretty much peerless in writing, directing and acting, a standout supporting turn from Nicholas Parsons (!) and a great story for the central Doctor-Ace relationship, based around WWII, early computers, Norse mythology and vampires from an alternate future. Possibly my favourite story.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2021, 10:52:23 PM »
As you haven't watched any Davison either, it would be lamentable of me not to recommend some of the adventures of my very favourite Doctor. Others have already mentioned The Caves of Androzani, his final story, but the problem is that it's such a good story, such an incredible piece of television, that you might want to hold it back - not just to stoke your anticipation, but also because once you've seen Androzani, you tend to wonder why swathes of other, lesser episodes couldn't have been realised as brilliantly.

Davison has one of the more inconsistent eras - clunkers and classics are intermingled more than with any other Doctor, I'd say - but one of the big problems throughout his tenure is that the guy who script-edited most of the stories had a uniquely dour outlook which is reflected in the cheerless dialogue and downbeat plots. Nevertheless Davison himself never puts in less than 100% and though he doesn't have the same eccentricity which made Tom Baker a natural fit for the role of the titular Time Lord, he has a charismatic charm which he brings to bear on his boyish portrayal.

I'd recommend Kinda and Snakedance, a brace of tales which pit him against the mind-forged menace of the Mara, a creature of the subconscious which manifests as a snake and tends to bring out the more destructive side of those it controls. There's symbolism and surrealism a-plenty in these stories that will appeal to those who enjoy a slightly weirder edge to their sci-fi. Then there's Frontios, scripted by the writer who wrote the fifth Doctor's first adventure and therefore has more of a handle on the character. The B-movie plot is a great vehicle for plenty of enjoyable dialogue and plot twists.

Ignore what everyone says about Warriors of the Deep.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2021, 12:15:39 AM »
Quote
Personally, the only Doctor I didn't like was the one played by David Tennant in the modern episodes - I've mentioned this before, but I found Tennant annoying in the role.

Is the correct answer.

And purlieu is right. Troughton is the best Doc that we've ever had.

Right - I'll try this 'two stories each' thing myself, and try not to repeat too many that have already been nominated.

Hartnell:

The Chase. Okay, it's a Dalek story, but it's a joyously barmy Dalek story that throws in everything but the kitchen sink. Objectively, it's silly rubbish, but just let it wash over you and there's a lot to enjoy - the Cosmos's Stupidest Dalek, Peter Purves' enjoyably crap American accent, the big Dalek/Mechonoid barney, and possibly the most affecting companion departure scene ever.

The Tenth Planet. Historical on so many levels for the show, but particularly memorable for the creepiest and most, well, logical depiction of the Cybermen to date. Here, they really are desperate survivors rather than galactic conquerors. The chilly atmosphere of the location is well-communicated, and there's a pleasingly utopian international feel to the supporting cast.

Troughton:

Fury From The Deep. Okay, so it's largely crap animation in its current version, but don't let that put you off. Along with The War Machines, this is another good instance of the show doing Quatermass long before the early Pertwee years. There's creepy atmosphere aplenty, another great supporting cast, and another of the most affecting companion goodbyes of them all.

The Invasion. A big, splashy, Cyberman action adventure! UNIT proper makes its debut with a good few of the familiar faces that we'd come to know and love already in place, the location work (especially in central London) is little short of iconic, and despite its eight-episode length this one whizzes along with style that means that you don't worry about the plot holes while you're watching.

Pertwee:

Terror Of The Autons. The Master and Jo arrive, the Autons are back, and what we have here is basically a re-run of the first Auton story, but adrenalised through the ceiling. The comic book aesthetic really comes across here, this one is basically essence of Doctor Who if you're looking for such a thing - shock scenes, memorable monsters, plenty of stunt action and a well-knit 'family' of central casting sparking off of each other.

Invasion Of The Dinosaurs. Look past the rubbish dinosaur puppets and this remains one of the most intelligent stories of the show's run, with some unsettling things to say about the Earth's potential future and some tough-love hope for better things. A tale with surprisingly sympathetic villains, which is often a good sign for a more thoughtful story than usual, and that's the case here.

Baker, T:

The Ark In Space - Hinchcliffe starts to set out his stall in child-friendly body horror and possession plot elements, and the result is an effective variant on IT! The Terror From Beyond Space and Alien-style yarns. A claustrophobic setting with marvellously moody (lack of) lighting, interesting monster ideas in the Wirrn, and - best of all - dear old Harry Sullivan, perhaps my favourite companion of them all.

The Keeper Of Traken - re-introduces another old enemy in a nifty manner, and I like the cod-Shakespearean feel of a lot of the dialogue, costumes, and set designs. For all of the elegance and prettiness of the look, there's an increasing air of doom about it all which feeds well into Logopolis, which has already been recommended. On a purely personal note, Nyssa (as played by Sarah Sutton) helped me out during many restless nights of puberty.

