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What non-new films have you seen? (2022 edition)

Started by Famous Mortimer, January 01, 2022, 02:18:34 PM

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Artie Fufkin

Quote from: Sonny_Jim on May 24, 2022, 08:12:39 AMFirst feature film, although he'd done a couple of TV episodes before that including an absolute ripper of a Columbo episode.  If you've never watched a Columbo episode it's a good place to start.

Murder by the book (1971) on IMDB

Sorry. Yes, that's what I meant. He'd done a couple of amateur films before Duel, and TV progs as you rightly say, but this was his first professional film, I believe?
Many thanks for the heads up re Columbo. Will definitely watch that. Love a bit of Columbo, so I do.

Oh. And just one more thing....

Artie Fufkin

Quote from: Bad Ambassador on May 24, 2022, 10:15:11 AMSpielberg followed this with three TV movies - Duel, haunted house drama Something Evil and Savage
Oooh. Fanx for that. Will check those other 2 out.

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: Famous Mortimer on May 23, 2022, 01:55:03 AMDecoder (1984)

FM Einheit off of Einsturzende Neubauten is a guy who, after meeting the High Priest (Genesis P-Orridge) has the revelation that he can replace the muzak played in burger restaurants with the noise music he's been creating, and break people out of their slumber. This leads to him being wanted by the police for fomenting revolution (the music is pushed over the edge by the sound of a frog being squeezed, in case you want to skip that bit).

There's other stuff going on, like a guy who represents German bureaucracy being obsessed with a stripper, and a cameo from William Burroughs (the movie is based loosely on something he wrote). But it's mostly a neon-lit nightmare with an incredible soundtrack (partially by The The and Soft Cell, along with the FM Einheit noisescapes).

FM's bored sort of girlfriend is played by Christiane Felscherinow, who's best known for being an underage junkie prostitute who had a book written about her which was turned into a 1981 movie, one of those that regularly appears on "what to watch if you never want to be happy again" lists. Her autobiography was made into a series on Amazon last year, which seems to have gotten good reviews too.



Watched this and enjoyed it. I kind of feel like filing it alongside things like Repo Man and the Max Headroom tv movie.

Quote from: zomgmouse on May 24, 2022, 01:14:54 AMyes except occasionally Australian films such as Babyteeth which is not very good

however young Mendelsohn in Return Home and The Big Steal is very good and both these films are worth seeking out (the latter in particular)

In a few things as 'bad guy with thespy accent'.

sovietrussia

Another voice to echo the Mendelsohn love but just to add that Gandolfini is absolutely immense in Killing Them Softly.  Completely walks away with it in two short-ish scenes.

zomgmouse

The Celebration aka Festen. The first Dogme film and my first film from Thomas Vinterberg. Spectacularly intense, wasn't really sure what to expect but the pace and energy of it was really impressive.

Angel Mine. Surrealist New Zealand film about married suburban malaise. Not for everyone perhaps but it's full of lo-fi strange imagery and offbeat humour and all comes together quite poetically in the end.

willbo

I watched the first hour of Captain Fantastic last night. I found the first 20 mins or so really powerful and funny with the kids living "primitive" with the Dad, and him being a kind of wild guru/sensei. Once they hit the road it started hitting all the Little Miss Sunshine/Royal Tenenbaums/Napoleon Dynamite tropes. I still like it so far tho.

Sonny_Jim

Yeah watched that a while ago with the missus, solid little film and comparisons to Little Miss Sunshine are valid.

famethrowa

#758
Superman 3 (1983). I think I saw this at the cinema when it came out; it was probably bollocks then and it's certainly bollocks now. Major ham all over, cliches, slapstick, inconsistencies, donkey comedy, technofear and shonky CGI. Chris Reeve and Richard Pryor do their best, and Pamela Stephenson looks rather lovely, but it's all a bit like the Goodies meet the Thunderbirds.

Oh and the big finish? A malfunctioning bingo blower. John Bluthal doing an hilarious stereotype.

Famous Mortimer

Hologram Man

Absolute belter of a 90s sci-fi/action film. Prison in the future involved people being turned into holograms and having their personalities digitally tweaked til they're good members of society; but Slash Gallagher escapes, gets himself a rubber body and it's up to Captain Decoda to stop him.

PM Entertainment made a mountain of similar stuff in the 90s, and this might be the best of the lot. Like a low-budget Demolition Man / Face-Off mashup.

willbo

Quote from: Sonny_Jim on May 26, 2022, 08:08:20 AMYeah watched that a while ago with the missus, solid little film and comparisons to Little Miss Sunshine are valid.

