Cook'd and Bomb'd

Forums => Remain Indoors (DEAD SOON) => Topic started by: turnstyle on February 24, 2021, 02:18:31 PM

Title: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on February 24, 2021, 02:18:31 PM
Rona has been a bit shit really, hasn't it? Not being able to see friends, missing out on dinner with the in-laws (OK, that one I'm alright with), and fuck me, I have missed fingering my way through the local charity shops.

Having said all that, I've been working from home for nearly a year now. Got a little desk set up, dual monitors (yeah, get me), and aside from getting pretty damn bored with video calls it has been a treat.

- Getting up ten minutes before work instead of 90 minutes
- No commuting on trains and shit
- Saved thousands on rail fares
- Cheeky naps at lunch
- Cash in the Attic on in the background
- Saved loads of money on trousers

So that's probably why my first response to being on the verge of defeating the virus isn't wahey, but 'bollocks'. Obviously I want things to return to 'normal', but I want it on my own terms. The thought of commuting back to the office 5 days a week (5!) is genuinely depressing.

There has been a lot of talk about companies changing the way they work, encouraging remote working and generally being less twatty, but I worry that all this will be forgotten about in the rush to return to 'normality'. Already some of my colleagues are chattering excitedly about getting back, and I feel like I'm watching deranged crims trying to tunnel their way back into prison.

What say you, fellow 'whores? You pumped to get back to the office, or, as I suspect, are most of you dole scum that think the Office is just a shoe shop whose doorway you occasionally duck into for a crafty piss on the way home, after a night down the Greyhound with your Legend Gary mates?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: icehaven on February 24, 2021, 02:50:40 PM
I was wfh completely from March-late August and give or take a week I've been back in 2 days a week since then, and the thought of going into work 5 days a week seems completely untenable, even though it was what I did for 17 years before. To be completely honest I've become very, very lazy, I could have written this letter (apart from the bit about colleagues running themselves ragged);

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2021/feb/24/i-have-no-motivation-to-work-how-can-i-change-my-attitude (https://www.theguardian.com/money/2021/feb/24/i-have-no-motivation-to-work-how-can-i-change-my-attitude)

Quote
I have always had a problem with work, I don’t have much internal motivation to do any and a lot of anxiety about it. Now I am supposed to be working from home I feel even more disengaged. I get up at 11am, then procrastinate around the internet for a few hours.

I do appreciate having a salary and it would logically make sense to try and keep my job. My colleagues are all running themselves ragged working and home schooling and all that stuff. I hate the idea of all that rushing about. How can I change my attitude, and persuade myself do a few hours work every day?

I can't really do my job from home anyway so on my 3 wfh days I do virtually nothing except check and reply to any emails, and I know how incredibly lucky I am to be able to do this and to have kept a job at all over the last year, but it really has made me lazy and unmotivated. I can't believe there's going to be a time when I'm getting up at 6am Mon-Fri again (possibly earlier as we're hoping to move further away from where I work soon) and catching buses every day (not been on one since last August). It's going to be a right grind for a while until I get used to it again, if I ever do.
That said I literally cried with boredom several times during the first lockdown and at least coming into work a few days a week is a change of scene, but like you I would prefer it on my own terms, just a few days a week and to start later in the day, but once proper normality returns we'll be back full-time as our job isn't really do-able at home.


Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on February 24, 2021, 02:59:42 PM
Grt back in that cubicle, boy.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Crumb on February 24, 2021, 04:15:18 PM
Been completely WFH since March. Extra free time, being assessed on work done rather than looking busy and more control over my working environment have been great. I do miss seeing colleagues in person and the cycle of exhibitions and events that came with working at an arts uni. Fucking hate the endless accumulation of cleaning and washing up from making 3 meals a day at home. Loved being able to put on a stew or slow roast at lunch.

Sounds like we'll be going to a 3 in 2 wfh model at the end of tbe year, which suits me ok. A lot of the appeal hinges on social stuff being semi normal by the time we have to go back.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: GMTV on February 24, 2021, 05:31:58 PM
Definitely enjoy the good bits of WFH, no commute, roll out of bed etc. But it's made my job a lot harder (engineering). Not being able to properly work as a team has slowed everything down. I now find myself tearing my hair out trying to work something out, that before I could probably have had a chat with someone and sorted out in 10 minutes. I think I've also realised I used to work a lot more collaboratively than I do now. Lots of spinning the chair around and getting a group of people talking over something to work it out. Do miss a bit of bantz as well when making cups of tea etc. So overall I'm ready to get back into the office sheep pen.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: holyzombiejesus on February 24, 2021, 08:28:16 PM
I don't miss a single thing or person about going in to work. If my colleagues vanished off the face of the earth, I would not give a fuck. I don't miss banter, or male colleagues talking like they're football managers, or female colleagues getting giddy about the latest ITV drama. I don't miss the tea fund, or the security guard who seems to get angry when you say hello to him, or people watching me. I miss ragging the photocopier and pilfering from the stationery cupboard but we've all had to make sacrifices.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: mippy on February 24, 2021, 08:46:16 PM
I miss having a chair that's designed to sit in for several hours a day, rather than sitting at a dining table. And I REALLY miss central heating.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: monkfromhavana on February 24, 2021, 09:47:49 PM
Depending on the job, I suspect a lot of  employers would think, if I'm employing some c*nt to sit at home in their pants working and watching Homes Under The Hammer I might just as well offshore their jobs so some c*nt in India to work from 15 storey admin-farm death trap for a 10th of the money.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on February 24, 2021, 10:29:50 PM
I think many employers are by now (if they've got any sense) drafting plans for a permanently flexible model. There are so many factors that can influence how any individual feels about working from home, many of which are likely to shift and change over the next few months (particularly for anyone with kids) - but if at least some employees have proven that not only can they functionally perform their jobs remotely for the best part of a year, they might actually be happier and more productive in some cases, it seems mad to forcibly yank that away (especially as by now there'll most likely be another employer round the corner who can offer remote working as an option).

And I've posted before about the wider implications it has for democratising employment and career progression prospects for people who would have found it physically, financially or otherwise challenging to be present in an office every day, especially with companies based in expensive city locations.

Having said all that, I'm over it. So, so fucking bored and lonely. I really struggled last year and assumed that was mainly because I was working from a cramped flatshare which just wasn't suited to spending all day in, let alone working from, but now I live on my own and have a bit more space - it was a bit easier at first, but I just really, really miss being around my colleagues.

I'm very very fortunate in that I enjoy my job and I like everyone on my team - I've been with the company for almost a decade, and I'm pretty close friends with quite a few of my colleagues - so I suppose it's a big chunk of my life and identity that I'm mourning at the moment, really. A few work friends have made fairly significant moves, enabled by remote working - i.e. moving out of London - and I feel childish and stupid for being sad that our regular impromptu after work pub trips or rambling nonsensical lunch break conversations are probably a thing of the past now.

I feel like I shouldn't be feeling this way. Everyone's going on about how brilliant it is that we can escape the rat race and break free from the tyranny of sweaty commutes and underwhelming Pret sandwiches snarfed down at desks, and instead work at leisure from nice homes with gardens far away from nasty grimy cities, but I don't want that. I want my friends to be happy, of course, and to be able to save money and progress in life and all that, but selfishly I feel sad and scared that I'm sort of surplus to requirements now, pathetic loser who needs to grow up and get an actual life and stop clinging to increasingly distant memories.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Beagle 2 on February 24, 2021, 10:41:59 PM
There's obviously great aspects to working from home, but seeing as it's been the busiest year at work in my life, often working all day and evening with no breaks except to shovel down some tea, we've had another baby and him, my wife and our three-year-old have all been in the next room for almost all of it, it's basically been hell on earth. I've managed to get another job now where it's going to be a mix of office, home working and travel (whenever that's allowed) and I cannot fucking wait. I don't miss being in an office but walking around, being not in my house and having a reason to shave does definitely cheer me up a bit, on reflection.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: BlodwynPig on February 24, 2021, 10:51:27 PM
The DVT is probably the main negative
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on February 24, 2021, 11:47:05 PM
I don't miss a single thing or person about going in to work. If my colleagues vanished off the face of the earth, I would not give a fuck. I don't miss banter, or male colleagues talking like they're football managers, or female colleagues getting giddy about the latest ITV drama. I don't miss the tea fund, or the security guard who seems to get angry when you say hello to him, or people watching me. I miss ragging the photocopier and pilfering from the stationery cupboard but we've all had to make sacrifices.

Seconded, the thought of work from home ending gives me mild anxiety.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: BlodwynPig on February 25, 2021, 08:35:56 AM
Seconded, the thought of work from home ending gives me mild anxiety.

"We've kept your cubicle warm...by adding a further 2 colleagues in the space"
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on February 25, 2021, 08:46:30 AM
The OP has articulated a lot of my feelings at the spectre of the office looms on the horizon - I have felt a little guilty over how much I've actually enjoyed the last year (people have died, been very ill and suffered in other ways, here's me thinking 'it's alright, this') because I'm an anti-social wanker.

I'm lucky enough to work with a couple of nice people, my manager is great, but I'm not looking forward to going back there when it does happen, which I imagine will be as soon as possible. Losing that extra hour in bed in the morn and not having to waste an hour of my evening sitting on a crowded bus... urgh. It's a very selfish mindset, I know, but I found myself envious of the chap who lives in the flat above me who has been told he's WFH throughout 2021 at the very least.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Norton Canes on February 25, 2021, 08:54:59 AM
Seconded, the thought of work from home ending gives me mild anxiety

Thirded. Could manage one day a week in the office, possibly two every so often at a push, the campus itself is a nice place to be and I like my commute. But no desire to have social contact with any of my colleagues (shudders at thought)

Fortunately I don't work in an "innovative, collaborative apprenticeship culture": Goldman Sachs: Bank boss rejects work from home as the 'new normal (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56192048)

Quote
“I do think for a business like ours, which is an innovative, collaborative apprenticeship culture, this is not ideal for us. And it’s not a new normal. It’s an aberration that we’re going to correct as soon as possible,” he told a conference on Wednesday.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on February 25, 2021, 09:29:17 AM
I have wondered what the percentage of people who would prefer to WFH permanently is, and whether a company who offered it as an perk of employment who benefit in terms of recruitment, assuming salary/annual leave being equal.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Bently Sheds on February 25, 2021, 09:36:58 AM
For the last 12 months I've not had that "Bullseye, Antiques Roadshow, Heartbeat, Radio One Chart Rundown" associated feeling of absolute dread that would occur every Sunday teatime when I realised the weekend was almost over and it was work tomorrow.

I don't want to get back to the normal 5 day week. I miss a couple of colleagues, but there's more that I don't miss. I miss the free cups of tea, free bog roll and heating; my dual monitors and my work desk. That's about it. If the company network connection was better and I had a better desk at home I could work like this forever.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on February 25, 2021, 10:58:08 AM
I'm with Bently. There's not a lot I miss. I might consider going in one day a week or something (probably a Friday as it's a shorter working day), but the thought of getting up at 6 so I can sit on a crammed train into Cambridge and sit among people I have no real affinity with  and then get on a similarly packed train that gets me home at 7 in the evening for 5 days a week? Fuck that.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Butchers Blind on February 25, 2021, 11:59:56 AM
Get back in that hamster wheel you lazy fucks.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on February 25, 2021, 09:30:14 PM
I agree with the OP, he makes a lot of sense. We should probably make him like, king or something. If that's too much, then deputy king.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 25, 2021, 10:11:15 PM
I don't miss a single thing or person about going in to work. If my colleagues vanished off the face of the earth, I would not give a fuck. I don't miss banter, or male colleagues talking like they're football managers, or female colleagues getting giddy about the latest ITV drama. I don't miss the tea fund, or the security guard who seems to get angry when you say hello to him, or people watching me. I miss ragging the photocopier and pilfering from the stationery cupboard but we've all had to make sacrifices.

Pretty much this. Although I genuinely miss our lunchtime chatting shit (I can't bring myself to call it "banter", more chatting shit with some fellow curmudgeons really) and given any return would be phased and involve 'covid secure' procedures, it'd probably be the last thing to come back.

I think dealing over text-chat and a bit of conferencing (where I refuse to put my camera on) has made me a bit more assertive and pushy over things I would've normally begrudgingly let slide, which is probably good in some ways, but I fear that returning to face to face might make me say something I regret or lose my rag.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 25, 2021, 10:15:33 PM
I think many employers are by now (if they've got any sense) drafting plans for a permanently flexible model. There are so many factors that can influence how any individual feels about working from home, many of which are likely to shift and change over the next few months (particularly for anyone with kids) - but if at least some employees have proven that not only can they functionally perform their jobs remotely for the best part of a year, they might actually be happier and more productive in some cases, it seems mad to forcibly yank that away (especially as by now there'll most likely be another employer round the corner who can offer remote working as an option).

