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Forums => Deeper Into Movies => Topic started by: zomgmouse on January 14, 2021, 11:12:22 AM

Title: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on January 14, 2021, 11:12:22 AM
NEW YEAR NEW THREAD BUCKLE IN EVERYFOLK

First film of the year was Suspect Zero which wasn't terrific but decent enough, with Eckhart, Moss and Kingsley. Main thing is I guess I have now seen all (three) of Merhige's films. When's he gonna do his next one already. Thanks E. Elias, cheers for reading this.

Then I signed up to MUBI's little cheap dealio, and they've got a whole series of "first films". Delved into a few of those: one by Angela Schanelec (My Sister's Good Fortune) and another by Lina Wertmüller (The Basilisks). Both very solid debuts, both affecting in their own way.

And, though I didn't realise it was a "first", watched Butter on the Latch by Josephine Decker as I absolutely loved Madeline's Madeline; this had the same mystical energy but maybe not quite the same degree of psychological tension. Still enjoyed it quite a lot though.

Another "first" (though I don't think it actually is), Xiao Wu/Pickpocket by Jia Zhangke. Again you can see his style already pretty fully-fledged but not entirely formed. A sort of nostalgic, wistful but not uncritical sheen to it all. No one is happy really.

And for something completely different I watched Alien Nation with James Caan and Mandy Patinkin (and Terence Stamp). Bonkers and equal parts great and shit. Entertaining nonsense.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on January 14, 2021, 11:22:01 AM
Mr Smith Goes to Washington

Probably preferred the supporting cast and Jean Arthur to James Stewart. Stewart knocked it out of the park in the finale but also contributed greatly to a massive lull in the opening half as Capra seemed to produce a tourist promotion piece for Washington DC and 'American' ideals. More understandable in the 30s than nowadays when we saturated with online media.

Jean Arthur really gets the ball rolling and works superbly off Thomas Mitchell; who must have one of the most impressive catalogue of films in a single year having also played prominent roles in Gone With The Wind, Stagecoach, The Hunchback of Norte Dame and Only Angels Have Wings in 1939.
Edward Arnold was great as the evil Murdoch like tycoon; Claude Raines looking older than he ever did was sublime as the crisis of conscience old time senator and finally Harry Carey was delightful and helped steer the latter half of the film.

One thing that stuck out most to me though was how much cheap/free child labour the political institutions seemed to be exploiting. That's before Mr Smith himself looks to utilise them as the driver of his own political machine.

Took a while to get going but overall 4 thumbs up out of 5.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on January 20, 2021, 08:45:46 AM
Mona Lisa

I loved seeing grimy mid-80s Soho in this but thought the ending could be a bit clearer. I didn't realise that
Spoiler alert
Simone and Cathy were lovers
[close]
until I read the wiki entry as the credits were rolling. Them being on separate beds with
Spoiler alert
Simone lightly brushing her fingers on Cathy's face wasn't enough of a clue for me
[close]
. I did think Bobo was going to take the gun off her and say he
Spoiler alert
killed Michael Caine and Clarke Peters though, so his happy ending was different
[close]
. I suppose it was a bit noir-ish in terms of the subject matter.

I don't know why I'm spoilering a 35 year old film but here were are.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: shagatha crustie on January 20, 2021, 09:42:51 AM
Pi (1998) - this was alright. Extremely 90s in a good way, nice to hear 'Petrol' by Orbital on the soundtrack. Lots of techniques (and actors) recycled for Requiem for a Dream. The theological number theory stuff was cool but it became a bit too much of a contrived conspiracy caper at the end for my liking. 7/10

High Life (2018) - eh. Cum in space does not 2001: A Space Odyssey make. Just an endless orange and teal sea of moody nothingness. 4/10

The Long Goodbye (1973) - I think you probably have to know the book to fully appreciate what this is doing, but I really liked it nonetheless. Love a New Hollywood 'everything has gone to the dogs' narrative. Of the Altmans I've seen, better than Images, and a notch under Nashville, McCabe & Mrs Miller and 3 Women. 8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Jerzy Bondov on January 20, 2021, 09:45:28 AM
I watched The Fly (1986) for the first time the other day. It's amazing. I don't know why I hadn't seen it before. I'd seen gifs of Jeffy having a little puke on his foods and scuttling around, but none of that took away from the impact of the film. Incredible how it's both a heartbreaking tragedy and a proper yucky slimy monster movie. Loved it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on January 20, 2021, 12:44:44 PM
Simple Men & Amateur - I have been wary of revisiting Hal Hartley because I am not sure if they will hold up no I am not a pseudy teen but they do. I am a sucker for that studied, quirky style and he fills his films with interesting minor characters and great actors. Amateur has early roles for Tim Black Nelson, Michael Imperioli, Parker Posey and Paul Schulze. A lot of the logic of the plot doesn't hold up but that is beside the point a bit. And obviously the music is great throughout with some fantastic original music as well as some great 90s indie needle drops
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on January 20, 2021, 12:59:41 PM
Wild Target - 2009

Bill Nighy, Emily Blunt & Ron Weasley in this 'crime caper'. Yeah, I liked it. Emily is very easy on the eye as always. It was fun.
Bill is reunited with his soulmate Gregor Fisher from Love Actually. They don't like each other in this film.
Rupert Everett as a slightly camp bad guy, Martin Freeman plays Martin Freeman with a gun, along with quite a few little cameo performances.
Better than expected.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 20, 2021, 02:35:30 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on January 20, 2021, 12:59:41 PM
Wild Target - 2009

Bill Nighy, Emily Blunt & Ron Weasley in this 'crime caper'. Yeah, I liked it. Emily is very easy on the eye as always. It was fun.
Bill is reunited with his soulmate Gregor Fisher from Love Actually. They don't like each other in this film.
Rupert Everett as a slightly camp bad guy, Martin Freeman plays Martin Freeman with a gun, along with quite a few little cameo performances.
Better than expected.

The original is worth a watch as well, however it's not a case of "urgh you cunt, the original is MUUUUUUUUCH better" - the remake is very very good (to the point of being hugely underrated actually) and they are about on a par.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on January 20, 2021, 03:06:56 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on January 20, 2021, 12:44:44 PM
Simple Men & Amateur - I have been wary of revisiting Hal Hartley because I am not sure if they will hold up no I am not a pseudy teen but they do. I am a sucker for that studied, quirky style and he fills his films with interesting minor characters and great actors. Amateur has early roles for Tim Black Nelson, Michael Imperioli, Parker Posey and Paul Schulze. A lot of the logic of the plot doesn't hold up but that is beside the point a bit. And obviously the music is great throughout with some fantastic original music as well as some great 90s indie needle drops

I've been doing that! I got the Long Island and Henry Fool boxsets plus one of shorts. I've enjoyed them.

It's worth checking out Karen Silas' other 90's classic What Happened Was, I couldn't find physical copies but it's really cheap for a really long rental on Vimeo (which I then grabbed with youtube-dl)
https://vimeo.com/ondemand/whathappenedwas
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on January 20, 2021, 03:30:10 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 20, 2021, 03:06:56 PM
I've been doing that! I got the Long Island and Henry Fool boxsets plus one of shorts. I've enjoyed them.

It's worth checking out Karen Silas' other 90's classic What Happened Was, I couldn't find physical copies but it's really cheap for a really long rental on Vimeo (which I then grabbed with youtube-dl)
https://vimeo.com/ondemand/whathappenedwas

I will see if i can get hold of it. Directed by Tom Noonan I see. She is very attractive and charismatic in Simple Men. I wonder if she was due for the Isobel part in Amateur until Isabelle Hupert contacted Hartley to be in it. It seems like a role made for her

I watched Trust, Unbelievable Truth and Surviving Desire last year and they still held up. They are more "arty" (read low budget and amateurish) but no less endearing. I am working my way through chronologically so it is Flirt next, which I think is the last one that will be a repeat viewing before I get into new territory with Henry Fool. I lost touch with Hartley for some reason in the mid 90s and never got round to watching anything after that. I seem to remember Henry Fool getting quite bad reviews at the time, but IMDB suggests I am mistaken
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on January 21, 2021, 09:16:34 AM
Night Of The Hunter

I thought I'd seen this because I remember being really disappointed with the ending. Turns out the DVD I watched (in 2008?) was shit and must've skipped the last chapter because that version ended with him on the horse in silhouette and the kid saying "Doesn't he ever sleep?" Weird.

Anyway, on second viewing (with the ending) I loved it all over again. Robert Mitchum was a scary MF.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dave The Triffids on January 21, 2021, 09:37:37 AM
Cop Land

Absolutely no idea why I'd never seen this before, given that I'm a big fan of all the lead actors in it.  Superb film.  It's also interesting to play "spot the Soprano's star" - there are many..!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on January 21, 2021, 01:29:23 PM
Snowpiercer the film. After watching the series I wanted to see the film to answer the question "why tf they made this series?"
Almost shut it off after 30 minutes but it gains momentum as they progress up the train. The visuals of the various cars was fun. There's a schoolroom scene that really felt Fifth Element-y in visuals and ott characterization. Glad I stuck it out to the end but would not watch again.

Edit-- will seek out more Boon Jong HO
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on January 21, 2021, 01:35:18 PM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on January 21, 2021, 01:29:23 PM
Snowpiercer the film. After watching the series I wanted to see the film to answer the question "why tf they made this series?"
Almost shut it off after 30 minutes but it gains momentum as they progress up the train. The visuals of the various cars was fun. There's a schoolroom scene that really felt Fifth Element-y in visuals and ott characterization. Glad I stuck it out to the end but would not watch again.

Edit-- will seek out more Boon Jong HO

I think I prefer the series as it's a bit more exploration. New series returns Monday I think.

Neither answer the question 'why didn't they put all that self-sustaining tech in a big building, underground bunker or dome?'.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on January 21, 2021, 04:09:22 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 21, 2021, 01:35:18 PM
Neither answer the question 'why didn't they put all that self-sustaining tech in a big building, underground bunker or dome?'.

the megalomania of the designer? that's what I gathered from the comics but I might be wrong, maybe there's a 'in world' scientific explanation.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 21, 2021, 04:57:10 PM
Quote from: Dave The Triffids on January 21, 2021, 09:37:37 AM
Cop Land

Absolutely no idea why I'd never seen this before, given that I'm a big fan of all the lead actors in it.  Superb film.  It's also interesting to play "spot the Soprano's star" - there are many..!

A minor masterpiece.  Stallone absolutely genuinely brilliant in it and the sequence near the end when he goes to Cathy Moriarty's house is stunning (literally for Stallone's character, b'boom).  Still incredibly underrated to this day.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on January 21, 2021, 06:01:09 PM
Quote from: chveik on January 21, 2021, 04:09:22 PM
the megalomania of the designer? that's what I gathered from the comics but I might be wrong, maybe there's a 'in world' scientific explanation.

Film nor series seem to explain enough for me. I'll be fucked if I'm falling into a snowpiercer.fandom.wankoff.hole to see a train circuit map.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on January 21, 2021, 06:24:25 PM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on January 21, 2021, 01:29:23 PM
Snowpiercer the film.
Almost shut it off after 30 minutes 



I almost did too, but I enjoyed the last 30 mins enough for it to be worth it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on January 21, 2021, 08:02:57 PM

Death Wish III on Netflix.

The first was a solid 70s rape revenge drama which followed in the New Hollywood trend of being gritty and violent but also held a mirror up to society and had something to say. The third instalment is a a mid-80s action film, which has more in common with Commando than with the original Death Wish film, although it still has a late 70s vibe, reminiscent of The Warriors. Gloriously over-the-top action with memorable bad guy gang members (The Giggler).

As much as I liked the knowing 80s pastiche Hobo With A Shotgun, Death Wish III is the real deal.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on January 21, 2021, 08:51:29 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on January 21, 2021, 09:16:34 AM
Night Of The Hunter

I thought I'd seen this because I remember being really disappointed with the ending. Turns out the DVD I watched (in 2008?) was shit and must've skipped the last chapter because that version ended with him on the horse in silhouette and the kid saying "Doesn't he ever sleep?" Weird.

Anyway, on second viewing (with the ending) I loved it all over again. Robert Mitchum was a scary MF.


I watched it not so long ago myself.

Its a masterpiece isn't it?

So sad however that the chap who directed this and lets not forget it was his debut never directed again as it bombed financially.


Guillermo del Toro chatted about it a few years and pointed out how stunning visually it is also.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJ4xpKwvI60


Mitchum is also very scary in Cape Fear.  He's got a hell of CV .
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: bgmnts on January 22, 2021, 04:01:26 PM
Dredd (2012)

Never thought I'd be saying a modern reboot of an old film is great but it is so wahey.

Mercifully free of Rob Schneider.

Karl Urban is good as well, makes Dredd seem like an actual real person as well as a remorseless agent of order and death.

Also this:

QuoteTHE CHIEF: Throw her in at the deep end.
DREDD: It's all deep end.

Is a line.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on January 22, 2021, 04:09:01 PM
The newest Dredd is great, I thought.

Terror On Tour

A band who look like Kiss and sound like a shitty Cheap Trick have someone who dresses like them murdering women. They don't go on tour. It is terrible though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on January 23, 2021, 10:52:45 AM
Office Romance (1977)

A Soviet Union comedy, over two and a half hours. Directed by Eldar Ryazanov. Absolutely magnificent. A lovely document at times of the 70s Moscow landscape and people getting on with their lives.

But at the heart is an absolutely hilarious wonderful romantic comedy, with plenty of office satire and a catchy score that carries it along.

Central performance by Alise Freindlich is stunning. Suppose to be uglied up but oozes so much sex appeal for me at least.

Mixes poignant character moments with screwball comedies. Like a mix of early Woody Allen and some classic Hollywood gems like the Apartment and Bringing Up Baby.
Also perfect encapsulation of one type of office character, who is constantly organising gathering money to celebrate people's birthdays, leaving dos etc....


5 out of 5
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on January 23, 2021, 11:59:50 AM
Quote from: EOLAN on January 23, 2021, 10:52:45 AM
Office Romance (1977)

A Soviet Union comedy, over two and a half hours. Directed by Eldar Ryazanov. Absolutely magnificent. A lovely document at times of the 70s Moscow landscape and people getting on with their lives.

But at the heart is an absolutely hilarious wonderful romantic comedy, with plenty of office satire and a catchy score that carries it along.

Central performance by Alise Freindlich is stunning. Suppose to be uglied up but oozes so much sex appeal for me at least.

Mixes poignant character moments with screwball comedies. Like a mix of early Woody Allen and some classic Hollywood gems like the Apartment and Bringing Up Baby.
Also perfect encapsulation of one type of office character, who is constantly organising gathering money to celebrate people's birthdays, leaving dos etc....


5 out of 5

This sounds great! Looks like Mosfilm themselves have put a hd copy on youtube too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR-1QGMK75c&list=PL4dWJMOQ_a1TgayrpaB-SEVJhHC58U1wU&index=38
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on January 23, 2021, 12:52:45 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on January 23, 2021, 11:59:50 AM
This sounds great! Looks like Mosfilm themselves have put a hd copy on youtube too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR-1QGMK75c&list=PL4dWJMOQ_a1TgayrpaB-SEVJhHC58U1wU&index=38

Yep. Watched on YouTube. Subtitles were getting out of synch and not sure if how it was filmed but a lot of the dialogue while in Russian appears to be dubbed.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on January 23, 2021, 03:51:32 PM
Most Russian films from that era were dubbed rather than recording dialog on set.

Alise Freindlich played the wife in Stalker, have been meaning to try and see other stuff from that era with her in so gave this and watch and I'd agree it does work really well, manages to mix 70's euro farce from very heartfelt romance. First half hour or so is a bit more straight forward but stick with it and takes off after that, even the cliched "woman suddenly becomes attractive" plot does actually work well here.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on January 23, 2021, 04:17:48 PM
Bumblebee (2018)

Prequel to the Transformers movies. I'd heard this was actually pretty good, but maybe that was just in comparison to the Michael Bay efforts. Despite the encouraging presence of Laika Studios veteran Travis Knight behind the camera, it was merely okay. The action was coherent at least and John Cena, muscling in on Dwayne Johnson territory, was entertainingly hammy (he seemed to think he was in some sort of parody).

Watch The Iron Giant instead.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: wasp_f15ting on January 23, 2021, 10:20:21 PM
Nightingale - I came across this on Netflix and just popped it on last night.

This is one of the most horrendous films I have ever seen.. but it was so well shot, and the story was good if a bit long.
Would recommend this but if you are squeamish and dislike violence and or sexual violence do not watch.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on January 23, 2021, 10:46:35 PM
Black Swan - Bit silly, I'm afraid. It so badly wants to break through into being art but it's just silly. It probably suffered from my watching Inland Empire last week, a film which so effortlessly PUMPS cosmic dread into your brain, even if it can confound and test the patience.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on January 25, 2021, 10:25:57 AM
Quote from: wasp_f15ting on January 23, 2021, 10:20:21 PM
Nightingale - I came across this on Netflix and just popped it on last night.

This is one of the most horrendous films I have ever seen.. but it was so well shot, and the story was good if a bit long.
Would recommend this but if you are squeamish and dislike violence and or sexual violence do not watch.

I thought this was really brilliant, beautifully photographed, wonderfully acted, a really good portrayal of toxic masculinity and colonialist entitlement. But I definitely agree, one of the most harrowing films I've seen.

Wings of Desire (1987) - Was the old Berlin the most cinematic city ever? Between this, Christiane F (Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo), Possession, and a ton more (even fake post-1989 movies like Atomic Blonde), nothing is more symbolic than that wall, the bombed-out Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, the whole city. I'd seen it before and it's often discussed here, but the other thing I noted was the Peter Handke influence on the screenplay. He's now (rightly) cancelled as a Yugoslav genocide denialist, but the film leans heavily on the slightly maudlin depressingness of Wunschloses Unglück (a good writer but fucking hell, lighten up). Thank fuck for Nick Cave and Crime and the City Solution and Peter Falk. It should be a mess, but for me there's enough wonder that it works; set anywhere else it would have no chance.

Dune (1984) - neither terrible nor exactly good, I'm sure the upcoming "reinvisionment" by Denis Villeneuve will have many of the same virtues and flaws: it looks amazing and the cast is great and the plot does eventually pick up, but compare it to Star Wars or Flash Gordon - I don't think Dune adds anything by its lack of humour (were the ginger villains meant to be funny?), perfunctory action scenes, and shortage of interesting, memorable characters (the villains are better than the heroes but even then they're hardly rounded characters; when Sting is the best thing in your movie, you've probably done something wrong).

Monos (2019) - kids are assholes. It's no Come and See but still very good.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on January 25, 2021, 10:31:44 AM
Over the weekend I did:
Samurai Cop - amazingly shit and entertaining.

A Serious Man - Seen when I was young and it came out, I got a lot more out of it this time round as I could empathise with the guy a lot more.

The Caveman's Valentine - I enjoyed this quite a bit, it's flawed and a bit of a mess but doesn't deserve the panning on release and then to be mostly forgotten. I'm slowly working my way through Kasi Lemmons' work, which probably deserves more recognition.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on January 25, 2021, 04:11:49 PM
Watched Code of Silence. Good film, Chuck Norris uses a police robot to help battle mafia types who have kidnapped the daughter of a rival mafia family.



Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on January 25, 2021, 04:47:01 PM
Nightbreed (1990) Was on the Horror Channel a few nights back.
I assume it was the botched theatrical cut (and then some for TV), as it's a bit of a mess, never really flowing properly. Characters don't seem to function properly, like the FBI agent who seems pretty nonchalant to the fact he's just found out that the undead and monsters exist. Similarly, the sheriff just shrugs and calls up a load of red-necks without much shock, just anger. And who was that drunk priest, he's just there.
But for all it's flaws, you can't hate it. Must be up there with the most monster designs for a single film, and there are some really nice ones too. It clearly has it's heart in the right place, and it's also clear a lot of the details were lost by clueless studio meddling and marketing demands (although really? By 1990, surely they'd know how to sell this. It's not that unique in it's tone or content for the era)

Maybe the TV show, if it ever gets anywhere, will do better.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on January 25, 2021, 04:59:12 PM
Bad Kids Go To Hell

Fooled by the trailer-maker's art. What I thought I'd be getting is a comedy horror version of "The Breakfast Club", what I got was a series of extremely convoluted plans that were all pulled off perfectly, twists on twists on twists, and none of it particularly interesting or good or well-acted or anything like that. There've been a lot of strong horror comedies in recent years, so I was perhaps expecting too much, but...it was still kinda rubbish.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on January 26, 2021, 02:48:43 AM
Day Of The Locust (1975) was on Talking Pictures earlier.  I knew nothing about it in advance and didn't know what to expect as the blurb on the guide was brief and not giving away much.  When it took a dark turn near the end it caught me completely by surprise.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on January 26, 2021, 10:06:41 AM
Feels Good Man

It really interesting to see how an innocent comic about a frog having a piss with his pants and trousers around his ankles became the face of the alt Right. The fellow who drew it seemed so lovely too.

I wanted some closure on the basement dweller. Like for the house above to collapse on him. Odious little cunt.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: NoSleep on January 26, 2021, 10:30:29 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on January 25, 2021, 10:25:57 AM
Dune (1984) - neither terrible nor exactly good, I'm sure the upcoming "reinvisionment" by Denis Villeneuve will have many of the same virtues and flaws: it looks amazing and the cast is great and the plot does eventually pick up, but compare it to Star Wars or Flash Gordon - I don't think Dune adds anything by its lack of humour (were the ginger villains meant to be funny?), perfunctory action scenes, and shortage of interesting, memorable characters (the villains are better than the heroes but even then they're hardly rounded characters; when Sting is the best thing in your movie, you've probably done something wrong).

The main problem of the film is that it's like watching a protracted "previously on Dune" as they desperately try to cram all of the book in the time they have.
Worst characterisation was Patrick Stewart as Gurney Halleck, because Gurney should really be played by an athletically-built Brian Blessed type, somebody who steals the scene whenever they appear (Gurney's a jolly fighting badass who's also a badass musician). In the TV mini series they managed to make an even poorer choice for Gurney; maybe the worst choice ever in any film or TV series (actually hilariously poor).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on January 26, 2021, 11:41:22 AM
Inside Man - solid, engaging... can't say it was amazing but it was really really good. Good take on the genre by leaving the
Spoiler alert
reason for the robbery/object stolen reveal
[close]
till late in the game.

The Joy of Man's Desiring - documentary by Denis Côté that is more a series of shots of workers in factories, quite hypnotic in its own way. The idea I think was to almost morph into a nature documentary, showing various artificial environments in their most natural state.

Heat. Never seen it before and luckily got to see a 35mm print in a cinema. I hated Thief so wasn't sure what to expect with this but it was fantastic, really brilliant stuff. The famous diner scene certainly lived up to its accolades. Can't say the romances were any good but basically everything else rocked.

Unknown Pleasures. Going through more Zhangke, this was another truly fantastic one. Don't think I've seen a bad film by him yet. Interesting choice of the digital aesthetic which definitely worked here. Lonely humans.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on January 26, 2021, 11:45:05 AM
Quote from: NoSleep on January 26, 2021, 10:30:29 AM
The main problem of the film is that it's like watching a protracted "previously on Dune" as they desperately try to cram all of the book in the time they have.
Worst characterisation was Patrick Stewart as Gurney Halleck, because Gurney should really be played by an athletically-built Brian Blessed type, somebody who steals the scene whenever they appear (Gurney's a jolly fighting badass who's also a badass musician). In the TV mini series they managed to make an even poorer choice for Gurney; maybe the worst choice ever in any film or TV series (actually hilariously poor).

