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Forums => Oscillations => Topic started by: Dewt on December 31, 2019, 05:57:38 PM

Title: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Dewt on December 31, 2019, 05:57:38 PM
It's ridiculous. It's getting to the point where the idea of going to paid school to study this sort of thing just seems silly, because there are people constantly milking expertise (theoretical and practical) all over the Internet for free.

Adam Neely is probably the biggest one https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnkp4xDOwqqJD7sSM3xdUiQ
David Bennett Piano such a mild guy, schooling us all on technical aspects of classic pop https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz2iUx-Imr6HgDC3zAFpjOw
OAIM https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaXUMMBlRvK20-hIYeYjHtA

Gonna stop listing them because it will get overwhelming, but what is it that you, another poster thinks about these kinds of channels?
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Famous Mortimer on December 31, 2019, 07:18:01 PM
Neely is my favourite, and he mentioned education the other day - he says all he's really doing is using the language of music theory to talk about things, not really teaching music theory.

Sadly for me, I work at the exact educational institution whose head of musicology Neely very vigorously insulted in the Katy Perry video, so while we have fancy jazz ensembles popping in for shows all the time (Alarm Will Sound are regulars) we probably won't be seeing him any time soon.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on December 31, 2019, 07:27:32 PM
Sadly for me, I work at the exact educational institution whose head of musicology Neely very vigorously insulted in the Katy Perry video, so while we have fancy jazz ensembles popping in for shows all the time (Alarm Will Sound are regulars) we probably won't be seeing him any time soon.

Was that a musicologist who appeared in court defending one of these ridiculous copyright infringements?
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on December 31, 2019, 07:33:30 PM
I'm an Adam Neely fan here, too. I especially like that he is dipping into the uncharted territory of microtonal music and trying to puzzle its place in the overall musical scheme. Seems like a nice bloke, too.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: SteK on December 31, 2019, 08:20:59 PM
This is my son's channel, sub if you can, he's made £12 so far!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIJnMdT6nTlGGROJ84GgI8A
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: madhair60 on December 31, 2019, 08:45:50 PM
I don't know anything about music. I don't even know what 4/4 means. Or what a middle eight is
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on December 31, 2019, 08:52:59 PM
Do you know where the "one" is?
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Famous Mortimer on December 31, 2019, 09:03:36 PM
Was that a musicologist who appeared in court defending one of these ridiculous copyright infringements?
Yes, that's the chap. I work in a whole different building, though. The only person of note who's showed up at my place is the still-alive Koch brother.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: SteK on December 31, 2019, 09:15:34 PM
I don't know anything about music. I don't even know what 4/4 means. Or what a middle eight is

Dropped D? Double-dropped D?
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: idunnosomename on December 31, 2019, 09:17:50 PM
I don't know anything about music. I don't even know what 4/4 means. Or what a middle eight is
a middle eight is the different bit in the middle, also called a bridge. usually it is vocal and seperate from the solo break.

verse
chorus
verse
chorus
bridge (middle eight)
out chorus

4/4 is just the most common beat (time signature) in music. the music fits into segments of 1-2-3-4, the length of which is a quarter note, hence 4 lots of 4. a middle eight is called so because it is generally eight lots of 1-2-3-4.

thanks guys, please like and subscribe, and hit that bell!!!
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: madhair60 on January 15, 2020, 10:44:59 AM
a middle eight is the different bit in the middle, also called a bridge. usually it is vocal and seperate from the solo break.

verse
chorus
verse
chorus
bridge (middle eight)
out chorus

4/4 is just the most common beat (time signature) in music. the music fits into segments of 1-2-3-4, the length of which is a quarter note, hence 4 lots of 4. a middle eight is called so because it is generally eight lots of 1-2-3-4.

thanks guys, please like and subscribe, and hit that bell!!!

I just read this and I still don't understand, i'm not a clever man i'm sorry.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on January 15, 2020, 11:46:23 AM
All songs can be described in terms of different sections. The easiest way to do this is to call each identifiable section by a letter of the alphabet.