Generally I think this will push institutional shifts towards home working, but in my experience a lot of flex-working is decided on a macro-level and it only takes a dinosaur boss to be workaholic or find it hard to work with their teenage kids in the house for them to foster a toxic culture of presenteeism amongst their team.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on February 28, 2021, 11:33:40 AM

Generally I think this will push institutional shifts towards home working, but in my experience a lot of flex-working is decided on a macro-level and it only takes a dinosaur boss to be workaholic or find it hard to work with their teenage kids in the house for them to foster a toxic culture of presenteeism amongst their team.

Oh I'm sure you're right - last year my company put out an anonymous crowd survey thing (where you could see everyone else's responses) to gauge how employees felt about the future of remote/office work, and it was interesting (and a bit depressing) to spot the managers who clearly had a rather antiquated view of remote working (going by their comments like "But how will I know if people are taking extra long lunch breaks/logging in late" etc.).

I suppose I'm lucky as my own team had embraced flexible working a few years ago - it's definitely made easier by the fact that we all had laptops already and our roles are very "digital", but the attitude towards it makes a huge difference as well. When I was having weekly CBT sessions in 2019 (which were on weekday afternoons), my lovely manager said I could work from home those afternoons if I wanted (as she understood I might not be up for rushing back to the office straight after crying on a couch). A few colleagues already worked from home one day a week for childcare commitments, and they've always been great with letting me work from home at short notice if I need to be around to let in a gas engineer or something.

Of course some jobs lend themselves to remote/flexible working better than others, but as lots of employees are clearly thriving on this format, as long as they're doing the job why take that away? All the talk about bizarrely punitive measures for those who choose to remain working remotely (increased taxes, reduced salaries) are very worrying too - is the work they're doing worth less because it's done from a kitchen table?

Still absolutely fucking HATING it myself, but appreciate having the option. I Disagree With How You Want To Work, But I Will Defend To The Death Your Right To Have It. Or something.

I think it's worth bearing in mind too that there must still be loads of people whose living situations really, really aren't cut out for home working - lots of people  (including myself) have been lucky enough to be able to adapt their living situation and surroundings in the past year to be better suited for home working, but so many people just don't have that option and I can only imagine the mental toll of nigh on a year of this by now.


Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: earl_sleek on February 28, 2021, 12:34:06 PM
I think it's worth bearing in mind too that there must still be loads of people whose living situations really, really aren't cut out for home working - lots of people  (including myself) have been lucky enough to be able to adapt their living situation and surroundings in the past year to be better suited for home working, but so many people just don't have that option and I can only imagine the mental toll of nigh on a year of this by now.

My previous employer decided a few months into the lockdown that every employee would work from whenever possible, and all non-essential offices would be closed, even after the pandemic. Apparently the top bosses were quite surprised when there was a big pushback from a lot of admin and business support staff, especially younger employees, as they'd assumed they would all prefer WFH. But the difference is the higher ups tended to be older, live in bigger houses and are more likely to have had their children leave home, whereas younger and more junior employees were more likely to have to share living space, less likely to be able to dedicate a space at home to work and more likely to have childcare commitments, making working from home a lot less comfortable.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: wooders1978 on February 28, 2021, 12:42:51 PM
Already nipped it in the bud with my manager via the medium of a grown up conversation, so I am now formally a homeworker and will only go to the office for vital meetings and I’ll be fucking of home again post meeting when it’s all back to normal

The MD of the company was basically heavily hinting (aka insisting) that the office based workers get back into the office last May and then got all het up when he was called on it citing mental health being his driver (bollocks, mate) so my boss sorted me out, fair play to him
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Captain Crunch on February 28, 2021, 12:46:14 PM
My current firm has been better than most but there is the constant cloud of senior employees saying “well why can’t they just buy a desk?” from the toasty warm comfort of their ridiculous £15,000 custom garden office. 
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on February 28, 2021, 12:47:12 PM
All the talk about bizarrely punitive measures for those who choose to remain working remotely (increased taxes, reduced salaries) are very worrying too - is the work they're doing worth less because it's done from a kitchen table?
Johnson "assuring" the rail industry that we'll all be back in the office this Summer did make me wonder about this, whether anybody trying to buck the desired trend would be punished.

My own workplace did a staff survey last Summer to gauge how people felt about WFH - I gather it was quickly buried when the results weren't that we were all desperate to get back in.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: paruses on February 28, 2021, 01:16:15 PM
Johnson "assuring" the rail industry that we'll all be back in the office this Summer did make me wonder about this, whether anybody trying to buck the desired trend would be punished.

I just read that article and it filled me with dread. I wondered the same and assumed it's aimed at employers at a corporate level to focus them back on paying the rent for those big old office blocks.

2018-9 I worked mainly from home and enjoyed trips into the office from time to time but mainly on my own schedule if there was a physical need / advantage to being there. I also just enjoyed going there from time to time to see different faces. The project itself drove me literally[1] insane so I would never want to go back to that but I did enjoy being able to work largely according to my own patterns and got more done. On office visits I achieved less, I would say,  because there are canteens to sit in and people to talk to and just general distractions.

I am lucky enough to have somewhere separate to work and I can see the need to want to see other people but I don't want to be forced back into that culture of presenteeism.
 1. Not figuratively
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on February 28, 2021, 04:05:19 PM
But the difference is the higher ups tended to be older, live in bigger houses and are more likely to have had their children leave home, whereas younger and more junior employees were more likely to have to share living space, less likely to be able to dedicate a space at home to work and more likely to have childcare commitments, making working from home a lot less comfortable.

Yep, 100% this. And presumably less likely to be earning enough to be able to afford to change their housing situation (even with any potential savings from not commuting or buying sandwiches or whatever, which some quarters are hailing as justification for forcing remote workers to cough up one way or another - as if the cost of paying rent, eating, raising kids and ensuring your home has power have all magically disappeared with lockdown).

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Norton Canes on March 01, 2021, 02:51:27 PM
Covid: 'People are tired of working from home' (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56237586)


Quote
"Working from home for the first couple of months of last year when the sun was shining and people were enjoying perhaps a more flexible environment, there was a sense that this was going to be a short-term process. I think now people are really missing that opportunity to collaborate with and just see their friends in the office, to get your hair cut, to go and get a good coffee at lunchtime, and to do all the life admin things you can do in a city centre."

Fuck you. Just, fuck you.


Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuellar on March 01, 2021, 02:52:58 PM
I wonder what has prompted the head of strategy at the Canary Warf Group to say that
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 01, 2021, 02:55:33 PM
It says a lot about the BBC that they report such comments by one person, who has an obvious interest in people returning to their offices, as front page "news".


Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 01, 2021, 02:58:13 PM
Quote
to get your hair cut, to go and get a good coffee at lunchtime, and to do all the life admin things you can do in a city centre.

I'd love to see an analysis of this by income and age, because it seems aimed at those people who live in nice houses in suburbia and commute to prestigious jobs in the city centre. If you're working at a less glamorous job, a factory or distribution centre in an industrial park, your hair styling and life admin options are going to be more limited. And if you're rich you can probably drive somewhere on your lunch break anyway. Maybe there's a lot of people who go to a specific barber in EC2 and just haven't found someone who can cover their bald spot anywhere else.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 01, 2021, 03:02:55 PM
Covid: 'People are tired of working from home' (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56237586)


Fuck you. Just, fuck you.

More reasonable than some of those interviewed but it is laughable how, hiding in plain sight, this is an interview with an owner of commercial property.

We owe you nothing mate.

I hope everyone here who is keen to continue some home working will put up some resistance when your bosses come calling.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 01, 2021, 03:36:27 PM
Quote
"I think now people are really missing that opportunity to collaborate with NO and just see their friends in the office NO, to get your hair cut NO, to go and get a good coffee at lunchtime NO, and to do all the life admin things you can do in a city centre. NO"

NO
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on March 01, 2021, 08:27:09 PM
Quote
"I think now people are really missing that opportunity to collaborate with and just see their friends in the office, to get your hair cut, to go and get a good coffee at lunchtime, and to do all the life admin things you can do in a city centre."

I actually do miss all that stuff, but a) I can appreciate it's just possibly not a great idea to shunt people back into offices and rush-hour commutes en masse right this moment, and b) I don't think that just because I want something, everyone else has the exact same needs and circumstances.

Something tells me he doesn't actually give a fuck about what anyone wants.

Also this bit, to me, is baffling

Quote
"I think it is going to be more socially acceptable for people to take the occasional day working from home," he said.

"So it may well be that people have a desk at Canary Wharf but some people will choose to work at home one day a week or a couple of days a month and that's a good thing."

Maybe it's because I've already had things pretty cushy with my company's pre-covid approach to remote working, but to me, the above sounds like it would've been a reasonable setup for before the pandemic. Indeed, as mentioned in my previous post, that's how I and many of colleagues were working already before March 2020 - in fact, I was working from home the very day they told us we'd all be working from home indefinitely. (Because the toilet had exploded and I had be at home to let the plumber in. Simpler, happier times.)

This basically just shits all over anyone having any hope of moving somewhere where rent/living costs/childcare etc. are more affordable, if that's what they want. And "socially acceptable"? Fuck that. As I mentioned in my previous post, I'll always be incredibly grateful that my manager was so understanding about my mental health wobble and let me work from home as much as I needed to at that time. I can't imagine working in an environment where that's considered either a taboo, or a luxury that has to be earned.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: FerriswheelBueller on March 01, 2021, 10:19:58 PM
Generally I think this will push institutional shifts towards home working, but in my experience a lot of flex-working is decided on a macro-level and it only takes a dinosaur boss to be workaholic or find it hard to work with their teenage kids in the house for them to foster a toxic culture of presenteeism amongst their team.

My old shop had a curmudgeon who hated the concept of working from home, so we were never allowed to do it (or rather, at a certain level of seniority we did it all the time but under the table). She was the only one who hated it but bad news, she runs the line of business so that’s everyone shafted.

Covid WFH was rolled out by panic-buying dozens of laptops on amazon for our specific departments (and hoping we could expense them) because right up until mid-March she was determined that we should continue to work from the office.

Incredible mindset. Seems bonkers looking back.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Mobius on March 01, 2021, 11:41:51 PM
I've gone into the office every single day of COVID because I spend too much time at home, but I only live 15 minutes away and don't pay for parking. I can't get into work mode at home, too many distractions. PS4, telly, weed, unemployed partner.

I hope people don't start coming back because I've enjoyed having my own little kingdom and as many fag breaks as I like.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Better Midlands on March 02, 2021, 08:19:19 AM
From the comments

(https://i.imgur.com/8QMUXbC.jpg)
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 09, 2021, 01:27:42 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/07/homeworking-job-takes-over-life-office-grind-remote-working

Fuck off, Harris.

Everyone will have different experiences and there obviously are downsides to home working but when people are saving thousands a year on commuting and lunches, hours of time each day (which they can use productively to improve their wellbeing) and for people like me fortunate enough to work for an employers who keeps clear boundaries between ontime and downtime, home working is a total no-brainer.

We need to pushback and pushback hard on this because they are going to be coming for us from all angles in the media, property speculators, politicians, pundits. Everyone needs to be open and honest that they don't want to go back in full time and they can prove they don't need to either.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: icehaven on March 09, 2021, 02:56:42 PM
If a lot more jobs became permanently or semi wfh it'd be interesting to see how it shaped career aspirations/workforce demographics etc. I had a few crappy office and call centre jobs years ago between Uni and starting what became my career, and I bet I'd have put up with jobs like that a lot longer if I'd been able to do them from home, and it might have steered me towards wfh posts only. I'd also probably live in rural Wales rather than in the grim West Midlands, so swings and roundabouts
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on March 09, 2021, 05:03:16 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/07/homeworking-job-takes-over-life-office-grind-remote-working

Fuck off, Harris.

Everyone will have different experiences and there obviously are downsides to home working but when people are saving thousands a year on commuting and lunches, hours of time each day (which they can use productively to improve their wellbeing) and for people like me fortunate enough to work for an employers who keeps clear boundaries between ontime and downtime, home working is a total no-brainer.

We need to pushback and pushback hard on this because they are going to be coming for us from all angles in the media, property speculators, politicians, pundits. Everyone needs to be open and honest that they don't want to go back in full time and they can prove they don't need to either.

I don't know, as much as I'm incredibly wary of anything like this being used as anti- remote working propaganda, I do think there are some valid points in there. Despite my company generally having a progressive attitude towards home working, I've definitely noticed an increase in last-minute meeting invitations at weird hours, with the unspoken assumption that "it's OK because everyone's always going to be at home anyway" (though I do wonder if this will change when lockdown restrictions are eased).