Should've let Jodorowsky do his 14 hour version.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: NoSleep on January 26, 2021, 12:13:55 PM
It would have all been about castration.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 01:37:52 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on January 26, 2021, 11:41:22 AM
...I hated Thief...

That's a shame. What didn't work for you?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on January 26, 2021, 05:30:46 PM
Peter Rabbit with a small child as an alternative to (the excellent) Paddington films, just to keep it fresh like.

It was absolutely execrable. No charm or warmth to it[nb]one character has a heart attack and dies on screen, and his corpse lies there for a few minutes while the eponymous rabbit cracks wise, and eventually pokes him in the eye to check he is dead; cf. all the nice people being nice to everyone in Paddington-land[/nb], no good visual gags, and all very cynical. Even Ferris Jr sloped off to play with some buttons and a biscuit tin instead after about 20 minutes. After looking it up, I see it had Corden as the titular rabbit.

Ferris Sez: "warren" peace it ain't! Hopefully this one drops down a "rabbit hole" and is never heard from again[nb]it made 7x its budget at the box office ($350m) so it'll be back in some shite form or another[/nb]! 1 star.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on January 26, 2021, 06:22:07 PM
Quote from: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 01:37:52 PM
That's a shame. What didn't work for you?

I find the reverse, Heat's well made by ultimately a bit bland for me compared to Thief.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 26, 2021, 07:01:30 PM
Quote from: FerriswheelBueller on January 26, 2021, 05:30:46 PM
Peter Rabbit with a small child as an alternative to (the excellent) Paddington films, just to keep it fresh like.

It was absolutely execrable. No charm or warmth to it[nb]one character has a heart attack and dies on screen, and his corpse lies there for a few minutes while the eponymous rabbit cracks wise, and eventually pokes him in the eye to check he is dead; cf. all the nice people being nice to everyone in Paddington-land[/nb], no good visual gags, and all very cynical. Even Ferris Jr sloped off to play with some buttons and a biscuit tin instead after about 20 minutes. After looking it up, I see it had Corden as the titular rabbit.

Ferris Sez: "warren" peace it ain't! Hopefully this one drops down a "rabbit hole" and is never heard from again[nb]it made 7x its budget at the box office ($350m) so it'll be back in some shite form or another[/nb]! 1 star.

Obviously Paddingtons are infinitely better films, but I have to admit Peter Rabbit was NOWHERE near as bad as I was expecting it to be - I enjoyed Sam Neill's slightly extended cameo, Gleeson makes a pretty good fist of creeping anger and frustration (although of course his heart melts in the third act, natch) and the cockerel genuinely made me LOL.

The second one is on the way.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on January 26, 2021, 10:52:46 PM
Quote from: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 01:37:52 PM
That's a shame. What didn't work for you?

It's been many years but I think I just found it incredibly nothing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on January 26, 2021, 11:10:06 PM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on January 26, 2021, 07:01:30 PM


Obviously Paddingtons are infinitely better films, but I have to admit Peter Rabbit was NOWHERE near as bad as I was expecting it to be - I enjoyed Sam Neill's slightly extended cameo, Gleeson makes a pretty good fist of creeping anger and frustration (although of course his heart melts in the third act, natch) and the cockerel genuinely made me LOL.

The second one is on the way.

Might be expectations? If you went in thinking it'll be a total stinker then I can understand being pleasantly surprised when it's merely very poor. We went in off the back of a Paddington film and were very badly let down.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 11:49:42 PM
Quote from: greenman on January 26, 2021, 06:22:07 PM
I find the reverse, Heat's well made by ultimately a bit bland for me compared to Thief.

Yeah, that more or less my feel for the two. Heat has a few good bits, but ultimately isn't quiet as good as it's cast should have made it.

Thief, on the other hand, does hold a compelling through line for me (I had a lot more interest in the Caan's story than either Al or Bob's) and straddles the 70's grime/80s glam eras nicely.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on January 27, 2021, 03:37:52 AM
Quote from: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 11:49:42 PM
Yeah, that more or less my feel for the two. Heat has a few good bits, but ultimately isn't quiet as good as it's cast should have made it.

Thief, on the other hand, does hold a compelling through line for me (I had a lot more interest in the Caan's story than either Al or Bob's) and straddles the 70's grime/80s glam eras nicely.

Wow yeah absolute opposite for me. Nothing much compelling in Thief whereas I was hooked all the way through Heat.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on January 27, 2021, 07:48:23 AM
Quote from: Blumf on January 26, 2021, 11:49:42 PM
Yeah, that more or less my feel for the two. Heat has a few good bits, but ultimately isn't quiet as good as it's cast should have made it.

Thief, on the other hand, does hold a compelling through line for me (I had a lot more interest in the Caan's story than either Al or Bob's) and straddles the 70's grime/80s glam eras nicely.

Pretty much, I think a more interesting film visually(and soundtrack wise) linking the two eras and with a more interesting central performance of a less cliched character. I do enjoy a good "men doing things" film as well and I think it sticks closer to that idea that latter Mann which becomes more dialog dependant, more of a police thriller than Caan actually doing stuff.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on January 27, 2021, 09:38:19 AM
Happy Happy Joy Joy

John K is a strange man. Even leaving the noncery to one side, he comes across as a robot in this. A passionate robot but a robot nonetheless. Also, what was happening with his hair?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 12:24:05 PM
I love both Heat and Thief, and if offered the to chance to watch one or the other I'd honestly be happy with either.  But I think Thief is right up there with Manhunter as Mann's masterpieces.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on January 27, 2021, 12:31:54 PM
Manhunter is a masterpiece of pure '80s-ness, that's for sure.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 03:07:57 PM
Yeah, alright Aliens bumhole.  I bet you think Blackhat or LA Takedown is his best film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on January 27, 2021, 03:51:07 PM
Now now. Have you forgotten our mutual disdain for Dawn of the Dead so soon?

Blackhat? Cacksplat, more like.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on January 27, 2021, 04:02:28 PM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on January 27, 2021, 12:31:54 PM
Manhunter is a masterpiece of pure '80s-ness, that's for sure.

Just checking Wiki, so Petersen's first three films were Thief, To Live and Die In La and Manhunter and he absolutely smashed them all.

Sadly none seem to have made much money, he's had a nice career and made money but he's someone who really deserved to be a much bigger star.

Got serious range, he is so vulnerable in Manhunter, so sleazy in to Live and Die In La and also the dude was seriously attractive.

Shame.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 04:28:38 PM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on January 27, 2021, 03:51:07 PM
Now now. Have you forgotten our mutual disdain for Dawn of the Dead so soon?

Blackhat? Cacksplat, more like.

I'll let it go.  Just this once...


Quote from: rjd2 on January 27, 2021, 04:02:28 PM
Just checking Wiki, so Petersen's first three films were Thief, To Live and Die In La and Manhunter and he absolutely smashed them all.

Sadly none seem to have made much money, he's had a nice career and made money but he's someone who really deserved to be a much bigger star.

Got serious range, he is so vulnerable in Manhunter, so sleazy in to Live and Die In La and also the dude was seriously attractive.

Shame.

Don't feel too bad for him - he was producer and executive producer on CSI as well as being the star of course, so he did more than okay on that alone for a good 15 years.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on January 27, 2021, 05:56:06 PM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 04:28:38 PM
I'll let it go.  Just this once...


Don't feel too bad for him - he was producer and executive producer on CSI as well as being the star of course, so he did more than okay on that alone for a good 15 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Petersen

Ha, fair.

Looking at the CV after that awesome start , not much really sticks out their of any interest.

I've not seen Mulholland Falls for years so genuinely can't recall him in that, and even reading up on the role its the briefest of cameos.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Billy on January 27, 2021, 10:05:18 PM
The last few posts give me fond memories of the 'Michael Mannathon' at the Prince Charles in 2017, my first all-night movie marathon. They showed Thief, The Keep, Manhunter, Last of the Mohicans, Heat and Collateral, none of which I'd seen before and other than nodding off for a good proportion of Mohicans I loved every second.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 10:38:58 PM
Quote from: Billy on January 27, 2021, 10:05:18 PM
The Keep

Now THERE's a massively underrated piece of work.  I know Mann has always disliked it because of the very tough shoot and Paramount's dreadful handling of it, and he's always basically said "arsed mate, cigs", but I did read something a little while ago that seemed to suggest Mann was starting to sniff around it and perhaps have a revisit.  It's extremely unlikely we'll get his original 3+ hour cut released in any fashion given a lot of effects work was never completed and it's too difficult to patch in modern CGI (at least according to Mann), but there's maybe potential for his final 2 hour cut as that was pretty much complete.  Wish that documentary would hurry up and get released.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on January 28, 2021, 05:13:31 AM
MILFs vs. Zombies

One of those movies where the title is 99% of the entertainment. Blame the couple of extremely positive reviews on Letterboxd for fooling me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on January 29, 2021, 12:14:26 AM
Vic + Flo Saw a Bear. Another Denis Côté that was on MUBI. I really liked this. Unusual little character piece that turns into something a bit more sinister.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on January 29, 2021, 12:09:25 PM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on January 28, 2021, 05:13:31 AM
MILFs vs. Zombies

One of those movies where the title is 99% of the entertainment. Blame the couple of extremely positive reviews on Letterboxd for fooling me.

How does it stand up alongside "Cockneys Vs Zombies" and "Zombies Vs Strippers"?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on January 29, 2021, 02:25:30 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on January 29, 2021, 12:09:25 PM
How does it stand up alongside "Cockneys Vs Zombies" and "Zombies Vs Strippers"?
"Cockneys" is really good, I reckon; not seen "Strippers". "Strippers vs. Werewolves", on the other hand, another British effort, is also excellent (relatively speaking).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on January 30, 2021, 05:12:16 PM
Aquarius Excellent Brazilian film from Kleber Mendonça Filho, whose Neighbouring Sounds I also really enjoyed last year, about a 60-something widow battling to stay in her home as developers try to kick her out. Just a really good character study, with Sonia Braga excellent as a woman who retains a fierce independence but is also unafraid to rely on family, friends and others. Great soundtrack, great colour and look.

The Chaser Korean action thriller madness as an ex-cop (aren't they always?) pimp tries to find the guy who he believes has abducted and stolen a couple of his girls, who turns out to be a serial killer. Pretty much two hours of people chasing each other, shouting at each other, and occasionally fighting. Pretty grim and gruesome when the action lets up, and there's a strangely amateurish quality to some of it, but it's breathless stuff. Based on a true story apparently, although I imagine a lot of the running around is embellishment.

Ordinary People I hardly ever check the films on Netflix but they seem to have chucked a bunch of foreign festival fare on there recently so I had a look at this Filipino effort about a homeless teenage couple whose baby is abducted. Obvious comparisons with the Dardennes aside, it's a decent film, straying a bit into poverty porn but also quite unsubjective and unjudgmental in the way it portrays its characters: there's no romanticisation of their lifestyles or personalities, or street life and the way different marginalised groups turn on one another. Well-acted and particularly well-directed - you can almost feel the humidity of the Manila streets the characters traipse around.
I think it's the first film I've seen from the nation - never quite plucked up the patience for a Lav Diaz - and I found the setting and language fascinating, with its occasional random streams of English words.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: wasp_f15ting on January 30, 2021, 05:18:28 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on January 30, 2021, 05:12:16 PM
Aquarius Excellent Brazilian film from Kleber Mendonça Filho, whose Neighbouring Sounds I also really enjoyed last year, about a 60-something widow battling to stay in her home as developers try to kick her out. Just a really good character study, with Sonia Braga excellent as a woman who retains a fierce independence but is also unafraid to rely on family, friends and others. Great soundtrack, great colour and look.

The Chaser Korean action thriller madness as an ex-cop (aren't they always?) pimp tries to find the guy who he believes has abducted and stolen a couple of his girls, who turns out to be a serial killer. Pretty much two hours of people chasing each other, shouting at each other, and occasionally fighting. Pretty grim and gruesome when the action lets up, and there's a strangely amateurish quality to some of it, but it's breathless stuff. Based on a true story apparently, although I imagine a lot of the running around is embellishment.

Ordinary People I hardly ever check the films on Netflix but they seem to have chucked a bunch of foreign festival fare on there recently so I had a look at this Filipino effort about a homeless teenage couple whose baby is abducted. Obvious comparisons with the Dardennes aside, it's a decent film, straying a bit into poverty porn but also quite unsubjective and unjudgmental in the way it portrays its characters: there's no romanticisation of their lifestyles or personalities, or street life and the way different marginalised groups turn on one another. Well-acted and particularly well-directed - you can almost feel the humidity of the Manila streets the characters traipse around.
I think it's the first film I've seen from the nation - never quite plucked up the patience for a Lav Diaz - and I found the setting and language fascinating, with its occasional random streams of English words.

The chaser is indeed bloody amazing. The cinematography was strikingly good.
I hope they re-release this on Blu-ray at some point!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on January 30, 2021, 11:30:28 PM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on January 27, 2021, 12:24:05 PM
I love both Heat and Thief, and if offered the to chance to watch one or the other I'd honestly be happy with either.  But I think Thief is right up there with Manhunter as Mann's masterpieces.
A lot of people seem to think it's cool to downgrade Heat, but every time I flick channels, I'm gripped. An amazing cast: even if Pacino and DeNiro aren't quite at their best, everyone else is. But brilliant direction, great heists and one of the great movie shoot-outs (in the middle), and a good Val Kilmer performance (despite his shocking hair.) It could easily have been an incredibly gripping mini-series.

But Thief: the heist sequence AND tragic Willie Nelson. What more do you want? (It's a shame that James Caan's most memorable film of the last 30 years (since Misery) seems to have been Elf.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on January 30, 2021, 11:55:31 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on January 30, 2021, 11:30:28 PM
(It's a shame that James Caan's most memorable film of the last 30 years (since Misery) seems to have been Elf.)

Regardless of the fact I'm not keen on Elf (I can't stand Will Ferrell), Way Of The Gun is a proper little cracker and Caan is brilliant in it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on January 31, 2021, 01:49:53 AM
Charlie Varrick
Spotted a person in the background of scene near the end that totally threw off the whole ending on me because I was expecting it to lear to something.
Spoiler alert
Obvs just someone wandered into shot, the idea someone else would be there ignoring them after the plane stuff is ridiculous
[close]


Bunny and the Bull
Not great but not that surprising the director would  go on to make something much better.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 01, 2021, 08:52:11 AM
Bolt (2008) Surprisingly entertaining Disney CG animation: even though it's basically the same plot as the Toy Stories, there's lots of action and jokes and a massive hamster with tiny human hands.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on February 01, 2021, 10:56:37 AM
The Prestige (magic film) Nolan with Huge Ackman and C Bale that i got suckered into watching this by one of those "must watch before it leaves at end of month" articles that said it was a scifi. I couldn't really tell who was who due to time jumps and couldn't follow the twists if there were any. Apparently it had Bowie in it.  3.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on February 01, 2021, 12:36:01 PM
Managing to actually make Bowie borning on screen, well done Nolan.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: neveragain on February 01, 2021, 11:13:11 PM
Wake In Fright (1971) An English primary school teacher working in an isolated Australian outpost decides to sample the local nightlife and soon wishes he hadn't.
I've fallen in love with this film. Firstly, the atmosphere is perfect. The arid, stultifying wasteland full of decrepit shitheaps where's there nothing to do but get pissed. Following on from that, the way alcohol is treated as a horror-film threat that you can't escape from - and which the locals will get very annoyed if you decline - is wonderful. Every time the night, which turns into a weekend, could stop it is furthered by the friendly siren call of "Have another beer?" ... leading to a very upsetting turn of events, featuring
Spoiler alert
real footage of kangaroo hunting spliced in... to make a point about how awful it is I suppose
[close]
which you may wish to fast forward.
A wonderful slow burn psychological thriller. Donald Pleasance is slimy and sinister as a struck-off doctor.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 01, 2021, 11:53:13 PM
Ned. Australian pisstake of the story of Ned Kelly by Abe Forsythe (who is also the titular star). Really stupid and very funny. Highly recommend as an underrated comedy.

Psychomania (aka The Death Wheelers). A curio (and George Sanders' last film; allegedly he committed suicide after seeing a print of it as it signified a career nadir - but it's honestly not as bad as that! I think old George was just in a what we in the biz like to call "bit of a state"). It's decent enough with an interesting philosophical question ("would you die if you knew you could come back to life") at its core.

Calamari Union. Hadn't seen a Kaurismäki film in a while so chose this one. Wonderful as usual, with an especial sense of irreverence.

Tetsuo: The Iron Man. First time seeing this, seems like a major gap to fill. Didn't realise it was so abstract and expressionistic, which was hard to get into at the beginning, but especially towards the end I was mesmerised.

The Good, the Bad, the Weird. Korean comedy action western. Solid entertainment.

About Endlessness. Latest film of Roy Andersson. Feels a little more slight than his previous ones but somehow still just as profound, affecting and absurd.

Infernal Affairs. Another one I should have seen by now. The film that was made into The Departed (which I remember not super loving). This was fine but nothing outstanding. The style seemed kind of muddled and amateurish and the storytelling very superficial. But it was ok overall. Maybe a rewatch of The Departed is due.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on February 02, 2021, 03:07:31 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 01, 2021, 11:53:13 PM
Ned. Australian pisstake of the story of Ned Kelly by Abe Forsythe (who is also the titular star). Really stupid and very funny. Highly recommend as an underrated comedy.

Just watched this on YT, thanks for the recommendation. Not amazing, but a good chuckle.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on February 02, 2021, 11:08:31 PM
Watched M on the YT earlier, its a superb piece of work and the lad playing the child-killer is frightening.  Obviously the final scene will stay with me for a long time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0C2Te59egQ&t=68s

That's it above.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 03, 2021, 10:29:47 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 01, 2021, 11:53:13 PM
Psychomania (aka The Death Wheelers). A curio (and George Sanders' last film; allegedly he committed suicide after seeing a print of it as it signified a career nadir - but it's honestly not as bad as that! I think old George was just in a what we in the biz like to call "bit of a state"). It's decent enough with an interesting philosophical question ("would you die if you knew you could come back to life") at its core.
I've never heard that story about Saunders, but it doesn't sound true. According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Sanders) he'd been depressed for several years: in 1967 his wife Benita Hume died of cancer and his brother also died; he married again in 1970 but it only lasted for 32 days; and he had a long history of alcoholism before his death in 1972. Still, great suicide note: "Dear World, I am leaving because I am bored. I feel I have lived long enough. I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck."

Psychomania is a very entertaining film, I was expecting something really awful when I saw it, but it's a lot of fun, with a great cast, good folk-rock music, and decent production values.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: wasp_f15ting on February 03, 2021, 04:32:08 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on February 02, 2021, 11:08:31 PM
Watched M on the YT earlier, its a superb piece of work and the lad playing the child-killer is frightening.  Obviously the final scene will stay with me for a long time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0C2Te59egQ&t=68s

That's it above.

Brilliant Film, and Lorre acts it so well.

I still say the opening of Testament of Dr Mabuse is one of the best, love how the machinery builds so much tension so quickly;

Full film below.

https://youtu.be/eiLXNS39aZs

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Johnboy on February 03, 2021, 07:40:51 PM
Christine (directed by John Carpenter)

Reminded me of how gnarly and analogue the early eighties were.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: pigamus on February 03, 2021, 07:47:08 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on February 03, 2021, 10:29:47 AM
I've never heard that story about Saunders, but it doesn't sound true. According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Sanders) he'd been depressed for several years: in 1967 his wife Benita Hume died of cancer and his brother also died; he married again in 1970 but it only lasted for 32 days; and he had a long history of alcoholism before his death in 1972. Still, great suicide note: "Dear World, I am leaving because I am bored. I feel I have lived long enough. I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck."

Wikipedia speaks, brilliantly, of "a failed sausage investment"
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on February 03, 2021, 09:18:02 PM
Quote from: pigamus on February 03, 2021, 07:47:08 PM
Wikipedia speaks, brilliantly, of a "failed sausage investment"

one of my favourate posters here, what happened to him?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 03, 2021, 11:20:11 PM
Audition. Very early Miloš Forman, a documentary (though some places say pseudo-documentary) in two parts. Didn't really dig it but it's interesting to see where he came from.

Sudden Manhattan. One of Adrienne Shelly's few films. Absolutely bizarre in the best of ways. Like a "woman in New York having a crisis" film but tonally completely surreal and dreamy. Very funny.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on February 04, 2021, 03:43:04 AM
Hey guys,

Curious about that movie The Devil All the Time - can anyone tell me if it's worth a watch or a bag of shit.

Thank you.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 04, 2021, 03:51:45 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on February 03, 2021, 10:29:47 AM
I've never heard that story about Saunders, but it doesn't sound true. According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Sanders) he'd been depressed for several years: in 1967 his wife Benita Hume died of cancer and his brother also died; he married again in 1970 but it only lasted for 32 days; and he had a long history of alcoholism before his death in 1972. Still, great suicide note: "Dear World, I am leaving because I am bored. I feel I have lived long enough. I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck."

Psychomania is a very entertaining film, I was expecting something really awful when I saw it, but it's a lot of fun, with a great cast, good folk-rock music, and decent production values.

Interesting, I got my info from the Wikipedia entry for Psychomania (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychomania), but didn't really peruse further on Sanders' own page. Curiouser and curiouser.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: buzby on February 04, 2021, 08:41:40 AM
A Silent Voice (2016)
I mentioned this in the anime thread in Picture Box, but I think it deserves to be mentioned in the film forum. A Kyoto Animation adaptation of the manga by female author Yoshitoki Ōima. Its the story of high school student Shôya Ishida, who in elementary school was the ringleader in his classmates physical and mental torture of Shoko Nishimiya, a hearing impaired girl who joins their class, to the point where she has to transfer to another school. He is held solely responsible for the bullying and is then ostracised by his former friends, which continues into high school. The film begins with Shôya preparing to commit suicide, and in part of getting his affairs in order he attempts to find Shoko to return the notebook that she used to communicate with the rest of the class (which he had snatched off her and thrown in a pond).

The film is an unflinching depiction of bullying and the effects it has on children as they get older, and at a few points is utterly heartbreaking film (I openly cried at least 3 times), but but as a story of atonement, redemption and forgiveness it's up there with any film you could mention, animated or live action. It looks absolutely beautiful too, right up there with Ghibli, and has a fantastic soundtrack.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 04, 2021, 09:53:41 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 03, 2021, 11:20:11 PM
Audition. Very early Miloš Forman, a documentary (though some places say pseudo-documentary) in two parts. Didn't really dig it but it's interesting to see where he came from.
Disappointed that this is a bit crap. Both of his Czech films that I've seen, Loves of a Blonde and The Firemen's Ball, are excellent. ...Blonde is a very free-wheeling and fun (exactly what you think of with eastern European new wave filmmaking) story about young people in love or looking for sex, that could almost pass for much more recent low-budget indie filmmaking if it wasn't set in communist Czechoslovakia. Firemen's Ball is completely different, a brutal, grotesque, brilliantly worked-out comedy about how awful and petty and greedy people are, which must have annoyed a lot of the Party leaders.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on February 04, 2021, 11:17:11 AM
Quote from: Mobius on February 04, 2021, 03:43:04 AM
Hey guys,

Curious about that movie The Devil All the Time - can anyone tell me if it's worth a watch or a bag of shit.

Thank you.

