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July 12, 2024, 05:39:43 PM

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The new "What Stand Up Have You Seen Lately?" thread

Started by Small Man Big Horse, July 16, 2016, 08:16:30 PM

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CaledonianGonzo

Quote from: Pink Gregory on January 13, 2024, 10:39:52 AMI'd certainly be interested to see, I think it's more I don't really vibe with his performing style, unless that's a bit more developed as well?  That kind of overlaboured histrionics kind of thing

Maybe not then. He does get quite animated. But them imho so does Mark Thomas.

Pink Gregory

Quote from: CaledonianGonzo on January 13, 2024, 10:43:35 AMMaybe not then. He does get quite animated. But them imho so does Mark Thomas.

it's not so much that I'm against it, I do like Thomas after all, it's just what I've seen of Nish...I don't know, it's like getting animated about stuff that's kind of not a suprise?  If Thomas get animated about e.g. the extent of government complicity in the arms trade, then it might be new information to the audience, and it's a lot more radical; while Nish is I believe left of the uk liberal press, its readers are still kind of his audience?

this is all 'I reckon' of course


checkoutgirl

Frankie Boyle on Thursday. Gotta ticket for a present and was bemused as I'd never expressed an interest in him. Because of the day of the week and being January it wasn't sold out. He's definitely a craftsman with well constructed jokes and wordplay but it's incredibly edgy and packed with shock humour and sexual imagery, which I was worn down by.

It's not often I watch a comedian and think "why don't you lay off the paedophiles for a bit?" Raped baby dead hooker pedophile AIDS Nazi billionaire nipple intercourse..

Alright Frankie!! Calm down.

He has 3 joke types, in this order of prevalence
1. Funny and shocking.
2. Shocking and unfunny.
3. Funny and not shocking.

I prefer mainly 3 with some 1 if necessary. But it seemed to be mainly 1 and 2 with trace amounts of 3. Maybe it's because I'm older?

I know now why he takes pops at Gervais (he did here) and it's because they tread the same ground and Ricky gets to paid 50 times as much for a quarter of the effort and ability. There's no doubt about Frankie's ability.

I did notice a difference though, Frankie never mentioned his money whereas Ricky has to always refer to how rich he is. Gervais rarely has a go at rich people whereas Frankie absolutely loathes rich people, particularly upper class toffs and degenerate Conservative MPs. Don't remember Frankie having much problems with trans or differently abled whereas Gervais does.

One joke I remember is Biden is like a laptop on 4%. Things like that. Quite good. I wouldn't recommend Frankie for the seasoned comedy person as he's very reminiscent of Bill Hicks but the young lads on our row had a ball so definitely one to recommend for the younger crowd into shock stuff.

Oh and if you have tinnitus, bring earplugs because he's Scottish and he'll burst your eardrums when he gets animated. I made that mistake and suffered the day after.

edwardfog

Quote from: Pink Gregory on January 13, 2024, 10:24:35 AMin the UK at least 'political comedy' largely means 'comedy in which the subject matter is parliament', at least in the mainstream

Stew Lee seems to rate Alfie Brown but I wouldn't really be able to see past him being Jan Ravens' son.  I don't really rate Kumar et al either (I find him likeable enough, haven't actually seen much of his standup), but I do find the 'my usp is that I'm right wing, actually' doesn't really tend to be reproduced up my end of the aisle.  I'm quite familiar with Milo Edwards because I listen to Trashfuture but that doesn't seem to be where he comes from, comedically. 

I just find it a bit annoying because with that USP is the idea that most comedians or comedy are/is left-wing, which is simply untrue, probably caught up in the idea that liberal - especially socially liberal - equals left wing.  I don't think the average comedian, and certainly not the average TV comedian, is in favour of abolishing private property and seizing the means of production.  It just feels what it is, a contrived USP.  You either end up like Geoff Norcott and managing to maintain it, or you end up getting absorbed in your grievances and taking your lot in with the *ndr*w D*yle lot e.g. Simon Evans.