I've had to be quite firm in saying no to stuff and setting clear boundaries for the sake of my own mental health - which isn't too difficult for me, as I've been with the company for years and have good relationships with my colleagues - but for someone who's new to a role/company, junior, or naturally less confident, it might be easy to be taken advantage of. Not to mention the possibility of, for instance, someone struggling to make a sexist, unsympathetic boss appreciate childcare commitments (a problem which obviously existed before, and within the right hands could be helped hugely by remote working - but I think it's naive to pretend remote working alone will fix these problems/won't bring potential for its own issues and inequalities).

Also, as the article mentions, there are loads of people who haven't been lucky enough to relocate to an environment more suited to home working, or weren't lucky enough to already be living in such an environment when the first lockdown came in. Yes, people will have saved money on commuting - although I'm sure lots of workers had expensive commutes precisely because they live somewhere more suburban and relatively comfortable - so it's win-win for them to work remotely, but less so for someone living in smaller accommodation in a city already, but not earning/saving enough to have the option of upping sticks. A year of trying to work (during what has arguably already been an incredibly challenging, stressful time for many industries) from surroundings which are physically uncomfortable, crowded or distracting, must have taken an absolutely huge mental toll on many.

HOWEVER

If a lot more jobs became permanently or semi wfh it'd be interesting to see how it shaped career aspirations/workforce demographics etc. I had a few crappy office and call centre jobs years ago between Uni and starting what became my career, and I bet I'd have put up with jobs like that a lot longer if I'd been able to do them from home, and it might have steered me towards wfh posts only. I'd also probably live in rural Wales rather than in the grim West Midlands, so swings and roundabouts

I agree that this could hopefully be a really positive, progressive thing for diversifying the workforce, especially in industries which have traditionally been associated with privilege and nepotism - e.g. media and arts jobs where roles are traditionally oversubscribed, starting salaries are low, and companies are based in expensive city locations, meaning that the only people who can get a foot in the door are middle class twats like me. It needs to change. And there are also potentially huge implications too for people who would struggle physically or mentally to be in an office or do a crowded commute every day, who might have been otherwise shut out of the standard 9-5 culture.

I really hope that companies listen to their employees' varied needs and can work towards a fair and inclusive future.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on March 09, 2021, 05:21:48 PM
It was hilarious when I think the guy in charge of canary wharf was saying how incredibly bad it is for people to be at home and not out in canary wharf spending spending spending spending spending and lining his pockets.

Cunt.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 09, 2021, 05:27:39 PM
My old shop had a curmudgeon who hated the concept of working from home, so we were never allowed to do it (or rather, at a certain level of seniority we did it all the time but under the table). She was the only one who hated it but bad news, she runs the line of business so that’s everyone shafted.

Covid WFH was rolled out by panic-buying dozens of laptops on amazon for our specific departments (and hoping we could expense them) because right up until mid-March she was determined that we should continue to work from the office.

Incredible mindset. Seems bonkers looking back.

Yeah the office I'm in now also has some engineers/electronics guys who need to use the workshop and lab, but we just piss about on computers so moved home to give more essential people space to use alternate desks etc. At one point there was talk of us coming in for some days a week and there was a bit of a push for it despite none of us wanting it, it just seemed like needless presenteeism and I think the main thing that got it dropped were us giving the days to people who actually needed it mixed with our protestations that it was actually worse working distanced than working from home since we couldn't help each other by looking at each other's screens without breaking distance rules and had to use all the conference sharing tools to do it, while making a racket and distracting others at the same time.

I've worked in other places where communication was so poor and absenteeism so common that the boss would turn up (usually in the afternoon) and go 'is x in? y is asking about stuff but they're not online or in the holiday spreadsheet?'.

But even if a boss is a bit of a workaholic but not a shit that can have an effect on their team. I had one like that who would let you work from home or leave early if you asked, but because they were always there and working to the point of misery there was a bit of a case of them leading by example. Not me though, I'd stopped caring and was just swinging the lead at that point.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 09, 2021, 05:36:24 PM
It was hilarious when I think the guy in charge of canary wharf was saying how incredibly bad it is for people to be at home and not out in canary wharf spending spending spending spending spending and lining his pockets.

Cunt.

What happens if everyone agrees to maliciously comply and go to work but also they make their own coffee and lunches?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 09, 2021, 06:56:54 PM
Quote
I don't know, as much as I'm incredibly wary of anything like this being used as anti- remote working propaganda, I do think there are some valid points in there.

Oh there are, absolutely, home working is not a one-size-fits-all solution, but I think the article is unbalanced. I appreciate it is meant to be pointedly 'what about all these things you haven't thought of - aaaahhh', but along with a rising pressure in the media to pursue the same narrative, there's a responsibility to explore it honestly. Instead it comes across as lacking real balance and potentially hunting for clicks in its provocation, which is why it can eff off.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 26, 2021, 10:30:08 AM
"People riffing off each other"

Quote
The chancellor has warned bosses that staff may quit if they are not allowed to work from the office as the UK emerges from lockdown.

Rishi Sunak told the Telegraph that employees would "vote with their feet" and could consider leaving for a rival if made to work from home full time.

A number of companies have announced plans to close offices prompting fears for city centres.

But now the chancellor has urged firms not to abandon the office altogether.

Mr Sunak told the newspaper that home working is no substitute for an office environment with "people riffing off each other".

"You can't beat the spontaneity, the team building, the culture that you create in a firm or an organisation from people actually spending physical time together," he said.

The chancellor argued that an office environment was particularly important for younger workers looking to understand how a company works.

He said it was "important that we try and get back to a good degree of that".

Although he acknowledged that hybrid working, using tools like Zoom to communicate, could work for some businesses.

His comments come amid concern from businesses that rely on busy cities that workers may spend more time at home.

Interesting Sunak isn't worried about people "voting with their feet" if they are made to come back to the office full-time.

Really he should say "give workers the choice of where they want to work and how they want to work, if possible" but he's probably only worried about businesses that rely on trade from commuters and people who rent out large office spaces.

If his government had done a better job of managing the pandemic, perhaps some people would feel more confident about going back to the office.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56535575
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuellar on March 26, 2021, 11:04:23 AM
Get back into the office, onto buses, onto tubes, into Pret. That worked very well last time.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: mothman on March 26, 2021, 11:56:56 AM
There are very good reasons why I can’t do my job from home. I wish I could but it’s just not possible. Social distancing measures at work (= shortage of desks) mean I get a desk four days a week and can choose to do what bits I can do at home, or go on a reserve list. Generally I choose the former but I had a situation where cunt colleagues were pass-agg’ing us to work five days putting others down on the list and trying to guilt us into doing that fifth day. I put a stop to that smartish.

So today I’m WFH. I’ve done a few emails and dialled into a meeting.  But that’s all I can do. I totally support less office working though. Be interesting to see what happens with those at my organisation who can do their jobs at home. The management are talking a sea change in how we work. Shame my part of the business is unlikely to.

MrsMoth has been WFH for years so was well set up last year... to keep working when millions of others couldn’t (until they got the kit & connectivity sorted). She’s resisted blocking some time out for a quickie, so I’ve readjusted my sights and am suggesting we go get some (takeaway) lunch...
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Chedney Honks on March 26, 2021, 12:41:19 PM
Can't imagine why some corpodroid from the Canary Wharf group would put its name to that
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on March 27, 2021, 10:12:39 AM
https://amp.theguardian.com/business/2021/mar/26/teleperformance-call-centre-staff-monitored-via-webcam-home-working-infractions

Jesus.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 27, 2021, 12:09:40 PM
https://amp.theguardian.com/business/2021/mar/26/teleperformance-call-centre-staff-monitored-via-webcam-home-working-infractions

Jesus.

Yeah, the sad fact is a lot of people will actually approve of this in the usual 'if you've nothing to hide you've nothing to worry about' dumb sheeple way because everyone knows and resents at least 1 person that slacks off at work.

'If you're not careful you'll end up hating the people being oppressed and loving the people doing the oppressing'.

I personally don't see why cameras are necessary for work which is already fully trackable, itemised etc. Call centres are tightly monitored and controlled data centres that just happen to have the slave drones in the same room. There's no reason why they need to be in the same room, and there's certainly no reason to have a camera pointing at them at work. They could be taking calls on a sun lounger in Belize and outperforming some shambling sack of shit in a poorly ventilated 60s office in Romford who has put on a suit and tie and grimly logged in and out with perfect metronomy for decades.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 28, 2021, 11:13:34 AM
Utterly vile man:

Quote
However, when asked at the Conservative party spring conference on Saturday whether there should be a special bank holiday when the pandemic subsides, Johnson said people should be thinking more about getting back to work than having more time off. “The general view is people have had quite a few days off, and it wouldn’t be a bad thing for people to see their way round to making a passing stab at getting back into the office,” he said.

Totally ignoring the realities of working from home, and how most people work just as hard if not harder from home - some people end up working longer hours from home than in the office as they are worried about being seen as "slacking off". Maybe he's been speaking to Tory donors who rent out business space.

No doubt we'll see more blue ticks claiming to be worried about the job security of people who want to continue working from home.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on March 28, 2021, 11:25:09 AM
^ The fuck? "Quite a few days off" - what exactly is he referring to there? People who've been furloughed and may well have been struggling to afford their rent on reduced pay? People who were ill with covid and had to take time off work? Or is he suggesting that any day working from home is a "day off"?

Also, I've been very lucky to have neither been furloughed or been ill, but I've taken hardly any of my annual leave over the past year because guess what, sitting around in the same small room which is now also your workplace, when there's fuck all to do and you can't go out anywhere or see anyone, is actually really fucking depressing. Stupid cunt.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on March 28, 2021, 11:29:41 AM
Days off lol.

Pure evil cunts aye.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 28, 2021, 11:31:55 AM
It's ridiculous. I suspect most attendees at the Conservative Party Conference are retired and have no idea about the realities of people working from home. It feeds into the idea on the right that people on furlough are having a great time - as if a 20% pay cut, especially  at a time when utilities and council tax are rising is going to be easy. Utter insult to millions of ordinary people, but then I suppose I shouldn't be surprised given the comment was from a man who regards his six-figure salary as "chickenfeed".

I've used barely any of my annual leave either - there is literally nothing to do at the moment. Will need to use it up in the next six months though.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on March 28, 2021, 11:54:01 AM
Exactly - it's an insult to both those who are thriving on working from home and being more productive and working harder than they were able to in the office, and to those who are really struggling with it and bloody miserable at the moment (like me). Obviously it's complicated and there are plenty of people who've fallen into both camps at different times, depending on various factors (e.g. schools being open making the difference between having a free house or not) but of course they're not bothering themselves with those details, why would they?

This antiquated idea that we've all just had a big year-long jolly of dicking around in our jimjams all day is below contempt - it's a concept which has definitely been used in the past, pre-pandemic, by individual managers to discourage flexible working policies back when it was maybe a handful of people trying to push for a day here and there, but the fact that they're still trying to apply this thinking on a national level after a year of more or less solid remote working is a bit disgusting.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 28, 2021, 12:10:48 PM
It's also massively hypocritical from Johnson, who is a very lazy man who has probably spent a lot of time dicking around the past 12 months and is able to more or less work from home, living next door to his office (does he live at Number 11?)

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on March 28, 2021, 12:15:34 PM
He's covered - the divide and rule tactics will mean lots of ordinary people spout the same garbage at their colleagues. People more interested in what's going on one desk across from them than what's happening in the boardroom.

He knows Keith the Non-Entity won't take a brave counter-position, in fact it's more likely Keith the Non-Entity will try and copy him or shout it even louder.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 28, 2021, 12:21:57 PM
Keith, May 2021 "I expect the Prime Minister to get everyone back in the office. No ifs, no buts"

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on April 03, 2021, 12:53:20 PM
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56418014

This article on weekly expenditure seems to bring into focus the enormous costs of commuting and how working from home has helped her be able to do more work and put savings away.

From the cost breakdown, other than a few frivolous things it seems pretty realistic to me and someone that is actually trying hard to keep costs down.

Times this by tens of millions and hopefully we can club together to tell the next JP Morgan ghoul to fuck off when they crack the whip to enforce office working.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on May 06, 2021, 01:36:04 PM
Quote
When
@JPMorgan
 announced that employees would be required to return to the office, they took to the internal company message board to express concerns.

JPMorgan responded by straight up shutting down the comments section, per screenshots provided to me:

https://twitter.com/kenklippenstein/status/1389989363015196673

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on May 06, 2021, 03:34:18 PM
This annoyed me, from a BBC story about the rise in coronavirus in Moray

Quote
Chris Littlejohn, deputy director of public health at NHS Grampian, said the situation was "rapidly deteriorating"...

"Analytics have shown us many people in the region have returned to their workplaces, rather than working from home. It remains the advice people should work from home where possible and we really need people to do that, where they can."