It's...alright.  A VERY sedate pace and it feels every one of its 139mins - Mrs Nose (a Marvel fanatic) was bored stiff, I (a Malick fanatic) was quite drawn in.  Acting is solid (R Patz makes for an especially good sleazeball bastard, little Spiderman completely different than you would expect [in a good way]) and it's got that backwoods period American gothic thing going on (some stylistic and tonal similarities to American Gothic are defo there [albeit without the supernatural element, obvs]).  I would say its current IMDB score of 7.1 is a tad generous, but equally some of the very harsh backlash on here was undeserved.

I think it IS worth a watch, but also that it's probs a one-and-done, if not don't-need-to-see-it-again-for-at-least-five-years.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 05, 2021, 12:55:15 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on February 04, 2021, 09:53:41 AM
Disappointed that this is a bit crap. Both of his Czech films that I've seen, Loves of a Blonde and The Firemen's Ball, are excellent. ...Blonde is a very free-wheeling and fun (exactly what you think of with eastern European new wave filmmaking) story about young people in love or looking for sex, that could almost pass for much more recent low-budget indie filmmaking if it wasn't set in communist Czechoslovakia. Firemen's Ball is completely different, a brutal, grotesque, brilliantly worked-out comedy about how awful and petty and greedy people are, which must have annoyed a lot of the Party leaders.

Agreed on all counts!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on February 05, 2021, 12:57:13 AM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on February 04, 2021, 11:17:11 AM
It's...alright.  A VERY sedate pace and it feels every one of its 139mins - Mrs Nose (a Marvel fanatic) was bored stiff, I (a Malick fanatic) was quite drawn in.  Acting is solid (R Patz makes for an especially good sleazeball bastard, little Spiderman completely different than you would expect [in a good way]) and it's got that backwoods period American gothic thing going on (some stylistic and tonal similarities to American Gothic are defo there [albeit without the supernatural element, obvs]).  I would say its current IMDB score of 7.1 is a tad generous, but equally some of the very harsh backlash on here was undeserved.

I think it IS worth a watch, but also that it's probs a one-and-done, if not don't-need-to-see-it-again-for-at-least-five-years.

Thanks mate. It sounds interesting but yeah the reviews weren't great. I was actually googling for "films, telly or books that resemble the vibe of Blood Meridian" and this came up, so I had no idea whether it was good or if that was a remotely accurate comparison.

But I've just realised that this was a book before a film, so I'm going to check the book out first.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 05, 2021, 01:50:06 AM
The Bikini Carwash Company 2

I feel a little silly chiming in with this after the movies everyone else is watching. But fuck it.

The ladies from part 1 are back, and...they dance around in their knickers a lot, and topless. Relatively few bikinis for a movie with that title. The extreme horniness of all men for scantily clad ladies with fake boobs saves the day again.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 05, 2021, 09:21:30 AM
Under the Silver Lake. Batshit crazy sort of detective film from the director of It Follows. If The Big Lebowski is stoner noir then this is prozac noir. Not sure how much of it is resolved, how much really happened and whether there was any real resolution but it had a unique atmosphere and was very compelling. Left me thinking about it a lot afterwards as well, and wanting to explore what the themes and ideas were. Apparently there is a very active subreddit on the film which I will need to check out
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on February 05, 2021, 09:37:07 AM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on February 05, 2021, 01:50:06 AM
The Bikini Carwash Company 2

Is this part of the Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants expanded universe?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 06, 2021, 05:57:44 AM
Quote from: Blumf on February 05, 2021, 09:37:07 AM
Is this part of the Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants expanded universe?
I wish more companies would do this, like having all the Hallmark Christmas movies be set in the same world, or something.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on February 06, 2021, 03:17:28 PM
Rambo I-IV

I'd somehow never seen any of these so thought I'd treat myself over the past few days. The first one is objectively the best but it's pretty dour and I think I enjoyed the mindless entertainment of the next three more. The village destruction scene in Rambo (2008) is genuinely horrific (I watched the extended cut, not sure if it's more graphic), even more so knowing it's pretty much based on reality.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Billy on February 06, 2021, 04:25:46 PM
The Sound of Music

One of those that, watching for the first time as a 32 year old in 2021 on a faded laptop screen, doesn't have the nostalgic/cinemagic attachment attached like it does for so many so it was inevitable it was going to leave me a little cold, if enjoying the cinematography and hearing the non-Big Brovaz original of Favourite Things/non-Gwen Stefani original of Wind It Up (not the Prodigy song). It was certainly more than just Julie Andrews singing on mountains for three hours which was all I really knew about it before, and I genuinely didn't know what was going to happen to the Von Trapps so it not ending with everyone horrifically murdered (even the
Spoiler alert
father
[close]
survives!!) was a nice moment.

Both my mum and girlfriend find it utterly unbelievable I've never seen it before, for both it's a huge thing from their childhood - it was the first film my mum saw at the cinema, around the turn of the 70s as it played on and off for years. Wait until they find out I've not seen Titanic...
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 06, 2021, 07:17:57 PM
Quote from: Billy on February 06, 2021, 04:25:46 PM
The Sound of Music

...
Both my mum and girlfriend find it utterly unbelievable I've never seen it before, for both it's a huge thing from their childhood - it was the first film my mum saw at the cinema, around the turn of the 70s as it played on and off for years. Wait until they find out I've not seen Titanic...
In many ways a fine film, with some great scenes sticking it to the Nazis, but as it is (feels) about 16 hours long I think requiring anyone to watch the whole thing is a bit much. Definitely one of those films to watch little and often. Since it's basically 2 separate films stuck together (Maria melting the Captain's stony heart, and then the Anschluss/singing contest bit.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: olliebean on February 06, 2021, 11:31:24 PM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on February 06, 2021, 05:57:44 AM
I wish more companies would do this, like having all the Hallmark Christmas movies be set in the same world, or something.

Netflix are doing it with a load of their Christmas movies, aren't they?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 07, 2021, 01:35:55 AM
Another one who did first watch of Sound of Music.

Liked Plummer's cynical performance that helped balance out the saccharine nature of rest of film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on February 07, 2021, 10:38:36 PM
Hands Off the Loot

Was on holidays to Canada (lol)and watched the above on Mubi. A really slick French crime thriller from back in the day. The lead is remarkably manly.  Very entertaining.

Bob le flambeur up next which I am looking forward to, Melville was so good at crime films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 07, 2021, 11:10:19 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on February 07, 2021, 10:38:36 PM
Hands Off the Loot

Was on holidays to Canada (lol)and watched the above on Mubi. A really slick French crime thriller from back in the day. The lead is remarkably manly.  Very entertaining.

Jean Gabin is one of the greats, particularly for "hardened French criminal" types, but also just in general. He reminds me of a French Spencer Tracy in a way. Terrific in the Jean Renoir-directed French Cancan and Grand Illusion.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on February 07, 2021, 11:43:00 PM
Thanks!

I was recommended Port Of Shadows here which he also is in which is a noir which I need to get around to.

Have you seen that or En Cas de Malheur which on googling looks interesting?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 08, 2021, 12:09:52 AM
Quote from: rjd2 on February 07, 2021, 11:43:00 PM
Thanks!

I was recommended Port Of Shadows here which he also is in which is a noir which I need to get around to.

Have you seen that or En Cas de Malheur which on googling looks interesting?

Haven't seen or heard of the latter, but the former is on my watchlist; Marcel Carné is spectacular.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: joaquin closet on February 08, 2021, 10:58:25 AM
All I really know about Carné is that he was incessantly bashed by the Cahiers lot... Can any knowledgables explain what that was all about?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 08, 2021, 03:03:13 PM
The Hills Have Eyes 2
Not bad. Well, not great either.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 08, 2021, 11:11:38 PM
Quote from: joaquin closet on February 08, 2021, 10:58:25 AM
All I really know about Carné is that he was incessantly bashed by the Cahiers lot... Can any knowledgables explain what that was all about?

I think they took issue with his flights of fancy and past-dwelling romanticism when the Cahiersers were all into realism and here-and-now-ness. But I could be misremembering.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on February 09, 2021, 12:47:38 AM
because he's shit
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on February 09, 2021, 12:54:05 AM
Quote from: joaquin closet on February 08, 2021, 10:58:25 AM
All I really know about Carné is that he was incessantly bashed by the Cahiers lot... Can any knowledgables explain what that was all about?

Presumably they were just being contrarian upstarts. They hated quite a few genius directors from the more classic era of film.

For my money, Children of Paradise is far better than anything anyone from the French New Wave ever made.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 09, 2021, 06:36:28 AM
Did a whole day of watching Babis Makridis' films today:

His short "The Last Fakir", based on a Luis Sepúlveda story which I would like to read, is quite a marvellous, minimalist, darkly funny character study of a magician forced into a career of cheap tricks.

L. Debut feature. Liked it the least out of all that I saw today but still liked it (though it goes a bit haywire towards the end). Follows a man living out of his car.

Pity. A lawyer is addicted to grief; his wife is in a coma and his grief is what fuels him. My favourite of the stuff I've seen. Comes together really touchingly.

Birds (or How to Be One) is a "documentary" of sorts, a philosophical contemplation on the nature of birds and our connection to birdhood as humans. This was on MUBI (as I believe the other two features are, I just didn't watch them there).

Makridis' two narrative features are co-scripted by Yorgos Lanthimos' frequent collaborator Efthymis Filippou, and it shows. Very reminiscent of the whole "Greek weird wave".
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on February 09, 2021, 10:59:48 AM
Lake Placid

I really liked this despite Bridget Fonda and Bill Pullman having no chemistry and Brendan Gleeson's voice sliding all over the place. Oliver Platt was suitably mental as was Betty White and, for a 1999 film, the CGI was quite good. It was just "Jaws" with a big crocodile though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on February 09, 2021, 07:14:08 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on February 09, 2021, 10:59:48 AM
Lake Placid

I really liked this despite Bridget Fonda and Bill Pullman having no chemistry and Brendan Gleeson's voice sliding all over the place. Oliver Platt was suitably mental as was Betty White and, for a 1999 film, the CGI was quite good. It was just "Jaws" with a big crocodile though.

I really like this movie.  It's charming.  They never thought to have Jaws transferred to a wild-life sanctuary at the end of that movie, now did they?  Admittedly, Lake Placid does somewhat try to eat its cake and have it too, by having two alligators, one of which is saved and the other of which is blown to pieces, but still I appreciated the gesture.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 09, 2021, 11:37:08 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 08, 2021, 11:11:38 PM
I think they took issue with his flights of fancy and past-dwelling romanticism when the Cahiersers were all into realism and here-and-now-ness. But I could be misremembering.
Carné seemed to annoy lots of different people.

For the New Wave, Carné was seen as part of a tradition of literary, old-fashioned French cinema, with its focus on historical drama, the influence of novels and plays and scenarists over directors, linear storytelling, good taste, the psychologism of the 19th century novel, and lack of formal experimentation. This was unfair on Carné as the French "tradition of quality" that the Cahiers du Cinema guys raged against was more a matter of the later 1940s and 1950s. Carné was probably more conventional than Renoir, whose films seem to reject traditional ideas of human motivation and heroes and villains, but there is plenty that's modern in them. And a Carné film like Hotel du Nord with its black humour has a lot in common with Truffaut or Malle. But each generation must insult the last.

He was also disliked in some quarters for being pessimistic; there's a school of thought that downbeat fatalistic movies like Quai des brumes led to France's capitulation and surrender in the war; Renoir  (https://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/may/03/quai-brumes-life-death-colonel-blimp) called him "counter-revolutionary". Of course, his focus on troubled, doomed masculinity is now part of what makes him so great to modern critics.

Here's a Truffaut essay on classic French cinema which sets out the position. (https://tcf.ua.edu/Classes/Jbutler/T440/TruffautInCahiers31/Truffaut%20A_certain_tendency_translated.pdf) Truffaut is also scathing on Carné for copying American crime films, which is a little bit ironic considering Truffaut's own films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on February 10, 2021, 08:49:42 AM
Alistair 1918

A friend recommended this to me. We're no longer friends.

A documentary crew are making a film about the homeless people in LA. They find a man with a Northern accent wearing a WWI uniform sleeping rough. He claims he's from 1918 and arrived in LA through a vortex. The crew set him up with somewhere to live and contact a French doctor with an "Allo Allo" ackzent to help send him back. It's obvious it's been made for no money but Christ alive. Avoid.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Custard on February 10, 2021, 10:16:06 AM
Gosford Park (2001)

As 'er indoors loves a good old fashioned murder mystery, I thought this might be good.

It's not very good. It's actually incredibly slow and boring, and takes forever to even get to the murder, let alone solve it.

To add the final drizzle of piss to the top of the shit cake Stephen Fry turns up as the inspector. Can't stand the man. I don't even really know why. Just this supreme irrational hatred

The cast is way too big and very starry, with Charles Dance, Clive Owen (playing Clive Owen), Helen Mirren, and many other recognisable types off British telly, but it's almost an insult to have them there when the material is this tedious. Richard E Grant doesn't look like he wants to shout and cheer and fist-pump the air with this one

Check it out on a very, verrrry slow Sunday. Or if there is literally nothing else
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on February 11, 2021, 12:04:49 AM
Quote from: Shameless Custard on February 10, 2021, 10:16:06 AM
Gosford Park (2001)

That's so funny - I loved it. Just mesmerised by Altman's (admittedly slick) reinterpretation of his own rhythms in that setting. All the overlapping sounds and words, the sweep of it. One thing, though - I went in thinking it was just a period piece and had no idea there was a mystery involved, so maybe for me that gave it an unexpected charge?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Syntax Head on February 11, 2021, 11:14:22 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on February 05, 2021, 09:21:30 AM
Under the Silver Lake. Batshit crazy sort of detective film from the director of It Follows. If The Big Lebowski is stoner noir then this is prozac noir. Not sure how much of it is resolved, how much really happened and whether there was any real resolution but it had a unique atmosphere and was very compelling. Left me thinking about it a lot afterwards as well, and wanting to explore what the themes and ideas were. Apparently there is a very active subreddit on the film which I will need to check out

2 3rds of the way through this and I think it's great. Beautiful to look at and fuck knows what's going on. A pound shop Mulholland Drive maybe but still good. Was 'The Songwriter' Max Martin? (not a genuine question)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on February 11, 2021, 11:47:33 PM
Watched that movie "Good Time" last night, really enjoyed it. Those Safdie Brothers are doing good work!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 12, 2021, 12:00:11 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on February 11, 2021, 12:04:49 AM
That's so funny - I loved it. Just mesmerised by Altman's (admittedly slick) reinterpretation of his own rhythms in that setting. All the overlapping sounds and words, the sweep of it.

Same here, I found it very wryly funny and engaging, leaning into its pace.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on February 12, 2021, 03:45:11 AM
Quote from: Dr Syntax Head on February 11, 2021, 11:14:22 PM
2 3rds of the way through this and I think it's great. Beautiful to look at and fuck knows what's going on. A pound shop Mulholland Drive maybe but still good. Was 'The Songwriter' Max Martin? (not a genuine question)

I have not seen it for a while so I can't help which is not ideal but I had a similar view of the film.

I do recall the reviews however were incredibly sneery and patronising, the Kermode review especially was bollocks.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pcl3GAOyJSk


For what its worth It Follows was fine but nowhere near as worthwhile.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: kittens on February 12, 2021, 07:59:18 AM
watched ali g indahouse last night. fuckin shit movie. didn't get it. like they all must have known it was shit and really bad and stupid. what was it. it wasn't satire. was it just 'chavs are dumb' or was it 'this is what you think chavs are like, and that means you're dumb'. there were plenty of lines in it that i vividly remember being used in playgrounds at the time to bully kids.
i wonder how they convinced borat to sign on for his cameo
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: kittens on February 12, 2021, 12:08:36 PM
just realised the titular 'house' ali g is in is probably the house of commons
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: shagatha crustie on February 12, 2021, 01:37:39 PM
It is pretty funny when he gets noshed off by his dog though. It is pretty funny, come on it is pretty funny.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 12, 2021, 02:04:06 PM
Capernaum (2018), a bit of a mixed bag, about half of it is a touching, well-made drama about people living on the fringes of Lebanese society, mixing suffering with a bit of humour and excitement (Lebanese spiderman!). But there's also stuff about child brides, which is just too horrible to be any kind of entertainment watching. And a subplot about the main character, a 12 year old boy, suing his parents for allowing him to be born: this is exactly stupid as it sounds, but it seems like the filmmakers realised that because it's kind of skated over and isn't really resolved. The film has been attacked for sentimentality, but I feel, give them a break.

I also watched John Woo's Hard Boiled (1992) which feels like the acme of a certain type of filmmaking: the sheer destruction of an entire hospital, as well as all the usual stuff about undercover cops and criminals and regular police and losing your moral compass or being just the same. And the moment when a baby pisses on Chow Yun Fat, which is the single greatest moment of any action movie ever.

EDIT: Obviously, this week's theme was babies and unconventional childcare arrangements.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 12, 2021, 09:43:20 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on February 12, 2021, 03:45:11 AM
I have not seen it for a while so I can't help which is not ideal but I had a similar view of the film.

I do recall the reviews however were incredibly sneery and patronising, the Kermode review especially was bollocks.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pcl3GAOyJSk


For what its worth It Follows was fine but nowhere near as worthwhile.


Kermode got it so wrong. He started by saying it was OK that Sam was a letch because he was a handsome young man but the whole point is that he is a shallow, letchy creep. He then says the film is misogynist when the film is partly about how women are treated in Hollywood. There is so much going on and it is a bit of a mess but that is why I liked it. But then I like Southland Tales and this is similar in the way it grasps for profundity and falls short but is more interesting for that nonetheless. Funnily enough for a film about the pointlessness of trying to crack codes and seek out conspiracies there is a subreddit dedicated to exactly that with the film, though to be fair the film does ask for it
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on February 12, 2021, 10:18:57 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on February 12, 2021, 09:43:20 PM
Kermode got it so wrong. He started by saying it was OK that Sam was a letch because he was a handsome young man but the whole point is that he is a shallow, letchy creep. He then says the film is misogynist when the film is partly about how women are treated in Hollywood. There is so much going on and it is a bit of a mess but that is why I liked it. But then I like Southland Tales and this is similar in the way it grasps for profundity and falls short but is more interesting for that nonetheless. Funnily enough for a film about the pointlessness of trying to crack codes and seek out conspiracies there is a subreddit dedicated to exactly that with the film, though to be fair the film does ask for it

I tend to love anything kermode describes as a mess

Southland tales really has something mad and wonderful about it. Dwyane and Sarah dancing at the end is pure evocative. Not of anything in particular, it's just distilled evok
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 13, 2021, 10:12:53 AM
Continuing my meander through Zhangke with Still Life. Perhaps his slowest one yet, very meditative. I rather enjoyed it once I got onto its level.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on February 13, 2021, 07:32:03 PM
Spilt Second from 92, only had a vague memory of this(maybe just the trailer?) but it ends up being very fun, Rutger Hauer hunting a demon in flooded 2008 London with every british character actor they could get their hands on. Wouldnt be supprised if there was a bit of Red Dwarf influence here as its pushing deliberately towards parody but never to the degree of not playing things straight.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 13, 2021, 11:35:58 PM
Quote from: PlanktonSideburns on February 12, 2021, 10:18:57 PM
I tend to love anything kermode describes as a mess

Southland tales really has something mad and wonderful about it. Dwyane and Sarah dancing at the end is pure evocative. Not of anything in particular, it's just distilled evok

Yeah I loved both Under The Silver Lake and Southland Tales although I'm not sure how similar they are. Silver Lake has fantastic Andrew Garfield as the nicest bro, and old Hollywood, while Southland Takes is far more random and more clearly bullshit but also more ambitious and prophetic. While Silver Lake parodies conspiracy theorists, Southland Tales is more pro theory.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 14, 2021, 10:11:49 AM
I didn't mean that they were thematically or tonally similar but just that they were the films that followed the breakthrough films from young directors who just said "fuck it" and threw everything into a very personal but divisive film that practically tanked their careers but slowly gained a cult following
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 14, 2021, 12:48:05 PM
My Demon Lover

Keeps up the grand tradition of every movie with "Demon Lover" in the title being absolutely horrible.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 14, 2021, 07:10:38 PM
Haha I've literally just finished watching Demonlover! Grim innit, reminded me of Videodrome in some ways.

Yesterday I watched The Long Good Friday for the first time. It was quite good, a shitload of familiar faces in it too.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 15, 2021, 03:33:12 AM
I was referring to the 70s "Demon Lover" as the other one, but I'm glad to know there's a third one which also sucks.

Young Frankenstein

I still liked it, but...it's a bit baggy. Some of the jokes have aged pretty badly? I suppose, doing that "length of time comparison" thing, it's closer in time to the originals it's parodying than it is to now, so it's to be expected it feels a bit that way compared to more modern things.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 15, 2021, 05:27:47 AM
Babette's Feast. Beautiful film. Simple and touching and gorgeously shot. (But I still do not understand religious people. Absolutely baffling and frustrating bunch.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 15, 2021, 01:06:07 PM
The Imitation Game - 2014

Benedict Cumberbatch & Keira Knightley star in this dramatisation of cracking the Enigma Machine.
Really, REALLY good. With a whole host of familiar faces.
Such a sad film, really. We really were cunts to homosexuals back in the day, weren't we? Yes, I know we still are, but you know what I mean. Really well filmed, and cleverly plotted, and I though Benedict was great.
Could quite easily watch that again right away.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on February 15, 2021, 02:13:07 PM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on February 15, 2021, 03:33:12 AM
I was referring to the 70s "Demon Lover" as the other one, but I'm glad to know there's a third one which also sucks.

Young Frankenstein

I still liked it, but...it's a bit baggy. Some of the jokes have aged pretty badly? I suppose, doing that "length of time comparison" thing, it's closer in time to the originals it's parodying than it is to now, so it's to be expected it feels a bit that way compared to more modern things.

This is why I am always giggling when someone answers their door


(https://media.tenor.com/images/ef64fff94f34fc528c76ab8819668c49/tenor.gif)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 16, 2021, 01:52:38 AM
Spite Marriage. Trying to whittle down my Buster Keaton gaps. Really quite disappointing. It seems MGM didn't actually let Keaton write this, and it shows. He's basically just the lead in a mediocre romance, with minimal great gags, even less so those of a particularly physical nature.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 16, 2021, 10:19:28 AM
Saving Mr Banks - 2013

The dramatisation of Walt Disney's meeting with Mary Poppins author PL Travers, if you didn't know.
Watched this last night. I almost turned off after 10 minutes cos Emma Thompson's portrayal of Mrs Travers really annoyed me. Fucking rude bitch. But so glad I stuck with it as it was such a good film. And so sad.
I held it together until they started playing Feed The Birds towards the end, and then I blubbed like a big girl.
I have to say, Tom Hanks is pretty awesome in everything he does nowadays.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 16, 2021, 11:31:38 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 16, 2021, 01:52:38 AM
Spite Marriage. Trying to whittle down my Buster Keaton gaps. Really quite disappointing. It seems MGM didn't actually let Keaton write this, and it shows. He's basically just the lead in a mediocre romance, with minimal great gags, even less so those of a particularly physical nature.

Have to brush up on my Keaton post silent film era stuff alright. Tend to not match his classic for a multitude of reasons, but did watch Speak Easily which is considered one of the relatively better ones and was far from a classic but was quite fun. Jimmy Durante and Keaton worked well together. Was fearful Durante would try to dominate screen and definitely benefited from being a Pre-Code era film as well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on February 16, 2021, 11:36:56 AM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on February 15, 2021, 03:33:12 AM
I was referring to the 70s "Demon Lover" as the other one, but I'm glad to know there's a third one which also sucks.