Davison:

Snakedance - the sequel to Kinda, also previously recommended, and well worth watching too as a rare example of a 'spiritual' Doctor Who story which still packs in some nice scares. Martin Clunes often gets mocked in 'before they were famous' shows for his appearance in this, but his performance is one of my favourites in all Who - a marvellously spoilt and louche young git. As with Kinda, Janet Fielding as Tegan delivers a powerhouse performance.

Frontios - the monsters haven't aged well visually, but the idea behind them is fantastic. There's a genuine sense of desperation about the far-Future Human colony trying to survive here, and some more effective touches of body horror, while the scenes of people being swallowed up screaming by the soil itself are nightmarish. A solid cast rises to the occasion, and the victory is achieved - as it should be - by the Doctor being cunning and improvisational.

Baker, C:

Vengeance On Varos - okay, this one's been recommended by others already, but I'm going to add to the chorus of approval for it. Philip Martin comes up with a typically sharp and self-reflexive script, Nabil Shaban creates an iconic villain seemingly without even trying, and Colin is a properly heroic Doctor. Refreshingly, it's a tale where not all of the problems are neatly solved at the end - not in the corny 'oh no, Davros/The Master/etc got away!' way, but more 'what are we gonna do now?...'

The Two Doctors - be warned, this one's real Marmite. I love it, but can understand why a good few people don't. Robert Holmes, displaying some of the biggest balls in Who, sidelines and even mocks his own Sontarans in favour of a new race of aliens with a thing for food. Baker and Troughton don't really get that much screen time together, but both shine, and the likes of James Saxon, Jacqueline Pearce and John Stratton ensure some real characters in the supporting cast.

McCoy:

Oops. Well, you've already seen Paradise Towers, which I personally love, so that's out: and most of the good stories from his run have already been recommended. I'll back up the recommendations of Ghost Light and Curse Of Fenric, oh, and also throw in Battlefield, although more for nice performances, visuals, and atmosphere rather than the story itself.


Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2021, 01:30:03 AM »
I'm gonna say what I always say when we have one of these threads: Pyramids of Mars.

There's others of course, but that's the one I go for.  The cliffhangar at the end of Episode 1 is one of the best in the whole show's history.

Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2021, 04:01:05 AM »
I'm gonna say what I always say when we have one of these threads: Pyramids of Mars.

There's others of course, but that's the one I go for.  The cliffhangar at the end of Episode 1 is one of the best in the whole show's history.

Aye, me too. A great example of Philip Hinchcliffe's gothic era of the show, probably my favourite along with Pertwee's Unit time.

Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2021, 10:00:00 AM »
I've only got two Dr Who DVDs.

- Genesis Of The Daleks, because it's my doctor, it has the moral dilemma that goes to the centre of what the Doctor's purpose actually is, and Daleks, innit.[1]

- The last McCoy one, which I've only got because like Ace, I used to live in Perivale. Lots of reasons not to recommend it, not least that it's got Hale & Fucking Pace in it.
 1. Plus it was even scarier because my grandmother looked and talked like Davros, the old witch.

purlieu

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2021, 12:52:31 PM »
The real problem with the central concept of this thread is that I agree with almost every recommendation so far. Fambo, can we just suggest you watch the entire thing start-to-finish?

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2021, 04:35:30 PM »
Planet of Giants is an underrated gem. It's partly an examination of our impact on the environment in response to the increasing use of insecticides in the 1960s but largely a short (3 episodes), "side-step" adventure that holds up surprisingly well. One of the cliffhangers is a plug being pulled out of a sink - if that doesn't tempt you to watch, nothing will.

Survival has probably been recommended by others and for good reason. It's a moody, introspective story that questions to what degree we must change ourselves to survive an unkind, rapidly-evolving world, and captures the existential dread of returning to your home town to find the shops have shut and your friends have moved away and all that remains is the bitter, bitter cold. Also, there's a lesbian cheetah lady in it. It's great!
« Last Edit: August 30, 2021, 04:59:52 PM by Midas »

Jerzy Bondov

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2021, 05:13:34 PM »
Pertwee is 'my' Doctor and I love his spikiness and warmth, and I know it's cool to say Troughton is your favourite, or Colin because of the audios, and I think Smith is up there with the very best, but if I'm honest, there's just no beating Tom Baker. If Troughton proved the lead actor could change, and Pertwee proved the whole format could change, it was Tom who proved that Doctor Who would still be going in some form for decade after decade. He absolutely fucking rules.

Ark in Space, Genesis of the Daleks, Terror of the Zygons, Pyramids of Mars, Brain of Morbius, Seeds of Doom, Deadly Assassin, Robots of Death, Underworld, Pirate Planet, City of Death, Leisure Hive.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2021, 06:17:15 PM »
Certainly reckon there’s a case to be made to watch the 1970s in their entirety in order.  You get the third Doctor’s years in exile on Earth, which leads to some fantastic Quatermass style stories and incomparable teaming with Liz Shaw/Jo Grant and UNIT, soon you get Delgado’s fantastic version of the Master, and even when the stories aren’t great the characters and the overall feel of the show is so comforting.