Basically if you do left political material and you aren't at least trying to be as funny as Alexei Sayle or as compelling as Mark Thomas then I'd hardly stretch to calling them political comedians, rather than people who talk about parliament.

I agree with the distinction but my list included plenty of comics who are genuinely political in the way you're describing. They're just the ones that you don't see on TV for obvious reasons, which is an issue with commissioning rather than the available talent. Cf Jack Lewis Evans, Sean Morley, Kate Smurthwaite, Ed Night, Liv Ello

I also don't rate Alfie Brown and actively wish him ill but he does handle political issues

Pink Gregory

Quote from: edwardfog on January 13, 2024, 12:19:41 PMI agree with the distinction but my list included plenty of comics who are genuinely political in the way you're describing. They're just the ones that you don't see on TV for obvious reasons, which is an issue with commissioning rather than the available talent. Cf Jack Lewis Evans, Sean Morley, Kate Smurthwaite, Ed Night, Liv Ello

I also don't rate Alfie Brown and actively wish him ill but he does handle political issues

Yeah, you definitely see more standup than I do so you would know, I'm largely going on vibes and remembered stuff that's out of date, or bits that appear on social media.

tribalfusion

Quote from: Pink Gregory on January 13, 2024, 11:03:09 AMit's just what I've seen of Nish...I don't know, it's like getting animated about stuff that's kind of not a suprise?  If Thomas get animated about e.g. the extent of government complicity in the arms trade, then it might be new information to the audience, and it's a lot more radical; while Nish is I believe left of the uk liberal press, its readers are still kind of his audience?

this is all 'I reckon' of course


That's definitely the case for me. I like Mark Thomas a lot and I occasionally like some things by Nish Kumar too but in general it's tempered by the fact that he's far softer politically and that makes a big difference in this context (before even getting into other aspects of their approaches to comedy).




tribalfusion

Quote from: Pink Gregory on January 13, 2024, 10:24:35 AMin the UK at least 'political comedy' largely means 'comedy in which the subject matter is parliament', at least in the mainstream

Stew Lee seems to rate Alfie Brown but I wouldn't really be able to see past him being Jan Ravens' son.  I don't really rate Kumar et al either (I find him likeable enough, haven't actually seen much of his standup), but I do find the 'my usp is that I'm right wing, actually' doesn't really tend to be reproduced up my end of the aisle.  I'm quite familiar with Milo Edwards because I listen to Trashfuture but that doesn't seem to be where he comes from, comedically. 

I just find it a bit annoying because with that USP is the idea that most comedians or comedy are/is left-wing, which is simply untrue, probably caught up in the idea that liberal - especially socially liberal - equals left wing.  I don't think the average comedian, and certainly not the average TV comedian, is in favour of abolishing private property and seizing the means of production.  It just feels what it is, a contrived USP.  You either end up like Geoff Norcott and managing to maintain it, or you end up getting absorbed in your grievances and taking your lot in with the *ndr*w D*yle lot e.g. Simon Evans.

Basically if you do left political material and you aren't at least trying to be as funny as Alexei Sayle or as compelling as Mark Thomas then I'd hardly stretch to calling them political comedians, rather than people who talk about parliament.


I understand what you're getting at though I suppose I was a bit more lenient than I am usually when I bring this topic up on here.

I said I was looking for political comedy (especially left of center) from younger comedians and usually there's almost nothing in response when the topic comes up beyond a few names so that's the reason I tried a different approach.

I have also listened to Trashfuture a few times and have to admit that I wouldn't have thought of him either in this context, but I understand why he came up.

As for your general point that most comedians are socially liberal while not being all that left of center in the scheme of things, I find that to be the case myself for sure.

 

tribalfusion

#1268
Quote from: edwardfog on January 13, 2024, 01:24:28 AMDisclaimer I definitely do not like all of those performers but they are political

I appreciate the list, thanks very much. For these purposes, they don't have to be comedians you (or I for that matter) especially like though I do appreciate some of them for sure.