Young Frankenstein

I still liked it, but...it's a bit baggy. Some of the jokes have aged pretty badly? I suppose, doing that "length of time comparison" thing, it's closer in time to the originals it's parodying than it is to now, so it's to be expected it feels a bit that way compared to more modern things.

I remember at school we had one of those days where we couldn't have a lesson for some reason so teacher had to put a film on. She put this on and was cackling like a loon throughout, while the class just sat in total bored silence. Felt kinda sorry for her, not really a film a bunch of twatty 14-year olds are going to be into though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 17, 2021, 02:27:27 AM
Yet when a bunch of 12 year olds watched Brooks other 1974 film: Blazing Saddles we absolutely loved it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 17, 2021, 03:04:47 AM
Baxter, Vera Baxter. Hypnotic beyond belief. Sometimes beyond comprehension. I liked it, I think, but struggled to stay connected despite its mesmerising nature. I wonder if Angela Schanelec was inspired by Duras.

Quote from: EOLAN on February 16, 2021, 11:31:38 AM
Have to brush up on my Keaton post silent film era stuff alright. Tend to not match his classic for a multitude of reasons, but did watch Speak Easily which is considered one of the relatively better ones and was far from a classic but was quite fun. Jimmy Durante and Keaton worked well together. Was fearful Durante would try to dominate screen and definitely benefited from being a Pre-Code era film as well.

This one had totally slipped me by! I guess I only put on my watchlist the ones he actually directed. Are any of the ones he didn't worth it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 17, 2021, 08:19:36 AM
The Day The Earth Caught Fire - sort of a proto-Threads. Very grim detailing of the slow breakdown of society following a climate-changing event. Early blink-and-you'll-miss-it uncredited appearances from Michael Caine and Peter Butterworth a well
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Custard on February 17, 2021, 10:38:40 AM
Did any women wee themselves in the street?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: shagatha crustie on February 17, 2021, 10:47:01 AM
Carnival of Souls (1962) - loved this low-budget creepfest about a pretty but nervous church organist who survives a car wreck, moves out to the sticks to get away from it all and then starts having weird visions and being drawn to this old abandoned entertainments pavilion. Written out like that, it sounds ludicrous and very of its time but I think that's why I loved it. The slightly 'off' acting and direction at points just added to its woozy charm. Big influence on Romero apparently which I can definitely see. 8/10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on February 17, 2021, 11:22:49 AM
I'd recommend Night Tide with a young Dennis Hopper from around the same time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on February 17, 2021, 11:29:16 AM
Quote from: shagatha crustie on February 17, 2021, 10:47:01 AM
Carnival of Souls (1962) - loved this low-budget creepfest about a pretty but nervous church organist who survives a car wreck, moves out to the sticks to get away from it all and then starts having weird visions and being drawn to this old abandoned entertainments pavilion. Written out like that, it sounds ludicrous and very of its time but I think that's why I loved it. The slightly 'off' acting and direction at points just added to its woozy charm. Big influence on Romero apparently which I can definitely see. 8/10.

Masterpiece. David Lynch clearly a fan also.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 17, 2021, 03:35:36 PM
It's such a great film. If you can get the Criterion Collection version, it's packed with good things.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on February 17, 2021, 05:57:30 PM
All the President's Men

Another of those classic films that I'd not seen, but felt like I had via cultural osmosis. One thing I didn't know is that it just ends, suddenly and arbitrarily. One minute they're all fretting that G-men might be about to kill them, then a quick montage of headlines tells us that everything worked out fine.
Rather a baffling turn of events, I thought.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 17, 2021, 10:31:31 PM
Teenage Exorcist

Cleverly titled, as the only exorcist in it is an old man, and the star who's playing a college student was in her late 30s when she made it. Given she also wrote it, the utter lack of agency of her character is a curious choice.

But anyway, it's terrible.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 18, 2021, 03:22:20 AM
Quote from: phantom_power on February 17, 2021, 08:19:36 AM
The Day The Earth Caught Fire - sort of a proto-Threads. Very grim detailing of the slow breakdown of society following a climate-changing event. Early blink-and-you'll-miss-it uncredited appearances from Michael Caine and Peter Butterworth a well

Love this film, shocking and captivating and feels very real.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 18, 2021, 10:17:52 AM
It manages to mix that breakneck banter that is associated with screwball romantic comedies with gritty disaster movie stuff and doesn't seem incongruous. Showing the whole thing from the PoV of a newspaper and its reporters is a great touch
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 18, 2021, 03:53:10 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on February 18, 2021, 10:17:52 AM
It manages to mix that breakneck banter that is associated with screwball romantic comedies with gritty disaster movie stuff and doesn't seem incongruous. Showing the whole thing from the PoV of a newspaper and its reporters is a great touch

Presume this isn't about All the President's Men but isn't far off.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on February 19, 2021, 12:00:50 AM
Shazam! (2019)
Finally got around to watching this. Nor great, but good. Could have done with a little trimming to sharpen it up, didn't need to be 2 hours, and the seven sins were visually indistinct. But Mark Strong was solid, and it was fun seeing the kids goofing about with super powers.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 19, 2021, 10:45:10 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on February 17, 2021, 03:04:47 AM
Baxter, Vera Baxter. Hypnotic beyond belief. Sometimes beyond comprehension. I liked it, I think, but struggled to stay connected despite its mesmerising nature. I wonder if Angela Schanelec was inspired by Duras.

This one had totally slipped me by! I guess I only put on my watchlist the ones he actually directed. Are any of the ones he didn't worth it?
I think Speak Easily is touted as one of the better of the Keaton/Durant sound collaborations; so maybe give that a try. Only one I have seen and why having a lot of restraints of Keaton films of the time; does have some good interactions with Durante and other female characters. Also; it at least benefits from being a Pre-Code film with a lot of salaciousness.
Have to wait towards the end for a strong string of visual gags. First half is a bit bland and does pick-up; but still not reaching anywhere near his own directed films. 
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 19, 2021, 12:43:55 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on February 17, 2021, 08:19:36 AM
The Day The Earth Caught Fire - sort of a proto-Threads. Very grim detailing of the slow breakdown of society following a climate-changing event. Early blink-and-you'll-miss-it uncredited appearances from Michael Caine and Peter Butterworth a well
Watched this last night. Really good, yeah.
Spoiler alert
Having said that, the actor who played the guy who ran the paper was quite possibly the worst actor EVAH.
And, yes I know it was filmed in 1961, but some of the effects were laughable. "Oh, no! There's a tidal wave coming up the Thames!" No there isn't, that's just 2 toy boats in a bath tub, isn't it?
[close]
Really nicely done, though. Great atmosphere to it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on February 19, 2021, 02:20:35 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on February 19, 2021, 12:43:55 PM
Having said that, the actor who played the guy who ran the paper was quite possibly the worst actor EVAH.

Apparently a real journo, who broke the story on the R101 disaster.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Christiansen

I'll just add my name to the fan club of The Day The Earth Caught Fire. Proper, no-nonsense disaster film. Even had me gripped as a kid.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 19, 2021, 02:45:42 PM
Quote from: Blumf on February 19, 2021, 02:20:35 PM
Apparently a real journo, who broke the story on the R101 disaster.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Christiansen

Oh, wow! That's a top piece of trivia! Nice one.
He was still shit though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on February 20, 2021, 06:29:24 PM
Dark Encounter (2019)

A decent enough production but let down by stupid dialogue - or rather a lack of dialogue when there should have been some.  Despite various people seeing lights in the sky, aliens, etc, nobody communicated this with each other, nobody mentioned aliens.  In scenes where lights were seen outside the house there should have been a babble of voices because everyone in the house would quite naturally have reacted to what they'd just seen etc, but not much was said at all.  Many scenes were noticeable for the lack of communication between people.  Unnatural dialogue.  It totally takes you out of the moment and makes you remember you're just watching a film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 20, 2021, 11:29:48 PM
Irma Vep (1996) - I've seen enough Olivier Assayas films to know they tend to be more like sketches towards movies rather than proper plots with screenplays and endings. Irma Vep is a reflection on the state of French film at the time in contrast to the alternative aesthetic of Hong Kong action cinemas, so you get a young Maggie Cheung playing herself in a latex catsuit making a dubiously-conceived film in Paris. Irma Vep is largely improvised and feels like dropping into cool parties and cool-but-disorganised film companies. There's a shitload of references to French cinema, some fairly obvious like casting New Wave star Jean-Pierre Léaud (The 400 Blows) as a fading director (he seems to have spent the last 25 years playing ironic commentaries on his fresh-faced youth like Last days of Louis XIV), lots that I'm sure I don't know. Like much of Assayas, lightweight fun. (There's a Scottish band called Irma Vep who are considerably less sexy.)

Down With Love (2003) - Insanely overdesigned 1960s-set romcom about publishing/magazines. Again, packed with filmic references, this time from 60s romcoms and musicals. Ewan MacGregor is charming, Renee Zellweger is also charming, and there's lots of misunderstanding, pretence, sexual tension, and all the usual romcom features. But what makes it stand out is how amazing it looks visually. If you like nice frocks and swinging bachelor pads and splitscreens, watch. Oh and David Hyde Pierce (excellent), Sarah Paulson, and Tony Randall.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on February 21, 2021, 12:14:38 AM
Promising Young Woman

I Care A Lot


Both stunning female empowerment thrillers - neither one quite perfect but both a blast from start to finish with powerful central performances. Seeing them back to back made it feel a bit like the film world is properly waking up again/releasing high calibre films that have been in Covid stasis.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on February 21, 2021, 12:40:55 AM
two-lane blacktop - dead good, a five bagger

high noon - pretty good, read an interesting essay about it afterwards, a much more intelligent film than I thought it was. john wayne was a fucking melt, apparently it was un-american to make a film where good people act a bit cowardly. the poor screenwriter was blacklisted.

the stranger - orson welles plays a nazi trying to fit in a shithole town as an american teacher. butchered by the studios of course, the plot makes no fucking sense, some nice shots typical of welles remain but when you end up rooting for the nazi because the american town folks are too fucking dull surely something has gone wrong.

ride the high country - nice fight between the good cowboys and the inbred rapey miners but not bloody enough for peckinpah's standards.

twenty days without war  - there's a very cool scene where the main character (a russian war journalist during ww2 that has witnessed the battle of stalingrad) struggles to make a speech in front of a crowd of industry workers. quite interesting contrast between the realities of war and the romanticized story he has to tell people at the home front so that they don't despair.

and some other shit but I'm getting tired
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 21, 2021, 02:09:28 AM
On High Noon. The recent rewatch. Just couldn't get over how incompetent the sheriff was. Watched one of the other famous films that is an allegory for the HUAC and Mccarthyism.
On The Waterfront. Stunning film. The parallels the director is trying to make is absolutely laughable.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on February 21, 2021, 02:28:57 AM
Quote from: EOLAN on February 21, 2021, 02:09:28 AM
On High Noon. The recent rewatch. Just couldn't get over how incompetent the sheriff was.

what do you mean?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on February 21, 2021, 02:37:20 AM
Quote from: EOLAN on February 21, 2021, 02:09:28 AM
On The Waterfront. Stunning film. The parallels the director is trying to make is absolutely laughable.

I don't understand this either, as you appear to be contradicting yourself. Can you clarify? It will bother me if you don't!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on February 21, 2021, 02:52:06 AM
I'm guessing the parallel is that kazan ratted on his communists pals while in the film brando's character testified against a mobster. the idea that these two events could be comprehended in the same way is ludicrous
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 21, 2021, 05:06:39 AM
Time Bandits

Still bloody good. It must be 25 years since I last saw it, and it holds up.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on February 21, 2021, 07:54:53 AM
Quote from: chveik on February 21, 2021, 02:52:06 AM
I'm guessing the parallel is that kazan ratted on his communists pals while in the film brando's character testified against a mobster. the idea that these two events could be comprehended in the same way is ludicrous

Ah, right. Ta. Eolan didn't express that point clearly. You did. Again: ta.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Custard on February 21, 2021, 09:21:56 AM
Absolutely love High Noon. One of my favourite films

It builds tension beautifully, and the payoff is cathartic and gripping

I like it so much I even bought a framed picture of the poster. Need to rewatch it again soon, as it's been a while

As Tony Soprano said, Gary Cooper - the strong, silent type
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 21, 2021, 11:29:10 AM
Yesterday I watched:

Space is the Place - didn't really know what was going on at points, other than Sun Ra creating a place for his people. Music was good.

The Brood - Creepy Cronenberg horror, feels like the weird kid things were a bit of a Don't Look Now ripoff but good.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on February 21, 2021, 12:33:16 PM
Quote from: chveik on February 21, 2021, 02:52:06 AM
I'm guessing the parallel is that kazan ratted on his communists pals while in the film brando's character testified against a mobster. the idea that these two events could be comprehended in the same way is ludicrous

Yep pretty much this. That a few young idealistic cinematic and theatrical friends had small political meetings in the communist party pre WW2, mainly as idealogues does not really compare to a bunch of power hungry murdering mobsters.

The film is just a great film independent of the political parallels it is trying to make just totally falls flat.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Syntax Head on February 21, 2021, 09:02:23 PM
Jellyfish on that BBC player. Bleak. A cryer.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on February 21, 2021, 11:39:27 PM
The Neon Demon - I hate calling things pretentious, but if you make a ridiculous film that prominently features your monogram on the title card, I have to call it pretentious. It didn't work as a psychological horror, because prior to the abrupt climax the only eerie thing that happens involves Keanu Reeves yelling at a mountain lion in a hotel room.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on February 22, 2021, 11:41:43 AM
Copland

Sylvester Stallone plays a deaf man like he's got learning difficulties in this film that's jam packed with everyone from gangster films playing bad cops.

I liked it overall (it was a bit Western-y) but thought the end shoot-out all in slow motion was ridiculous.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on February 22, 2021, 11:54:21 AM
Quote from: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on February 21, 2021, 11:39:27 PM
The Neon Demon - I hate calling things pretentious, but if you make a ridiculous film that prominently features your monogram on the title card, I have to call it pretentious. It didn't work as a psychological horror, because prior to the abrupt climax the only eerie thing that happens involves Keanu Reeves yelling at a mountain lion in a hotel room.

To be fair I think part of the idea its "pretentious" comes down to the way some of his fans react to his work, just as a load of atmospheric bunk about high fashion with a nice soundtrack its a worthwhile watch IMHO even its a bit edge lordy and mean spirited.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on February 22, 2021, 12:08:34 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on February 22, 2021, 11:41:43 AM
Copland

Sylvester Stallone plays a deaf man like he's got learning difficulties in this film that's jam packed with everyone from gangster films playing bad cops.

I liked it overall (it was a bit Western-y) but thought the end shoot-out all in slow motion was ridiculous.

Oh, I think Sly is pretty good in that film. I suppose you could argue that he's slightly too low-key, as he was obviously trying to show that he could still do 'proper' naturalistic acting after years starring in high-octane action blockbusters. But his performance suits the character he's playing: a depressed, introverted schlub.

But yeah, it's not a bad film. I think people expected a lot more from it at the time: a gritty crime drama starring De Niro, Keitel, Liotta and Stallone?! That sounds amazing! But it's not amazing, it's merely quite good. A decent contemporary western.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on February 22, 2021, 01:58:57 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on February 22, 2021, 12:08:34 PM
Oh, I think Sly is pretty good in that film. I suppose you could argue that he's slightly too low-key, as he was obviously trying to show that he could still do 'proper' naturalistic acting after years starring in high-octane action blockbusters. But his performance suits the character he's playing: a depressed, introverted schlub.

But yeah, it's not a bad film. I think people expected a lot more from it at the time: a gritty crime drama starring De Niro, Keitel, Liotta and Stallone?! That sounds amazing! But it's not amazing, it's merely quite good. A decent contemporary western.

I was also startled to see how much like Talia Shire his love interest looked in it.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BM2EyZTA3MWYtOWVkOS00NDVlLWE3MGQtMTFkMWI0OWRkNjA3XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjA4NTIyOTE@._V1_.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 22, 2021, 02:45:40 PM
I watched The Great Dictator which was great.

Then I watched Under the Silver Lake and didn't really rate it much. I do like a good slacker movie usually though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 22, 2021, 11:19:42 PM
A Cottage on Dartmoor. Very good British silent film. Some truly impressive shots and editing, though the story was somewhat unengaging, apart from the ending.

A short Varda documentary, Ydessa, the Bears, etc., about an artist's installation that featured many many teddy bears. Interesting exploration of the various themes and motivations and processes involved.

Mountains May Depart. Really really liked this, though the third act dropped a little, mainly due to the young man's acting. But the rest was quite phenomenal.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 22, 2021, 11:38:53 PM
Tougher Than Leather - Great music, great evocation of early hip hop and 80s New York. Dogshit film
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on February 23, 2021, 05:22:34 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on February 22, 2021, 02:45:40 PM
I watched The Great Dictator which was great.

When I saw the antifascist speech near the end, I was surprised I hadn't seen it before in a million memes and other references, as it was both really good and quite old; it was entirely fresh to me. I concluded that not many people had actually seen The Great Dictator.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on February 23, 2021, 06:39:17 AM
Quote from: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on February 21, 2021, 11:39:27 PM
The Neon Demon - I hate calling things pretentious, but if you make a ridiculous film that prominently features your monogram on the title card, I have to call it pretentious. It didn't work as a psychological horror, because prior to the abrupt climax the only eerie thing that happens involves Keanu Reeves yelling at a mountain lion in a hotel room.

Yeah its very lazy to call something pretentious at times, but it really is.

Refn has made some bangers such as the Pusher trilogy, Bronson and Drive but all his recent output has been unbearable.

Only God Forgives was dismal and To Old To Die Young was at times unwatchable. It had some memorable moments, but not a fucking clue what he was trying to achieve.

All those misses , the word pretentious seems apt.

Odd how you can make something as fun and accessible as Drive then all that shite.

I watched A Touch of Zen on Mubi a three hour martial epic.

Also watched Fury from 1936, it was peak Friz until the fucking ending.



Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on February 23, 2021, 07:00:26 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on February 22, 2021, 01:58:57 PM
I was also startled to see how much like Talia Shire his love interest looked in it.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BM2EyZTA3MWYtOWVkOS00NDVlLWE3MGQtMTFkMWI0OWRkNjA3XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjA4NTIyOTE@._V1_.jpg)

Blimey, she's her double. Yo Adrian.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Johnboy on February 23, 2021, 11:54:14 AM
Watched Boxcar Bertha for the first time - what a romp!

Followed it with Mean Streets with Marty's commentary, had to look away from the screen he was saying so much stuff (which was good).

Then Raging Bull which I hadn't seen in decades, was surprised how much of it I remembered, it left an imprint, hilarious and serious at the same time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on February 24, 2021, 08:14:14 AM
Cobra

I know this has been discussed somewhere else, alongside your Dirty Harrys and Death Wishes. Anyway, its approaching Peak 80s Screw-The-Rules Detective Actioner. There's a truly bizarre montage cutting between Sly, Bridgette Nielsen dancing with some robots and Brian Thompson doing his thing. Lots of Pepsi signs in the background. Do love a good ending in a steel works.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on February 24, 2021, 11:49:18 AM
Quote from: A Hat Like That on February 24, 2021, 08:14:14 AM
Cobra

I know this has been discussed somewhere else, alongside your Dirty Harrys and Death Wishes. Anyway, its approaching Peak 80s Screw-The-Rules Detective Actioner. There's a truly bizarre montage cutting between Sly, Bridgette Nielsen dancing with some robots and Brian Thompson doing his thing. Lots of Pepsi signs in the background. Do love a good ending in a steel works.

The original version of this is over 2 hours long, they cut out about 40 mins so that it could play more times per day at cinemas.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on February 24, 2021, 12:05:56 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on February 24, 2021, 11:49:18 AM
The original version of this is over 2 hours long, they cut out about 40 mins so that it could play more times per day at cinemas.

Really? What was cut?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on February 24, 2021, 12:07:37 PM
Quote from: Blumf on February 24, 2021, 12:05:56 PM
Really? What was cut?

List of cuts here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobra_(1986_film)

Apparently only a VHS workprint of it exists.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on February 24, 2021, 12:29:47 PM
We demand The Cosmatos Cut!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on February 24, 2021, 12:36:09 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on February 24, 2021, 11:49:18 AM
The original version of this is over 2 hours long, they cut out about 40 mins so that it could play more times per day at cinemas.

They cut the montage.

Philistines.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on February 24, 2021, 12:37:11 PM
They didn't cut down Art LaFleur's massive head, tho, did they??
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on February 24, 2021, 03:25:50 PM
Cobra fans should check out (or maybe not) the Italian rip-off/remake Black Cobra starring Fred Williamson.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: monkfromhavana on February 24, 2021, 09:54:35 PM
The Fourth Protocol is on Talking Pictures.

Enjoyable cold war hokum featuring Pierce Brosnan doing a trade and a whole host of TV actors with bit parts.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on February 24, 2021, 10:59:56 PM
Quote from: monkfromhavana on February 24, 2021, 09:54:35 PM
The Fourth Protocol is on Talking Pictures.

Always happy when it turns up on TV. It's not great or anything, but a nice late evening film to leave on.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mr Banlon on February 24, 2021, 11:09:49 PM
Quote from: Blumf on February 24, 2021, 12:05:56 PM
Really? What was cut?
His pizza, with scissors. https://youtu.be/5SxN_U2H0Xc?t=18
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on February 25, 2021, 10:14:17 AM
Les Misérables (Ladj Ly, 2019ish) - very entertaining French banlieue film about incompetent, asshole cops failing to deal with the social problems of a poor, mostly-immigrant housing scheme near Paris. There's a big cast of very colourful characters: an obnoxious cop who collects pig toys, a populist mayor who goes around in a football shirt with "La Mairie" (Town Hall) on the back, very scary circus types, very scary Muslim leaders, and vast amounts of kids getting up to mischief. It's all fun and games till somebody loses an
Spoiler alert
eye
[close]
and
Spoiler alert
a lion
[close]
. Slightly connected with Victor Hugo, but more like La Haine remade as farce.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on February 25, 2021, 08:44:13 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on February 25, 2021, 10:14:17 AM
Les Misérables (Ladj Ly, 2019ish) - very entertaining French banlieue film about incompetent, asshole cops failing to deal with the social problems of a poor, mostly-immigrant housing scheme near Paris. There's a big cast of very colourful characters: an obnoxious cop who collects pig toys, a populist mayor who goes around in a football shirt with "La Mairie" (Town Hall) on the back, very scary circus types, very scary Muslim leaders, and vast amounts of kids getting up to mischief. It's all fun and games till somebody loses an
Spoiler alert
eye
[close]
and
Spoiler alert
a lion
[close]
. Slightly connected with Victor Hugo, but more like La Haine remade as farce.

Sort of a Do the Droit Thing
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JamesTC on February 26, 2021, 12:00:21 AM
Quote from: shagatha crustie on February 12, 2021, 01:37:39 PM
It is pretty funny when he gets noshed off by his dog though. It is pretty funny, come on it is pretty funny.

I rewatched this a few months back and honestly I think it deserves praise for depicting Ali G accidentally getting wanked off by a blind council worker who thinks he is polishing a railing and then just 30 minutes later shows Ali G brokering peace at the United Nations.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on February 26, 2021, 10:48:07 AM
Watched a few more assorted Agnès Varda things on MUBI:

The Gleaners and I: Two Years Later, a follow-up to Varda's famous documentary The Gleaners and I. It mainly catches up with several of the film's subjects, as well as featuring some of Varda's reflections on the subject matter and showcasing objects that people sent her after the film was released.