I was sure it was based on a true story of a guy who fought the authorities to raise his children in the forest - I thought I heard a radio 4 documentary about him - but seems not

dissolute ocelot

City Lights (1931) - old Hitler-face doing his homeless shtick. I'd not seen any Chaplin films before, but this was very enjoyable, with a plot about poverty, wealth, drunkenness, and healthcare expenses that still makes sense, while largely being an excuse for Chaplin's silent clowning. Some great gags, and the sentiment is mostly done with a light touch (certainly compared to some silent films). Scenes like the opening statue unveiling and the boxing match are classics. Someone getting a sword up the arse is never not going to be funny. And he wrote the soundtrack. (NB: Does not feature Gerard Kelly.)

zomgmouse

Quote from: dissolute ocelot on May 26, 2022, 11:16:20 PMCity Lights (1931) - old Hitler-face doing his homeless shtick. I'd not seen any Chaplin films before, but this was very enjoyable, with a plot about poverty, wealth, drunkenness, and healthcare expenses that still makes sense, while largely being an excuse for Chaplin's silent clowning. Some great gags, and the sentiment is mostly done with a light touch (certainly compared to some silent films). Scenes like the opening statue unveiling and the boxing match are classics. Someone getting a sword up the arse is never not going to be funny. And he wrote the soundtrack. (NB: Does not feature Gerard Kelly.)

this is one of my favourite Chaplins. perhaps his tenderest?

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: Famous Mortimer on May 26, 2022, 04:55:56 PMHologram Man

Absolute belter of a 90s sci-fi/action film. Prison in the future involved people being turned into holograms and having their personalities digitally tweaked til they're good members of society; but Slash Gallagher escapes, gets himself a rubber body and it's up to Captain Decoda to stop him.

PM Entertainment made a mountain of similar stuff in the 90s, and this might be the best of the lot. Like a low-budget Demolition Man / Face-Off mashup.

I've seen this. I love that it's got William Sanderson in as, well, basically JF Sebastian again.

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: famethrowa on May 26, 2022, 12:57:14 PMSuperman 3 (1983). I think I saw this at the cinema when it came out; it was probably bollocks then and it's certainly bollocks now. Major ham all over, cliches, slapstick, inconsistencies, donkey comedy, technofear and shonky CGI. Chris Reeve and Richard Pryor do their best, and Pamela Stephenson looks rather lovely, but it's all a bit like the Goodies meet the Thunderbirds.

Oh and the big finish? A malfunctioning bingo blower. John Bluthal doing an hilarious stereotype.

Is this the Canon Inc one that they hyped up madly then ran out of money making? I've not seen it but remember it from the documentary about them. Kind-of want to see it, one of the other ones that did them in was Masters of the Universe and I watched that a while back and while it wasn't without flaws it was kind of fun bollocks.

famethrowa

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 27, 2022, 12:02:54 AMIs this the Canon Inc one that they hyped up madly then ran out of money making?

Seems that it was, and Richard Lester was brought in with all the subtlety he'd learned from working with Spike and Lennon.

Ballad of Ballard Berkley

No, that was the utterly abysmal Superman IV, which makes Superman III look like what it is: a silly committee-led film made with some degree of competency.

I'm fond of Superman III, it was a childhood favourite. It's a Superman film with Richard Pryor in it. Catnip to a kid who likes Superman and Richard Pryor. Obviously in hindsight I can see that it's mostly rubbish, but you really must watch Superman IV. It's extraordinarly cheap and inept.

Poor old Christopher Reeve tries his best, but his anguish is palpable.

famethrowa

Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on May 27, 2022, 12:38:23 AMNo, that was the utterly abysmal Superman IV,

Ah thank you yes. IV was on the telly straight after III last night, but I'd had enough! The business with Richard Pryor using the unconscious security guard to put the cards in the computer has stayed with me for all this time, that's memorable.

#768
Cries and Whispers Do you think anyone has lipread the silent part? Had a quick search and didn't find anything, and maybe it would be wrong and trivial to fill it in with words (or maybe there's a funny easter egg). It's a great film.

willbo

For some reason Supe 3 was on TV all the time when I was a kid - it was the only one I saw a lot of, although I do remember watching the first 2 a couple of times with family, Supe 3 is the definitive one I remember the series by. All the tropes - the changing in the phone box, the music, the heroic flights - I saw first in 3, with Richard Pryor's comedy scenes being linked to Supes in my mind forever.