So the song idunnosomename describes would be A,B,A,B,C,B

Best would be to use an actual song and follow this through:

River Deep Mountain High (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uj0wPrN_Y_4)

(0:00) Short instrumental intro leads to:

A (from 0:03) this section actually repeats (musically, not lyrically) from 0:16. This could be called the verse.
B starts at 0:26 ("And it gets stronger..."). This a 2nd part to the verse, sometimes called a bridge. Like a change of gear as they work up to the chorus.
C starts from 0:43 ("And do I love you, my-oh-my..."). This is the chorus.
D starts at 1:06. This is the "middle eight" (but actually builds for 16 bars in this case, not 8). It's actually in two sections (vocal, then instrumental), so you could describe it as D & E if you wanted.
C the chorus returns at 1:51

(2:14) Ends with the same instrumental passage as the intro.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: the on January 15, 2020, 11:48:10 AM
I don't know anything about music. I don't even know what 4/4 means. Or what a middle eight is
I just read this and I still don't understand, i'm not a clever man i'm sorry.

4/4:

1          2          3          4
Oh         Mickey     you're so  fine

1          2          3          4
You're so  fine you   blow my    mind, Hey

1          2          3          4
Mickey!    (clap-clap)           (clap), Hey

1          2          3          4
Mickey!    (clap-clap)           (clap)


Four beats (the 1, 2, 3, 4 bit) and four bars (there are four lines, then the phrase repeats).


Middle 8:

(If you're listening to a song that's got quite a standard structure) the middle 8 is basically that bit that happens about two thirds of the way through the song that isn't the verse or the chorus. (In songs that have vocals, it's often instrumental.)
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: phantom_power on January 15, 2020, 01:21:28 PM
But you can't blame me now for the death of summer
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: jake thunder on January 15, 2020, 01:53:14 PM
I am detecting a slight increase in harmonic sophistication in some current pop music. Wouldn't be surprised if the preponderance of these YouTube vids has an effect on future music. Good stuff. Learning a bit of music theory shouldn't be limited to musicians.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: madhair60 on January 15, 2020, 02:02:55 PM
Thank you for the explanations they are interesting and informative.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on January 15, 2020, 02:07:36 PM
I am detecting a slight increase in harmonic sophistication in some current pop music. Wouldn't be surprised if the preponderance of these YouTube vids has an effect on future music. Good stuff. Learning a bit of music theory shouldn't be limited to musicians.

Might also be connected to these high profile copyright claims made against certain artists because their new songs bears similarities to another song in some completely natural way (not plagiarism; more shared culture; some chord sequences can't really be said to be owned, as occurred in the case against Radiohead by The Hollies or the case against Ed Sheeran by Marvin Gaye's estate).

Whilst it is wrong, it would be a positive if it drove some to try something more original.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Dewt on January 20, 2020, 01:37:28 PM
I forgot to mention the Strong Songs (http://strongsongspodcast.com/) podcast. It will take stone cold classic pop songs and analyse the shit out of them, as well as passionately talking about why the songs are great. Imagine NoSleep's post above extended to an entire song, with clips.

It's the perfect podcast for me, somebody who has a reasonable musical education but no practical real practical application of it outside of casually playing instruments.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Dewt on January 20, 2020, 01:39:51 PM
no practical real practical application of it
That said, I have created music for corporate stuff simply because I put placeholders in that were never replaced

Made a music sting for a low profile Vodafone thing which is fucking hilarious to me, it's like getting to be an architect or a doctor without any training, just turn up and start making skyscrapers and giving people medicine, except for music that nobody will ever consciously hear

Secretly replaced a sound engineer's work for a Porsche ad campaign with my own stuff because he did shit work and all the sound was clipped. Didn't tell anyone. Just replaced the sound files. The clown worked for the BBC as a sound engineer in his day job
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on January 20, 2020, 01:44:39 PM
I'm not a drummer but I've found 80/20 Drummer to be very watchable and informative. I guess his approach to timing, feel and playing in general is applicable to all instruments.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: ArtParrott on January 20, 2020, 01:46:59 PM
Tantacrul is good and he likes Cardiacs - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFKg09GBFQE
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Jerzy Bondov on January 20, 2020, 07:44:52 PM
I forgot to mention the Strong Songs (http://strongsongspodcast.com/) podcast. It will take stone cold classic pop songs and analyse the shit out of them, as well as passionately talking about why the songs are great. Imagine NoSleep's post above extended to an entire song, with clips.