And some of her shorts: "You Have Beautiful Stairs, You Know", "7p., cuis., s. de b., ... à saisir", "The Pleasure of Love in Iran", "Women Reply", "Elsa the Rose", "Salut les Cubains", "The Vanishing Lion". An interesting selection from a range of times and places. I think the best of these was "Salut les Cubains", a great ethnographic overview done pretty much entirely from still photos; some great editing in particular.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on February 26, 2021, 05:48:45 PM
Avenging Force

Michael Dudikoff and Steve James, from in between the first and second "American Ninja" movies - they must have enjoyed working together? Anyway, the two men are old army buddies, and James is running for Senate. The idea of a black man getting power so incenses a local businessman that he organises a lot of wealthy racists into a full-on fascist militia that hunts people for sport, as well as tries to seize power wherever possible.

The way the Government instantly springs into action against this far-right threat to democracy is the thing that makes it seem almost laughably quaint, though. I was watching it, enjoying the action and the fight scenes, while simultaneously lamenting when even low-budget action movies had better politics than Presidents.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JamesTC on February 26, 2021, 10:22:18 PM
Dredd (2012)

I like the idea that an obscure BBC Three comedy/sketch show becomes popular in the far future.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on February 27, 2021, 11:04:00 PM
Thoroughbreds - Well, NEVER would have watched this if there'd seemed like a better choice, I was just in such a rut and went for it. So glad I did - what a stunning, funny, pitch-BLACK (crime?) drama. Performances all terrific, and I was very sad to realise that the excellent fucked-up loser guy was played by Anton Yelchin, that actor I'd heard had died in tragic circumstances.

As a debut this was stunning, and it made me very excited to see the director's follow-up Bad Education, which looks like a similarly wicked affair, this time with Hugh Jackman.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 28, 2021, 01:11:28 PM
I rewatched the first 3 Indiana Jones films Friday/Saturday.
Lost Ark - Classic!
Temple - Not so good
Crusade - Better, but not as good as Ark.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on February 28, 2021, 01:14:08 PM
I also rewatched Return Of The Pink Panther the other day.
Brilliant stuff, although a little 'of its time' in places. I cringed a few times. But overall so good. Sellers is just brilliant in it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on February 28, 2021, 06:01:02 PM
Yesterday I watched
S1m0ne - Expected it to be a bit more of a black mirror social commentary on a fictional star but it ended up having a bit of a Mrs Doubtfire vibe with the ex husband living through her and trying to get back his wife and daughter.

The Big Bus - a bit of an Airplane! but a bus scenario really.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on February 28, 2021, 06:52:34 PM
Independence Day: Resurgence This was universally panned on release but I didn't think it was that bad. It wasn't good, either, it was just kind of relentlessly OK. I mean alright, the only memorable action scene involved a gigantic alien queen running in slow motion after a school bus, tentacles wiggling everywhere like some kind of monstrous wacky waving inflatable tube man, but other than that there wasn't anything that inspired any particular negative or positive feelings. The film existed, it passed two hours on a Saturday evening. Nice to see old-timers like Bill Pullman and William Fichtner picking up a pay packet.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 01, 2021, 01:02:31 AM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on February 28, 2021, 06:52:34 PM
Independence Day: Resurgence This was universally panned on release but I didn't think it was that bad. It wasn't good, either, it was just kind of relentlessly OK. I mean alright, the only memorable action scene involved a gigantic alien queen running in slow motion after a school bus, tentacles wiggling everywhere like some kind of monstrous wacky waving inflatable tube man, but other than that there wasn't anything that inspired any particular negative or positive feelings. The film existed, it passed two hours on a Saturday evening. Nice to see old-timers like Bill Pullman and William Fichtner picking up a pay packet.

I did get the sense they realised that the main plot with the new lead characters was bollocks and just focused on maximum Golblum/Hursh/Spiner.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on March 01, 2021, 02:02:53 PM
Yesterday I watched High Ground, an Australian western set just after WW1, about an ex-Army sniper who gets involved in an Aboriginal massacre, and then, years later, has to enlist one of the survivors to help him hunt an Aboriginal outlaw. It was great -- a very tense, frequently violent action-drama with heaps of great performances, particularly Jacob Junior Nayinggul and Simon Baker, the two leads. A familiarity with Australia's violent history will make several images and scenes more familiar and poignant, but the nature of white.Australia is so terrible and obvious that a prior education isn't necessary. You just need to know that shit like this happened all the time. Check out the trailer: https://youtu.be/LOCAKnVHpos 
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on March 01, 2021, 05:51:41 PM
The Way Way Back (2013)

Coming of age comedy/drama written and directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. Dragged on holiday by his mum and her overbearing boyfriend, introverted teenager Duncan comes out of his shell when he's offered a job by the free spirited manager of the local waterslide park.

Liam James, himself a teenager at the time, leads the film with remarkable ease, backed up by one heck of a supporting cast, including: Toni Colette as his mother, trying desperately to mask her anxieties; Steve Carell, playing very effectively against type as her suburban alpha douche boyfriend; Alison Janney, as their amusingly blunt neighbour; Amanda Peet and Rob Corddry as family friends; Faxon, Rash and Maya Rudolph as employees at the water park. Anna Sophia Robb fills the love interest role, but is more than a prize to reward Duncan's emotional arc. But it's Sam Rockwell who steals his every scene, as the militantly fun-loving park manager, with whom Duncan forms a brotherly attachment.

Set in the present day, but consciously harking back to the 80s (Duncan listening to music on his phone, instead of a Walkman, is about the only signifier of the era) the film is nothing we haven't seen in others of this type. I suppose there might be some novelty to the amount of focus it gives the adult characters. The rest of the park staff are conspicuously middle aged and Rudolph gets some poignant laments about still working there at their age and being forced to be the only responsible one among them. It also feels more grounded and real than the Likes of Caddyshack, with even Rockwell, at his Rockwelliest (yes, he does a little dance) remaining believable, rather than a cartoon character made flesh.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 01, 2021, 10:17:28 PM
The Corporation. Comprehensive documentary chronicling the rise and continued influence of corporations. Really well put together. They've made a sequel which apparently isn't as good but it'd be worth a watch.

Swordsmen in Double Flag Town. Chinese historical adventure/action film, starts off quite interestingly but fairly quickly loses meaning and momentum. The end in particular is rather sloppy and unimpactful.

Jerichow. Moving earlier in my Christian Petzold watching. Absorbing, understated, complicated personal relationships as usual.

And the two films Chloé Zhao made before Nomadland (which I'd like to see): Songs My Brothers Taught Me and The Rider, which were fine, some extremely good moments but overall not really my favourite style.



Quote from: samadriel on March 01, 2021, 02:02:53 PM
Yesterday I watched High Ground, an Australian western set just after WW1, about an ex-Army sniper who gets involved in an Aboriginal massacre, and then, years later, has to enlist one of the survivors to help him hunt an Aboriginal outlaw. It was great -- a very tense, frequently violent action-drama with heaps of great performances, particularly Jacob Junior Nayinggul and Simon Baker, the two leads. A familiarity with Australia's violent history will make several images and scenes more familiar and poignant, but the nature of white.Australia is so terrible and obvious that a prior education isn't necessary. You just need to know that shit like this happened all the time. Check out the trailer: https://youtu.be/LOCAKnVHpos 

I didn't mind this, the landscapes were beautiful, but gosh I'm sick of stories that are ostensibly meant to be about indigenous people somehow still centred on white people.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 02, 2021, 05:10:48 AM
Radio Mary. Interesting premise of a woman suddenly able to hear people's thoughts but it did not really execute it very well and the supporting characters were all annoying.

Variety. American independent film about a young woman who gets a job at a porn cinema but somehow this turns into a mystery investigating a shady businessman, I dunno, some good aspects but seemed a bit unfocussed.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 02, 2021, 05:22:32 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 02, 2021, 05:10:48 AM
Variety. American independent film about a young woman who gets a job at a porn cinema but somehow this turns into a mystery investigating a shady businessman, I dunno, some good aspects but seemed a bit unfocussed.

I love this movie. Underrated.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 02, 2021, 05:57:53 AM
Quote from: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 02, 2021, 05:22:32 AM
I love this movie. Underrated.

Can you elaborate? I didn't connect with it
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 02, 2021, 01:15:07 PM
Miracle Mile

I thought this was going to be all set in the diner in the style of "Twelve Angry Men" and there'd be a "is this a prank or real?" ticking clock thing happening but no. Everyone splits up and you never see all the people from there again.

My Spy

Basically it's "Kindergarten Cop" even replicating a few shots. There's a lot of swearing in it so my son was almost constantly saying "Omm bad word"

Bloody Hell

A man (who looks like a mid-90s Mike Patton) foils a bank robbery but gets imprisoned for the death of a bank employee. When he gets out he goes to Finland. Bad stuff happens. It's not as weird as it thinks it is.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on March 03, 2021, 08:51:55 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 02, 2021, 01:15:07 PM
he goes to Finland. Bad stuff happens.

Tautology surely
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 04, 2021, 11:33:52 AM
Timescape

Dumber, from "Dumb And Dumber", runs a dilapidated boarding house/hotel in the middle of America with his daughter "Jurassic Park" girl. A group of travelers arrive and ask to stay even though the hotel is still in the process of being done up. They're fine with it. When one of the travelers turns up late covered in ash with a passport that's got dates going back to the late 19th century, Dumber's suspicions are raised.

It was alright. Passed the time while I waited to see if I was going to die. Spoiler-
Spoiler alert
I didn't die.
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 04, 2021, 10:29:18 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 02, 2021, 05:57:53 AM
Can you elaborate? I didn't connect with it

Not much to say really. I just think it has a great atmosphere.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 05, 2021, 06:14:37 AM
Dragon Inn (the original 1967 King Hu one). Incredible set pieces and choreography, though the last desert sequences felt a bit like they dropped in intensity and pace.

L'amour fou. I liked this but I have almost no idea what it is I watched. But I liked it. Gonna attempt Out 1 next week.

Quote from: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 04, 2021, 10:29:18 PM
Not much to say really. I just think it has a great atmosphere.

Fair enough.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 05, 2021, 09:44:53 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on February 28, 2021, 01:11:28 PM
I rewatched the first 3 Indiana Jones films Friday/Saturday.
Lost Ark - Classic!
Temple - Not so good
Crusade - Better, but not as good as Ark.
Watched Crystal Skull the other day.
Not bad.
I'd say from bestest to worstest :
Ark
Crusade
Skull
Doom
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on March 05, 2021, 11:20:15 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 05, 2021, 06:14:37 AM
L'amour fou. I liked this but I have almost no idea what it is I watched. But I liked it. Gonna attempt Out 1 next week.

love this one but i wish they'd release a decent version.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 05, 2021, 10:11:14 PM
Osmosis Jones

I really liked this. The gross out bits could've been a little more gross but the look of the happenings inside Bill Murray were beautifully designed with lots of background jokes.

The Squeeze

It took me a while to realise that Stacy Keach's ex-wife was Edward Fox's current partner when the kidnapping took place but I probably wasn't paying much attention. I loved seeing old stinking 70s West London and Freddie Starr was surprisingly good as Keach's ex-con sidekick.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on March 05, 2021, 10:37:04 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 05, 2021, 10:11:14 PM
The Squeeze

It took me a while to realise that Stacy Keach's ex-wife was Edward Fox's current partner when the kidnapping took place but I probably wasn't paying much attention. I loved seeing old stinking 70s West London and Freddie Starr was surprisingly good as Keach's ex-con sidekick.

This deserves to be much better known. Keach does a great job as a hopeless alcoholic, and as you say Starr really shines (ahem). Pure 70's grime at it's best, sitting nicely between Get Carter and The Long Good Friday.

I suspect most of us have seen it, but for those that haven't, get it down yer!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 06, 2021, 12:56:48 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on March 05, 2021, 09:44:53 AM
Watched Crystal Skull the other day.
Not bad.
I'd say from bestest to worstest :
Ark
Crusade
Skull
Doom


This is an even hotter take than my thesis that Episode I is the best Star Wars.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on March 06, 2021, 01:29:57 AM
Temple of Doom is my favourite, and I think Willie is a good foil for Indy, how's that for a hot take?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 07, 2021, 02:25:56 AM
Quote from: samadriel on March 06, 2021, 01:29:57 AM
Temple of Doom is my favourite, and I think Willie is a good foil for Indy, how's that for a hot take?

The odd couple romance before most of the action kicks off is the best bit of the film I'd say.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 07, 2021, 08:32:57 PM
Real Life

I've waited to see this for years and there were loads of laugh out loud moments but it didn't feel like a "complete" thing. That might be part of the joke but it felt very thin.

I could watch Albert Brooks talk to the camera for days though and the weird Dutch camera heads were constantly hilarious.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on March 07, 2021, 09:52:32 PM
Oh, I think it's a classic. I keep turning up brilliant stealth gags every time I watch. And the trailer for it's funnier than most full-length comedies...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOAihCRr1y4
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 08, 2021, 12:25:03 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 05, 2021, 11:20:15 AM
love this one but i wish they'd release a decent version.

Yeah, the flaff quality certainly didn't help. Started watching the proper good quality version of Out 1 on MUBI and it's a world of difference.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 08, 2021, 11:31:05 AM
Quote from: McChesney Duntz on March 07, 2021, 09:52:32 PM
Oh, I think it's a classic. I keep turning up brilliant stealth gags every time I watch. And the trailer for it's funnier than most full-length comedies...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOAihCRr1y4

That is a GREAT trailer! He is a loveable motherfucker.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 08, 2021, 12:10:55 PM
The Rescuers - low-key heroic mouse drama from the mouse people, mixing earnest orphan and sad songs with lots of funny animals including Bob Newhart as a mouse janitor. Solid entertainment in the manner of The Aristocats, rather than the more flamboyant earlier or later Disney. Madame Medusa is an underrated villain. Must watch sequel.

The Killer - in which Chow Yun Fat wears some wacky disguises and shoots a lot of people. Less Christian symbolism and more gunfights than I expected, so it's great as an action film, but slightly disappointing for lovers of kitschy existentialism.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 08, 2021, 02:47:07 PM
The Stuff

A really good film about everyone in the US becoming addicted to a dessert called "The Stuff", which also attacks people. A private investigator, small boy and advertising executive must battle the people behind "The Stuff". If you have Amazon Prime it's free on there.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 08, 2021, 09:34:54 PM
Scare Me

A load of bollocks. I've fallen asleep twice and the fucking thing is still going.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 08, 2021, 09:43:21 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 08, 2021, 09:34:54 PM
Scare Me

A load of bollocks. I've fallen asleep twice and the fucking thing is still going.

Should have titled it Bore Me... ooooooooooohhhh
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 09, 2021, 08:09:28 AM
Quote from: St_Eddie on March 08, 2021, 09:43:21 PM
Should have titled it Bore Me... ooooooooooohhhh

They really should've. Unfrightening stories told in a boring way that lead to nothing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 09, 2021, 09:50:05 PM
Monster Hunter

I should've just punched myself in the face for 90 minutes.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 10, 2021, 06:21:00 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 09, 2021, 09:50:05 PM
Monster Hunter

I should've just punched myself in the face for 90 minutes.

Monster Hunter?  More like... um.... "Monster Cunter" Oooooooooohhhh
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gregory Torso on March 10, 2021, 04:37:03 PM
Minoru Kawasaki's Executive Koala (2005).

Well, this was weird.

It's a film about a down-trodden salaryman koala (or rather a man in a koala custome with a clearly visible zip on the back of the head) working in a pickled vegetable export firm who becomes a suspect after his human girlfriend is murdered.

I'd seen some frames from it that made it look like "crazy Japanese version of American Psycho with a koala" but it really isn't that. It's actually pretty disappointing in that it doesn't lean in hard enough on the weird stuff - it's just a sort of lightweight murder mystery with animal costumes, with a few digs at Japanese work culture thrown in. Some interesting facets of the film - such as having the lead character completely unable to emote as his face is covered by a koala mask, or even the ambiguity of whether we are supposed to see him as a giant koala or just a man who wears a koala costume under his business suit - aren't really explored in any way. There's a sort of Miika Takeshi-esque musical number that also doesn't really work that well.

(https://i.imgur.com/qTxzQh7.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/Y9F54lN.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/4GSy8i6.png)

On the plus side, it was fun and did quite a lot with its budgetary restraints and I genuinely had a couple of laughs just at the ridiculousness of it all. Fucking awesome theme tune, too.

I would like to check out some of the director's other films -The Calamari Wrestler (a giant squid enters the world of professional wrestling), The Rug Cop (a policeman with a weaponised flying toupee), The World Sinks Except For Japan (the world sinks except for Japan) and Super Erotic Businessman (who cares).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 11, 2021, 08:58:25 AM
Never Rarely Sometimes Always

I'm on a roll of shitness this week. A girl wants an abortion. A girl gets an abortion but has to go to New York City for 3 days without having anywhere to stay. Her cousin (who works in the same supermarket where some weirdo kisses their hands when they post the money they've taken that day through a slot?) goes with her. They wander about. She gets her abortion. The end.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on March 11, 2021, 10:01:09 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 11, 2021, 08:58:25 AM
Never Rarely Sometimes Always

I'm on a roll of shitness this week. A girl wants an abortion. A girl gets an abortion but has to go to New York City for 3 days without having anywhere to stay. Her cousin (who works in the same supermarket where some weirdo kisses their hands when they post the money they've taken that day through a slot?) goes with her. They wander about. She gets her abortion. The end.

Just the pits of where movies are at the moment. Endless, dreary defeat in service of an incredibly heavy-handed message - I couldn't believe that was all there was to it, expecting at any moment that the film was going to start. It never did - best part was the title.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 11, 2021, 10:41:38 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on March 11, 2021, 10:01:09 AM
Just the pits of where movies are at the moment. Endless, dreary defeat in service of an incredibly heavy-handed message - I couldn't believe that was all there was to it, expecting at any moment that the film was going to start. It never did - best part was the title.

YES! I was constantly waiting for *something* to happen. A reason for her to want to keep the kid or finding out that the step-dad was the father of her kid or ANYTHING! It's just grim and grimy. My wife loved it. Fucking weirdo.

The only reason I downloaded it was that I thought Edwyn Collins and Sean Read had done the soundtrack to it. Turns out that film is called "Sometimes Always Never" and I'm an idiot.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 12, 2021, 12:07:43 AM
George Kuchar's Ascension of the Demonoids, only the second Kuchar film I've seen after the brilliant Sins of the Fleshapoids. This one doesn't quite reach those heights but still continues the filmic dream state and lo-fi energy (and use of children's toys as props). Here we deal with some sort of a UFO experience.

And thanks to Famous Mortimer at some point on Letterboxd logging the short film "Red & Rosy" which I watched and loved, I watched that director's only other film, the 1997 feature Love God, which was absolutely berserk and featured giant rubber sex monsters and an oppressively manic style which is hard to not respect.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 12, 2021, 06:52:16 AM
Spent this whole week bit by bit getting through all of Out 1. Entirely worth it, all 12 hours of it (made easier as it's split into 8 episodes). Incredibly impressive, and honestly doesn't feel lengthy - I was content to just watch and see what was happening. Remarkable. At some point I'd like to also watch the Spectre version which apparently is not a shorter cut but rather an entirely different entity made up of a lot of the same footage plus extra that wasn't used.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 12, 2021, 09:08:35 AM
The Rental - Not sure what to make of this. I enjoyed the first two thirds with all the character work that is Swanberg's stock-in-trade and then the horror element kicks in. Part of my likes the swift brutality of that final act but in the end it all felt a bit inconsequential and almost an afterthought. Decent direction by Dave Franco

Mad Max 2 - an absolute animal of a film. Perfectly streamlined and custom built to be a thrill ride

Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation - Actually not as bad as I thought it would be, and loads better than the third one. It actually had some interesting satirical points to make about the commodification and toothlessness of sequels but in the end it just meant that the film ended up a bit toothless. There is an interesting Illuminati subplot that is reminiscent of Martyrs but it is a bit pissed away. It feels like the original vision by Kim Henkel, who wrote the first film, was too dumbed down and smoothed out by the studio which made the film a bit pointless in the end

Promising Young Woman - Brilliant, bleak, biting

The Gambler - Gritty, grim 70s film. Not bad, bit rote. James Caan is great in it

Love & Mercy - Really enjoyed this. I remember the reviews saying the Dano sections were better than the Cusack ones, and though I agree that Dano is excellent and his version of Wilson is better, I found myself a lot more engaged with the Cusack bits. Probably because it was about his rescue and redemption rather than his descent, and though I read his autobiography years ago I couldn't remember when he got free of the manipulative doctor so wasn't sure if things would end up well for him and Elizabeth Banks. Some lovely Beach Boys sampling soundscapes from Atticus Ross in there as well

Freaky - Fun comedy horror with everyone enjoying themselves

Unhinged - Not fun not comedy horror that wants to be The Hitcher (80s) but ends up being The Hitcher (2000s). People do a lot of stupid things to make the plot go. Russell Crowe is pretty good as a big unstoppable brute though

Insomnia - Meh

A Simple Favour - Enjoyable twisty thriller. Bit silly but it knows it

Blow Out - De Palma at his peerless best. Amazing visual treat and a killer ending

Housebound - Another fun comedy horror, this time from New Zealand. Ghostly hi-jinx when a woman has to go back to live with her parents in the country while under house arrest
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on March 12, 2021, 03:06:00 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on March 12, 2021, 09:08:35 AM
The Rental - Not sure what to make of this. I enjoyed the first two thirds with all the character work that is Swanberg's stock-in-trade and then the horror element kicks in. Part of my likes the swift brutality of that final act but in the end it all felt a bit inconsequential and almost an afterthought. Decent direction by Dave Franco

I posted about this one in the horror thread, and I didn't gel with it either, for the reasons you mentioned. Felt like a horror film that thought it was being innovative but was actually very traditional and quickly became rote in the third act. All of the cast and the group dynamics were good though. A shame there wasn't anything more to it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: bgmnts on March 12, 2021, 11:45:30 PM
Won't lie I don't really like the Irishman at all, but its so old and plodding that its perfect to sleep to. It just has a slow paced vibe that helps me drift. I have been using it a few times a week now.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 13, 2021, 10:16:16 AM
Quote from: frajer on March 12, 2021, 03:06:00 PM
I posted about this one in the horror thread, and I didn't gel with it either, for the reasons you mentioned. Felt like a horror film that thought it was being innovative but was actually very traditional and quickly became rote in the third act. All of the cast and the group dynamics were good though. A shame there wasn't anything more to it.

In theory I liked the fact that no-one even really had a chance to put up a fight but in practice it was unsatisfying. I suppose part of the thrill of a horror film is seeing if people will escape and in this there was never really much doubt apart from maybe Nina(?)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 15, 2021, 05:11:39 AM
Down in Shadowland. Observational documentary filmed by Tom DiCillo in the New York City subway. Mesmerising.

The Owners. Slow, slightly surreal drama (both light and dark) by Kazakh filmmaker Adilkhan Yerzhanov, whose The Plague at the Karatas Village was a wonderful revelation - and this doesn't fail to impress either.

A bunch of Peter Tscherkassky shorts: "The Arrival" (brilliant), "Dream Work" (hypnotic), "Motion Picture" (fine) and "Miniatures" (seemingly an experiment that was never meant to be released which entirely checks out).

