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Everything Everywhere All At Once

Started by phantom_power, December 15, 2021, 08:27:15 AM

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BritishHobo

He also says
Spoiler alert
it's consequence-free because they just jump to another universe whenever things go wrong, even though the whole joy of the third act is that you see consequences play out in all of the established universes, even the daft ones that seemed like they were just going to be one-off jokes. Every alternate-Eveleyn has to deal with what's happened in her universe.
[close]

I don't read Bradshaw often, but it feels like an issue with the whole model of paid reviewing of, well, everything everywhere all at once. Rather than giving such a significant film time and consideration, he's had to knock out three paragraphs along with reviews for every other film that's just come out. And one of them paragraphs is just a description of the plot.

mjwilson

Quote from: Egyptian Feast on May 12, 2022, 05:43:36 PMPeter Bradshaw says it's shit. I was already really looking forward to it, now I'm slightly worried it couldn't possibly live up to my expectations. If he'd given it one star, I'd be really worried.

I thought I remembered him giving Swiss Army Man a pretty dismissive review too, but it looks like it was his colleague Wendy Ive.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/oct/02/swiss-army-man-review-daniel-radcliffe-dead

Barely counts as a review at all.

Anyway saw this last night and loved it, am recommending it to everyone I can find.

JamesTC

Has anybody been able to find a list of all the different Evelyns?

Spoiler alert
I definitely remember seeing a dead Evelyn amongst the whopping great montage of the different versions near the end. After seeing that, I hoped somebody would go through them all but all articles I find just mention the main ones.
[close]

Mister Six

Quote from: JamesTC on May 14, 2022, 07:32:49 PMHas anybody been able to find a list of all the different Evelyns?

Spoiler alert
I definitely remember seeing a dead Evelyn amongst the whopping great montage of the different versions near the end. After seeing that, I hoped somebody would go through them all but all articles I find just mention the main ones.
[close]

Dead Evelyn or spooky living skeleton Evelyn? I'm guessing that someone will note them all down once this hits streaming services and it's easier to go frame by frame through that sequence.

JamesTC

Quote from: Mister Six on May 14, 2022, 07:41:30 PMDead Evelyn or spooky living skeleton Evelyn? I'm guessing that someone will note them all down once this hits streaming services and it's easier to go frame by frame through that sequence.

Oh, I thought it had already hit streaming in America. Will wait a few weeks and check then.

Mister Six

I don't think so, it's still going (relatively) strong in cinemas and it's only been out for about a month. Maybe I'm wrong though.

JamesTC

Quote from: Mister Six on May 14, 2022, 08:04:48 PMI don't think so, it's still going (relatively) strong in cinemas and it's only been out for about a month. Maybe I'm wrong though.

Just checked and it is out there on home media and streaming next week.

Thomas

Quote from: Mister Six on May 14, 2022, 01:29:30 AMOr just the notion that each individual human life is precious and worthwhile on its own terms, even if it means absolutely nothing when viewed in the context of all time and space (much less multiple realities)? I genuinely think he was just too thick to follow what was happening, or what any of it meant.

Also,

Spoiler alert
Alpha Waymond did definitively die. He didn't survive due to multiverse shenanigans - he died and the original Waymond resumed his place, unaware of what had happened.
[close]

Usually I leave it lie if someone has a differing opinion, but I seriously think Bradshaw wasn't watching this properly. He has quite seriously misrepresented the film.

It's like watching Titanic and coming away mistakenly believing the scenes set in 1912 were supposed to be dream sequences, and judging the film on that basis.

Marv Orange

Thought this was great, while not wholly original, the combination of elements and direction made it feel like I was watching something new for the first time. I also loved the fact that there was a pay off to every element shown in the film, even the ridiculous elements that I thought were throw away gags had a pay off.

Small Man Big Horse

Absolutely loved this, though while there was only about ten other people in the cinema I was in I didn't hear anyone laugh at any point. I can only presume they were all suffering from some terrible disease where you can't make any noises as I found it extremely funny in a good few places, and it's beautifully touching too, and gets a rare 9/10 from me.

non capisco

The first appearance of the
Spoiler alert
hot dog fingers
[close]
universe got a huge laugh at the screening I was at, I'm happy to say.