He makes it sound like people are choosing to go back into the workplace rather than being asked to by their bosses. Perhaps he should appeal to those at the top instead.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: wooders1978 on May 06, 2021, 05:44:39 PM
This annoyed me, from a BBC story about the rise in coronavirus in Moray

He makes it sound like people are choosing to go back into the workplace rather than being asked to by their bosses. Perhaps he should appeal to those at the top instead.

A lot of people I work with are choosing to go back to the office to be fair, we had a takeover and all the corporate fucknuts got fired in exchange for beanbaggers who want “fluid workspaces” - i probably would go back if I lived a bit closer to be honest but getting 2-3 hours of my day back is too much of a habit to kick
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: FerriswheelBueller on May 06, 2021, 05:58:36 PM
i probably would go back if I lived a bit closer to be honest

Can I ask why? Not after an argument, is it just the fact it’s nice to see people and that (which I understand)?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Bernice on May 06, 2021, 07:32:31 PM
Can I ask why? Not after an argument, is it just the fact it’s nice to see people and that (which I understand)?

A lot of people I know in London have taken the opportunity to get back to the office where possible - like me they live in houseshares without adequate space for four people to work from home, as well as the tension among housemates riding a bit high after months of staring at each other's pallid faces and breakfasting on each other's coffee breath for the past year.

I've mostly been working sat on the edge of my bed at a tiny desk in a shoebox room, but have no desire to go into the office more than once a week ever again. My posture's fucked but I save money, easily fit a run and a shower into my lunch hour and get to have a wank and read a book when there's fuck all for me to do, rather than desperately trying to feign being busy in an open plan office.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 06, 2021, 08:32:22 PM
https://twitter.com/kenklippenstein/status/1389989363015196673

But ofFICE wOrkers doN't NEED unIons
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: wooders1978 on May 06, 2021, 08:34:26 PM
Can I ask why? Not after an argument, is it just the fact it’s nice to see people and that (which I understand)?

Pretty much that’s basically the reason to be honest - I’m fortunate to work with some very nice people and believe it or not I’m an occasional social butterfly myself
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on May 06, 2021, 11:26:11 PM
Can I ask why? Not after an argument, is it just the fact it’s nice to see people and that (which I understand)?

Pretty much what Bernice and wooders1978 have said. I think for those who had chosen to live close-ish to their work (especially if that's in an urban/city environment), particularly those who are young-ish and/or single, and especially if you actually get on with and enjoy socialising with at least some of your colleagues, then having to make the switch to working from home felt like a big chunk of your identity had essentially been cut off overnight.

That feels like a dramatic and taboo thing to say, and I don't want to promote a culture of presenteeism or the idea that anyone's identity should be based around their job (and I've posted here several times about how I strongly support people's right to work from home if they want to) - but for many people it certainly does influence some aspects of their personal lives.

In my case, I'm very fortunate to work in an industry I enjoy and have an interest in, so I guess I do see it as a part of my identity, rightly or wrongly. As I've worked there for years, the office did sort of feel like a second home (not in a deso way, it's a nice office), and I also have some really close friends at work, so not having that daily in-person interaction with them has been a big adjustment, too. I appreciate that might not be the norm, but all the speculative talk of doing away with office culture forever definitely did make me panic (selfishly) that maybe my adult years have been a waste and I'd quickly be forgotten, surplus to requirements, sad loser still hankering after office parties, while it seemed like everyone else was thriving on remote working (I now know this wasn't the case, of course).

Also as Bernice says, loads of people's living situations just aren't cut out for working from home. Likewise, I was living in a flatshare with a tiny bedroom and very limited space and privacy (with a furloughed flatmate who I wasn't especially close with) in March 2020, and I was incredibly unhappy trying to work full time from such an intense, claustrophobic environment. It was pretty galling hearing the senior managers with their spacious spare rooms and gardens bleating on about how much they loved working from home.

I can absolutely see the benefits and don't get me wrong, I definitely do appreciate the pluses (and not just "not having to risk getting COVID in order to earn a living", obvs) and it's given me the freedom and flexibility to do stuff I wouldn't have been able to do before, but I just don't think I could work from home full time for the rest of my life, I'd go mad.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: MrMrs on May 07, 2021, 12:18:46 AM
been working from home 8 months before lockdown, I'll never go back
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: FerriswheelBueller on May 07, 2021, 12:30:28 AM
Yeah completely understand those reasons, I suppose it comes down to personal preference. I hate commutes, like wearing pyjamas all day, and enjoy being able to make my own lunch and have a shower during breaks.

I’d be delighted if I never went to an office ever again at this point, but my old apartment was a fucking nightmare for working in (had to balance a laptop on the edge of the bath and sit on the floor for 60hrs a week for 6 months, among much else that made life difficult).
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on May 07, 2021, 12:39:44 AM
my old apartment was a fucking nightmare for working in (had to balance a laptop on the edge of the bath and sit on the floor for 60hrs a week for 6 months, among much else that made life difficult).

Christ. OK, that trumps my old poky bedroom, which at least had just about enough space to wedge in Wayfair's smallest desk, even if I had to climb over it to get to the door.

Yep, having the option to change your surroundings makes a world of difference. I'm still in a (different) flatshare but I've got far more space now and my current flatmates don't work from home so I've got a free flat during the day most of the time, which makes things a hell of a lot easier.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Malcy on May 09, 2021, 01:11:29 AM
Just taken a job with Teleperformance and received my equipment during the week. Should I be checking for hidden webcams? It seems going back to an office environment with them isn't likely though which really suits my moving to a cottage in the arse end of nowhere plans.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on May 13, 2021, 04:29:46 PM
Just found out today that the slow crawl back to the old routine is starting - one day in the office next week, moving up to two from the week after that. End of June will see it move up to three. Ho-hum.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on May 27, 2021, 06:39:40 AM
I'm with Bently. There's not a lot I miss. I might consider going in one day a week or something (probably a Friday as it's a shorter working day), but the thought of getting up at 6 so I can sit on a crammed train into Cambridge and sit among people I have no real affinity with  and then get on a similarly packed train that gets me home at 7 in the evening for 5 days a week? Fuck that.

So, in an attempt to change things up a bit and stop the downward trajectory of my mental health, I’ll be going back into the office for one day a week. Boss says to travel off-peak too, as the idea of a crowded early morning train triggers my anxiety, so it’ll be a nice short day. Starting tomorrow. Might even try and go for a beer after work.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on May 29, 2021, 01:23:11 AM
^ That sounds like a decent compromise, I hope it helps you feel better.

I think I'm going back in (voluntarily) a couple of days a week at some point next month. I live within walking distance of the office (by choice) so I won't have to fuck about with public transport, and likewise, when they reopened for a bit last summer they stressed that we could arrange our start and finish times flexibly around our individual travel needs.

It's going to be weird but I'm looking forward to it, even if it turns out no other fucker is in on the days I'm there. The sweet lick of a mediocre coffee I'll spend the next hour earning back my expenditure for, the giddy thrill of shitting in public toilets again.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on May 29, 2021, 11:12:34 AM
Ive been working from home 3-4 days a week for 10 years. I detest the office environment, being in a room with 100+ other people.
I detest being stuck in an uncomfortable chair for 8 hours a day being forced to share space with inconsiderate fucking twats who have a desire to shout around the floor about their entire lives. Also the people who are unaware that the volume of their voice does not have to be in 'talk extremely loud' or shout mode.

Having nowhere to go at lunchtime. Sharing 3 cubicle toilets per floor with 200 other men (I work in IT).

There is not one thing about the office that I like. Actually there is and thats leaving the office on a crisp Autumn/Winter evening with Christmas approaching.

Ive been working full time at home since March last year and its heaven. The team I work with are all based in other offices, in the US and other offices we have, not local. So it doesnt matter if im in the office or not. Even my managers are all in other offices. When I go in i'm sat on my own all day talking to no-one.

They're tentatively opening the office again in July though have said its fine if people arent back until September. And then we might have the choice to work from home more if we wish.

I dont want to ever go back though. Even when I had to be in 3-4 days a week I usually tried to stay at home for 5 days, got into trouble twice for doing this. Was touted on.

As well as comfort, peace and quiet, no office stress, loud noises, being able to mow the grass at lunchtime, prepare dinner for evening, no commute, I havent caught a cold in years and years as im not sat with 100+ people a day. And ive been able to crap in peace in a clean toilet.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 29, 2021, 11:44:20 AM
There was some knobhead in a last job who was some senior type who used to inexplicably turn up every now and again, I'm not sure why because they didn't seem to meet with anyone who worked in the office regularly, they just used to have loud phone calls all day in their stupid whiny voice to let everyone know how important they were.

It got even worse after they implemented soft/voip phones on people's laptops as the cunt got a pair of massive noise cancelling headphones and talked even louder.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on May 29, 2021, 12:58:21 PM
plenty of very understandable reason to hate going into the office

I think a lot of it depends on the actual physical office space itself, doesn't it? I'm very fortunate as my office is a genuinely nice building, very homely with plants and sofas and books everywhere. I've worked there for so long that it sort of does feel a bit like a second home - not in a deso, corporate drone, AmaZen Suicide Booth type way - it's just been a big feature of my twenties, and I have loads of fond memories of social events, friendships, funny stories etc. that were born there, I'm quite matey with the cleaners and the canteen staff and the like. It's definitely more than just a workplace for me.

I realise this is probably quite an unusual and certainly a very privileged position to be in, and I'd almost certainly feel differently if I was being pressured to drag myself back to a soulless cubicle and spend all day with people I had no relationship with (not that I'm under pressure to return to the office - it's very much voluntary, they're being pretty good with that, so far anyway). But then if I hadn't been living in a cramped flatshare in the first lockdown, I'm sure I'd have felt differently too.

I did have an in-person meeting with some colleagues a few weeks ago (outdoors at a cafe) and when we had a break for lunch, I was reminded of the seething, molten white-hot vitriol stirred by having to hear someone else loudly sucking their fingers, one by one, after eating with their hands. I haven't missed that. At all.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on May 29, 2021, 10:28:51 PM
Type of office space definitely comes into it.
We’ve been in the same building for 14 years now, chairs are battered and falling apart. Sore on the back.

Open plan office with 100+ per room. No cubicles so you can stand up and see everyone. Just people everywhere.
Horrible. I can never settle. Just never feel comfortable. I’m just always aware that there are people and noise everywhere.

My wife works elsewhere and shares a room with one other person.
That would be heaven. Your own space to sit and relax.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on June 02, 2021, 11:33:12 AM
My return to office delayed till after the summer now.
Wife also works in the NHS and they’re preparing for another wave in October time again, maybe just contingency.
But I’m starting to doubt whether I’ll be back in the office this year at all.

Good stuff, hopefully sat here till after Christmas at least.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuellar on June 02, 2021, 11:36:09 AM
We're doing a one day a week thing from the end of June, on a non-compulsory basis. Don't think anyone has actually volunteered. The more senior folks don't think we'll ever go back really. Good.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on June 02, 2021, 11:41:40 AM
My return got kicked back a couple of weeks (a colleague kicked up a fuss about us ignoring the official government guidance) but we're in tomorrow for the first time, which is bringing on a wee bit of anxiety for me. It's just one day, then another in two weeks - after that, I have a week off, but I'm not sure I'm looking forward to July. We've been getting a fair bit of general communication about "welcoming staff back" - if we can keep it down to twice a week, it'll be manageable but there's been zero consultation.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 02, 2021, 11:57:14 AM

Been in work all day every day throughout, essential worker unable to remote work (auto mechanic). Had fuck all to do, income off 40% for 2020. Shit is coming back now but am now well accustomed to spending most of the day on a stool poking at my phone.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Captain Z on June 02, 2021, 02:19:25 PM
spending most of the day on a stool poking at my phone.

The exact opposite of what BlodwynPig does.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 03, 2021, 02:47:43 PM
guardian shilling for the landlords now https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/jun/03/the-empty-office-what-we-lose-when-we-work-from-home?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1622697565
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on June 03, 2021, 03:30:51 PM
Quote
Gillian Tett is chair of the US editorial board at the Financial Times and the author of books including Fool's Gold (2009) and Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life (2021)

Her only article so far for the Guardian. The article was adapted from her Anthro-Vision book which will be published soon.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on June 03, 2021, 04:02:22 PM
My wife works elsewhere and shares a room with one other person.
That would be heaven. Your own space to sit and relax.

I've mostly worked in open plan offices over my career, but a few years ago the place I was working had a big renovation and we all had to vacate it for 18 months. Whole company ended up in one of those poncy modern shared offices like WeWork. I wound up sharing an nice little room with just two other people, and I genuinely think it was the happiest time I've ever spent in an office. My focus was great, but the three of us also built up great camaraderie and had mad bantz on occasion. Salad days.

