Author Topic: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century  (Read 1967 times)

Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #60 on: October 05, 2021, 10:53:39 PM »
The difference between musicals and other genres is that The Wicker Man is blatantly not a musical.

mothman

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Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #61 on: October 05, 2021, 11:01:11 PM »
Does there need to be a stage origin for it to count?

How about films that become musicals? Though the only one I can think of off the top of my head is Billy Elliott, and that had the film’s original soundtrack replaced by anodyne Elton John songs.

Noodle Lizard

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Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #62 on: October 05, 2021, 11:19:23 PM »
How about films that become musicals? Though the only one I can think of off the top of my head is Billy Elliott, and that had the film’s original soundtrack replaced by anodyne Elton John songs.

The Producers is an interesting one to look at. It was a film about a musical, and the production thereof, featuring long sequences from that musical. Then it became a stage musical in and of itself. Then it became a musical film version of that stage musical.

mothman

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Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #63 on: October 05, 2021, 11:22:42 PM »
Watched the filmed musical version once. I wondered what the point of it all was. What did having characters sing boilerplate big-M musical numbers every ten minutes add to the story?

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Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #64 on: October 05, 2021, 11:52:44 PM »
anodyne Elton John songs.

Or "Elton John songs".

thenoise

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Re: Moulin Rouge is one of the greatest films of the century
« Reply #65 on: October 08, 2021, 08:26:29 AM »
The only bit close to emulating something you'd find in an out-and-out musical is Britt Ekland's song, because it has the non-diegetic presentation common with musicals (although I think you do see some people playing the instruments downstairs, so it's not entirely non-diegetic).
This isn't quite true. The mucky song that the teacher sings is sung direct to camera, with accompanying dancing, which certainly fits with the usual idea of a "musical number". Also the big feel-good musical number to end it, spoiler alert, with everyone joining in in a big cheerful song and dance while celebrating the end of that insufferable prudish policeman. I mean, it is structurally musical, even if it's ironically so.

Children's films of the old school (with musical numbers) are really a genre of their own, combining elements of musicals with other things. Although the likes of the Jungle Book have songs and singing, they don't really have big showstoppers or dance numbers etc.

Cabaret is a weird one, it's usually thought of as a musical as it is an adaptation of a stage musical. But they (wisely imo) decided to leave out all the songs apart from those performed on the Cabaret stage and, outside of the Club, the film plays out more or less realistically. It's no more a musical than any drama about a singer/dancer would be.

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