Sonny_Jim

Imagine if one of the Snyder Superman films had Dave Chappelle in it, cracking wise.  I can't, it seems almost impossible.  Still it's the Superman I remember as well.  Rewatched the first one and I spent the first 40 minutes going 'Why are we still on Krypton?  Surely we should be seeing him growing up at the farm by now?'.  Completely forgotten whole sections of it.

On the plus side, during the rewatch I spotted the inspiration for this quite memorable delivery from the Snyder Superman film:


I reckon matey was trying to homage this bit

Or is that 02021us?

Sebastian Cobb

Watched Something Wild as Ray Liotta was in it, I actually downloaded it before he'd carked it. Good daft fun with Jeff Daniels and Melanie Griffith. Also some good cameos from John Sayles and John Waters (as a grubby used car salesman).

Memorex MP3

Punishment Park

I dunno, in a lot of ways it was quite grim how much of it felt like it could've been made recently too and it was pretty solid Watkins fare but I think his whole style is used so much better in Edvard Munch that this just felt like a novelty in comparison.
I guess I'm gonna have to hype myself up to check out La Commune...

phantom_power

Suspicion (1941) - Cary Grant plays an absolute cunt who may be a murderer. He is such a cunt though, and Joan Fontaine is so wrong to be with him at all, that I couldn't bring myself to care that much. It is interesting that negging and gaslighting were things in 1941 though, and that his character could well have been the inspiration for MRAs.

Famous Mortimer

Quote from: phantom_power on May 30, 2022, 12:55:51 PMIt is interesting that negging and gaslighting were things in 1941 though, and that his character could well have been the inspiration for MRAs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslight_(1940_film)

phantom_power

Quote from: Famous Mortimer on May 30, 2022, 02:33:06 PMhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslight_(1940_film)

I knew that but that was in the context of making a woman think they were going mad rather than as some MRA control control tactic

Sebastian Cobb

Quote from: Famous Mortimer on May 30, 2022, 02:33:06 PMhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslight_(1940_film)

I've not read/watched Gaslight but I have read Patrick Hamilton's Hangover Square and there's very little that gives away its age I think the subjects he deals with are pretty timeless.

zomgmouse

#777
Allegro Non Troppo. Italian animated parody of Fantasia though visibly on a smaller budget. Some strong sequences, some not so strong but on the whole just edges out the Disney anthology, in part because of its decidedly humorous tone (including the live-action interludes). Favourite was the cat/abandoned building one.

Supermarket. Dirty, bleak German crime film with a disenfranchised youth hopping from place to place on the run. Desperate and grimy, this is very good.

Utu (the redux version). New Zealand colonial western/revenge film. Looks stunning and features some superb visuals and vibrant performances. Quickly flies to be perhaps one of the best NZ films I've seen.

Holy Smoke. Watching this before watching The Power of the Dog. Her next collaboration with Harvey Keitel after The Piano, and while it isn't quite at the same level, it's still wonderful. Kate Winslet is a young Australian woman taken into an Indian cult and Keitel is the deprogramming expert assigned to her case. I love the way Campion treats such a complicated topic and complicated characters with nuance, compassion, and also humour. It's also bananas.

Watched one of her shorts too: "Passionless Moments". Feels like a slightly calmer The Falls with its collection of charmingly quotidian... well, moments. Liked this quite a bit.

Quote from: Memorex MP3 on May 28, 2022, 02:04:38 AMPunishment Park

I dunno, in a lot of ways it was quite grim how much of it felt like it could've been made recently too and it was pretty solid Watkins fare but I think his whole style is used so much better in Edvard Munch that this just felt like a novelty in comparison.
I guess I'm gonna have to hype myself up to check out La Commune...

this might be my favourite Watkins so far, just so relentlessly angry and sadly still pertinent

Edvard Munch is the next one I'll be watching (at some point)

samadriel

Quote from: zomgmouse on May 24, 2022, 01:14:54 AMyes except occasionally Australian films such as Babyteeth which is not very good

however young Mendelsohn in Return Home and The Big Steal is very good and both these films are worth seeking out (the latter in particular)

I thought Babyteeth was pretty damn good,  although it suffers a bit from the context of every single Australian film from the past 20 years being depressing dirges.

famethrowa

Quote from: samadriel on May 31, 2022, 08:00:06 AMevery single Australian film from the past 20 years being depressing dirges.

Good point, why is that? Makes things like the Big Steal still such a joy.