It's the perfect podcast for me, somebody who has a reasonable musical education but no practical real practical application of it outside of casually playing instruments.
Thanks for this, listened to a couple on the way home. Really good
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on February 22, 2020, 09:49:11 PM
A suitable place to drop this: The Beefheart Project Toronto show you how to play Doctor Dark (from Lick My Decals Off, Baby), breaking it down part by part to reveal its complexities, both rhythmic and harmonic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJVCMV0bfgM

There's only this one tutorial/analysis (just over an hour's worth) and another video to accompany the BPT's version of Hair Pie Pt 2, but the Doctor Dark tutorial is a revelation, a door into understanding this music better and incorporating the ideas into your own music.

Hopefully this will become part of a series, but this one video is a remarkable bit of research. I will report back once I've finished watching.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: hummingofevil on February 22, 2020, 11:38:04 PM
Jazz Theory is another level of madness but I love watching Kent Hewitt Videos. No matter how complicated the principle he is trying to explain he always leaves you with something easy enough that you can just fuck about with. A lovely combination of learning a theory and having fun in its application. He also has exactly the right accent to be teaching jazz theory.

This one is good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A41X1RbKdk

Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on February 23, 2020, 06:55:04 PM
Hopefully this will become part of a series, but this one video is a remarkable bit of research. I will report back once I've finished watching.

Thankfully there is more stuff coming soon; next up a review of Lick My Decals Off, Baby.

One of the most interesting points of the video was how he demonstrates the individual musical parts on a keyboard, which highlighted for me how obviously they were all originally composed on the piano. I have an unofficial recording of the Captain playing the piano in this manner. Also interesting that the presenter categorically states that you can break down all of the tunes on Trout Mask Replica and Lick My Decals Off, Baby to the same method as found in Doctor Dark (but notes that the later albums; Shiny Beast, Ice Cream For Crow, Doc At The Radar Station, etc, were composed otherwise). Presumably, that doesn't include Moonlight On Vermont and Veteran Day's Poppy (featuring pre-Trout Mask sessions and line-up), The Blimp (which features the Mothers performing music written by Zappa) and the folk/bluesy demo recordings and acappellas.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Shit Good Nose on February 23, 2020, 07:27:09 PM
I love Dave Frank's vids and this breakdown of the Grateful Dead's performance of Dark Star from Live/Dead is a belter - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs_4TQLycQI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs_4TQLycQI)

Although I used to play guitar (over 20 years ago now), I'm no musician and can't read music, but he has a way of talking about music theory (predominantly improv, his forte) which draws in even the most talentless ignoramus like me.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: OnlyRegisteredSoICanRead on March 02, 2020, 01:08:46 AM
It's ridiculous. It's getting to the point where the idea of going to paid school to study this sort of thing just seems silly, because there are people constantly milking expertise (theoretical and practical) all over the Internet for free.

Adam Neely is probably the biggest one https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnkp4xDOwqqJD7sSM3xdUiQ


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6X2MEl7R8

Isn't it ironic?
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Dewt on March 02, 2020, 01:26:56 AM
Well yeah I really do think.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Dr Syntax Head on March 03, 2020, 11:40:01 AM
Neely is great. Rick Beato likes to talk theory. His what makes this song great series of vids are brilliant
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: the on March 03, 2020, 12:02:28 PM
In this safely established popular classic song, that bit was really great

'Why, Rick?'

It uses a diminished chord

'So where does that fact lead us?'

That bit was really great
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on March 03, 2020, 01:51:09 PM
In this safely established popular classic song, that bit was really great

'Why, Rick?'