I thought this managed to hit a perfect sweet spot with being relentlessly inventive but never in an exhausting way. I was happy experiencing the carnival of ideas being thrown at me throughout. Great film.

(Also liked how Ke Huy Quan was instantly recognisable despite the fact that I don't think I've ever seen him as an adult before.)


samadriel

I'm down in Sydney at the moment and saw this in a packed cinema (with a lot of Chinese people). Lots of boisterous reactions,  I think the biggest hits were the rock scenes and
Spoiler alert
the butt plug fight
[close]
.

Quan still looks quite young and has his squeaky Short Round voice, to the point I thought at the start he might have been an elder son, until that was clarified. Whatever, fantastic movie, laughed,  cried, the whole magilla. I think it was silly for JLCurtis to bring this up,  but it's true that this is a much more impressive motherhood-focused multiverse movie than Dr Strange 2, and anyone who watched that should give this a go too. Everyone should check this out.

Dannyhood91

I saw this yesterday afternoon in Sheffield at the Odeon. Easily the best film of 2022 so far for me and maybe the best experience I've had at the cinema in a good few years (well behaved audience and comfortable seats helped)

It was the most I've laughed in the cinema in ages and the most emotionally invested in a story I've been in ages too. I thought the main villain was perfect. Equal parts intimidating and sympathetic. It's emotional resolution felt well earned and not at all mawkish. Didn't feel overly long in fact I could have stomached another good 20 mins or so.

Got me thinking about all sort the multiverse theory, and my relationship with my mother which I can't say about any other films of 2022.

Famous Mortimer

Not sure why

Spoiler alert
the sausage fingers universe developed pianos
[close]

but that was the only problem I had with it, really.

JamesTC


Junglist

This is an absolute delight and easily the best thing I've seen this year, and that's coming from an Eggers fanboy who thought The Northman was astonishing. So inventive, fun, joyous. A wonderful thing.

Wish I'd have been able to see it in the cinema but missus is feeling a bit ill so watched it at home.

Gonna be one of those getting multiple rewatches over the year.

the science eel

I absolutely fucking loved it apart from the last 30 minutes. I admired the creativity and could have done without the message.

sevendaughters

saw this tonight and really didn't like it. Technically excellent but boring pomo humour undermining anything that felt like it had potential for real pathos, and when the final pathos did arrive, it was all 'be kind' bullshit. Too American for me. Multiverse can get to fuck.

13 schoolyards

I was a bit "meh" about the whole thing, though I admired the ambition and there were definitely moments scattered about that made it worthwhile.

It was interesting to see when it first came out there was a short-lived backlash towards the film, with a few critics saying "children don't have to forgive their crappy parents, actually", as I didn't think the film did all that great a job of selling that side of things. Having the big SF drama side of the story be an exaggeration of the "real" mother-daughter relationship seemed like a great way to explore it at first but it never really hit the big emotional moments.

The way Jamie Lee Curtis' character developed and having the villain's scheme double as a depression metaphor worked well (I thought), but I suspect having the focus be largely on the mother skewed the whole central relationship a little too much for the end to have the pay-off it needed.

samadriel

Quote from: 13 schoolyards on May 18, 2022, 06:09:41 AMIt was interesting to see when it first came out there was a short-lived backlash towards the film, with a few critics saying "children don't have to forgive their crappy parents, actually", as I didn't think the film did all that great a job of selling that side of things.

It was far more about parents accepting their "difficult" children than the other way round.

olliebean

Seeing this tomorrow, my first cinema visit since before Covid. I'd have gone earlier, but nearly all of my local multiplex's screenings of it are on the piddly little screens that used to be half of the toilets, and I held out for a showing on one of the big screens.

First time I've gone anywhere not absolutely necessary since Omicron, actually. It's an afternoon showing so I'm hoping it will be fairly sparsely attended.