Jimmy Orpheus, early Roland Klick. Naturalistic and at the same time free-wheeling, chronicling a young worker's night out in Berlin. Very New Wavey. Bit aimless but that's okay.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 15, 2021, 09:14:29 AM
Artemis Fowl

A right mess of a photocopy of Harry Potter...but it OIRLAND! Begorrah! I fell asleep in the middle though so something interesting might've happened then.

Judas And The Black Messiah

I don't think Lakeith Stanfield has been in a bad film/show so far. I knew nothing about Fred Hampton and the Black Panther party so this was an eye-opener.
Spoiler alert
Especially seeing as he did everything he did and was assassinated by the police when he was 21.
[close]
Not sure why I spoilered that but just in case.

The Day The Earth Caught Fire

5/5. Amazing performances from everyone (apart from the Daily Express editor) and really well made. The beatniks going "wild" was a particular highlight.

It also features Michael Caine's weirdly long arm

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dLI1bJur7EY/VS7hRsVTD_I/AAAAAAAAHSw/njQh6ePQyj0/s1600/the%2Bday%2Bthe%2Bearth%2Bcaught%2Bfire%2B4.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 15, 2021, 12:42:49 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on March 15, 2021, 09:14:29 AM
The Day The Earth Caught Fire

5/5. Amazing performances from everyone (apart from the Daily Express editor) and really well made. The beatniks going "wild" was a particular highlight.

It also features Michael Caine's weirdly long arm

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dLI1bJur7EY/VS7hRsVTD_I/AAAAAAAAHSw/njQh6ePQyj0/s1600/the%2Bday%2Bthe%2Bearth%2Bcaught%2Bfire%2B4.jpg)
Apparently an actual editor and not an actor, according to someone on here (I forget who now, apologies).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on March 15, 2021, 03:44:55 PM
Slaughterhouse Rulez (2018)

Comedy horror, co-written and directed by nobody's favourite Britpop frontman, Crispian Mills.

Wait! Don't leave just yet.

Right up front, one of the most obvious criticisms that can be leveled at the film is that it pretty much just takes Attack the Block and inverts it: the setting is now a ridiculously posh boarding school (Mills presumably digging into his own background), the human monsters are now toffs and the inhuman ones have changed from extraterrestrial to subterranean. Heck, it even has Nick Frost turn up as a comical drug dealer.

That said, I'm not a stickler for originality and I think a derivative work can still stand on its own merits. So, does this? Yes... for the most part.

In the lead role of the token normal kid surrounded by posh freaks, Finn Cole is a bit bland, but solid enough. Asa Butterfield is more fun as his roommate - also an outsider, despite his privileged background (speaking of Britpop singers, I reckon he'd make a good Jarvis Cocker someday). Tom Rhys Harries is good as the straight up psychopathic prefect (who, despite his blond hair and shithead, somehow never garners a single Johnson/Malfoy quip). Hermione Corfield and Isabella Laughland make the most of absurdity slight roles as the romantic interest and her sarky friend respectively. Simon Pegg (who co-produced with Frost) and Michael Sheen provide much of the comic energy as a sad sack teacher and the flamboyant headmaster. Somehow, they got Margot Robbie to give up ten minutes of her day to play a doctor with whom Pegg is desperately drawing out a clearly finished romance via Skype.

Where the film really falls down compared to Attack the Block is its character arcs. There nothing here to rival John Boyega's redemptive arc, or the growing understanding and respect between him and Jodie Whitaker in the earlier film. The swipes at the self serving nature of the upper classes are a bit obvious perhaps, but it's the sort of thing that bears repeating. Another pass at the script could have bumped the whole film up a few points.

Mills' direction is unshowy but not pedestrian. I didn't feel like I was watching a stretched out telly programme.

The most pressing issue with the film is that, by Christ, it takes its sweet time getting to the fireworks factory. It is past the halfway point before the action begins in earnest. Once shit gets real, it's good fun stuff, but there feels like a lot of wheel spinning in the 50 minutes leading up to it.

Now you can leave.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 16, 2021, 01:32:00 AM
Some Bill Plympton shorts: "How to Make Love to a Woman", "Surprise Cinema" and "Sex & Violence". He's a brilliant animator with a sly, silly sense of humour. Loved all of these, particularly the latter.

Sun Don't Shine, Amy Seimetz's debut. Didn't enjoy this nearly as much as the excellent She Dies Tomorrow. Just a little too mumblecore for me. Nonetheless somewhat heartbreaking at its core.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 16, 2021, 09:29:06 AM
Night of the Hunter - A masterpiece and way ahead of its time. Some amazing cinematography

Synchronic - Bit disappointing. Looked and sounded good but not sure it all amounted to much and the central premise was a bit silly
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pink Gregory on March 16, 2021, 10:20:47 AM
Personal Shopper - is Kristen Stewart being texted by a ghost?

I liked it a lot.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 16, 2021, 10:44:21 AM
The Crow (1994) - haven't seen this in 20+ years. Great stuff, lots of bad action movie cliches and goth crowd pleasing but it runs along at a fine pace and is never boring. Reminded me of a housemate I had at college in the late 90s who was obsessed with it and dressed like the main character (minus the makeup).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on March 16, 2021, 12:15:05 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 16, 2021, 10:44:21 AM
The Crow (1994) - haven't seen this in 20+ years. Great stuff, lots of bad action movie cliches and goth crowd pleasing but it runs along at a fine pace and is never boring. Reminded me of a housemate I had at college in the late 90s who was obsessed with it and dressed like the main character (minus the makeup).

Seems to be a film that just exists in the 90s. Nobody seems to notice it these days, even though it was quiet big back then.

Surely we're due a goth revival now.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 16, 2021, 01:06:54 PM
Hardcore (1979)

George C. Scott's daughter goes missing in California. Has she been kidnapped? Short answer- no. Felt a bit pointless. George C. Scott going undercover pretending to be a porn producer was pretty funny

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dc4CIiJW4AErT6A.jpg)

The same scene also features this piece of gold

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Toj8nkaPdtA
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 17, 2021, 12:12:40 PM
Quote from: Pink Gregory on March 16, 2021, 10:20:47 AM
Personal Shopper - is Kristen Stewart being texted by a ghost?

I liked it a lot.

Sometimes I think Assayas can get a bit too haute for his own good but this worked very well for me with that aspect feeling natural to the story.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on March 18, 2021, 12:09:40 AM
Quote from: greenman on March 17, 2021, 12:12:40 PM
Sometimes I think Assayas can get a bit too haute for his own good but this worked very well for me with that aspect feeling natural to the story.

Loved Personal Shopper and Clouds, and Stewart was excellent in both. Just started to write that I was excited to see what Assayas does next, then realised he's had a couple of films since that I've not seen. One looks as though it was well received, but the other less so.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 18, 2021, 06:24:03 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on March 18, 2021, 12:09:40 AM
Loved Personal Shopper and Clouds, and Stewart was excellent in both. Just started to write that I was excited to see what Assayas does next, then realised he's had a couple of films since that I've not seen. One looks as though it was well received, but the other less so.

Actually picked up Non Fiction on stoneage DVD last week, hopefully get around to it in the next day or two.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 18, 2021, 10:08:36 AM
No Way To Treat A Lady (1968) - I think this was mentioned on CaB recently but search didn't help. Anyway, perhaps not the best film when murdering women is suddenly considered a bad thing, but a very entertaining serial killer comedy with Lee Remick and Rod Steiger competing to do the most costume changes, and Eileen Heckart being the most overbearing Jewish mother ever. It's not as stylish as The Abominable Dr Phibes, and George Segal isn't the most engaging lead, but lots of fun.

Big Eyes (2014) - more toxic masculinity, with Christophe Waltz oppressing artist Amy Adams in Tim Burton's rare excursion into true story biography of kitschy artist Margaret Keane. Waltz is brilliant, Terrence Stamp is fun, but Adams is very passive and not as interesting. Probably one of the better recent Burtons, but still a missed opportunity to delve into the weirdness of Keane's art. Does Burton have a woman problem too?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 18, 2021, 10:28:51 AM
The Golden Child - Pew what a stinker. Eddie Murphy is so unlikeable in it and it is incredibly dull. It seems to be an attempt to rip off Big Trouble in Little China and getting it very wrong but they came out at around the same time so I don't think that is true. Charles Dance makes a good villain though
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 18, 2021, 11:52:29 AM
Quote from: phantom_power on March 18, 2021, 10:28:51 AM
The Golden Child - Pew what a stinker. Eddie Murphy is so unlikeable in it and it is incredibly dull. It seems to be an attempt to rip off Big Trouble in Little China and getting it very wrong but they came out at around the same time so I don't think that is true. Charles Dance makes a good villain though

The script for Big Trouble had been around for awhile though so I suspect it was basically a ripoff that got to market first, arguebly had the effect of ending Carpenters career working on larger budget films as well for better or worse.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on March 19, 2021, 12:52:11 AM
the texas chainsaw massacre  jeepers, i'm going to have some fucked up dreams later
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 19, 2021, 12:54:45 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 12:52:11 AM
the texas chainsaw massacre  jeepers, i'm going to have some fucked up dreams later

One of the most viscerally disturbing films I have ever seen. It's like a relentless nightmare caught on film. Sleep well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 19, 2021, 12:58:38 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 12:52:11 AM
the texas chainsaw massacre  jeepers, i'm going to have some fucked up dreams later

Superb film.  Easily within my top 5 horror films of all time.  A true masterpiece.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 19, 2021, 01:17:26 AM
Leatherface's first appearance in the film is unforgettable.
Spoiler alert
The murder is just so swift, sudden and brutal; Hooper doesn't shoot it in typical horror film style, it's presented as a piece of stark documentary footage. And my God, the relentless screaming and utter sense of hopelessness in the film's final act - such harrowing, feverish intensity.
[close]
. As you say, a masterpiece.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 19, 2021, 01:26:41 AM
Dong, a documentary by Jia Zhangke following an artist who here creates paintings of workers and communities around the Three Gorges Dam. Released in conjuction with Zhangke's fiction feature Still Life, set in the same location. Can't say this was groundbreaking, but it was a calm and interesting way to spend an hour.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 19, 2021, 08:43:56 AM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 19, 2021, 12:54:45 AM
One of the most viscerally disturbing films I have ever seen. It's like a relentless nightmare caught on film. Sleep well.

Yeah I think it was banned in the UK for so long not because of any particular scene (it isn't very gory) but because of the overall tone of the film. It is just fucking grim and oppressive, in a good way
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 19, 2021, 10:13:32 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 12:52:11 AM
the texas chainsaw massacre  jeepers, i'm going to have some fucked up dreams later
Has anyone seen the remake?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 19, 2021, 10:49:49 AM
Someone must have.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on March 19, 2021, 10:54:33 AM
The Master (2012)

Really enjoyed this. A very slight plot, but meaty subject matter, fantastic period recreation and magnificent performances. It's wonderfully shot too.

A reminder, not that it's really needed, that Philip Seymour Hoffman was a fantastic natural actor who couldn't give an insincere performance if he tried. He's a powerhouse here. If I had a slight criticism of the film it's that Phoenix's tics feel a bit too mannered in comparison to Hoffman and Amy Adams, but it's still a fascinating and odd performance.

I think it got a bit overlooked at the time because it wasn't as iconic or bombastic as Paul Thomas Anderson's previous There Will Be Blood, but it's an excellent and subtly powerful film that's definitely worth a watch.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 19, 2021, 11:14:28 AM
I think people were expecting it to be some takedown of scientology and when it wasn't felt a bit disappointed, which may have coloured its initial reception
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on March 19, 2021, 11:20:36 AM
Quote from: phantom_power on March 19, 2021, 11:14:28 AM
I think people were expecting it to be some takedown of scientology and when it wasn't felt a bit disappointed, which may have coloured its initial reception

Yeah I must admit I thought it would be more savage, but didn't mind that it wasn't. I found it interesting that it explored the attitudes of faith and cynicism and hope and manipulation without really coming down on either side. But I think it's clear that "the Cause" is a load of billy bollocks spouted by a charismatic but manipulative leader.

PT Anderson screened it for his pal Tom Cruise who got apparently got really angry with the bit where Jesse Plemons' son character admits that his dad is making all of it up, because Hubbard's son said the same about Scientology. So it pissed off the Cruiser at least.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 19, 2021, 12:53:50 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 19, 2021, 10:49:49 AM
Someone must have.
Can I have a list, please.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: joaquin closet on March 19, 2021, 01:43:15 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 19, 2021, 01:26:41 AM
Dong, a documentary by Jia Zhangke following an artist who here creates paintings of workers and communities around the Three Gorges Dam. Released in conjuction with Zhangke's fiction feature Still Life, set in the same location. Can't say this was groundbreaking, but it was a calm and interesting way to spend an hour.

Enough already with the Three Gorges Dam, Jia. Go find another poetically resonant infrastructure project.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 19, 2021, 04:15:52 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on March 19, 2021, 10:13:32 AM
Has anyone seen the remake?

I have, just as I've seen literally every movie in the series ever made for my sins.  The only one outside of the original worth a damn is The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, which is essentially a parody of the first film by the original director, Tobe Hooper.  It's kinda like what Gremlins 2 is to Gremlins.

As for the remake, it's pretty much what you'd expect from a Platinum Dunes release; slick and overproduced, with none of the raw terror of the original, instead electing to show all of the gore for the Saw generation, unlike the restrained original.  Having said that, there are effective moments throughout (a particularly nasty sheriff character being the highlight) but it's really not fit to lick the boots of the original.  It's just a standard modern horror flick for dumb teenagers.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on March 19, 2021, 11:11:03 PM
martin - a very good draclea. ****
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 20, 2021, 12:07:15 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 11:11:03 PM
martin - a very good draclea. ****

Aye, good film.  One of Romero's best, I'd say.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on March 20, 2021, 12:06:05 PM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 11:11:03 PM
martin - a very good draclea. ****
Or is he?

Quote from: St_Eddie on March 19, 2021, 04:15:52 PM
As for the remake, it's pretty much what you'd expect from a Platinum Dunes release; slick and overproduced, with none of the raw terror of the original, instead electing to show all of the gore for the Saw generation
Is Platinum Dunes still a going concern, or did someone build a Blumhouse on them?

Speaking of Saw, I saw Saw[nb]At the time, I see Saw. Apologies for the pure grammar - I add feeling tense.[/nb]. 1 to 7, I think (they do rather blend into each other). They weren't as terrible as I was expecting - partly because it's morbidly entertaining to see the traps get sprung (like Casualty, turned up to 11) and partly because there's a certain nostalgia to them now, even though I never watched them at the time. They are noughties as fuck.

God damn, but the writers are way too in love with the Jigsaw killer though. And he is obviously a killer, regardless of his frequent denial of the fact. They clearly watched Silence of the Lambs and Seven and thought "I can do that", but Jigsaw is just a pretentious, whiny little twerp. Little wonder he caught on with nu metal kids.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Custard on March 20, 2021, 03:14:31 PM
Heh yeah, Jigsaw's flimsy excuses for putting people through hell always got a dark laff out of me

Like when he chucked that girl into a pit of syringes, to cure her of liking drugs. "Yeah, cheers mate'
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 20, 2021, 03:38:08 PM
Quote from: frajer on March 19, 2021, 11:20:36 AM
Yeah I must admit I thought it would be more savage, but didn't mind that it wasn't. I found it interesting that it explored the attitudes of faith and cynicism and hope and manipulation without really coming down on either side. But I think it's clear that "the Cause" is a load of billy bollocks spouted by a charismatic but manipulative leader.

PT Anderson screened it for his pal Tom Cruise who got apparently got really angry with the bit where Jesse Plemons' son character admits that his dad is making all of it up, because Hubbard's son said the same about Scientology. So it pissed off the Cruiser at least.

I felt it was a more effective film for being more than a takedown though, showing the attraction of that kind of character to his followers and what they were prepared to look past. Olsen in Martha Marcy May Marlene the year before was I felt also very good at highlighting how such men weld power.

Got around to Assayas Non Fiction, not really drama on the scale of Personal Shopper or Clouds of Sils Maria, more semi light hearted bourgeois drama along the lines of Let The Sunshine In although less focused on one character, enjoyable enough if you like that kind of thing but not really essential.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 21, 2021, 04:40:40 AM
Get Carter - Thought this was going to be a fun 70s action romp, didn't expect to watch Michael Caine
Spoiler alert
unceremoniously kill multiple more or less innocent women
[close]
.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on March 21, 2021, 08:46:22 AM
Quote from: Pearly-Dewdrops Drops on March 21, 2021, 04:40:40 AM
Get Carter - Thought this was going to be a fun 70s action romp, didn't expect to watch Michael Caine
Spoiler alert
unceremoniously kill multiple more or less innocent women
[close]
.

A powerfully grim film when I first saw it as a teen. I've never heard it described as a 'romp' before.

One From The Heart 1981

The film that allegedly Killed Zoetrope but the money's up there on the screen. Even with it's very slight plot I still love it. Cast are great and the Waits/Gayle soundtrack is one of my favourites. Can't remember if it was this or Cat People that I developed a teenage crush on Nastassja Kinski.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SczK22jpRvk
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 21, 2021, 01:02:46 PM
Babyteeth (2019) - Aussie girl with cancer movie, reviews seem divided over whether it's "bitingly satirical" or "heartrending drama" but I'd definitely go for the former. Ben Mendelsohn is brilliant as her father, a psychiatrist using his access to drugs for all kinds of control, yet still a loving father. Most of the other characters are a bit too enigmatic or sketchy (or zoned out on drugs), and there are lots of distancing devices and stylisation, so it's never going to reach Muriel's Wedding levels of tear-wringing. But it's often wonderful to watch, some brilliantly awkward but true scenes of family life, great use of music, some brilliant lighting and use of colour, nice wigs.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 21, 2021, 01:05:03 PM
Been rewatching some Hitchcock

Rope (1948) - James Stewart didn't like it, Hitchcock didn't like it, Ebert gave it 2 stars. I'd rate it as one of Hitch's top 10. Some gay subtext left over from the explicitly gay original play, Joan Chandler is adorable ("What would you say to some champagne?" "Hello champagne!") and I like the clever little Hitch cameo.

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/fc/1c/e0fc1cb47f6ccc29f1b98f688ab8f436.gif)

Vertigo (1958) - this is one that I think gets better every time I see it. Beautiful use of red and green and shots of SF. I still really dislike the very end though, too sudden. Actually prefer the alternate ending.

Rear Window (1954) - probably my third favourite after my favourite Psycho and 2nd fave North by Northwest. Some odd line fluffs (did Hitchcock not like doing extra takes?) but an incredible set and Grace Kelly's entrance might be the greatest of all time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 21, 2021, 01:14:40 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 21, 2021, 01:05:03 PM
Been rewatching some Hitchcock

Rope (1948) - James Stewart didn't like it, Hitchcock didn't like it, Ebert gave it 2 stars. I'd rate it as one of Hitch's top 10. Some gay subtext left over from the explicitly gay original play, Jane Chandler is adorable ("What would you say to some champagne?" "Hello champagne!") and I like the clever little Hitch cameo.

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/fc/1c/e0fc1cb47f6ccc29f1b98f688ab8f436.gif)

Vertigo (1958) - this is one that I think gets better every time I see it. Beautiful use of red and green and shots of SF. I still really dislike the very end though, too sudden. Actually prefer the alternate ending.

Rear Window (1954) - probably my third favourite after my favourite Psycho and 2nd fave North by Northwest. Some odd line fluffs (did Hitchcock not like doing extra takes?) but an incredible set and Grace Kelly's entrance might be the greatest of all time.

Rear Window is great fun, surprisingly modern in the way Stewart and Kelly seem just to hang out, watch stuff, and make snide comments. A perfectly constructed movie, although I slightly understand people who find it cruel or snide. I've not seen Vertigo since Sight & Sound elevated it to "Greatest movie of all time" status, but remember loving it as a teen for its mix of romance and ickiness. James Stewart was an amazing actor: these days whenever a comic actor is called upon to do something more serious they get showered with adulation, but Stewart could cover the full range from light comedy to dark comedy to serious anguish.

There are so many great Hitchcock films though, even the less regarded ones are often glorious. I love the low-key black comedy of The Trouble with Harry, a fun murder mystery (or is it?) that's half Murder She Wrote and half Twin Peaks, and Family Plot, a film about fake spiritualists getting caught up with real criminals which spirals out of control in a way most modern post-Tarantino crime-film directors could only dream of, but remains witty and playful. Hitchcock did it all first.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 21, 2021, 03:44:17 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 21, 2021, 01:05:03 PM
Rope (1948) - James Stewart didn't like it, Hitchcock didn't like it, Ebert gave it 2 stars. I'd rate it as one of Hitch's top 10. Some gay subtext left over from the explicitly gay original play, Joan Chandler is adorable ("What would you say to some champagne?" "Hello champagne!") and I like the clever little Hitch cameo.

Incredible film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: RicoMNKN on March 21, 2021, 08:38:00 PM
Ballast (2007) - Story of a kid and his mum who move to his uncle's house after the kid gets involved with criminals. The focus is on the small acts of people looking out for each other, and forgiveness. Really impressed by the humanistic tone of the whole thing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on March 22, 2021, 12:45:13 AM
Battle of Algiers

Compelling. Horrifying. Wonderful depiction of a guerilla revolutionary war.
Has some of the tensest scenes I recall watching which reminds me a bit of the above mentioned Hitchcock though for me personally this film was far more effective in building and utilising the tension.
Spoiler alert
And crucially the bombs did go off.
[close]

Man With a Movie Camera

Soviet silent film without any supposed narration. Though I personally felt there was a clear strong narrative arc. As a person who usually hates fast edited films, absolutely loved it here as the pace the rhythms and cuts were the basis for the emotional drive of the film. Also one of the most graphic birth scenes.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 22, 2021, 08:45:27 AM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 11:11:03 PM
martin - a very good draclea. ****

I watched Season of the Witch the other day. The Romero one, not the Halloween sequel. A really interesting film that ultimately doesn't quite hold together. He has a unique style, a combination of avant-garde sound design and editing mixed with a less definable prosaic cinematography that is probably a holdover from his days making industrial films
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 22, 2021, 12:02:17 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 21, 2021, 01:05:03 PM
Been rewatching some Hitchcock

Rope (1948) - James Stewart didn't like it, Hitchcock didn't like it, Ebert gave it 2 stars. I'd rate it as one of Hitch's top 10. Some gay subtext left over from the explicitly gay original play, Joan Chandler is adorable ("What would you say to some champagne?" "Hello champagne!") and I like the clever little Hitch cameo.


Rear Window (1954) - probably my third favourite after my favourite Psycho and 2nd fave North by Northwest. Some odd line fluffs (did Hitchcock not like doing extra takes?) but an incredible set and Grace Kelly's entrance might be the greatest of all time.
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on March 21, 2021, 01:14:40 PM
and Family Plot, a film about fake spiritualists getting caught up with real criminals which spirals out of control in a way most modern post-Tarantino crime-film directors could only dream of, but remains witty and playful. Hitchcock did it all first.

My 3 favourite Hitchcocks, I think. I could watch Rear Window anytime. And now I must rewatch Rope. It's been too long.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 22, 2021, 12:03:32 PM
Quote from: chveik on March 19, 2021, 11:11:03 PM
martin - a very good draclea. ****
I haven't watched this for about 30 years. One of those films I keep meaning to dig out. I remember being really creeped out at the time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 22, 2021, 01:35:04 PM
Another Hitchcock

The Birds (1963) - A decent thrill ride but I wouldn't rate it as one of his best. Very dated special effects, and I hadn't noticed before how much of a stalker Tippi Hedren comes across in the first 30 mins. She meets a fella in a shop for a couple of mins and then she's driving 60 miles to the island he lives on, asking everyone for info about him, leaving notes for his daughter who she's never met, and spying on him from a boat. Probably seemed like innocent romantic whimsy back in the day but these days could only be the precursor to a Fatal Attraction-type obsession thriller.