It uses a diminished chord

'So where does that fact lead us?'

That bit was really great

Yeah, Rick Beato is knowledgeable and many of his videos are informative, but a blow by blow account of any song, or a "top 20 greatest intros, drum fills, guitar solos, etc", is a fairly pointless exercise (aside from being clickbait) compared to his videos on modes and symmetrical scales, or how computers have screwed rock music, and why audiences have abandoned rock music. I wish he'd focus less on rock, actually, and let us see more of his jazz roots, but that's also not clickbaity enough for him.

Adam Neely is impeccable, though.

Likewise, 12tone, the musicological scribbler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y4T9SkNYFo
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: olliebean on March 03, 2020, 02:26:10 PM
Likewise, 12tone, the musicological scribbler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y4T9SkNYFo

I couldn't watch that, the speeded up fiddly scribbling hand just makes me tense right up.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: drummersaredeaf on March 03, 2020, 02:28:57 PM
Technically production, but I greatly enjoyed this channel's interviews with a few producers - particularly Michael Beinhorn talking about producing Soundgarden (and Manson).

On the topic of Soundgarden he goes into some of the writing, and makes some really great points. I've always loved Black Hole Sun (SG generally), being both anthemic yet unnerving at the same time, and there's some discussion of the composition on this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng4f_fj9Lfc

One thing I've never really conciously noticed is how there's no real sense of resolution apart from the big D chord at the end of the early choruses. Sometimes picking music apart like this can ruin the magic, but in this case absolutely not.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on March 03, 2020, 03:10:10 PM
I couldn't watch that, the speeded up fiddly scribbling hand just makes me tense right up.

But the visuals are mostly secondary to the commentary, which is always great.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: phantom_power on March 24, 2020, 11:46:51 AM
I forgot to mention the Strong Songs (http://strongsongspodcast.com/) podcast. It will take stone cold classic pop songs and analyse the shit out of them, as well as passionately talking about why the songs are great. Imagine NoSleep's post above extended to an entire song, with clips.

It's the perfect podcast for me, somebody who has a reasonable musical education but no practical real practical application of it outside of casually playing instruments.

Have  you tried the "Why Do I Like This" podcast? It is Martin Rossiter and his wife discussing why she likes particular songs. Rossiter will be given an hour to figure out the song and then he comes back and goes through all the theory stuff to try and explain why it is good. It is interesting in and of itself but an extra bonus is that he sounds exactly like Greg Davies, both in how he sounds and how he speaks. That was unexpected

https://www.patreon.com/whydoilikethis
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on April 05, 2020, 09:46:40 AM
More Beefheart-related goodness, this time from Samuel Andreyev. Here's an interview he conducted with Bill Harkleroad (Zoot Horn Rollo) in which Bill is revealed to be a wonderful human being (well, I knew this already, from his music and his book "Lunar Notes"):

Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWgfVVbK4bA
Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfeKBp6OJdQ

I've just discovered this account and I see he's interviewed other members of the Magic Band - Mark Boston (Rockette Morton), John French (Drumbo), Jeff Cotton (Antennae Jimmy Semens), which I'm looking forward to viewing.

Here Andreyev breaks down the opening track of TMR, Frownland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FhhB9teHqU EDIT: This analysis appears have been what inspired Jeff Cotton to allow the only interview that he ever given.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on April 10, 2020, 12:31:14 PM
David Collins; a really good guitar tech:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEjekEOMWmg

EDIT: Looks like he's way too busy to do YouTube videos; last one is two years old.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 10, 2020, 01:20:51 PM
a middle eight is the different bit in the middle, also called a bridge. usually it is vocal and seperate from the solo break.



It always irritated me that the middle 8 is also called the bridge, I always thought the bridge would be a better name for the part that goes between the verse and chorus on some songs (the "bridge" between the two) but learned the name for that is the "pre-chorus"
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on April 10, 2020, 02:11:30 PM
It always irritated me that the middle 8 is also called the bridge, I always thought the bridge would be a better name for the part that goes between the verse and chorus on some songs (the "bridge" between the two) but learned the name for that is the "pre-chorus"

That's what I mentioned when I explained the structure of River Deep Mountain High. It is what is often named the bridge.

