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April 18, 2024, 01:56:12 AM

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Comedy Shows or Characters that changed things

Started by confettiinmyhair, January 07, 2024, 09:22:54 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

ajsmith2

Quote from: Poirots BigGarlickyCorpse on January 08, 2024, 10:24:50 AMNot only that, The Simpsons completely changed (American) family sitcoms, which up till that point featured wise parents and occasionally disobedient but ultimately good kids, getting into wholesome scrapes and learning and growing together. After its debut, you see a lot more stupid dad/bratty kids sitcoms. Malcolm in the Middle is The Simpsons' spiritual successor.

And not only that, but I'd say The Simpsons was hugely game changing in bringing surreal, ironic and pop culture specific humour to a mass audience/into mass usage. In this way, it set the tone, nay the base standard for all mainstream Western comedy of the 21st century.

Video Game Fan 2000

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 08, 2024, 09:24:31 PMI agree with your point, mostly but I think light entertainment lived on a fair bit longer than you think there; Ant and Dec were up until fairly recently doing the classic ITV variety format that persisted from the 70's onwards and essentially took over the mantle from your Barrymore's and the like, they'd probably still be at it if one of them didn't crash their car drunk

I bet you wouldn't have had The Big Breakfast without Noel though, as it was kind of a real-world NHP with 90's lad culture.

not that i want to defend Ant and Dec on CaB but it does feel like they sustained it through force of personality alone. and SM:TV felt like an anachronism at the time - wow, people having fun on TV without patronising the audience of kids, why isn't this cancelled yet?

i forget who it was, probably Brooker, said you could tell the bbc was thoroughly in the toilet when House Party followed the Generation Game. we can alway go lower for you slobs

Sebastian Cobb


Video Game Fan 2000

the Beatles transition to the studio wouldnt have happened without the Goons

more arguably but still probably true - they made Lennon receptive to things like absurdism, existential and postmodernism. if lennon didnt like the goons there is a whole list of things the listening public might not have been exposed to.

Video Game Fan 2000

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 09, 2024, 01:55:10 PMSM:TV was good, I'll give you that.

second thoughts you're probably right The Big Breakfast was more influence on the whole, but its not really a comedy show

was TFI Friday influential? it felt like the dying embers of the mad fer it era rather than part of a zeitgeist. camera spinning around when the band was on and everyones just standing at a bar

Brundle-Fly

The tiny David Steel, Liberal leader puppet always found poking out of David Owen's jacket top pocket in Spitting Image didn't do his political career aspirations many favours. Although, arguably the monstrous Margaret Thatcher in a suit and 'leather cosh boy' Norman Tebbit seemed to have the opposite effect, making them look tough and no nonsense.

It also made Paul Daniels give up wearing a toupee and Roger Moore to embark on his newly self deprecating persona in interviews.

JesusAndYourBush

Paddy Ashdown getting called Paddy Pantsdown (after he had an affair) went and made him MORE popular.

Oh and supposedly Reef were pissed off with TFI Friday using "Place your hands" for the "It's your letters" jingle, supposedly people chanted it at their gigs, although all that has been denied on wikipedia.

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: Video Game Fan 2000 on January 09, 2024, 02:02:00 PMwas TFI Friday influential? it felt like the dying embers of the mad fer it era rather than part of a zeitgeist. camera spinning around when the band was on and everyones just standing at a bar

I don't think it was influential. I was a bit young for it and the acts/celebs were aimed at people of pub age I think, so a bit hard for me to gauge but I think it was quite popular, but one of those things that might be hard to judge now (beyond ratings) as it's aged like milk and I'll bet lots of people won't admit to regularly watching it.

Oh one thing I guess you could say it did influence was Channel 4's broadcasting charter including an official ban on Sean Ryder appearing live after swearing while being interviewed and then while singing Pretty Vacant. I think they commemorated this by having Evans then interview him from a live studio, but with Ryders responses taped.

gilbertharding

Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on January 09, 2024, 03:52:11 PMPaddy Ashdown getting called Paddy Pantsdown (after he had an affair) went and made him MORE popular.

Not that it should really be part of this thread, but Paddy Ashdown was the subject of a couple of quite low-voltage 'News Quiz' style observations I nevertheless always remember.