Then we went back to the refurbished office, which they had essentially 'modernised' by stripping back to the bare concrete and steel beams and making it look like a Tesco warehouse. They also implemented hot desking, meaning I spent every morning roaming for somewhere to sit, and never felt like I had my own little space in the office. 

Rubbish.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 03, 2021, 04:49:43 PM
Her only article so far for the Guardian. The article was adapted from her Anthro-Vision book which will be published soon.

Good digging!
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: ZoyzaSorris on June 04, 2021, 10:13:25 AM
guardian shilling for the landlords now https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/jun/03/the-empty-office-what-we-lose-when-we-work-from-home?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1622697565

Proper one for 'Pseud's Corner', that.

There's going to be a real battle between the productive side of the capitalist class who see potential of big benefits from savings on office expenses and a fairly cost-free way of improving staff wellbeing (not that this is often a priority but if they can do it at no cost to themselves I'm sure a lot of business owners would rather their staff weren't physically and mentally ill if only for selfish reasons) and reducing staff's own costs so resulting in less pressure for pay rises - and the extractive rentier economy seeing a slow decline of their cash cows. Obviously in many case these two categories overlap these days after decades of mass financialisation of the economy, but nonetheless the tension exists.

I imagine in media, tech and more white collar parts of public sector the employees still have enough sway to make returning to the old way of doing things impossible even if the bosses wanted to. 
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 04, 2021, 10:21:28 AM
The journos calling for it proper sticks in my craw because a lot of these columnists have probably been submitting their ill-informed opinions from home since times when floppy disks and cycle couriers were the most reliable way to do so.

Here's an article from 2008 where some prick celebrates using their clout to allow them to still use an Amstrad PCW to write books and journo articles, creating much work for everyone else around them: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2008/jul/19/computing
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on June 04, 2021, 10:25:20 AM
Had my first day back yesterday and was just about able to cope with the humid office and shite office chair, though the ride back home on an over-crowded tram was a bit much. I've had my shots, so not worried on this aspect, just not used to being crowded together like that after 14 months of as much personal space as I could wish for.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 04, 2021, 10:29:28 AM
Good thing from chapo about ceos forcing people back to the office I listened to last night:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHZXfH7VHNs
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Norton Canes on June 04, 2021, 11:40:38 AM
We're being leant on gently...

"We are expecting a proportion of staff in student-facing and some other roles to return to working wholly or partially on campus if and when the government removes all social distancing measures... It is the expectation that all staff will be located and working on campus for some of their time... Staff will not be exclusively based at home as their contractual base, now or in the future"

All about maintaining the 'vibrant campus experience'.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on June 04, 2021, 11:42:26 AM
I read that guardian story about office spaces yesterday and was almost physically sick.

Awful cunts.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 04, 2021, 04:45:39 PM
Some of this is quite relatable but also precisely why working from home is great - https://novaramedia.com/2021/06/03/welcome-to-slacker-school-learning-from-the-best-how-to-work-the-least/

office work is largely about presnteeism and playing dress-up a lot of the time.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on June 07, 2021, 02:40:51 PM
https://amp.ft.com/content/118f5258-c9d0-41cc-a8dd-ec27fd8724b4

I'm very excited for this titanic showdown between slaves and slave drivers where the bosses just say come into the office or else in approved, soft language and everyone meekly complies. Maybe they'll get to bring their toys in at the end of term.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: mothman on June 07, 2021, 09:08:21 PM
(https://images.dailykos.com/images/954353/large/TMW2021-06-09color.png)
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on June 08, 2021, 07:28:15 AM
Quote
"I expect we will see three or four days a week in the office as the UK recovers," Paul Swinney, director of policy and research at Centre for Cities, told Radio 5 Live's Wake Up to Money programme.

"Over the longer term, I'm quite hopeful that we will see people return five days a week.

"The reason for that is, one of the benefits of being in the office is having interactions with other people, coming up with new ideas and sharing information."

He said people could not do this by scheduling a three o'clock meeting on a Tuesday - it had to happen randomly.

Think tank wonky looking forward to people being in the office full time. Don't most people.working from home have access to a messaging program where they can share ideas with others in the office?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57339105
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: seepage on June 08, 2021, 07:40:04 AM
Last time I worked the cost model was 20% onshore / 80% offshore. So most of the time I was on the 'phone to someone overseas anyway. But then we were told we all must gather around the same whiteboard to brainstorm, even though the whiteboard could be controlled remotely from e.g. home. So the conclusion was probably everyone working abroad on a 'campus'.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 08, 2021, 09:31:20 AM
Yeah in the Chapo thing I posted there's talk of bosses pressuring people back, and then it veers onto the discussion of the cogs turning in managers heads to think 'if someone can do this job from a home in America someone can do it cheaper overseas' but as they point out bosses like that are going to want to do that regardless so in terms of long-term job security it probably makes little difference.

There was an article on bloomberg last week that said people in America are quitting rather than going back to offices.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-01/return-to-office-employees-are-quitting-instead-of-giving-up-work-from-home

Quote
A six-minute meeting drove Portia Twidt to quit her job.

She’d taken the position as a research compliance specialist in February, enticed by promises of remote work. Then came the prodding to go into the office. Meeting invites piled up.

The final straw came a few weeks ago: the request for an in-person gathering, scheduled for all of 360 seconds. Twidt got dressed, dropped her two kids at daycare, drove to the office, had the brief chat and decided she was done.

Good on her.

Quote
JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s Jamie Dimon said at a recent conference that it doesn’t work “for those who want to hustle.”

No wonder the banking crash happened.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Pinball on June 08, 2021, 10:20:10 PM
I'd have thought the predatory sharks in the merchant banks would love being able to snort coke, fuck hookers and make money at the same time at home, also bearing in mind their homes are as large as hotels. A beehive-structured open plan space and cubicle (that open plan model was invented by JP Morgan so that managers could see the bees kicking off in times of crisis) not quite as much fun.

As for us plebs, we have tasted freedom, but it's about to be taken away. For the corporations, I mean economy, of course. Think of England = prostitute yourself and die for the elite.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Uncle TechTip on June 09, 2021, 02:45:19 AM
Apparently work is entirely dependent on those chance encounters, chats over the water cooler and so on, which certainly casts all the petty project management, pointless meetings and timesheets in a new light.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on June 09, 2021, 07:49:03 AM
I thought the main point of talking by the water cooler/coffee machine/kettle were just so an otherwise pointless line manager could appear and say "come on, back to work", thus justifying their role.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: icehaven on June 09, 2021, 10:49:14 AM
I hope all those rich twats who've completely fucked the housing markets in Cornwall and Wales are unexpectedly made to go back to their offices four days a week and spend their lives on motorways.

Everyone else should be able to work from home if they want though.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 09, 2021, 11:35:08 AM
I used to take off my headphones and prick my ears for the sound of clinking about in the kitchen before deciding whether I'd get up to make a brew.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: ASFTSN on June 09, 2021, 12:57:30 PM
I've been 'managed' by a lot of what I think are very lonely people who honestly seem to depend on having their employees around them to feel ok. I don't think that's justification for everyone just going back into the office just 'coz. But I do think it might be what drives a lot of the "a company is the small moments you have between work, that's where the ideas and chemistry is" blather I've heard from my own manager and others.

EDIT: Obviously just some of it, I know about the heavy pressure from the landlord wankos.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 09, 2021, 04:57:04 PM
That's just as bad, colleagues aren't jesters for ones entertainment.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: ASFTSN on June 09, 2021, 06:30:48 PM
Oh yeah I'm right with you. It's pretty pathetic. But I've seen it happen quite a lot, especially with smaller businesses. Especially with "cool" businesses.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Uncle TechTip on June 09, 2021, 07:28:16 PM
But I've seen these relationships in action, and all it amounts to is banter-ish ribbing when your team loses, and comparing notes on whatever Netflix time-waster you've got going on. It's absolutely inconsequential.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 09, 2021, 08:41:53 PM
Yeh in an old job they did "friday cakes" where a project would by cakes and people would natter for about 20 minutes, it happened right behind my desk and I used to just openly browse the internet pretending they weren't behind me, then graze on the leftovers all day. The awkward conversation was what really put me off, with it either being dominated by some charmless high-up manager with nothing interesting to say, but people feeling obliged to entertain their ear-piss, or people trying to find something to say, but not wanting to say anything that would start a conversation niche enough to alienate at least some people, which only really left trite platitudes.

Of course that's not to say I haven't worked places where I genuinely had people I enjoyed chatting to and spent lunch with and that, but it's only good if it grows organically, if you try and force it it just becomes awful.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on June 09, 2021, 11:53:14 PM
Many were the mornings where I'd struggle to find space for my lunchbox in the fridges at work because they were invariably rammed with booze.

Being a boring vacuous twat, I actually quite liked the frequent excuses to awkwardly shuffle around a desk and nurse a plastic flute of flat prosecco and a squashed fairy cake while someone senior waxed lyrical about a project I had negligible involvement in, trying not to gulp it too flagrantly because I was never really meant to be at any of these gatherings anyway... but I can imagine that sort of office culture must be incredibly alienating to anyone who doesn't drink.

Same with workplaces which are heavily reliant on a culture of everyone going to the pub - I'm down for that, I miss it, but lots of people don't necessarily feel at home or even safe in that environment, even if they aren't teetotal. I raised this with the inclusivity committee at my workplace (as in, we need to make sure no one feels ostracised or left out just because they don't want to take part in social stuff based around boozing).
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 10, 2021, 01:21:04 AM
Same with workplaces which are heavily reliant on a culture of everyone going to the pub - I'm down for that, I miss it, but lots of people don't necessarily feel at home or even safe in that environment, even if they aren't teetotal. I raised this with the inclusivity committee at my workplace (as in, we need to make sure no one feels ostracised or left out just because they don't want to take part in social stuff based around boozing).

And there's the big challenge isn't it, making sure everyone's included without it feeling like forced fun/social stuff; by the time a committee is involved, no matter how well meaning I reckon the moment has passed.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on June 19, 2021, 12:01:31 PM
The right's attack on people on furlough continues:

Quote
Speaking to BBC Radio 4's Any Questions, Dame Andrea said: "For some people they're just terrified, so it's like, 'I've been on furlough for so long I really can't quite face going back to the office' and employers are rightly saying, 'well, you need to'.

"So there's that issue, the mental health issue, the fear of it.

"For other people, it's like, 'well actually being on furlough in lockdown has been great for me - I've got a garden, I've been able to go out walking every day, I've got great vegetables growing, I don't really want to go back to work, maybe I'll think about part-time or I'm going to retire early'."

She said some businesses in her constituency "simply can't get people to come back to work", saying: "They can't get staff because people have, to be perfectly frank, become used to being on furlough"...

Dame Andrea said on Thursday it was "disappointing that some staff on furlough have taken on second jobs and then resigned when invited back to work".

She said she asked Steve Barclay, chief secretary to the Treasury, in the House of Commons what could be done to protect the taxpayer from "furlough gaming" and how businesses could be protected.

Replying, Mr Barclay said it was a "very important and legitimate point", saying: "In terms of the design of the furlough scheme it was designed to operate within the employment law framework, so an employee is able to have a second job whilst on the furlough, providing this is allowed within the terms of their existing employment contract.

It's another way to distract people from the corruption of those in power and the obscene wealth of the super-rich, attack people earning 80% of what they were pre-pandemic, many of whom may not have jobs to go back to.

I'm wondering where Leadsom got this information from that some people didn't want to come off furlough because they were enjoying gardening. Did she just make it up?

It's another example of the elites pitting ordinary people against each other aided by a mostly morally bankrupt media owned mainly by the wealthy. It's alright for people like Leadsom, who never has to worry about being put on furlough and only earning 80% of her salary.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on June 19, 2021, 12:19:35 PM
Maybe offer them fucking incentives like a decent fucking wage and better fucking conditions to get them back in YOU CUNTS.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: DrGreggles on June 19, 2021, 12:26:25 PM
The CEO sent out an email yesterday regarding what will happen post-pandemic.
We won't be returning to the office unless there's work that can't be done remotely.
So about 5-10% of staff (categorised as GREEN) will be onsite most days, with maybe another 5-10% (YELLOW) going in once a week.
Anyone else (RED) will need prior approval from management.
#NewNormal

I suspect we won't be moving to bigger premises after all then!
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on June 19, 2021, 07:29:45 PM
My lot have started talking about "hybrid working". Sounds amazing. Really stoked.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 19, 2021, 11:18:12 PM
Guy I work with is leaving to go to a company that I think are remote, to the point that they send you 'snack parcels' as a twee perk.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: MrMrs on June 20, 2021, 12:07:58 PM
sounds like my work
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on June 21, 2021, 08:27:03 PM
Quote
Dame Andrea said on Thursday it was "disappointing that some staff on furlough have taken on second jobs and then resigned when invited back to work".