The crow scene outside the school is still fantastic though, masterclass in suspense editing. Also some more great use of primary colour shots with his female characters which he did so well (also wondered if the "birds nest hair" was intentional?)

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/18/b5/cc/18b5cc0869c04077fb21228d1275c1e3.jpg)

This shot from Vertigo being another good one

(https://www.casaromantica.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Casa_Cinema_Vertigo.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 22, 2021, 06:00:04 PM
Quote from: EOLAN on March 22, 2021, 12:45:13 AM

Man With a Movie Camera

Soviet silent film without any supposed narration. Though I personally felt there was a clear strong narrative arc. As a person who usually hates fast edited films, absolutely loved it here as the pace the rhythms and cuts were the basis for the emotional drive of the film. Also one of the most graphic birth scenes.

I've been meaning to watch this for a while. Although silent people like The Cinematic Orchestra have done soundtracks, which I'd be inclined to put on as listening to silent films in pure silence seems to make room noise/tinnatus quite loud and hard to ignore.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on March 23, 2021, 12:36:46 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on March 22, 2021, 06:00:04 PM
I've been meaning to watch this for a while. Although silent people like The Cinematic Orchestra have done soundtracks, which I'd be inclined to put on as listening to silent films in pure silence seems to make room noise/tinnatus quite loud and hard to ignore.

Oh yes. Definitely watch with a score - as the director specifically intended. There does seem to be a lot of versions where the first couple of minutes may be complete silence - as an orchestra begins to play - and then the score starts.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 23, 2021, 12:48:58 AM
If you're on a Classic Hitchcock kick you can't go past North By Northwest and Strangers on a Train. If you're after some underrated ones, I would recommend Foreign Correspondent and I Confess.

Last night a friend of mine showed me Mortal Kombat and Mortal Kombat: Annihilation. The first is decent enough, the second one is just awful. Awful.

Today for something different watched Pasolini's Medea. Mythically evocative and deeply poetic interpretation of the play. Particularly striking final scene.

Also watched Stella Street: The Movie. Plenty of fun moments but does not live up to the series, not even close. But I liked it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 23, 2021, 06:14:09 AM
"The Bunker of the Last Gunshots", an early short by Jeunet & Caro. Bit hard to follow because of the quality of the video (on YouTube) but it's an impressionistic sci-fi with basically no dialogue, sometimes a bit Guy Maddin-y, somehow manic and depressive at the same time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 23, 2021, 09:43:19 AM
I watched Dead Ringers over the weekend, a bit 'straighter' than some of Cronenberg's 80's efforts, both through a lack of body horror and no real supernatural stuff. Irons smashes it. It's grim and creepy as fuck.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 23, 2021, 10:43:01 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 23, 2021, 12:48:58 AM
If you're on a Classic Hitchcock kick you can't go past North By Northwest and Strangers on a Train. If you're after some underrated ones, I would recommend Foreign Correspondent and I Confess.


Love North By Northwest, seem to recall liking Strangers too. Haven't seen those other two, I'll check them out at some point. There's quite a few of his earlier ones that I haven't seen, I've got Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt (his personal favourite) and The Lady Vanishes lined up for the rest of the week.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 23, 2021, 10:52:52 AM
I rewatched Rear Window for the first time in years due to this thread. Agreed that it is a great film. My only criticism would be that they don't really have anything solid on the killer so why he freaked out and risked everything to go for Stewart was a bit odd. It seemed to be resolved too easily
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on March 23, 2021, 02:08:05 PM
John Wick 3

I'd seen this before in the cinema, but it's naffing off Netflix next week, so I thought I'd watch it again. I liked it fairly well the first time (albeit less than the first one) but this time I watched it with one of my housemates, who hadn't seen any of the John Wick films before. Sitting there as they struggled to contain their boredom and confusion really threw the film's flaws into sharp relief. I'm not a stickler for realism, but all the assassin mythology and the sheer amount of deadly mayhem that goes on (often in public, to utter indifference) just ends up seeming ridiculous after a while.

In addition to the action scenes just going on too long, I also spotted problems with the choreography this time - while the camera work is still admirably steady, it highlights that the baddies frequently seem to be politely waiting for their turn to get shot in the bonce. The scene with the attack dogs gets less impressive when you realise that they're just being held offscreen - there's no sense that they're doing anything elsewhere that might prevent them from running in on cue.

It's still better than your typical Hollywood shakycam action hackery and the cinematography and production design are leagues ahead of films that cost five times as much. The series has definitely been a case of diminishing returns since the first film though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on March 23, 2021, 06:07:31 PM
The first 20 mins or so with him being chased down by various gangs was probably the best thing in the franchise for me, after that I don't think it really picked up again until the showdown at the end although as you said it does always look good for a Hollywood action film, maybe not inspired but their is the effort to have more than generic cinematography.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on March 24, 2021, 09:01:09 AM
Rollerball (2002) - iirc, this all but ended John McTiernan's directing career. Its got a Rotten Tomatoes score of 3 %. There's some scathing reviews.

Its a bad film and its very 2002 - the right mix of nu-metal soundtrack (Slipknot have a cameo), early CGI, low-rise jeans and exxxxtreme sports.

I ended up liking it. It's not worth a rewatch but there's more going on that 'this is just a bad movie'. It's based in central Asia, a rarity, and tries desperately both to sell that and make it part of the plot (wiki tells me, "Some of the cuts were made because MGM thought that movie was "too Asian"), there's an extended scene filmed entirely in night vision, panned in places, but I think this would have been when proper night vision goggles were still new and the similar footage from the Iraq war was around the corner, some of the minor roles (the yank commentator, for a start) are good: there's the feeling of a better, more-focused story tucked away. Its vision of the future, with oligarchs and TV bread and circuses feels at least validated.

So, its shit but its shit in interesting ways.



Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on March 24, 2021, 09:46:28 AM
The lad out off of Rollerball must lie in bed and think about how he was in one genuinely great film, and it was petty much his first, and it's been unrelenting shit since.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 25, 2021, 03:24:26 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on March 23, 2021, 09:43:19 AM
I watched Dead Ringers over the weekend, a bit 'straighter' than some of Cronenberg's 80's efforts, both through a lack of body horror and no real supernatural stuff. Irons smashes it. It's grim and creepy as fuck.

One of my fav Cronenbergs. Scales to a deeply existentially tragic point in a way some of his other films steer clear of.

Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 23, 2021, 10:43:01 AM
Love North By Northwest, seem to recall liking Strangers too. Haven't seen those other two, I'll check them out at some point. There's quite a few of his earlier ones that I haven't seen, I've got Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt (his personal favourite) and The Lady Vanishes lined up for the rest of the week.

Ooh yes not seen TLV but the other two you mention are spiffing, if I may use that word. Spiffing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 25, 2021, 11:36:47 AM
Watched The Lady Vanishes, it's a very good little British pre-war mystery romp. Apparently Orson Welles liked it so much that he watched it 11 times (and he reportedly never rewatched films usually). Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood have great chemistry, he's a typical English cad and she's a sassy spunky type who doesn't stand for any nonsense, and Dame May Whitty is great as well. Obviously some concessions have to be made for some of the 30s dialogue/model effects, although there's an FX shot with a person hanging off a train which is extremely well done for the time.

(https://i.imgflip.com/1wh1au.gif)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 25, 2021, 01:00:14 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 23, 2021, 10:43:01 AM
Shadow of a Doubt (his personal favourite)
I watched this last night.
Hmmmm. Not my favourite.
Spoiler alert
I found it a little contrived?
Niece Charlie comes to correct conclusions very quickly and easily, I thought.
[close]
However, it was quite enjoyable overall.
A couple of really nice location shots.
And it was nice to see an appearance by Clarence from It's A Wonderful Life.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 25, 2021, 10:39:53 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on March 25, 2021, 01:00:14 PM
Spoiler alert
I found it a little contrived?
Niece Charlie comes to correct conclusions very quickly and easily, I thought.
[close]

Spoiler alert
I thought the point here was that she realises very early on but that nobody around her believes her.
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on March 25, 2021, 11:49:56 PM
kind hearts and coronets ****

pretty funny, reminded me strongly of guitry's story of a cheat (the disguises, the voice-over etc.).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on March 26, 2021, 01:16:25 AM
Couple of Talking Pictures entries:

No Sex Please, We're British (1973) - Just wish it was better. Such a waste of a classic title on a rather dull film. How can Ronnie Corbett, Beryl Reid, and Arthur Lowe fail to work? I hear the stage productions are better.

The Medusa Touch (1978) - I think this works better than it has a right to. The central idea is quiet fun, Richard Burton is very Richard Burton, and the finale delivers, with
Spoiler alert
a cathedral full of establishment figures crushed to death (although the Queen manages to avoid it)
[close]
. If you're into 70's supernatural thrillers, then you've already seen it, everyone else, give it a punt next time it turns up.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 26, 2021, 07:00:41 AM
Of Freaks and Men. Set at the beginning of the 20th century in Russia where two men make pornography. Shot in the style of cinema at the time. It's quiet and subdued which juxtaposes very well with the subject matter. At times seems a little on the nose about its "freaks" but on the whole much to reflect on and take in.

Lynne Ramsay short, "Gasman". Excellent as usual. Intimate and evocative.

Bullet Ballet. First and foremost, what a great title. Secondly - this is a wacky crime by Shinya Tsukamoto, of Tetsuo fame. Hyper and violent, not as surreal as Tetsuo but lots of distinctive filmmaking. A man's girlfriend kills herself so he becomes obsessed with a gun and gets involved with an underworld gang. Exceedingly striking though sometimes overloaded to the point of losing me. A few outstanding pieces of kinetic editing in this.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 26, 2021, 09:03:10 AM
Le Mans '66 or Ford V Ferrari - fun by-the-numbers underdog pic. Bale demonstrating a up-to-now-hidden ability for light comedy. He is really good in it and should do more roles in that vein
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on March 26, 2021, 11:41:22 AM
I know that's how the story's told but it's a bit of a reach to paint one of the biggest car manufacturers with a team of engineers going after a small Italian car company as the owner refused to sell it as an underdog.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 26, 2021, 12:04:14 PM
The underdog in my view were the engineers and drivers having to overcome the suits and wankers at Ford, rather than Ford themselves
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 26, 2021, 12:45:04 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on March 25, 2021, 10:39:53 PM
Spoiler alert
I thought the point here was that she realises very early on but that nobody around her believes her.
[close]
Oh. Ok. Well I totally missed that, then. *awkwardgrin*
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on March 26, 2021, 02:28:09 PM
Hellboy (2019)

Another one I've had bookmarked for a while, but only got around to because it's leaving Netflix shortly.

I quite liked the Guillermo Del Toro Hellboy films at the the time, but (having subsequently got into Mike Mignola's comics) they were clearly more Del Toro's vision than Mignola's. Thus, I was quite anticipating this reboot film - not only was it talked up as being more faithful to the comics, but it also marked a return to cinema for Neil Marshall, director of one of my favourite horror flicks, The Descent, plus a bunch of other films with the right blend of horror and fun, pulpy action. Alas, after a troubled (occasionally bizarre sounding) production history, it was released to a critical drubbing and box office indifference. Considering all of that, it wasn't nearly as bad as I was expecting. That is not to say that it was particularly good, however.

You can tell that it was pretty heavily chopped and changed in the editing room, resulting in a film that feels both overegged and undercooked. Case in point being Hellboy's whole mankind/monster dilemma - he throws a few tantrums about killing his own kind, but there's little sense that he might really turn against humanity, or even why he would. There's also his psychic sidekick, Annie, whom the film treats like someone we're supposed to recognise, despite the flashback scene that sets up her connection to Hellboy coming a long time after they reunite.

Also, while the film attempts to differentiate itself from the Del Toro ones (and - unsuccessfully - earn some of that sweet Deadpool money) by laying on lashings of blood, guts and swearing, it still feels more like them than it does the comics. David Harbour, in the title role, is like a metaphor for the whole thing: Almost indistinguishable from Ron Perlman's version, but more abrasive and over the top.

The rest of the cast are alright. As Professor Bruttenholm[nb]Pronounced "Broom", although it seems no one told Harbour[/nb] Ian McShane is basically Ian McShane. It's the role he was born to play, baby, but it's a strange reinterpretation of the the gentle, scholarly figure from the comics and earlier films. Sasha Lane brings a playfulness to Annie (and does a flawless English accent - I had no idea she's really American). After all the controversy that ended with his casting, Daniel Dae Kim's role, as a hardass army type, is almost hilariously inconsequential - and sounds like he hastily redubbed all his lines to make the character English. Stephen Graham plays a (literally) pig-headed, violent scouse monster. Not exactly a stretch for him, but lends the role some real humanity (pigity). The same can't really be said of Milla Jovovich as the the big baddie. She does what she can, but it's a pretty one-dimensionally evil role.

Despite some dodgy effects, there are a few decent action scenes. The opening one, with Hellboy taking on a vampire Mexican wrestler, and a scrap against a trio of giants do successfully capture the feel of the comics.

Overall, it's not an experience that I can see catching on, but neither is it one which I regret. Netflix also has Del Toro's Hellboy 2, which I can easily recommend over this.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 27, 2021, 01:39:31 PM
En liberté! (2018) - moderately funny/entertaining and very light film about a police lieutenant (my fave Adèle Haenel) who discovers her dead husband sent an innocent man to jail, and sets about trying to protect him after he's released. Some quite amusing S&M-related gags.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: joaquin closet on March 27, 2021, 02:19:02 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 27, 2021, 01:39:31 PM
En liberté! (2018) - moderately funny/entertaining and very light film about a police lieutenant (my fave Adèle Haenel) who discovers her dead husband sent an innocent man to jail, and sets about trying to protect him after he's released. Some quite amusing S&M-related gags.

If I could make a film it would star Adele Haenel and Steven Yeun and probably the reanimated corpse of Robert Mitchum
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on March 27, 2021, 04:43:59 PM
Comfort food distractions whilst installing a new hard disk and operating system. They aint Kubrick but they are entertaining.

The Negotiator (1998) and The Hunt For Red October (1990)

Love the Negotiator. Great performances and full of 'oh that guy' character actors. Entertaining guff.

THFRO from John 'Die Hard' McTiernan is as full of clichés as the Negotiator but still a fun diversion nevertheless.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on March 28, 2021, 01:20:11 PM
Bamako (Abderrahmane Sissako, 2006) is a didactic but interesting film about how debt is crippling Malian society. The main thrust is a trial to determine if the World Bank and IMF are responsible for Mali's poverty, disease, and lack of public services, but the trial is held in an open courtyard outside the court building, and daily life goes on all around. There's a night club chanteuse about to leave her husband, a woman running a dyeing works (colourful), and a subplot involving a guard losing his gun (hmm). The cast includes various real lawyers, including hunky French human rights dude William Bourdon and Senegalese politician Aïssata Tall Sall. But there's also a bizarre, wonderful Danny Glover cameo as a cowboy. Aside from details about the privatisation of Malian state railways, this is stuff we've all heard many times before, but it's a brave attempt to liven up the issues.

Over Her Dead Body (Jeff Lowell, 2008). Paul Rudd and Lake Bell are not only very short names, but reliable comedy names. Sadly this isn't either of their best work. Rudd is about to marry bridezilla Eva Longoria who's killed by an ice sculpture on her wedding day, and she returns as a ghost to stop him hooking up with anyone else. Coincidentally, Bell plays a sexy spirit medium. As with every Hollywood romcom, there is a lot that's problematic here: exploitative mediumship, betrayal of secrets, entering a relationship through deception, occasional misogyny, and a gay character
Spoiler alert
who's pretending to be gay to get close to a woman
[close]
. Some bits are funny: Rudd is always good at low-effort snark, here playing a vet who makes frequent jokes against cat-owners. But there are many better Rudd films; and if you want Lake Bell romcom, Simon Pegg's name is nearly as short opposite her in Man Up, or she's good in the only slightly romcom In A World; I'm doing a bit of a Lake Bell season. This is on Amazon Prime for 4 more days. Don't rush.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on March 28, 2021, 05:22:02 PM
The Jigsaw Man

Somewhat dull and confusing Cold War thriller in which Michael Caine plays a former head of M16 (I think, might have been M15) who defected from the UK to then USSR and gets his face altered to go back to the UK pretending to be a defector from the KGB (I didn't understand why). Too many scenes of people in expensive suits talking in wood panelled rooms, and I didn't like the bit where they filmed at Woburn Safari Park and animals were running about while people fired guns, I hope it didn't scare the animals in real life). I thought the bits with Caine's character
Spoiler alert
and his daughter
[close]
trying to avoid the KGB were ok, but it wasn't a very memorable or logical film. Still, it was free on Amazon Prime and I'm running out of films to watch.

44 Inch Chest

Also free on Prime. Wasn't what I expected. I liked Ray Winston's character and his group of friends, but the
Spoiler alert
hallucinations
[close]
were confusing and I couldn't get into it. Lots of uses of the word "cunt" and really, a somewhat boring film in my view. I thought it would have been more violent and a lot of it
Spoiler alert
seemed to take place in the main character's mind
[close]
.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on March 28, 2021, 09:27:27 PM
Busy weekend!

Double Impact
Starting to really enjoy these JCVD films on weekend afternoons. There's a goofy kinda amateur charm that seems to endure into the 90s ones but with less of the usual Canon films frustrations I have.
Think I'm just gonna watch ALL of them at this stage


The Hunger
Well... suffers a little by starting so fucking strong that it feels a bit disappointing that it can't sustain it, but on the whole I loved this. Fairly surprised its reception is so mixed.


Any Given Sunday
Is there a shitter director than Oliver Stone whose films still manage to be quite watchable yet never ever approaching the territory of "good"? Be checking out Nixon next, might revisit JFK too cos I remember thinking it was good when I was 14.


Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
eh... it was good but his later stuff is so much better.


North
Dreadful, can picture Rob Reiner being the kind of person who thinks kids find him super charming but he's really got zero clue how to engage with them at all.
Dunno how we're supposed to think North himself is likeable at any point in this thing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on March 28, 2021, 09:39:01 PM
The Handmaiden Park Chan-Wook's twisty tale of deceit and sex in 1930s Korea with a pickpocket taking a job as handmaiden to a woman who - I never quite figured out what the deal was here - is basically a shut-in, engaged to marry an extravagantly eyebrowed gent who had already been married to her mother and her aunt at various points, though they are both dead now, in order to con said woman into eloping and marrying her (the pickpocket's) boss, who would then have her sectioned and waltz off with her inheritance. It gets sillier from there, especially the acting, particularly from the male leads who spent the film's 150 minutes gurning and posing all over the place.

It's pretty entertaining for all that: the ridiculous plot and faintly laughable sex are fun and it is very handsomely and stylishly mounted. Held back, though, by a feeling of undeserved smugness, like it wants to be a serious, meaningful epic rather than the preposterous, empty-headed romp it really is.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on March 29, 2021, 12:26:48 AM
Quote from: peanutbutter on March 28, 2021, 09:27:27 PM
North
Dreadful, can picture Rob Reiner being the kind of person who thinks kids find him super charming but he's really got zero clue how to engage with them at all.

You say that and yet North was one of my favourite films as a kid.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 29, 2021, 05:26:57 AM
License to Live. Kiyoshi Kurosawa directed this a year after the inimitable Cure. It's fairly quiet and tender - follows a young man who wakes up after a ten-year coma and tries to make his life. Reminds me a bit of Kore-eda.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 29, 2021, 08:45:46 AM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 25, 2021, 11:36:47 AM
Watched The Lady Vanishes, it's a very good little British pre-war mystery romp. Apparently Orson Welles liked it so much that he watched it 11 times (and he reportedly never rewatched films usually). Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood have great chemistry, he's a typical English cad and she's a sassy spunky type who doesn't stand for any nonsense, and Dame May Whitty is great as well. Obviously some concessions have to be made for some of the 30s dialogue/model effects, although there's an FX shot with a person hanging off a train which is extremely well done for the time.

(https://i.imgflip.com/1wh1au.gif)

I watched this last night as it is free on Amazon Prime at the moment and really enjoyed it. A lot funnier than I was expecting. I loved the droll stereotypical English duo, who apparently went on to appear in loads of other films. Redgrave is very good as the cad with a heart and the way the mystery plays out with the different reason for the passengers' answers is well done. It all goes off the rails (ho ho) at the end though. I loved the model work as well

Did you spot the Hitchcock cameo?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 29, 2021, 09:31:13 AM
The Foreigner - 2017

Jackie Chan IS John Rambo vs The IRA.
Fucking bizarre little film, but, y'know what? I really enjoyed it. I thought Chan was really good with this Sallone-style character. Pierce Brosnan was pretty bloody good too. Not the usual part he plays (I don't think).
Chan is bloody mental with the stunts he's still doing. He really should be taking it easy at his time of life.

Young Frankenstein (Fronkensteen) - 1974
Absolute classic. My favourite Brooks film, I think. Top class performances throughout. Particularly Kenneth Mars as Inspector Kemp and Madeline Kahn as Elizabeth.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on March 29, 2021, 02:18:21 PM
Quote from: peanutbutter on March 28, 2021, 09:27:27 PM
Busy weekend!

Double Impact
Starting to really enjoy these JCVD films on weekend afternoons. There's a goofy kinda amateur charm that seems to endure into the 90s ones but with less of the usual Canon films frustrations I have.
Think I'm just gonna watch ALL of them at this stage



I love how JCVD's acting range extends to slicking his hair back to play the bad boy twin.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 29, 2021, 02:27:18 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on March 29, 2021, 08:45:46 AM
I watched this last night as it is free on Amazon Prime at the moment and really enjoyed it. A lot funnier than I was expecting. I loved the droll stereotypical English duo, who apparently went on to appear in loads of other films. Redgrave is very good as the cad with a heart and the way the mystery plays out with the different reason for the passengers' answers is well done. It all goes off the rails (ho ho) at the end though. I loved the model work as well

Did you spot the Hitchcock cameo?

I didn't! Just looked it up on Google images, not sure how that one got past me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 29, 2021, 03:42:45 PM
I think I saw it right near the end at the train station. He does a very strange movement as he walks across the frame
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on March 29, 2021, 04:24:08 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on March 29, 2021, 02:27:18 PM
I didn't! Just looked it up on Google images, not sure how that one got past me.
I completely missed the one in Shadow Of Doubt I watched the other day. And that was an obvious one when I looked it up after.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 29, 2021, 04:27:25 PM
There are more "classic" films on Prime than Netflix so I am working through some of those. There are some Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes and things like Dick Barton and Dick Tracy that look quite interesting, as well as stuff like The Old Dark House

I watched The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance today as well, another great film. James Stewart has been in so many of my favourite old films like this, Harvey, It's a Wonderful Life and his Hitchcock films
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Crabwalk on March 29, 2021, 04:30:13 PM
Quote from: peanutbutter on March 28, 2021, 09:27:27 PM


Any Given Sunday
Is there a shitter director than Oliver Stone whose films still manage to be quite watchable yet never ever approaching the territory of "good"? Be checking out Nixon next, might revisit JFK too cos I remember thinking it was good when I was 14.