Firstly, how ironic that it was the leader of the Liberal Democrats who was the politician best equipped to kill a man with his bare hands (Ashdown had served in the Special Boat Service).

Secondly, how tragic it was for impressionist Rory Bremner that the politician he most looked like was the one least likely to ever gain power.

As I say - not the most hilarious observations, but anyway.

Thosworth

Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on January 09, 2024, 03:52:11 PMOh and supposedly Reef were pissed off with TFI Friday using "Place your hands" for the "It's your letters" jingle, supposedly people chanted it at their gigs, although all that has been denied on wikipedia.

But they actually recorded themselves singing 'It's your letters' so maybe they didn't realise how often it would be used (if they did in fact get pissed off by it (which apparently they didn't))

Also I've just realised that the caption comes up LET...TERS when it should be LE...TTERS. Boy I really hope somebody etc.


Gulftastic

I'm a fan of Baker but, my gosh, he has built TFI Friday into something it wasn't in his memory.

He talks as if they invented the format and that before them bands was rarely seen on TV.

Des Wigwam

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 09, 2024, 03:58:08 PMI don't think it was influential. I was a bit young for it and the acts/celebs were aimed at people of pub age I think, so a bit hard for me to gauge but I think it was quite popular, but one of those things that might be hard to judge now (beyond ratings) as it's aged like milk and I'll bet lots of people won't admit to regularly watching it.


I was about 22 when it started (looking at the dates - I'm not Buzby or a fan) in 1996 and it seemed for people best part of a decade older. Can't believe it ran until 2000. It must have played like the audience were there at gunpoint by then.

Very weird to think how popular it supposedly was and yet is it ever mentioned fondly or even as having any Legend moments (outside of Chris Evans failing to control his guest, Sean Ryder)?

My memory of it was a televised bastard child of Loaded and the Radio 1 Breakfast Show but with even less charm.

Sebastian Cobb

Haha you're about 12 years older than me then, so kind of also interesting you also thought it was made for people about a decade older and all.

beanheadmcginty

Vic and Bob's use of the voiceover skills of Patrick Allen led to every fucking light entertainment thing being V/O'd by someone who sounds like Patrick Allen.

The Bo Selecta Craig David character would be held responsible for ending the real one's career, if he hadn't made a comeback a little while ago. Totally ruined his cred for years.

Thosworth

Quote from: Des Wigwam on January 09, 2024, 06:16:15 PMI was about 22 when it started (looking at the dates - I'm not Buzby or a fan) in 1996 and it seemed for people best part of a decade older. Can't believe it ran until 2000. It must have played like the audience were there at gunpoint by then.

Very weird to think how popular it supposedly was and yet is it ever mentioned fondly or even as having any Legend moments (outside of Chris Evans failing to control his guest, Sean Ryder)?

My memory of it was a televised bastard child of Loaded and the Radio 1 Breakfast Show but with even less charm.

The Word (which was far more low-brow) ran for the first half of the 90s, and TFI for the second. Don't Forget Your Toothbrush was in the middle there somewhere too, plus The Girlie Show, Eurotrash and a whole load more. The 90s could never be described as sophisticated and understated.

Des Wigwam

Ah yes @Thosworth was going to mention The Word but it doesn't fit the remit of the thread (not that TFI does but I didn't bring it up).

Far more anarchy and memorable moments in The Word amongst the gross out. Snoop Dogg and Emu, MC Hammer and Mark Lamarr, the lad in the washing machine, Dani Behr and Katie Puckrick playing havoc with my hormones .....

Magnum Valentino

The Word had Seps, TFI had Napalm. Acts on The Word always sounded better though. And that's some thoughts from a metaller cheers.

JesusAndYourBush

Quote from: Thosworth on January 09, 2024, 06:56:31 PMThe Word (which was far more low-brow) ran for the first half of the 90s, and TFI for the second. Don't Forget Your Toothbrush was in the middle there somewhere too, plus The Girlie Show, Eurotrash and a whole load more. The 90s could never be described as sophisticated and understated.

And all built on the back of The Tube.

Twilkes

Wasn't Ryder on TFI the trigger for broadcasting things on a 5 second delay so putrid content could be bleeped/blanked?