HAHAHAHA - FUCK YOU

We're not 'all in it together', these cunts are the cunts you created. The shat on will shit on and it's high time for a high altitude shit fest.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: paruses on July 01, 2021, 08:28:22 PM
The CEO sent out an email yesterday regarding what will happen post-pandemic.
We won't be returning to the office unless there's work that can't be done remotely.
So about 5-10% of staff (categorised as GREEN) will be onsite most days, with maybe another 5-10% (YELLOW) going in once a week.
Anyone else (RED) will need prior approval from management.
#NewNormal

I suspect we won't be moving to bigger premises after all then!

Those colour bands don't make sense do they? Why isn't Green in once a week and Yellow mostly in?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on July 06, 2021, 09:02:43 AM
Started going in once a fortnight for my own mental health, and now it looks like I'm going to be asked to go in full time from the end of July - I work at an exam board and the appeals process this year is expected to be fairly batshit busy. So the announcement that mask wearing is no longer mandatory after 19 July has increased my anxiety, as I would have to travel into work on busy trains bound for That London. The idea of getting on a seven o'clock Kings Cross train full of unmasked cunts is one I am trying not to dwell on.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: DrGreggles on July 06, 2021, 09:15:04 AM
Those colour bands don't make sense do they? Why isn't Green in once a week and Yellow mostly in?

Someone tell Walkers that it's green for cheese & onion!

HR have finally made it official:
"the Government are expecting to end a large number of the COVID-19 related legal restrictions in England from 19th July, which will also include an end to the “work-from-home guidance”.  With this in mind and in light of the growing numbers of staff we have in the UK, irrespective of whether the current restrictions are lifted, we would like people, where possible, to continue with your current working arrangements with regard to where you are working, until further notice"
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: checkoutgirl on July 06, 2021, 09:29:53 AM
Those colour bands don't make sense do they? Why isn't Green in once a week and Yellow mostly in?

Green means GO into the office.
Yellow means YE might go in here and there.
Red means STOP, don't come into the office.

Makes sense to me.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on July 06, 2021, 01:32:58 PM
Quote
David Abrahamovitch, founder of Grind coffee shops, said the relaxation on office-working rules was "very much welcomed".

He previously said the four-week delay to restrictions ending "killed the summer" for his London-based coffee shops, which rely on commuters for business.

"We are looking forward to seeing more people back in the city," he said. "I hope lots of companies will follow the lead of those such as Apple and mandate a return to the office for at least three days per week."

To be honest, I'd rather boycott businesses whose owner/s were lobbying for people to be forced back to the office. Also, if people don't want to return to the office because they are worried about getting covid, are they really going to want to go to a coffee shop at lunchtime.

Just another example of how capitalism and public welfare don't mix.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 06, 2021, 02:23:20 PM
Do Apple even have much office staff in the UK? I thought they mostly just had shops/repair staff tbh.

I certainly get the impression most of the interesting stuff happens in Cupertino.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Pinball on July 06, 2021, 05:07:39 PM
Do Apple even have much office staff in the UK? I thought they mostly just had shops/repair staff tbh.
Probably just 2 accountants who organise the tax-dodging.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: mothman on July 06, 2021, 08:59:06 PM
There’s definitely a ramping up across the media of the “back to work, proles” messaging. Fucking cunts.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: FerriswheelBueller on July 06, 2021, 09:28:48 PM
Probably just 2 accountants who organise the tax-dodging.

They’re about 11 miles outside of Dublin city centre. I know one of them (or did, he left because he hated it).

Allegedly.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: MojoJojo on July 07, 2021, 11:44:19 AM
Do Apple even have much office staff in the UK? I thought they mostly just had shops/repair staff tbh.

I certainly get the impression most of the interesting stuff happens in Cupertino.

They have about 1400 in Battersea power station. The have a chip design team somewhere boring in the commuter belt north of London, and probably a few other tech teams about the place. They have an office in Cambridge now I think about it.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuellar on July 09, 2021, 04:15:28 PM
I honestly think the best thing about working from home is being able to just sit at your desk with your head in your hands and your eyes closed thinking 'what the hell am I doing with my life' for anywhere between 15 and 30 mins at a time. If you did that in the office someone might come up and ask you if you were ok, or tell you to get back to work. It's bliss.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: mothman on July 09, 2021, 08:27:25 PM
Not in my workplace. I once went a whole day without talking to anyone, just to see if it was possible (easily, it turns out).
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on July 10, 2021, 10:38:04 AM
Going back in a few weeks once I'm fully vaxxed, for 2-3 days a week for now (entirely voluntarily on my part - my company seems to be adopting a pretty decent approach re: flexibility, which is something I've strongly advocated for. Think they realise they'd potentially lose an awful lot of talent if they started forcing people in, and also it would completely contradict all the inclusivity and diversity platitudes they've spent the past year harping on about.)

My main concern is that I need to start rethinking my shitting schedule, do I go for "early AM before leaving the house" or "ascertain an afternoon slot when everyone else in in meetings"? This is the stuff yer Canary Wharf bigwigs don't talk about.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: MrMrs on July 10, 2021, 09:04:22 PM
dyou work for monzo?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on July 11, 2021, 09:57:18 AM
Started going in once a fortnight for my own mental health, and now it looks like I'm going to be asked to go in full time from the end of July - I work at an exam board and the appeals process this year is expected to be fairly batshit busy. So the announcement that mask wearing is no longer mandatory after 19 July has increased my anxiety, as I would have to travel into work on busy trains bound for That London. The idea of getting on a seven o'clock Kings Cross train full of unmasked cunts is one I am trying not to dwell on.

They said "get a later train to work and work later" because the trains will be quieter. Not really the point that the htrains are quieter if no fucker has to wear a mask. Virtually everyone else in the team has the option of getting to work without having to use public transport, which I don't. Had a row with my boss about on Friday, proper shouting and that. Told him that all the talk of looking after the mental health of staff was bullshit as the needs of the business will always come first. Now on a week's leave and feeling anxious about it pretty much constantly.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on July 11, 2021, 12:20:24 PM
dyou work for monzo?

Nope, are they known for being more sympathetic to employees' bowel movements?

They said "get a later train to work and work later" because the trains will be quieter. Not really the point that the htrains are quieter if no fucker has to wear a mask. Virtually everyone else in the team has the option of getting to work without having to use public transport, which I don't. Had a row with my boss about on Friday, proper shouting and that. Told him that all the talk of looking after the mental health of staff was bullshit as the needs of the business will always come first. Now on a week's leave and feeling anxious about it pretty much constantly.

Really sorry to hear that. Is there a specific reason you need to physically be in the workplace during busy times - like something that can't be done remotely? If you're more stressed and anxious when you're having to get public transport then surely that's not conducive to being at your most focused and productive anyway.

I've always been clear that I do want to come back in, but with the caveat that if it ever feels like a bad idea at any point then I've got a right to sack it off, seeing as my job can definitely be done remotely (even though personally I've been pretty miserable working from home). Having my cake and eating it maybe, but whatevs. I can walk to my office so I realise I'm in a pretty jammy position here, I can't imagine how stressful it must feel to be forced to do something you're uncomfortable with.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Milo on July 11, 2021, 02:00:09 PM
The thought of having to go back to using the valleys train lines to and from Cardiff gives me terror. Back at the start of 2020 we were still waiting for loads of new capacity which has failed to materialise despite being due in 2019. I remember many times having to shove myself into the entryway and hope the doors would still close so I could get to the school run on time.

There's still only half the trains running at most. Absolute madness to be forcing people to use them where they don't have to.. We're at half the capacity we were when we were desperate for more capacity.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on July 12, 2021, 08:48:18 AM
Is there a specific reason you need to physically be in the workplace during busy times - like something that can't be done remotely? If you're more stressed and anxious when you're having to get public transport then surely that's not conducive to being at your most focused and productive anyway.

A lot of temps are apparently being brought in and they will need supervision. That’s it. Let those who can walk/cycle/drive into work do the supervision, I say.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on July 15, 2021, 06:07:28 PM
A lot of temps are apparently being brought in and they will need supervision. That’s it. Let those who can walk/cycle/drive into work do the supervision, I say.

Ah right, makes sense, and yep completely agree.

My work have put out some guidance on returning to the office and it's actually pretty sound from what I can see. Mask wearing and distancing still in place, no more than 50% capacity at any time, anyone returning on a regular basis has to get tested twice weekly, flexible start/finish times, and most importantly it's still entirely voluntary, no obligation to go in if you don't want to.

I'm still planning on going in part time as I'm finding it unbelievably difficult to focus or complete anything at the moment, but I'll be walking there and back so it's a doozy.

Need to invest in some decent headphones for meetings though. And probably some decent deodorant as well.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 23, 2021, 07:25:25 PM
Just this morning the boss announced they thought daily stand ups were a waste of time as we all generally take several days to do stuff and it's very repetitive. But they also thought about having us back in a day a week for the 'face time', most of the team were very enthusiastic and I felt the strongest opposition I was able to give was 'I don't mind coming in for collaborative stuff but also am fine working from home'.

In offices I generally just whack my headphones on and stay out of everyone's way. I did enjoy having lunches as a social thing but that was mostly across teams so some of the people I really enjoyed nattering with won't even be there.
:(
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on July 23, 2021, 08:02:10 PM
Our office cancelled the back to work plan at the start of last week.

I think they sniffed that the pingdemic would leave them on the floor.

Prior to that I stood my ground and refused to go back until I get my 2nd jab, but this has now rendered that mini-drama moot.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 23, 2021, 08:16:28 PM
Yeah we don't have to go back until we've got our 2nd dose. Mine's in just under 2 weeks time.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on August 02, 2021, 05:06:16 PM
The latest attempt by the government to persuade more people to return to the office:

Quote
...Asked about a return to offices, Mr Sunak told LinkedIn News: “I have spoken previously about young people in particular benefiting from being in offices.

“It was really beneficial to me when I was starting out in my career.”

He said that on a visit to Scotland last week he met young people starting careers in financial services, an industry Mr Sunak has also worked in.

“I was telling them the mentors that I found when I first started my job I still talk to and they have been helpful to me all through my career even after we have gone in different ways.

“I doubt I would have had those strong relationships if I was doing my summer internship or my first bit of my career over Teams and Zoom.

“And that’s why I think for young people in particular being able to physically be in an office is valuable.”...

https://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/news/national/19485886.chancellor-says-office-really-beneficial-early-career/
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: greencalx on August 04, 2021, 09:16:47 AM
As usual, I seem to be coming in the opposite direction to most people on this thread. My working conditions are such that no-one pays much attention to where I am, as long as the work gets done and you don't fail to show to something really important like a class or exam-board meeting. However, the main thing I've learnt from the past year is how essential having an office is to getting my work done. A large fraction of my time is spent talking to people, so although I have - on paper - a single-occupancy office, more often than not there's someone else in there that I'm talking to. Since the pandemic, this has all been shunted online of course, and it kind of works, but means that I spend much longer staring at a screen than I did before. And I am highly allergic to low bit-rate audio.

When I'm not meeting with people, I need a distraction-free space if I'm to get on with real work, and it turns out my office is much better for this than the room I'm using at home, even though there's a decent enough desk in it, actually a better computer than the one in my office. There's a lot more desk space in the office (two desks, in fact), and a whiteboard, and easy access to all the reference materials I might need when doing research work. I can access most of the same stuff from home, but it always feels much more cramped and less ergonomic somehow. Luckily, most of the last year has been filled with 'busy work' of a type that I can get done from home - the kind of stuff that involves long Word documents with numbered paragraphs, for example. But we seem to have got to the end of that kind of work now, and I'm struggling to get any research work done from home, even though the summer is traditionally the time when most of that gets done.

In principle I've been able to work in the office since the end of the first lockdown, as we were all billed 'essential workers', but retained the option to wfh, which almost everyone has done. The main reason for not going in, other when I've being doing stuff like recording lectures, is because no-one else is there. Seems a bit pointless to trek into the office just to sit and have Zoom calls all day, particularly when the office wifi is misbehaving. But since there is a substantial 'social' component to my work (and I don't mean chatting over lunch or coffee, I mean collaborative problem-solving) I'd really like to get that back in person once conditions allow, and most of my colleagues seem to think the same way.

So I am a bit nervous about the institution talking about "hybrid" and "flexible" working, because the cynic in me sees this as an opportunity for managers to massively reduce the amount of office space on the estate. It would go something like this: people are offered the option to work from home on an agreed basis with their manager. In certain parts of the administration I could imagine people mostly working from home (if they have the space to do so) and coming in for team meetings, training etc. The institution then decides to audit room usage, and determines that it's, I don't know, 50% utilised, so decides that everyone has to hotdesk, two to a desk, most likely in a shared space. At a stroke, that's an end to the ability to hold all my meetings and get on with work undistracted. And I can bet that none of the money saved will be passed on to employees to establish a fully fit-for-purpose working space at their own homes.