Sooner or later the third Doctor gets to travel the universe again, fine, it all has its ups and downs and pretty soon you are into Philip Hinchcliffe’s Hammer Horror era with the fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith, then some sillier stuff kicks in with the next producer, and it’s all still a delight if a little over-indulgent and out of control.  Then for Tom Baker’s final season (overlapping into the 80s) it all goes more serious and quite funereal at times.


Honestly, just watch seasons 7-18 in order as its own thing; you don’t even have to think of it as Doctor Who with any important continuity - it’s just a wildly varied show that needs checking out.

Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2021, 06:30:20 PM »
Certainly reckon there’s a case to be made to watch the 1970s in their entirety in order.  You get the third Doctor’s years in exile on Earth, which leads to some fantastic Quatermass style stories and incomparable teaming with Liz Shaw/Jo Grant and UNIT, soon you get Delgado’s fantastic version of the Master, and even when the stories aren’t great the characters and the overall feel of the show is so comforting.

Sooner or later the third Doctor gets to travel the universe again, fine, it all has its ups and downs and pretty soon you are into Philip Hinchcliffe’s Hammer Horror era with the fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith, then some sillier stuff kicks in with the next producer, and it’s all still a delight if a little over-indulgent and out of control.  Then for Tom Baker’s final season (overlapping into the 80s) it all goes more serious and quite funereal at times.


Honestly, just watch seasons 7-18 in order as its own thing; you don’t even have to think of it as Doctor Who with any important continuity - it’s just a wildly varied show that needs checking out.

Yes, do that.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2021, 12:26:19 PM »
The real problem with the central concept of this thread is that I agree with almost every recommendation so far. Fambo, can we just suggest you watch the entire thing start-to-finish?

Just in case this is taken seriously, may I recommend that this is exactly not the way to watch Classic Who.  It's an endurance test undertaken as an experiment by die-hard fans and their begrudging partners, and most give up halfway through season 1.  There's a reason that blogs and books are dedicated to this feat.  In today's binge-watching age, approaching Who from start to finish simply won't work if you're trying to find your feet with the show.


I assume that didn't need to be said, but nevertheless wanted to say it.  Watch the 70s seasons in order, though.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2021, 12:28:37 PM »
Thank you for your replies, this is all very useful.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2021, 12:41:25 PM »
Troughton is the best doctor, but he's got some of the worst stories. Due to poor ratings, they only let him have one measly historical - and even that was wiped - the bastards!

Of the ones that remain, a good sample would be Enemy Of The World (like a James Bond) and the epic 10 part The War Games - which is possibly the best story of the whole black and white era!

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #21 on: August 31, 2021, 06:03:22 PM »
Quote
Do my views on the episodes so far make me worse than Hitler?

You praised aspects of not one but two McCoy stories, lets just say you're on thin ice sunshine.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2021, 08:45:48 AM »
That’s not funny
Underworld? Underrated more like!

(You aren't getting the Doctor Who experience if you only watch the unqualified successes)

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2021, 01:37:48 AM »
Watching An Unearthly Child now. Have only seen a couple of Billie Piper ones from back when I was one of those objectifiers.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2021, 02:14:36 PM »
I was amazed at how padded The Daleks was, it reminded me of the start of The Shinning, where Homer forgets to lock the front door and has to drive all the way home at the start. Were they all so stretched out in the black and white era? I recall seeing The War Machines on TV and really liking it, but that's the entirety of my Hartnell/Troughton viewership.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2021, 03:28:15 PM »
Anything longer than a four parter is quite likely to have what might be considered padding, but I suppose it depends how much you like the story. I love the atmosphere in The Daleks so could happily watch all seven episodes in a row, same as The Silurians and Inferno. Something like The Sensorites, on the other hand, I struggle with because I'm not particularly into the story so realising it's on for another two hours when you're already bored is a bit much.

The ultimate one is The War Games, which has a lot of capture - escape - capture - escape episodes that actually add comparatively little to the overall story, but it's all done so well that I never tire of it.

samadriel

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2021, 03:37:20 PM »
Oh yeah, I love Inferno, so it's silly of me to criticise the longer stuff; with The Daleks, I just felt like they'd done everything that needed to be done halfway through, then it was like, oops, forgot my keys! Gotta go back to the city! I don't think I actually finished it, so it might have picked back up after that lull.

purlieu

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2021, 03:45:18 PM »
Oh yeah, there's some different stuff in the second half, including a lake full of monsters and the Thals going to war.

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2021, 03:51:09 PM »
Best situation is when they write an excuse for the Doctor to disappear for two weeks so that William Hartnell can go on holiday.  “Ooohhhh, ohhhh I am weak and must lie down under a blanket.  Chatterton, please fill in my lines while I am away, I mean incapacitated.”

pigamus

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Re: Classic Dr Who (views from someone who knows little of the series)
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2021, 04:06:25 PM »
Oh yeah, I love Inferno,

I thought everybody did, but apparently not. I've got all the About Time books, and they don't like Inferno. Same with TARDIS Eruditorum - she doesn't like Inferno either. Odd.

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