Thinking back to 90s culture, who was the first 'crew posse', did anyone predate Steve Wright on the radio? Saw a horrendous example of it on a video game programme hosted by a woman and Charlie Brooker, anyone know what show that would have been?

Gurke and Hare

Paddy Pantsdown was more of a tabloid thing than a comedy thing wasn't it?

Either way, it remains a spot on indicator of someone being a Colin Hunt if they use it.

dontpaintyourteeth

Gary Sparrow really made time travelling bigamy unfashionable

Brundle-Fly

Since the early eighties, Viz Comic had a massive effect on comedy in Britain. From Harry Enfield to Steve Coogan to Vic & Bob to The Fast Show to Little Britain. Not forgetting TV Go Home, The Framley Examiner, Adult Ladybird Books (even CaB, the frequent absurdist/ acerbic/ scatological humour can be of a very Vizesque nature).

Terry Torpid

Do we know which "comedian" first came up with the "attack helicopter" joke? That one sure had legs.

Andy147

Quote from: Gurke and Hare on January 09, 2024, 09:54:58 AMSound of Music was on at least twice this Christmas.

It's certainly been shown a lot at Christmas recently - I meant that back in the era of "all the family round the telly watching the big Christmas movies" it wasn't on very often (compared to e.g. The Wizard of Oz).

Gulftastic

Quote from: Brundle-Fly on January 09, 2024, 09:07:01 PMSince the early eighties, Viz Comic had a massive effect on comedy in Britain. From Harry Enfield to Steve Coogan to Vic & Bob to The Fast Show to Little Britain. Not forgetting TV Go Home, The Framley Examiner, Adult Ladybird Books (even CaB, the frequent absurdist/ acerbic/ scatological humour can be of a very Vizesque nature).

Yes to the Viz/Enfield influence. In the first series of Harry's programme each sketch had a title card, like a comic strip and there was an attempt to set them all in the Fulchester aping town of 'Knuckleston'.

Pimhole

Quote from: Magnum Valentino on January 09, 2024, 07:35:43 PMThe Word had Seps, TFI had Napalm. Acts on The Word always sounded better though. And that's some thoughts from a metaller cheers.

Had no idea who you meant by Seps at first but I have now discovered this boss YouTube playlist. Veruca Salt! Teenage Fannies! Supergrass on a bender!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA1E886716664082B


Quote from: Twilkes on January 09, 2024, 08:15:48 PMThinking back to 90s culture, who was the first 'crew posse', did anyone predate Steve Wright on the radio? Saw a horrendous example of it on a video game programme hosted by a woman and Charlie Brooker, anyone know what show that would have been?

And you have led me to find this stupendous clip
https://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/charlie-brookers-favourite-website/zfbgbdm

Did Howard Stern invent the posse thing?

Twilkes

#87
Quote from: Pimhole on January 10, 2024, 08:55:17 AMAnd you have led me to find this stupendous clip
https://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/charlie-brookers-favourite-website/zfbgbdm

Yeah the retro computers clip on that page is the one I saw - it's as if the producers thought 'Hmmm, we've got two great presenters but it's just missing something... I know - let's call Dial-a-Knobhead".

letsgobrian

Quote from: Pimhole on January 10, 2024, 08:55:17 AMHad no idea who you meant by Seps at first but I have now discovered this boss YouTube playlist. Veruca Salt! Teenage Fannies! Supergrass on a bender!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA1E886716664082B


And you have led me to find this stupendous clip
https://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/charlie-brookers-favourite-website/zfbgbdm

Did Howard Stern invent the posse thing?

According to wikipedia Scott Shannon and Cleveland Wheeler are credited with inventing the "morning zoo" format of multiple on-air personalities in 1981 with Q Morning Zoo. Steve Wright picked up on it in the same year, as did Stern.

Snrub

I think Steve Wright has been reasonably open about going over to America and stealing that kind of radio and trying to put a UK spin on it. He's heavily leaned on America influences, and the showbiz stuff in particular as a hanging point for lots of his show. I'm sure he said he didn't like doing Radio 1 Breakfast that much, as all the showbiz news doesn't break until later in the day as America is still asleep.