I've been stung by "flexibility" before, where mandated holidays (e.g. Good Friday) were discontinued and added as extra days of annual leave "to take off when you want". Sounded good on paper, except I didn't realise that this meant you could then be expected to work on these traditional holidays (teaching, in particular). Which is maybe not a big deal, unless other people in your household are required to take these days off, which means you've basically reduced the amount of leave that you can use to spend with your family. Nice one.

So while I understand that most people don't have a job like mine, and wfh works way better for them, I've very nervous that we're going to see a one-size-fits-all approach that satisfies no-one.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on September 06, 2021, 12:23:45 PM
Still not back in the office but I feel it’ll be coming in the next couple of weeks.
Eugh.

Anyone else back to the office grind yet?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on September 06, 2021, 02:07:22 PM
Went in for one day but my desk had been flat packed and people weren't really able to tell me where I should be sitting, just that I shouldn't be sitting where my old desk was, sat at a desk for a colleague was on holiday and it had monitors/keyboard/network but couldn't use the monitors without a docking station which I told a new start they could borrow as I never took it home, boss is ordering more and told me not to bother coming back in until they've arrived.

Also not able to connect to some repository domains from inside the building, I suspect they're being blocked.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on September 06, 2021, 03:10:43 PM
Back in this week, partial return. 2 days a week.

Not happy with this development.

At least due to plenty of annual leave this works out as only 10 days between now and the start of November.

Urrrgggh. Why, what is this achieving
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: The Culture Bunker on September 06, 2021, 03:20:01 PM
I'm currently on leave this week (same as last) but I'm expecting to get a call on Monday that I'll be expected in at least three days a week from now on. I don't know a single person at work who's happy with this, but the big chiefs need us up in the city spending money. Quite frankly dreading it and am considering looking at options with other places that offer full-time WFH - not something I really want to do, as my job is bearable, I work with some really good people and there's other perks that I appreciate, but the idea of losing the best part of two hours of my day again through commuting - amongst the other issues I have with office working - just seems far too much to handle.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Bernice on September 06, 2021, 03:21:29 PM
Can't wait to get back in the office in a couple of weeks, fucking sick of this house.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Norton Canes on September 07, 2021, 11:37:40 AM
Back in this week, partial return. 2 days a week.

Same here. It's been on the cards for a few weeks but the plan to come in from yesterday was emailed round at... 3:30pm on Friday afternoon.

Quote
Not happy with this development.

At least due to plenty of annual leave this works out as only 10 days between now and the start of November.

Urrrgggh. Why, what is this achieving

Got onto campus this morning, straight into the same routine - lock up bike, get changed, dump stuff in locker, slump at desk... literally like the last 18 months had been a dream.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on September 07, 2021, 12:18:03 PM
Same here. It's been on the cards for a few weeks but the plan to come in from yesterday was emailed round at... 3:30pm on Friday afternoon.



Cunts.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Chollis on September 07, 2021, 12:36:38 PM
lock up bike, get changed, dump stuff in locker, slump at desk... literally like the last 18 months had been a dream.

ugh this hits hard
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on September 07, 2021, 10:58:50 PM
My main concern is that I need to start rethinking my shitting schedule, do I go for "early AM before leaving the house" or "ascertain an afternoon slot when everyone else in in meetings"? This is the stuff yer Canary Wharf bigwigs don't talk about.

Update: turns out there's a gender neutral bog near my desk which is seemingly always empty. JACKPOT

I'm enjoying going back in, though I appreciate I'm in quite an unusual position as my office is a plush media cocoon type place. And getting up and walking for 40+ minutes at the start of the day definitely picks up my mood in a way that lurching from my bed to my desk can't. I'm still only going in a couple of days a week at the most though, seems pointless to go in for days when I'm just going to be tethered to my desk on video calls with external teams most of the day.

I do also worry that this flexibility risks fostering a creeping culture of presenteeism - the official line has been admirably free from any kind pressure to go in so far, but I think there's still a risk of in-person conversations happening in the office, that don't reach (or benefit) those who are less able to be there physically all the time for whatever reason. And in the same way that I know I'm no less of an employee just because I sometimes might log in (from home) an hour later than some other colleagues (but still work the same number of hours) because insomnia has been kicking my arse all night, someone obviously isn't any less deserving of being involved and connected just because it's not practical for them to schlep to central London several times a week.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: DrGreggles on September 08, 2021, 09:48:29 PM
Had to pop into the office today for a while, due to getting a hardware delivery.
I think the permanent WFH I'd be advised of may be true, as my desk has been given away to a newbie.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Milo on September 09, 2021, 09:13:31 PM
Had to take the train due to an MOT test yesterday. Despite running half the old number of trains it was still only a two carriage one and we were all rammed in and I was stood in the aisle right next to a schoolchild who was coughing like a raven.

Let's all get back to the office.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on September 09, 2021, 10:30:31 PM
Quote
Same here. It's been on the cards for a few weeks but the plan to come in from yesterday was emailed round at... 3:30pm on Friday afternoon.


Awful shite, I thought the week and a half notice we got was a piss take.

Hope plenty of people said 'tough, can't, made plans'
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Poirots BigGarlickyCorpse on September 15, 2021, 02:27:34 PM
Phased return starting 20th September here.

I kind of don't want to because my dog is very old, but at the same time I live only five minutes away from the office. Main arseache will be checking which blouses and jumpers a) still fit me b) are fit to be seen.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on September 16, 2021, 02:11:00 PM
Official return to office date of first week of October, but there's been a lot of 'it would be AWESOME if you could come in now, but NO PRESSURE, but it would be AMAZING'.

Went back in last week for a day, to give it a go. Haven't commuted in 18 months, totally haven't missed it. Caught a fairly late train and it was still pretty busy - I assumed it would be dead. About half the passengers not wearing masks. Cheers mates! Then, on the way home, trains were fucked. My 5 second commute from bedroom to living room has ruined me. 

All the talk of 'collaboration' and 'togetherness' was all bollocks. Because the desks are 'socially distanced', I ended up sat at the other end of the office away from the people I actually work with.

We're really entering the phase of 'get back into the office you cunts', but considering the whole Plan B business from Boris and chums, my take on it is that if we've coped well enough until now, why rush back into the office in our droves and put the NHS under massive strain during the winter. Better to play it cautious, no? Though I realise this would massively jeopardize Pret A Manger and its ilk. Sorry sandwich lads.   

Anyway, 3/10, would not recommend.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on September 17, 2021, 01:37:32 PM
Im still WFH. Also learned this week that our return to office is dependent on the number being below 200/100,000 in the daily/weekly COVID stats.
Its more than double that here. Im just hoping to at least get this side of Christmas out of it and keep working from home.

Though saying that i'll be a hybrid worker and have no set days in the office. Everyone I work with is remote so I may basically just be working from home full time now, in this team at least.
Also heard in a meeting to only come in if you want and if you're gonna be on calls/in remote meetings all day you might as well work from home.
Suits me. Cant stand open plan offices.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on September 23, 2021, 11:14:01 AM
Latest BBC anti-WFH propaganda: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-58662455

Does this one person have any evidence people abuse wfh? Surely most people working from home aren't doing audit work either.

No doubt the BBC will hold off on pumping out these stories if the government ever advise people to work from home again.

Perhaps less people would ask to work from home if they felt safer travelling on public transport. If Mr Monk is so bothered by people working from home, he should call for the government to mandate masks on public transport and reduce the cost of commuting by rail and bus.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuellar on September 23, 2021, 11:22:07 AM
Quote
His view is that a lot of people who ask for flexible working want to work part-time but on a full-time salary.

...

Nevertheless, any legislation is "setting a tone that is almost making people think they can do full-time work but on part-time salaries", Mr Monk told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.

Someone has got this the wrong way round. The BBC paraphrase contradicts his direct quotation doesn't it? Surely he meant to say 'part time work on full time salaries'?

Anyway, why is it always banks, hedge funds, and the like who are advocating 'back to office'? Bit hard to do a 3 hour coke fuelled lunch then go and molest an intern while WFH I suppose.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on September 23, 2021, 11:56:09 AM
Anyway, why is it always banks, hedge funds, and the like who are advocating 'back to office'?

Because they're all cunts?
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: SpiderChrist on September 23, 2021, 11:57:01 AM
Anyway, why is it always banks, hedge funds, and the like who are advocating 'back to office'?

edit double post twat
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: icehaven on September 23, 2021, 01:50:18 PM
Is it partly because then they can justify only recruiting their preferred type of person, i.e. those that can afford to do the unpaid internships, live in central London, went to school with their kids etc. rather than from virtually anywhere in the world? 
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Better Midlands on September 23, 2021, 04:07:40 PM
Anyway, why is it always banks, hedge funds, and the like who are advocating 'back to office'?

Commercial property interests.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Cuntbeaks on September 24, 2021, 03:25:03 PM
End of November for us, but seeing as how there are only 6 socially distanced desks between 34 people, i dont think I'll be buying a travel pass any time soon.

Going back is tempered by the fact that it will be to swanky new offices a lot closer to the train station than they previously were. Still, walking around Glasgow city centre is about as appealling as eating dog shit.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: QDRPHNC on September 24, 2021, 05:23:34 PM
If my linkedin feed is anything to go by, the cunts who can't wait to get back to the office are the same cunts the rest of us want to work from home to avoid. A lot of them seem to work in HR.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on September 25, 2021, 10:40:33 AM
I was in the office the other day and I hardly got anything done because I was too busy talking to people. I mean, it was genuinely productive having meetings in person and it was useful being able to just run over to someone's desk to ask them something (rather than "let's schedule in a Zoom, how's your afternoon looking?" thanks I'd prefer to die) but I think I replied to maybe three emails all day.

And colleagues who were working from home that day and didn't realise I was in the office probably thought I was just not replying because I was dossing around eating biscuits and wanking. And they'd be correct ahhh

I think there's a risk of engineering a culture of presenteeism both in person and online, and both can fuck off tbh.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Uncle TechTip on September 25, 2021, 11:20:16 AM
I'll be honest, I occasionally stick blutack over my camera and run a script that presses keys to keep it awake, then I have a quick nap. I'm doing the work, just not at the time you expect.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on September 25, 2021, 11:47:34 AM
^ I think that's it. I've been a bit unwell recently (nothing serious) and it's made a huge different being able to wear comfortable clothes and have my camera off if I want, or have the option of lolling over to my bed for a quick lie-down if I need to - it's kind of opened my eyes to how wildly unsuitable and taxing daily office presence and commuting must be for anyone with any sort of actual chronic or debilitating pain or illness.

I've also had insomnia for years and I used to really struggle sometimes with the fact that it's not really socially acceptable to shut your eyes for a few minutes in a meeting (not to actually sleep or anything, just for a bit of respite), and having the extra time in the mornings has been a bit of a godsend some days - again, that's obviously nothing compared to what loads of people go through, but just another example of an incredibly simple change that doesn't actually detract from the quality of work being done. Someone is not a better worker for unnecessarily struggling through pain or discomfort, ffs.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: beanheadmcginty on September 25, 2021, 01:38:39 PM
stoplock.bat
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: DrGreggles on September 25, 2021, 01:43:30 PM
Caffeine works too
https://m.majorgeeks.com/files/details/caffeine.html
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on September 25, 2021, 01:51:42 PM
I use one of them but can't remember what it was called.

I had some colleague who's a bit forward ask me in chat why they never get read ticks in teams when they send me a message, I said at the time I had no idea and probably some weird bug using the browser/linux versions of teams, but then later I was fiddling with some other settings and it seems I must've explicitly turned it off, good.

I guess that's one that was snuck in turned on by default. People who turn read receipts on in emails are generally scabs who are not to be trusted imo, I always decline to send the response anyway.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Poirots BigGarlickyCorpse on September 25, 2021, 06:04:31 PM
^ I think that's it. I've been a bit unwell recently (nothing serious) and it's made a huge different being able to wear comfortable clothes and have my camera off if I want, or have the option of lolling over to my bed for a quick lie-down if I need to - it's kind of opened my eyes to how wildly unsuitable and taxing daily office presence and commuting must be for anyone with any sort of actual chronic or debilitating pain or illness.
Working from home has been great on days when my period is being an absolute bastard.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Chedney Honks on September 25, 2021, 06:05:26 PM
Until I was stuck at home isolating, I fucking loved it. Now I can't wait to get back to the office.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: wooders1978 on September 25, 2021, 09:28:03 PM
Sadly I was made redundant earlier in the year from mid pandy agreed “home based” job - boo
Got a new, betterer job though - yay
Only downside is that they are insisting on 3 days in 2 days out of the office and sadly, when they can get away with it, a full 5 day return to the office

It’s fucking SHITE and senseless for me
All of my team are either up north or in the US - so I don’t work directly with anyone in my local office - I spend two hours of my day getting there and back, all I can get for lunch is pasta or sandwiches (can’t have either due to diet restrictions)
I also forgot about the horrors of granulated coffee so I have go to the down the street to the coffee shop and spend 3 quid on a crap cappuccino - fuel costs me a bomb and basically I just sit in an office on a teams meeting which I could quite easily do from home - my boss is chill about me WFH but HR have intervened so I have to go in 3 days a week or the cunting world will fucking explode, it’s fucking RIDIC

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on September 25, 2021, 10:09:17 PM
Working from home has been great on days when my period is being an absolute bastard.