There is no one way of naming parts of songs, as I have discovered working with many different artists in the recording studio.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on April 10, 2020, 02:15:26 PM
I am detecting a slight increase in harmonic sophistication in some current pop music. Wouldn't be surprised if the preponderance of these YouTube vids has an effect on future music. Good stuff. Learning a bit of music theory shouldn't be limited to musicians.

Do you not feel a certain cynicism and hollowness at its core though? I feel the same way when watching many modern movies. They use techniques that have reliable emotional responses but lack ingenuity and authorial voice, so you can be sat there sometimes feeling teary-eyed while simultaneously thinking "this movie is a pile of fucking hackwork". There is something about the best art that is a sweet spot between the organic drive to create something with a message and an understanding of the form behind it, whether that be innate or learned.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on April 10, 2020, 02:28:07 PM
Do you not feel a certain cynicism and hollowness at its core though?

Lack of genius combined with technical ability/knowledge has always been a stumbling block for players. They need to get beyond the technique to use it properly.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Twit 2 on April 10, 2020, 02:30:50 PM
Feldman on Cage:

Quote
At this first meeting I brought John a string quartet.  He looked at it a long time and then said, ‘How did you make this?’  I thought of my constant quarrels with (Stefan) Wolpe, and how just a week before, after showing a composition of mine to Milton Babbitt and answering his questions as intelligently as I could, he said to me, ‘Morton, I don’t understand a word you’re saying.’  And so, in a very weak voice I answered John, ‘I don’t know how I made it.’  The response to this was startling.  John jumped up and down, and with a kind of high monkey squeal, screeched, ‘Isn’t that marvelous.  Isn’t that wonderful.  It’s so beautiful, and he doesn’t know how he made it.’  Quite frankly, I sometimes wonder how my music would have turned out if John had not given me those early permissions to have confidence in my instincts.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: little pianist on April 13, 2020, 01:36:37 PM
Some great suggestions so far. It’s very piano specific but I think this guy is great:
https://www.youtube.com/user/cedarvillemusic

A real emphasis on the almost lost classical traditions of partimento and improvisation.

This sort of stuff has been a part of my teaching for a long time so it’s nice to see. I’ve always been fascinated by the similarities between for example Nadia Boulanger’s teaching methods which were seen as old fashioned in the 1920s and the way jazz musicians learn.

Nahre Sol is fun too
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8R8FRt1KcPiR-rtAflXmeg

Instrumental tuition is somewhat more varied in quality as there’s a lot of emphasis on ‘hacks’. I’m teaching myself a new instrument and i certainly feels I’d be wasting a lot of time with rubbish if I wasn’t a professional already. There’s enough good stuff out there if you know what to look for though.

It’s under-appreciated the extent to which the church music scene in America (and the uk to a much lesser extent) is absolutely huge. Many musicians in the pop scene cut their teeth in that world and it fuels so much popular culture now. A lot of harmonic and rhythmic sophistication comes from that but it not cynical, it’s absolutely joyous.

Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 06, 2020, 07:58:31 AM
Got to love Adam Neely:

The ****ed up legacy of the arrest of Miles Davis (https://youtu.be/Sapc6BSxlRI)
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 06, 2020, 08:01:54 AM
Yeah, Rick Beato is knowledgeable and many of his videos are informative, but a blow by blow account of any song, or a "top 20 greatest intros, drum fills, guitar solos, etc", is a fairly pointless exercise (aside from being clickbait) compared to his videos on modes and symmetrical scales, or how computers have screwed rock music, and why audiences have abandoned rock music. I wish he'd focus less on rock, actually, and let us see more of his jazz roots, but that's also not clickbaity enough for him.