Rich Uncle Skeleton

blimey, long wait for a cinema trip then. fingers crossed for an empty screen, place I saw it in had 6 people in it including my friend and i,  it was bloody lovely. enjoy!

I'd never even heard of the film before my friend got me a ticket to go with him, no trailers, not a scrap of plot info, cast, anything. so it was a really great surprise, can't really add anything of substance but what a great film!

phantom_power

This completely lived up to my expectations. I was worried I was over-hyping it in my head but it turns out it is an amazing film and I would be surprised if there was a better film this year

Apparently all the effects were done by the two directors (who have no formal CG training) and a few other people in their bedrooms during the pandemic, which makes the whole thing even more astonishing

Ron Superior

Saw this this afternoon in a massive cinema with 2 other people in it. This will be the first ever film I go and see twice at the cinema. What an experience!

Every time I thought it was getting a bit stupid and over the top, it hit me with some emotional or thoughtful gutpunch.

Wonderful

phantom_power

It is amazing how pretty much every silly idea in the film gets some sort of emotional pay-off at the end

beanheadmcginty

Loved this. One question: is there an established connection in folklore between having a third eye on your forehead and multiverses? Seems like a huge coincidence that both this film and Dr. Strange have the third eye thing otherwise.

gotmilk

This was an excellent and extremely entertaining film. It's rare to see something so relentlessly inventive and specific.

Having said that, there is something about the tone of both this and Swiss Army Man which does grate on me at times. The directors'  approach seems to be to create absurd scenarios and mine them for genuine emotional resonance, or perhaps to take emotionally resonant ideas and portray them in the most absurd way possible. This can be disarming and effective, but there are points where the combination of zaniness and earnestness can set my teeth on edge. Depicting depression and nihilism through a cosmic bagel would be one example of a creative choice which seemed a little bit too self-consciously situated between "lol random" and "this is deep" for my tastes.

As I said, I mostly enjoyed the film for all the reasons you have all outlined. It was only during the cascade of speeches and montages at the end where it really felt like a guy putting his arm around me and saying something like "We're all a little bit kooky, and it's a crazy world, but hey isn't that what life's all about?"

gotmilk

The scene with the rocks was where the combination of wackiness and sincerity worked best for me. Genuinely emotional, and very reminiscent of the scene in 'A Ghost Story' where the main character talks to another ghost through subtitles.

zomgmouse

Quote from: gotmilk on May 21, 2022, 01:34:58 AMThis was an excellent and extremely entertaining film. It's rare to see something so relentlessly inventive and specific.

Having said that, there is something about the tone of both this and Swiss Army Man which does grate on me at times. The directors'  approach seems to be to create absurd scenarios and mine them for genuine emotional resonance, or perhaps to take emotionally resonant ideas and portray them in the most absurd way possible. This can be disarming and effective, but there are points where the combination of zaniness and earnestness can set my teeth on edge. Depicting depression and nihilism through a cosmic bagel would be one example of a creative choice which seemed a little bit too self-consciously situated between "lol random" and "this is deep" for my tastes.

As I said, I mostly enjoyed the film for all the reasons you have all outlined. It was only during the cascade of speeches and montages at the end where it really felt like a guy putting his arm around me and saying something like "We're all a little bit kooky, and it's a crazy world, but hey isn't that what life's all about?"

yeah weirdly this is the exact thing i disliked about swiss army man but for some reason it worked and won me over in this one

Dayraven

Quote from: beanheadmcginty on May 20, 2022, 08:58:25 PMLoved this. One question: is there an established connection in folklore between having a third eye on your forehead and multiverses? Seems like a huge coincidence that both this film and Dr. Strange have the third eye thing otherwise.
Well, the third eye in Buddhism is a symbol of enlightenment beyond ordinary perception, so that happens to fit well with the concept of the multiverse.

This film is obviously drawing on East Asian references, but so do the Doctor Strange comics in a looser way (okay, a 'take things you've vaguely heard of and make the rest up' way), and they've definitely used third-eye imagery before.