CaledonianGonzo

Mark Thomas may be a great bunch of lads in a political sense, but seems like less of a good one on the day to day, at least if you believe Jenny Landreth.

In terms of a comedian who's actually taking occasional political action (as opposed to just doing onstage performance), weirdly it feels like Joe Lycett is the only name that springs to mind. Maybe also Josie Long.

Laura Davis has been getting increasingly political the last couple of times I've seen them.

DrGreggles

If your opinion on Nish is based on seeing him 4 or 5 years ago, I'd recommend giving him another go.
He's become a far better (and angrier) performer since then, finding his voice as a stand up.
To quote me after seeing him at the Fringe last year: "When did Nish Kumar become good?"

tribalfusion

Quote from: CaledonianGonzo on January 14, 2024, 05:50:03 AMMark Thomas may be a great bunch of lads in a political sense, but seems like less of a good one on the day to day, at least if you believe Jenny Landreth.

In terms of a comedian who's actually taking occasional political action (as opposed to just doing onstage performance), weirdly it feels like Joe Lycett is the only name that springs to mind. Maybe also Josie Long.

Laura Davis has been getting increasingly political the last couple of times I've seen them.

I definitely don't agree with your assessment of Mark Thomas who has both been active politically and drawn attention to important issues in his work regularly (and let's leave his private life out of this).  If only other comedians followed his example in terms of his work and activism.

Joe Lycett would also definitely not be the only name to spring into my mind in this context.

In any case, I don't think this is the thread to hash such things out, and it was not my intention to discuss them. I'm still interested in any suggestions for younger political comics, particularly those on the left.

edwardfog

#1272
I thought of a good one I missed: Tom Mayhew - very left wing comic doing shows pretty much exclusively about being working class and having no money

Pink Gregory

Quote from: edwardfog on January 14, 2024, 06:38:35 PMI thought of a good one I missed: Tom Kayhew - very left wing comic doing shows pretty much exclusively about being working class and having no money

was he not on Alexei Sayle's podcast?

here is is https://audioboom.com/posts/8116725-plain-clothes-priest-with-tom-mayhew

CaledonianGonzo

Quote from: tribalfusion on January 14, 2024, 05:15:53 PMI definitely don't agree with your assessment of Mark Thomas who has both been active politically and drawn attention to important issues in his work regularly (and let's leave his private life out of this).  If only other comedians followed his example in terms of his work and activism.



You've misunderstood me. I'm an admirer of his work as an activist - just maybe not so much of him as a person any more.

And by Joe Lycett, I was going with your ask about young comedians.

tribalfusion

Quote from: edwardfog on January 14, 2024, 06:38:35 PMI thought of a good one I missed: Tom Mayhew - very left wing comic doing shows pretty much exclusively about being working class and having no money

Thanks again. I've been following Tom for a while and do appreciate his focus on class indeed.

edwardfog

Two WIPs tonight at the BM

Jeff Innocent - Smart Casual
A true veteran club comic preparing for his first UK tour in what I'm guessing is his late 60s? Apparently he's been building a big profile on TikTok? He's such a diamond. This show feels finished already. His material is mainly about subverting expectations - he's old but he still fucks and dresses well and takes coke; he's an east end geezer who looks a bit terrifying but he's a social liberal with a black family and a gay son. The punchlines are often based on stereotypes and not necessarily that adventurous, but he's such a great guy to spend an hour with - his voice is so nice to listen to and he projects an amazing humility and warmth. Seems like it's not an act either - when he won the British Comedian of the Year with its huge prize packet, he split the money across all the finalists. Class act in at least two senses of the phrase