Looks like the lockdown has moved Rick Beato into a preferable mode for me; his lockdown videos have been amongst his best ever, exploring his love, and knowledge, of music in a more personal way.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 06, 2020, 08:24:27 AM
Discovered Tantacrul recently[1], who is primarily a composer in real life and talks about music with a sense of humour, to produce stuff like this:

Corporate Music - How to Compose with no Soul (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIxY_Y9TGWI[/url)
 1. via Shostakovich - How to Compose Music Despite [ R E D A C T E D ][1] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCxzMYVvHBg)
 1. Stalin
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Marner and Me on June 06, 2020, 10:37:10 AM
4/4:

1          2          3          4
Oh         Mickey     you're so  fine

1          2          3          4
You're so  fine you   blow my    mind, Hey

1          2          3          4
Mickey!    (clap-clap)           (clap), Hey

1          2          3          4
Mickey!    (clap-clap)           (clap)


Four beats (the 1, 2, 3, 4 bit) and four bars (there are four lines, then the phrase repeats).


Middle 8:

(If you're listening to a song that's got quite a standard structure) the middle 8 is basically that bit that happens about two thirds of the way through the song that isn't the verse or the chorus. (In songs that have vocals, it's often instrumental.)

That is one of the few things I hate about music. For something that is meant to be free expressionism and a do what you want attitude to it. Music is so formulated. If you don't play an instrument in the right way or make a song in the right way, it doesn't sound 'right' to people.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 06, 2020, 11:15:11 AM
They're just devices that can work; there's no hard and fast rule that they must be adhered to, as was exemplified to myself when I randomly chose to break down River Deep, Mountain High (see earlier, upthread) into sections and realised how unlike a standard song structure it was.

Describing the structure of something in hindsight does not prove that it was written to fit that structure, which is what I think you are implying. That's a problem with musicology rather than the music it tries to explain.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Twit 2 on June 06, 2020, 11:57:14 PM
Got to love Adam Neely:

The ****ed up legacy of the arrest of Miles Davis (https://youtu.be/Sapc6BSxlRI)

I can’t watch more than 30 seconds off him and his affected, smug drawl. Beato is great, though: not up himself, just a genuine, humble enthusiastic guy.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Mr_Simnock on June 07, 2020, 02:37:33 AM
That is one of the few things I hate about music. For something that is meant to be free expressionism and a do what you want attitude to it. Music is so formulated. If you don't play an instrument in the right way or make a song in the right way, it doesn't sound 'right' to people.

I get the impression that's the sort of thing that drove people like John Cage to spend such a lot of time on looking for alternate sounds and ways of creating music, just sick to death of how rigid music can get, although No Sleeps point about them just being tools is spot on.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 07, 2020, 03:36:06 AM
I can’t watch more than 30 seconds off him and his affected, smug drawl. Beato is great, though: not up himself, just a genuine, humble enthusiastic guy.

I would have said that Rick Beato is the smug one of the two and a bit too needy for me too; until this lockdown (he's been far for more genuine and honest). I'd say Neely is the the one with a genuine humility and sense of humour.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Shoulders?-Stomach! on June 07, 2020, 12:21:13 PM
Quote
Music is so formulated. If you don't play an instrument in the right way or make a song in the right way, it doesn't sound 'right' to people.

I have never had that impression. Musical genres all have fans who use their understanding of the genre to say stuff like that at times. Some people don't understand or appreciate atonal music, for example, yet it has a significant fan base. Who decides what sounds right? I think some music that is enjoyed by millions sounds like a meteor of turds colliding with a malattended substation. Am I right?

One of the joys of playing an instrument or composing is that you can pick up techniques or 'what sounds right' to you organically through experimenting. And because you are alone there is no pressure or disappointment if you feel something sounds wrong. You need to practise to improve your technique, so you may as well try to keep it fun and low pressure.

Formal learning on the other hand can save some time at the start and provide a good grounding, but depending on your mindset it can encourage rigidity. Classical music is a good example of a cultural phenomenon with embedded rituals and traditions which to a section of its fans are as important as the music itself. Some reject modernism and any attempts to reform classical instrumentation, the composition of orchestra, performance format etc. It seems they just want a preserved in aspic idyll of high culture which makes only familiar reinforcing sounds.