Oh yeah, I'll never forget the time I was unceremoniously given the old heave-ho from a job on the same day I also happened to be having a ridiculously torrential flow, and only realised once I got home that I must have done the walk of shame from my desk with a gory Rorschach splayed across my arse for everyone else in the office to see, as if getting fired wasn't humiliating enough already.

But yeah having the option to work from home removes so much potential awkwardness and embarrassment with stuff like that, a few mates who have IBS/IBD or similar disorders have said the same thing (though of course if you're cooped up in a flatshare with a shared bathroom and people you're not especially close to who are at home all day too, it might not be ideal).

my boss is chill about me WFH but HR have intervened so I have to go in 3 days a week or the cunting world will fucking explode, it’s fucking RIDIC

Urgh, sorry to hear that.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on September 25, 2021, 11:43:02 PM
That's an absolute example of needless presenteeism.

Scotland doesn't exactly have bank holidays, it's very convoluted and with the exception of easter (which differs still depending on where you live) is largely completely arbitary.
There's a fucking table and everything:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_and_bank_holidays_in_Scotland

The outfall of this is we more-or-less get given 'floating days' or if you ask your boss nicely you can work a designated holiday and then take it as a holiday 'on tick'.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Ham Bap on September 26, 2021, 01:42:58 AM
Sadly I was made redundant earlier in the year from mid pandy agreed “home based” job - boo
Got a new, betterer job though - yay
Only downside is that they are insisting on 3 days in 2 days out of the office and sadly, when they can get away with it, a full 5 day return to the office

It’s fucking SHITE and senseless for me
All of my team are either up north or in the US - so I don’t work directly with anyone in my local office - I spend two hours of my day getting there and back, all I can get for lunch is pasta or sandwiches (can’t have either due to diet restrictions)
I also forgot about the horrors of granulated coffee so I have go to the down the street to the coffee shop and spend 3 quid on a crap cappuccino - fuel costs me a bomb and basically I just sit in an office on a teams meeting which I could quite easily do from home - my boss is chill about me WFH but HR have intervened so I have to go in 3 days a week or the cunting world will fucking explode, it’s fucking RIDIC

I really hear you with this. I also work remote from everyone. My teammates and boss are all 80 miles away, and my US teammates and US boss are 3000+ miles away.
 
In the before times I would go into the office to sit by myself, do my work, teams meetings all day then trudge home again. Maybe not talk to many people in the office, sat there like a plum Billy no mates all day.
Literally no point being in the office.

I had to be in the office at least twice a week. Most of the time I didn’t bother going into the office or would go in then home at lunchtime so at least I was seen.
I did get into trouble in the past for working too much from home when I was meant to be in. Easy to do when my most immediate manager sits 80 miles away.
Pain in the arse though. It’s as if they don’t trust you to do the work or if you’re not in the office then they can’t justify their own job and building.

I’d say in a lot of places they could cut a lot of managerial levels with little impact. I have about 5 different people who could call themselves my manager. Don’t talk to most of them. I just get my work done.

One thing this pandemic has shown is a lot/most, (in my job) absolutely everything can be done in the house.
I don’t need to drag myself out of bed at 7am on a freezing cold winter morning, drag myself Into the shower, out into the cold and into an office to sit on a shite back breaking chair for 8 hours surrounded by 100 people.

If someone is new on a team or new to the job then fair enough they may need hands on face to face training.
For everyone else there should be the trust to allow them to work where they want to get the job done.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Alberon on September 26, 2021, 07:43:12 AM
Apart from three months at the start of this shitshow last year and a few weeks at the start of this year I’ve been back in the office pretty much full time. I work in facilities management at a university.

Up until last week, however, there were very few other people in. I know quite a few other staff aren’t happy about physically returning to the campus and now all the students are returning as well. At least I don’t have to share classrooms or labs with them.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on September 26, 2021, 11:43:07 AM
I have to say, being able to go into the office last year (around June/July, I think) even though hardly anyone else was going in was a huge help for my mental health at that point, as I was losing the plot trying to work from my tiny furnace of a bedroom and being cooped up with my furloughed flatmate in a very small flat with barely any privacy all day. At that stage it wasn't about reconnecting with colleagues, just having a reason to get out of the flat and having a bit more space and peace to work. And it was very much optional.

I've been fortunate enough to change my living situation since then to something far more suited to home working now, but I know not everyone will have had that option. But then I'm also lucky in that my offices are physically nice comfortable modern welcoming spaces, not the clinical soulless cubicles I'm sure loads of people have to put up with.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on September 30, 2021, 05:08:34 PM
Been pretty healthy for the last 18 months over lockdown, not even a sniffle - commuted into the office three days this week, and now I have some hardcore lurgee shit. Def not Covid, did a test to make sure.

Only about 25% of people on the trains wearing masks too. Thanks cunts!
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: DrGreggles on September 30, 2021, 05:31:01 PM
Working in Heathrow next week, so hopefully I can get fuel by then and avoid the train.
At least I can limit the number of cunts in my car to one.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: confettiinmyhair on October 01, 2021, 11:48:32 AM
Been pretty healthy for the last 18 months over lockdown, not even a sniffle - commuted into the office three days this week, and now I have some hardcore lurgee shit. Def not Covid, did a test to make sure.

Only about 25% of people on the trains wearing masks too. Thanks cunts!

Yeah, I've been back in the office and using public transport for three days a week and two weeks in have been knocked for six by a heavy cold. Awaiting a test to be sent today.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: wooders1978 on October 03, 2021, 05:36:51 PM
We seriously need to change office culture and the expectation - one of my team went to the office sick as a parrot with this super lurg because he felt pressured to go in by senior management and HR he meekly explained as he’d passed a pcr test & “everyone’s sick with it  up here” - just fucking work from home bro, let me worry about managers and HR
If I get lurg and feel unwell from the office I’m taking sick time until I am feeling better
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on October 03, 2021, 10:26:26 PM
Yeah, fuck that. My manager's had the 2021 Cunt Cold™ for about a week now and is opting to work from home until it's fully cleared up, because even though he's had a negative PCR he doesn't want to make anyone else feel anxious by coughing and snuffling in the office (likewise in the summer when the office first re-opened, he delayed going in as he had really bad hayfever). Also, if you're feeling a bit ropey then it's hardly like you're going to produce higher quality work having dragged yourself to the office, surely it makes sense to be at home where you can wrap yourself in a blanket and nurse a hot toddy during video calls.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on October 03, 2021, 10:40:45 PM
Absolutely praying that it doesn't go back to full office doing fuck all for 8 hours, waking up at silly o'clock, the stress lesding you to an early death, having to deal with people you despise.

Just give me one day to come in and do what's necessary to be done in the office and let me spend the rest of my time doing things like cooking food and enjoying my life.

Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: George Oscar Bluth II on October 07, 2021, 06:51:08 AM
Grimly hilarious that the Conservative Party is promising "leveling up" and that people don't have to move to London to get ahead in life and there's this once in a century opportunity to actually leverage the post-covid desire to work from home into helping these things happen but they can't lean into it because they're funded by the commercial property industry, so instead the messaging is "get back to the office you woke cunts". Marvellous.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: flotemysost on October 07, 2021, 08:53:45 PM
Yep, if colleagues are gossiping about you (projection much?) then they're gonna do it regardless of whether you're logged in from home or out of earshot down the corridor in the post room. Fucking ridiculously childish logic.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on October 10, 2021, 09:10:51 AM
I see the Daily Mail is running a "Get back to the office" campaign" and today's front page is about claims by unnamed cabinet ministers that civil servants were unable to access vital documents due to working from home, with the headline "home working left britons at taliban's mercy".

Fairly sure that civil servants could have gone into the office if there were vital documents they needed to access. Still, the propaganda to push people back to the office continues in order to make sure that the rich don't lose any money. I'm sure the mainly retired people who read the Daily Mail will support this revolting propaganda and not question why people don't feel safe travelling on buses and trains where only 10% of people are wearing masks and people don't want the windows open because they'd rather make spreading covid easier than get a little chilly. Wear a jumper/coat on the bus if it is that much of an issue.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: George Oscar Bluth II on October 10, 2021, 09:49:39 AM
Iain Duncan Smith has a column headlined "In the 1940s they kept coming to the office - even when Hitler's bomb's were raining down". Too stupid to even engage with really.

Still, the propaganda to push people back to the office continues in order to make sure that the rich don't lose any money. I'm sure the mainly retired people who read the Daily Mail will support this revolting propaganda

It's probably partly an attempt to whip up resentment against "woke" young people who do jobs that can be done remotely and also an attempt to pander to their (imagined) base voters of plumbers and pipe fitters and so on who can't work from home.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: bgmnts on October 10, 2021, 10:58:35 AM
The anxiety of knowing that covid is basically over and office work will be full time again very soon is just crushing.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on October 10, 2021, 11:27:11 AM
Iain Duncan Smith has a column headlined "In the 1940s they kept coming to the office - even when Hitler's bomb's were raining down". Too stupid to even engage with really.

Imaging an episode of Dad's Army where Captain Mainwairing and Sgt Wilson are trying to get 1940's Zoom to work.

"Keep cranking the internet, Pike!"

IDS seems to be very concerned about landlords

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FBU62wFX0AME1uD?format=jpg&name=small)
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Milo on October 10, 2021, 11:44:22 AM
The anxiety of knowing that covid is basically over and office work will be full time again very soon is just crushing.

Fingers crossed for a new variant.

Edit to add: just realised that sounded really snide but I didn't mean it like that. I have to go into work regardless and it does make it so much easier if as many other people as possible are staying home.

Although even then, me hoping for a new variant that kills loads of people and forces a harsher lockdown probably isn't fine. I'm sorry. I'm so tired.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Uncle TechTip on October 10, 2021, 01:29:08 PM
We fight to keep it.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: George Oscar Bluth II on October 10, 2021, 01:33:25 PM
Edit to add: just realised that sounded really snide but I didn't mean it like that. I have to go into work regardless and it does make it so much easier if as many other people as possible are staying home.


March 2020-March 2021: the golden age of commuting
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Milo on October 10, 2021, 02:11:33 PM
It was wonderful. It was basically just me and my own private train.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: jobotic on October 11, 2021, 09:11:11 AM
Please be a new variant that only affects wealthy far-right parasite filth. Please
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: lipsink on October 11, 2021, 07:15:51 PM
It's also funny that BoJo has been telling people they can only do their job properly if you're in the office when he's famously a lazy cunt who doesn't turn up to meetings and now he's fucked off on holiday again.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: turnstyle on October 15, 2021, 05:33:18 PM
Been back to the commute for a few weeks now. 3 days in the office, commuting from the home counties. Seems to me the trains are back to pre-pandemic capacity, at least on my line. By the time I get on it's pretty much standing room only. There are constant reminders over the tannoy to 'social distance throughout the carriage', which is hysterical when you're rammed in cheek by jowl with the rest of the commuter cattle.

I had forgotten a lot of the things that used to wind me up about commuting, and they've all come flooding back like a 18 month old turd that suddenly pops back up from the u-bend. Jesus, so many little, crappy things that I had totally eliminated from my life when I was working from home. I hated commuting before, but now I've had a reprieve, going back has been very challenging. 

I also don't think it's worth it. If I'm honest, seeing colleagues has been good, and meetings in person are actually something of a relief after doing them via a screen, BUT 80% of the time I'm sat on my own working, thinking about how I could be doing exactly the same thing at home. We have 'team days' where we all come in, which ordinarily consist of a 20 minute catch up at the start of the day, and then the rest of it just sat at a desk, not communicating. And then there are the meetings where half the people are on video anyway, which defeats the purpose of coming into the office.

It's my hope that there's some backlash and our mandatory office days are pared back a little, because this is shiiiiiiiit.
Title: Re: I Would Rather Not Go, Back to the Office
Post by: Milo on October 16, 2021, 05:22:19 AM
You'd think there would have to be a spectacular difference in productivity to warrant giving everyone an effective pay cut and longer working day.

I'm now at the point that public transport is giving me panic episodes. It's just too many people. I can usually hold it together at the time but before and after I'm getting severe head pains, dizziness and weird lapses in awareness like skipped frames on a film.