The Duncan Brothers - Blood Sword
First WIP for a new show from the Duncan Brothers, who were the other two parts of Legs with Julia Masli. It's a sort of spoof fantasy/sci-fi story about a bunch of aliens who come to Earth in an iron and a boy raised by a deer who finds a magic sword. Absolute nonsense as you'd expect, delivered in their distinctive bombastic-but-hesitant style which I just always find funny. It was incredibly ramshackle: the last fifteen minutes felt almost completely improvised and made no narrative sense even within their very loose parameters. There's nothing quite as hilarious here yet as the segways from Jeremy Segway but I'm sure it'll get there. Their incorporation of their irl medical issues is very funny for just how artlessly they jam it in

itf

I think Mark Thomas has been a case of diminishing returns for very many years now, although I haven't seen his recent play, I have seen every tour he's done since about 1996. I go out of a sort of misguided loyalty, but he's just not that good any more , and as others have said the allegations by his ex-wife are not good. The last show of his I saw really just didn't have enough structure or enough of a point to carry it. His early shows had very strong gags with political tinges, his single-issue campaigning shows entertained and informed, but the recent sets just haven't done it for me.

Nish I saw on a mixed bill and was very surprised by how good he was.

Saw Miles Jupp : On I Bang last night with a bit of trepidation after seeing his special on Prime Video which was extremely gentle and forgettable. The show last night was very funny throughout - 99% of it taken up by his recent brain tumour, but was frequently laugh-out-loud funny, particularly an excruciating bit about MRSA testing, and another about having a catheter removed (this is better than I'm making it sound, I promise), alongside just being generally interesting about the realities of being struck down unexpectedly by a brain tumour. I know, posh boy, private school etc but really just a very strong show.


Tiggles

Julia Masli: Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha @ XS Malarkey

A standing ovation at the excellent XS Malarkey for a magical show by Julia Masli, doing a full warm-up for her London run.

There's been a lot written about this already. There is something truly wonderful in the simplicity of the way Masli sets us off balance immediately, then maintains a uneasy tension between wariness (I've never thought harder about what problem I'd have if the Golden Leg was pointed my way) joy, silliness, melancholy and tenderness throughout.

I can see how addictive this show is - I want to see how it changes on each performance too! I loved that she had a full hour on what is usually a more mixed bill, the time allows for a unique bond to form with her and the audience and I felt quite moved by the end. Her Soho Theatre run should be a massive, deserved success. A great night in Manchester.


lauraxsynthesis


Small Man Big Horse

Sooz Kempner & Juliette Burton: Work In Progress at The Bill Murray. Sooz and Juliette split an hour, except instead of doing a work in progress show Sooz explained to us how she has a new agent who wanted a recording of her club set, and that's what we got instead. It turns out I love Sooz when she's talking about video games and her life, but find her impersonating / lampooning Christina Aguilera's Christmas Album (from the year 2000!) a bit naff. She essentially mocks Aguilera for making traditional Christmas songs sexual, but it's a fairly weak idea stretched near to breaking point. Then in another "Huh, this is another pretty dated segment" she spoke about her headmaster making a bunch of seven year olds sing dull hymns which they found funny as one had the word "naked" in it, though on occasion he made them perform certain songs with inappropriate lyrics, and this part was really drab, filled with observations that I've heard many a time before. 2.25/5

Juliette Burton - Whereas this was definitely a work in progress, and while a bit all over the place the first twenty five minutes had some strong jokes, but then she rushed through a final ten at breakneck speed and didn't allow any time for the jokes to land so it felt a bit exhausting. 3/5, but I'd definitely like to see the finished show.

Rob Copland (WIP) at The Bill Murray - A slightly camp mix of James Acaster and Sam Campbell, I really enjoyed this, sure, by the forty minute point he admitted he'd finished all of his prepared material and the next ten minutes were odd bits and bobs and a question from the audience, but I didn't mind at all. Copland's joyously silly and it was just what I was in the mood for, so I'll give it 4/5 even though it probably doesn't deserve that just yet as it needs a fair bit of polishing.


checkoutgirl

Quote from: itf on January 16, 2024, 09:54:08 AMI know, posh boy, private school

Wasn't that part of Jupp's act around 25 years ago? Talking down to the audience and being ridiculously and unashamedly posh.