On a personal note electronics have done a lot to progress the development of 'texture' and the variety of sounds available as the manipulation of aural space and sound can be more fine tuned, taking listeners to different places trad bands and orchestras tend not to even try and reach. It has tapped into emotions and experiences which preciously didn't have musical representation (or if they did were imprecise and not made with the most suitable equipment).
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: earl_sleek on June 07, 2020, 12:40:29 PM
If we're talking smug, I can't fucking stand that grinning twit Jacob Collier. His music is shit as well, though all the other Youtube musos seem to love him.

David Bruce is a contemporary classical composer whose channel has some interesting videos about classical composition, and how it relates to pop music and various non-western musical traditions.

Also like Nahre Sol's channel, particularly her "... as digested by a classical pianist" videos, where she's investigating different genres like flamenco, hip hop, electronic music etc and trying to incorporate them into her playing.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on June 07, 2020, 01:12:56 PM
If we're talking smug, I can't fucking stand that grinning twit Jacob Collier. His music is shit as well, though all the other Youtube musos seem to love him.

I get the feeling they point toward him from a safe distance, if at all. At least Jacob Collier thinks Jacob Collier is amazing.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Nobody Soup on June 11, 2020, 02:14:45 AM
it's not really as high concept as some of these, but I enjoy https://www.youtube.com/user/MusicTheoryForGuitar

best intro of the bunch, and the white board and simple loops are the easiest of all of these people to understand for me.

Never really got into Rick Beatos theory stuff but I'll give him a look as his other videos are good.

Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on September 07, 2020, 06:35:22 PM
Adam Neely's latest video is outstanding.

Music Theory is Racist (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr3quGh7pJA)

Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Famous Mortimer on October 15, 2020, 02:22:15 PM
Beato did a video hours after the death of Eddie Van Halen which perhaps shows you don't need to make a video about everything. Just grieve, my man, if that's what you want to do - no need to film yourself grieving though.

But the people mentioned so far have been great. Neely's video, mentioned by NoSleep, was a real eye-opener, but shows how a change you'd think would be relatively uncontroversial (saying "great music is made all over the world") has become very controversial.

Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on January 05, 2021, 02:42:09 PM
I spent all morning today watching videos from Classical Nerd (albeit not talking about classical composers). He's very well-researched and speaks with passion and is clearly having fun doing this.

The best summary of what Duke Ellington's career and his immense contribution to music I've so far found, not that many people bother to give him more than a footnote mention (I'm looking at Rick Beato & Adam Neely here). Compared to the perfunctory and often inaccurate few I found before stumbling upon CN's video, this is an essential contrast:

Ellington: The Life and Music of the Duke and His Orchestra (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfsHRpSfQuY)

Then I noticed that he done a couple of videos on another of my favourite musical figures - Harry Partch - and once again he really knows his stuff (and has read Partch's amazing book Genesis Of A Music) distinguishing how Partch's research and practice of microtonality and just intonation is so different from many other practitioners in this field.

Harry Partch and his Microtonal Carpentry [Harry Partch, Pt. 1/2] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPTBRFnc8_w)
What is the Tonality Diamond? (Harry Partch's Theories, Explained) [Harry Partch, Pt. 2/2] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N57Wt0mpSu4)

And finally, a nice sympathetic assessment of Frank Zappa's life & music.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=uc9ZKxJbAAo

Lots more to delve into on this channel. Given how well-researched the above are, I'd trust him as a guide to people whose music I know less well. Subscribed and liked.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: earl_sleek on January 05, 2021, 03:28:54 PM
Thanks for posting that - I think you're right that Duke doesn't get the attention he deserves, and as a jazz newb I'm looking forward to watching the vid.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on January 05, 2021, 07:06:15 PM
Thanks for posting that - I think you're right that Duke doesn't get the attention he deserves, and as a jazz newb I'm looking forward to watching the vid.