Small Man Big Horse

I was just randomly looking up acts I'd like to see on twitter to see if they were gigging in London any time soon, and found that Crizards have uploaded their recent show Cowboys to youtube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Crpf6IRUYL8

Pink Gregory

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on January 19, 2024, 07:03:37 AMexcept instead of doing a work in progress show Sooz explained to us how she has a new agent who wanted a recording of her club set, and that's what we got instead. It turns out I love Sooz when she's talking about video games and her life, but find her impersonating / lampooning Christina Aguilera's Christmas Album (from the year 2000!) a bit naff.

Having seen her doing only WiPs and never finished shows I'd imagine those bits are quite old material and it's just her all purpose filler/showreel stuff.  Goes down well enough, but yeah, it tends to come out a lot.  Can't really blame her for having some of the singing material on hand because that makes her stand out a lot to a new or less comedy-literate audience.

Small Man Big Horse

Quote from: Pink Gregory on January 19, 2024, 02:08:40 PMHaving seen her doing only WiPs and never finished shows I'd imagine those bits are quite old material and it's just her all purpose filler/showreel stuff.  Goes down well enough, but yeah, it tends to come out a lot.  Can't really blame her for having some of the singing material on hand because that makes her stand out a lot to a new or less comedy-literate audience.

I think the biggest problem I had with it was the amount of singing per joke, she'd basically explain that Aguilera had made Silent Night sexy, but then sang it for way too long, before repeating the joke with another long burst of another song, and it was never that great an idea in the first place. Plus the school assembly bit was really hacky, I can imagine it going down well at a drunken pub gig but that's about all really.

Eraseya

Caught Simmons too – love his props, but got a bit irked with the audience nagging. Goose was hit and miss, bit too rushed. Kendall's storytelling rocked – hadn't heard much before, but she's top-notch.

Small Man Big Horse

Quote from: Eraseya on January 19, 2024, 06:52:22 PMCaught Simmons too – love his props, but got a bit irked with the audience nagging. Goose was hit and miss, bit too rushed. Kendall's storytelling rocked – hadn't heard much before, but she's top-notch.

I'm a little bit confused by this as it appears to be a reply to my opening post from seven and a half years ago!

Mat Ewins - Danger Money at the Bill Murray - Supposedly a try out for something he hopes might be made in to a tv show, Ewins hosted the show where guests Harriet Kemsley and Sean McLoughlin had to take part in a number of games which would prepare them for a heist at a jewellery shop run by John Kearns "Big Ron". It was fairly chaotic but I really enjoyed it, McLoughlin didn't get a lot to do but the rest were good value, and while it needs a fair bit of polishing I could see this working as a half hour Dave series if they mixed up the games a bit each episode. 4/5, just because I like daft silliness like this.

non capisco

Enjoyed Kearns coming out of character as Big Ron the shop owner to join in on the panel's Jimmy Carr slagging saying 'If it's any consolation he hates me too' and then 'covering himself' by going "Oooh, he doesn't like the prices in my shop!". Whole thing was a fun slice of early afternoon daftness but Kearns' bits definitely my highlight. 

Small Man Big Horse

Quote from: non capisco on January 21, 2024, 04:36:36 PMEnjoyed Kearns coming out of character as Big Ron the shop owner to join in on the panel's Jimmy Carr slagging saying 'If it's any consolation he hates me too' and then 'covering himself' by going "Oooh, he doesn't like the prices in my shop!". Whole thing was a fun slice of early afternoon daftness but Kearns' bits definitely my highlight. 

I'd agree with that, as you know I almost didn't make it as I was so tired but it was the opportunity to see Kearns live for the first time that led to my going, and he absolutely made it worthwhile.