You should scan through this CaB thread, too:

https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,44868.0.html

Lots of useful information about when various releases of Early Ellington material on CD, which you may be able to track down. As I mention in the thread, the period from 1924-1942 is absolutely essential especially the last leg from 1940-1942, which is a true high point of his career. But there is gold even going back to the earliest recordings (you mustn't miss Bubber Miley, who plays trumpet like Hendrix later played guitar - the original voodoo chile bluesman) and it just gets better and better as he gains experience and hones the band.

I'm sure Robert Johnson must have heard some of that early Ellington stuff somewhere along the way; you can hear its influence on him.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on February 07, 2021, 12:06:27 PM
Found another great channel, this time about the art of mixing.

The House Of Kush https://www.youtube.com/c/TheHouseofKushTV/videos

Looks like he started really getting into this since the lockdowns started. He gets into the psychology of mixing really well, explaining how to avoid the mental pitfalls that our minds present us when listening in on a piece of music as we work on it. Speaking from experience, this guy really knows his shit.

LCR Mixing as an exercise: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9aDCLUDomg
Listening to your mix in mono to improve clarity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IomooOHKZMs
Not getting bogged down by lingering on details for too long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlZb-nT-eWE
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on July 05, 2021, 02:50:13 PM
I've only just stumbled upon this channel and watched this single video, but it's a mindblowingly straightforward walk through a lot of material about the use of different scales (with a few examples near the end):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq2xt2D3e3E

If he has anymore videos as good as this, I'll be back to tell you.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on July 18, 2021, 12:07:16 PM
Can't work out whether this video is trolling/satire or they're genuinely excited[1] by the bland shit that is John Mayer's latest album.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55Ox5TDwPmk

Or maybe John Mayer is trolling them[2]?

There was also this exchange earlier:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXL_Grv3WWk

Which led to this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=A71rBlN8pag
 1. They don't seem particularly excited.
 2. Apparently he has said this album has been designed to antagonise people.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: NoSleep on July 18, 2021, 10:34:57 PM
Or maybe John Mayer is trolling them?

Indeed he is...

https://www.insidehook.com/article/music/john-mayer-sob-rock

I think all the videos I posted earlier are in on the troll. It's the only way to make sense, seeing as those people aren't usually waiting with bated breath to review albums. I also forgot to mention that Music Is Win has also posted about this album (or rather the preceding single, like Mary Spender).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sfq9OMVzhag
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Petey Pate on July 19, 2021, 03:22:47 PM
I've only just stumbled upon this channel and watched this single video, but it's a mindblowingly straightforward walk through a lot of material about the use of different scales (with a few examples near the end):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq2xt2D3e3E

If he has anymore videos as good as this, I'll be back to tell you.

Thanks, this is very helpful.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: OnlyRegisteredSoICanRead on July 20, 2021, 05:20:35 PM

12Tone: "No, Today's Music Isn't Boring (A Response To Rick Beato, The Boomer who thinks everything was better in his day)"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tODG4Xt45bU


"Bad and lazy video" 🤭
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Petey Pate on July 21, 2021, 12:09:43 AM
Thanks, this is very helpful.

Been checking out some more of the channel and the man (Oliver Prehn) is an excellent teacher.[1]  This video is the first he recommends to beginners, which involves improvising using only the black keys and includes an activity where you draw a storyboard and improvise a piece which evokes the mood and story told by your drawings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9MRjpjDkAs
 1. His day job is a bus driver in Denmark.
Title: Re: The abundance of high-quality music theory YouTube channels
Post by: Petey Pate on August 04, 2021, 02:20:45 PM
Oliver Prehn's videos on the pentatonic grips have legitimately changed my life.  Just knowing this has 'widened' my hands when playing keys unlike anything else.  Plus it opens up doors to many other things, e.g. if you can form a minor pentatonic grip, then you can also play a minor 7 chord (just don't play the key with your third finger).

https://youtu.be/k6uepCrDm4I

Easily one of the best piano teachers on YouTube.