I've been watching his 80s films recently and have been surprised to find that they're almost all fucking brilliant, given I've disliked almost everything I've seen from him since. Salvador and Talk Radio are especially great.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on March 29, 2021, 04:46:21 PM
Quote from: Crabwalk on March 29, 2021, 04:30:13 PM
I've been watching his 80s films recently and have been surprised to find that they're almost all fucking brilliant, given I've disliked almost everything I've seen from him since. Salvador and Talk Radio are especially great.

They're his two best for me, though Talk Radio isn't on the same level as Salvador. James Woods is so good in the latter it's a shame he's such a mahoosive cunt.

The last watchable film he made was U-Turn. The last one I bothered watching was the last 30 minutes of Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps while flicking around. It was absolute shit.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on March 29, 2021, 11:16:09 PM
Quote from: St_Eddie on March 29, 2021, 12:26:48 AM
You say that and yet North was one of my favourite films as a kid.
You'd've been like 12 when it came out? When I say as a kid I generally mean "firmly before most people would've started puberty", and the age of the lead is usually representative of the higher end of the target age group. There's a lot of shit jokes in it a 12 year might get that I can't picture many 9 year olds getting.

Quote from: Crabwalk on March 29, 2021, 04:30:13 PM
I've been watching his 80s films recently and have been surprised to find that they're almost all fucking brilliant, given I've disliked almost everything I've seen from him since. Salvador and Talk Radio are especially great.
Ah yeah Salvador is good iirc, and I'm sure Platoon is at least alright too? Not a fan of Talk Radio but that's more that I'm not a fan of Bogosian

Got a wildly bad output in recent years for someone who presumably doesn't do great numbers relative to the budgets he must need.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 29, 2021, 11:52:02 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on March 29, 2021, 04:27:25 PM
I watched The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance today as well, another great film. James Stewart has been in so many of my favourite old films like this, Harvey, It's a Wonderful Life and his Hitchcock films

Stewart had an interesting career, started off as the cute shy guy (Mr Deeds Goes to Town) then had a reinvention post-war as a grisly jaded man (e.g. Winchester '73). Pulled both off very well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 30, 2021, 03:49:21 AM
Traps. Vera Chytilová dark comedy about a woman who is raped by two men and then castrates them and the consequences of all that. Plays extremely lightly but the humour is pitch black.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on March 30, 2021, 10:40:01 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on March 25, 2021, 01:00:14 PM
I watched this last night.
Hmmmm. Not my favourite.
Spoiler alert
I found it a little contrived?
Niece Charlie comes to correct conclusions very quickly and easily, I thought.
[close]
However, it was quite enjoyable overall.
A couple of really nice location shots.
And it was nice to see an appearance by Clarence from It's A Wonderful Life.

I watched it last night and would have to agree. Even taking into account when it was made, it was a tad silly, and that little girl's voice is still ringing in my ears. But, always nice to see the Hitchcock trademark artistic flourishes, and I was on the lookout for his cameo this time and spotted him, although I had to check as his face isn't shown.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on March 30, 2021, 08:11:37 PM
On Stewart I watched Anatomy Of A Murder the other week a court room drama which was very good, slightly dated but nonetheless Stewart and the supporting cast which includes George C Scott excellent.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 30, 2021, 08:32:05 PM
FUN FILM FAX: Anatomy of a Murder, which is great, was the first Hollywood film to mention sperm and contraceptives. In 1959! Shocking.

Quote from: zomgmouse on March 29, 2021, 11:52:02 PM
Stewart had an interesting career, started off as the cute shy guy (Mr Deeds Goes to Town) then had a reinvention post-war as a grisly jaded man (e.g. Winchester '73). Pulled both off very well.

I hate to be that guy, but Gary Cooper starred in Mr Deeds Goes to Town. I take it you're thinking of Mr Smith Goes to Washington? Both films were directed by Frank Capra and co-starred Jean Arthur, plus they have very similar titles, so it's an easy mistake to make (he says patronisingly).

Genuinely sorry, but I can't help myself. Pedantry is a curse.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on March 30, 2021, 11:22:15 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on March 30, 2021, 08:32:05 PM
I hate to be that guy, but Gary Cooper starred in Mr Deeds Goes to Town. I take it you're thinking of Mr Smith Goes to Washington? Both films were directed by Frank Capra and co-starred Jean Arthur, plus they have very similar titles, so it's an easy mistake to make (he says patronisingly).

Genuinely sorry, but I can't help myself. Pedantry is a curse.

Ah yes! That's the one!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on March 31, 2021, 12:50:19 AM
Quote from: Crabwalk on March 29, 2021, 04:30:13 PM
I've been watching his 80s films recently and have been surprised to find that they're almost all fucking brilliant, given I've disliked almost everything I've seen from him since. Salvador and Talk Radio are especially great.

Really enjoyed Talk Radio - a great little film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on March 31, 2021, 09:41:24 AM
Play Misty For Me

He was sending out mixed messages.

The last 20 minutes was ace though with the "Oh I've got a new housemate" thing being peppered in throughout the film and then BOOM! Lucille is Annabelle.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on March 31, 2021, 10:12:18 AM
Cape Fear - Watched after seeing a documentary on J Lee Thompson, itself watched after he was discussed by Edgar Wright and Quentin Tarrantino on a recent Empire podcast on great British films. A really good film, obviously, and made me want to investigate his work more. Think I will try Ice Cold in Alex next. It also made me realise that Robert Mitchum is one of my favourite actors, after seeing this and Night of the Hunter

The Asphyx - another film mentioned in the Wright/Tarrantino podcast. Unfortunately named but pretty fun 70s horror film
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Custard on April 01, 2021, 12:30:59 PM
I've not seen Robert Mitchum be less than stellar in anything I've seen him in. He's also great in The Friends Of Eddie Coyle
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on April 01, 2021, 07:59:59 PM
Quote from: Shameless Custard on April 01, 2021, 12:30:59 PM
I've not seen Robert Mitchum be less than stellar in anything I've seen him in. He's also great in The Friends Of Eddie Coyle

Ha was going to post this also.

Out Of The Past is also a banger of a Noir.

The  American Friend was on film 4 the other night where Hopper plays Tom Ripley and Bruno Ganz plays a dude who has a terminal illness.

It's actually a pretty reserved performance from Hopper which from all accounts shocked a few people but even still he is good as a nervous ball of energy and he just can't  not do menace can he? Ganz also very good.  Not a bad neo -noir at all.

Nicholas Ray plays the villain who works with both leads , for those unfamiliar he directed They Live By The Night and In A Lonely Place two absolute Noir classics.


https://www.channel4.com/programmes/the-american-friend/on-demand/8687-001
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 01, 2021, 08:41:19 PM
More stuff was leaving (and has now left) Netflix, so I finally got around to watching:

Flawless (1999)
Joel Schumacher, hot off the turkeytronic antics of Batman and Robin, seemed to make an attempt at regaining some critical kudos with this fairly low key comedy drama. Robert De Niro and Philip Seymour Hoffman star respectively as Walter - a homophobic New York police officer - and Rusty - an out and proud singer, to whom Walter turns for help with speech therapy, after suffering a stroke. Will this classic odd couple clash but eventually become friends? Well obviously.

Hoffman is unsurprisingly excellent, inspiring pathos, without making the character into some one dimensional saint - it's not Driving Miss Daisy, but with homophobia instead of racism. It would be tempting to describe the film as passing the torch to him from DeNiro, but this is no meeting of equals. Bobby (on the cusp of his full on shite years) is no match for Hoffman here. I vaguely recall Mark Kermode at the time describing DeNiro's mumbling performance as a bad impression of himself and, for once, he was right.

Also, having said it was fairly low key, the film still feels the need to include a melodramatic subplot about drug dealers menacing the building after one of the residents steals their money. Despite there only being three of them, no one (including Walter or his frequently visiting police buddies) does anything about them, until things boil over in a ridiculous action finale. It feels like a particularly clumsy point that Walter suffers his stroke while attempting to intervene in their first rampage, but just by coincidence.

You can't watch it on Netflix now anyway, but I wouldn't particularly bother, even if you could. Maybe watch it if you're a Hoffman completist, but he was in much better films than this. So was DeNiro, once.

Fruitvale Station (2013)

Ryan Coogler's debut feature and also his with Michael B. Jordan, in the role of Oscar Grant, who was shot dead by transport police at the titular station, on New Year's Day 2009.

Coogler opens with a real video of the shooting, before flashing back to the beginning of the previous day. This gives the whole film a horrible, ticking clock sense of doom, made all the worse by how mundane Grant's final day was. Filmed documentary style, we follow him around as he argues and makes up with his girlfriend, drops his daughter off at school, helps a grateful young woman at the supermarket, puts his own money worries aside to help his sister with her rent, celebrates their mother's birthday and, finally, enjoys the New Year's celebrations in San Francisco. While the film doesn't shy away from showing that Grant had spent time in prison, the overall portrait of him we are given is that of a perfectly normal young man, no more, no less.

Performances are excellent across the board. Jordan, already a veteran of dying tragically young onscreen, carries the film effortlessly, with an understated charisma that makes you hope for the best, even though you know full well that's not on the cards. Melonie Diaz does similarly strong work as Grant's girlfriend, as does Octavia Spencer as his tough but fair mother.

This one I do recommend seeking out. Despite being set on a specific date it is, sadly, timeless.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 02, 2021, 12:44:56 AM
Whenever Mitchum comes up I always recommend The Big Steal, a very early Don Siegel noir: super short, slick and takes place in the hot Mexican sun. Some great car chases. And Mitchum is incredible.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 02, 2021, 04:48:23 AM
Rewatched The Red Shoes last night. Really cements it as one of my favourites, if not my absolute favourite. Just extraordinary filmmaking.

Gia. TV movie about the model Gia Carangi, played by Angelina Jolie. It's pretty standard biopic fare, quite well done but nothing particularly amazing.

The Quiet Family. Korean dark comedy about a family who owns a mountain inn and lots of
Spoiler alert
murders
[close]
end up happening. Thought I'd really enjoy this but it kind of fell flat for me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on April 03, 2021, 02:18:19 AM
The 2020 Andy Samberg joint, Palm Springs.

It were alright.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 03, 2021, 04:27:25 PM
Apollo 13 - 1995
I didn't think I'd seen this before.
I had.
Anyhow, great stuff. Tom Hanks is excellent as always.
Loved the hubbub of Houston.
Brilliant.
Isn't space brilliant!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 03, 2021, 07:11:25 PM
Lethal Weapon One of those from the "famous films you've never seen" pile. It was enjoyable but quite peculiarly dated: thinking about films like this, people notice the '80s fashions and designs[nb]which I actually rather like, it's quite comforting seeing those colours and styles on screen[/nb] but forget the shouty acting - seriously, there's something wrong when Gary Busey is the most restrained of the lead actors - and odd pacing. And speaking of odd, the climax is just bizarre, Gibson putting his arrest of Busey on hold in order to, um, mudwrestle him in front of a captive audience instead. What?
Some classic Hollywood psychology too as Danny Glover's daughter is kidnapped by gangsters, possibly raped, tortured, witnesses the murder of her boyfriend and at least two bloody gunfights in which men are shot in the face literally a foot or two away from her, and in the next scene is redecorating the family home and enjoying Christmas dinner with one of the men responsible for those killings.
Nice location work. Weird to see a Hollywood blockbuster nicking jokes from Dad's Army.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 04, 2021, 11:45:46 AM
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me – Teresa Banks, and the Last Days of Laura Palmer - Fan edit of the 1992 film which inserts the "missing pieces" scenes to bump it up to 3.5 hours. It really didn't feel that long to me (although the Pink Room scene seems to go on forever), seamlessly edited and I can imagine this being the version I watch more than the original cut from now on. Definitely deviates from the main story a bit more, with appearances from many of the show's secondary characters. Still amazes me that the film was dismissed on initial release as just trashy nonsense when it's actually a very profound exploration of abuse/incest, focusing on the victim's life and feelings which is a rare thing in stories of this nature. Quentin Tarantino declaring after seeing it at Cannes that Lynch had gone "so far up his own ass" which is a bit rich. Sheryl Lee should have won every award going.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 05, 2021, 07:33:27 AM
Blade. Went in expecting a pretty silly and dated vampire superhero film but this is surprisingly really good. Hasn't dated that much, action sequences are superb. It is very cool.

Tokyo Eyes. Quirky French-Japanese production about a man who puts on glasses and goes around shooting at people and the police detective's little sister who falls in love with him.

Blues Harp. Takashi Miike I hadn't seen (one of hundreds I suppose). Quiet and reflective, which is not something you can say for a lot of Miikes - though still involving some degree of (mob) violence. Fun live music moments too.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 06, 2021, 07:27:14 AM
Forgot the other day I also watched Bullet in the Head. Probably my favourite John Woo of the handful I've seen now. Surprisingly epic and sensitive - was not expecting a Vietnam War film. It's a little over 2 hours but feels like it packs a lot more in.

April Story. My first Shunji Iwai. Pretty blown away. Simple but incredibly touching.

Khrustalyov, My Car!. Absolutely mad and poetic portrait of life during Stalin's final years. Really must get around to Hard to Be a God.

Bulworth. Another kind of political satire, much more broad and straightforward of course, perhaps no use comparing. But a strong script, very fun.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 06, 2021, 08:57:42 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on April 06, 2021, 07:27:14 AM
Khrustalyov, My Car!. Absolutely mad and poetic portrait of life during Stalin's final years. Really must get around to Hard to Be a God.

Only seen those two but Germans style is almost apart from any other cinema I'v seen, the kind of circus like atmosphere with everyone performing almost knowingly to the camera building up a sense of madness. Hard To Be a God is actually quite a similar story just shifted from Stalinism to medieval sci fi that arguably has heavy doses of it is as well, perhaps easier to follow as you don't need to know specifics of history as much as Khrustalyov that offers you very little explanation for say the plot to try and connect the lead character to a foreign influence or him discovering a double of himself.

They are both two of the best looking films ever made for me and it is quite amazing how consistently they come up with great looking images given the long roving takes.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Rock on April 06, 2021, 10:44:34 AM
I've watched everything on YouTube so I'm having a movie marathon of stuff I haven't seen.

Greed
The Steve Coogan thing. I found it enjoyable enough. I liked it when
Spoiler alert
the lion bit his head off.
[close]
6/10

Gran Torino
Liked it. Clint's face is a work of art. 7/10

Parasite
Brilliant stuff. 10/10

I'm Thinking Of Ending Things
Super-loved it. Suspenseful, puzzling, I got that it was dream-logic to some extent, loved the ending though couldn't work out exactly what it meant. Reading here that it was
Spoiler alert
the janitor's fantasy
[close]
made a lot of sense and I guess means
Spoiler alert
the girl was never in that creepy situation
[close]
, cos I was worried. 10/10

Nomadland.
Couldn't get into it. Got bored and turned it off before the end. 5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: The Ombudsman on April 06, 2021, 11:41:41 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on April 03, 2021, 04:27:25 PM
Apollo 13 - 1995
I didn't think I'd seen this before.
I had.
Anyhow, great stuff. Tom Hanks is excellent as always.
Loved the hubbub of Houston.
Brilliant.
Isn't space brilliant!

Watched this yesterday and enjoyed it again. Been watching some older films with the daughter of late, one of which was The Mask. Definitely a film that wouldn't be made today. The ending was a re-surprise.

Also been going through the Tom Hanks and John Candy back catalogue. Candy was such a treat to watch.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on April 06, 2021, 11:51:50 AM
The Third Man - Classic. Lots of zither

The Godfather -  I know it is the Cineaste 101 film of choice but it is fucking amazing. The acting, the cinematography, the attention to detail. A film you can live in for a few hours, however disreputable the company. And there are the little fun bits like James Caan's ridiculously short punch when he is beating up Connie's husband
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 06, 2021, 12:42:32 PM
Rope - 1948
Classic Hitchcock, here. So well done, with a small ensemble cast. James Stewart, John Dall & Joan Chandler to name a few.
Chandler was great, particularly.
Based on a play, and I want to see that play!
One of my top 3 Hitchcock's, this.

Page Eight - 2011
The first in the 'Johnny Worricker Trilogy'.
Really slick 'government shenanigans' type of film.
Bill Nighy, Michael Gambon, Rachel Weiss & Ralph Fiennes head the cast.
Will definitely be watching the other 2 films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 06, 2021, 12:48:43 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on April 06, 2021, 11:51:50 AM

The Godfather -  I know it is the Cineaste 101 film of choice but it is fucking amazing. The acting, the cinematography, the attention to detail. A film you can live in for a few hours, however disreputable the company. And there are the little fun bits like James Caan's ridiculously short punch when he is beating up Connie's husband

I recently re-watched the 7.5 hour Godfather Epic, which basically is the first 2 films in chronological order. Might sound a bit pointless but there's an additional hour of footage not in the theatrical cuts which really flesh out the story, particularly lots more of Vito/De Niro in the 1900s.

I'd still opt for the original versions but it's worth watching.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 06, 2021, 04:57:08 PM
Harvey (1950) - closest I got to an easter movie with its giant rabbit. More James Stewart, who gives a brilliant performance, underplaying nicely as the town alcoholic. Everything is fast moving, charming, funny. It's dated, and I guess even in 1950 it would be a bit dated with its small town setting and grand middle-aged women, but it's still very entertaining. It's easy to imagine someone like Jerry Lewis or Jim Carrey completely ruining the film, and it's to Stewart's huge credit that it all seems quite natural, and it's never mean or cruel.

The Secret of NIHM (1982) - well-made and thoughtful animated adventure with a mix of the lighthearted (zany crow) and more serious; it is similar to the Borrowers movies in that way, despite being famously non-Disney. It has a reputation as being very scary, which I think is largely down to some bizarre character design moreso than the plot, which is fairly standard as a small mouse goes on a quest to save her home, albeit with a female protagonist and a slightly more portentous tone than Disney. I don't like the massive deus ex machina (
Spoiler alert
a magic gemstone that can just rescue everybody
[close]
), but maybe small children wouldn't mind (because they were too busy cowering at the icky rat hands.) Also not sure what the actual NIMH would make of it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on April 07, 2021, 02:16:58 AM
Quote from: Shameless Custard on April 01, 2021, 12:30:59 PM
I've not seen Robert Mitchum be less than stellar in anything I've seen him in. He's also great in The Friends Of Eddie Coyle
Pretty fucking great in Ryan's Daughter, injects far more life into a character I suspect was a  bit of a dud from the script alone. Kinda think it's the best of the Lean epics tbh and it's largely due to him saving some of the weaker points.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 07, 2021, 03:11:45 PM
Wild Tales Entertaining anthology film from Argentinian director Damián Szifron comprising several short stories about people losing control and giving in to their violent and vengeful urges. Could have been trashy but thanks to stylish direction and a cast of top-rank Argentine stars playing morally ambiguous characters (Darin etc) it hits the mark.

Daisies Cult Czech classic about two girls going round poking fun at everyone and everything. Was banned by the authorities because, well, it takes the piss out of them, though it's more about social rules and mores than the specific political situation. It's very highly rated by many even today; for me, I never really warmed to the two leads, which stopped me really getting into it, but it's hugely creative nonetheless and there are some great bits of psychedelic avant-garde cinematography (
Spoiler alert
the scene with the scissors stands out
[close]
).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on April 07, 2021, 04:00:13 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on April 07, 2021, 03:11:45 PM
Wild Tales Entertaining anthology film from Argentinian director Damián Szifron comprising several short stories about people losing control and giving in to their violent and vengeful urges. Could have been trashy but thanks to stylish direction and a cast of top-rank Argentine stars playing morally ambiguous characters (Darin etc) it hits the mark.

An outstanding anthology film.  Right up there with Creepshow and Twilight Zone: The Movie for my money.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Alberon on April 07, 2021, 08:23:57 PM
The Devil At Your Heels

1981 Canadian documentary about stunt driver Ken Carter and his attempt to jump a mile across the St Lawrence river in a jet powered car. The film covers five years in his attempt to make the jump happen. Health and safety is virtually non-existent and the whole endeavour is very ramshackle.

It's here on YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgIhGTpKTwM&t=615s
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 08, 2021, 08:58:32 AM
"99 and 44/100 Dead"

I saw a trailer for this on one of those Color Space compilation things. It looked amazing, like a knowing James Bond rip-off starring Richard Harris.

It was shit. The small kernels of ideas weren't popped into life and left to wilt. The opening with all the bodies wearing cement shoes in the river was the best bit.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on April 08, 2021, 09:14:42 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on April 08, 2021, 08:58:32 AM
"99 and 44/100 Dead"

I saw a trailer for this on one of those Color Space compilation things. It looked amazing, like a knowing James Bond rip-off starring Richard Harris.

It was shit. The small kernels of ideas weren't popped into life and left to wilt. The opening with all the bodies wearing cement shoes in the river was the best bit.

Very disappointing movie. It never lives up to that opening and Harris' hair was so shit it kept distracting me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 08, 2021, 09:26:58 AM
Barfly - grim 70's Cannon films adaptation of Bukowski's work. Bukowski doesn't do much for me and I'm well aware he was a shit, this film caught my eye amongst some others when watching the Boogaloo documentary on Cannon because of some clips in it showingmmisery and squalor and Dunway and Rourke seemed to intrigue me. It was alright in a learned helplessness kind of way. Pretty sleazy but that's Cannon innit.

Might make a cannon thread, I've also got Joe and Masters of the Universe amongst others to get through.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 08, 2021, 10:27:54 AM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on April 08, 2021, 09:14:42 AM
Very disappointing movie. It never lives up to that opening and Harris' hair was so shit it kept distracting me.

The hair! Even when it was wet it looked like a hat!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Vitalstatistix on April 08, 2021, 07:52:03 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on March 29, 2021, 04:46:21 PM
They're his two best for me, though Talk Radio isn't on the same level as Salvador. James Woods is so good in the latter it's a shame he's such a mahoosive cunt.

Such a wild ride of a film. On one hand a tragic, searing indictment of US foreign intervention in central America and on the other hand a weird, darkly comic, drug addled buddy movie.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 09, 2021, 07:37:18 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on April 06, 2021, 12:42:32 PM
Page Eight - 2011
The first in the 'Johnny Worricker Trilogy'.
Really slick 'government shenanigans' type of film.
Bill Nighy, Michael Gambon, Rachel Weiss & Ralph Fiennes head the cast.
Will definitely be watching the other 2 films.
Turks & Caicos - 2014
The second in the JW Trilogy.
Which finds our Johnny hiding out on an island off the coast of Florida, and getting into more government style mischief. Christopher Walkern stars, and is of course awesome, along with Helena Bonham Carter & Rupert Graves.
Polished stuff. Really enjoyable. Life changing? No. Just good stuff. Nighy is so debonair, isn't he?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 10, 2021, 08:50:17 AM
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword no shot lasted longer than 5 seconds. Gave up trying to understand what was happening, started trying to follow along with the Wikipedia plot summary.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on April 10, 2021, 08:21:00 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on March 29, 2021, 04:46:21 PM
They're his two best for me, though Talk Radio isn't on the same level as Salvador. James Woods is so good in the latter it's a shame he's such a mahoosive cunt.

I asked him on Twitter if he thinks Salvador has a happy ending these days and he didn't even bother blocking me for it. What's the use, I say...
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 10, 2021, 08:46:58 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on April 08, 2021, 09:26:58 AM
Might make a cannon thread, I've also got Joe and Masters of the Universe amongst others to get through.

Please do. I watched that wildly entertaining Cannon documentary last week, and while I appreciate that it's probably more fun to sit through than most of the shite they pumped out, I did laugh at the sheer amount of shameless sleaze and gore in some of the film clips.

I've seen Over the Top, Masters of the Universe, Superman IV and the hilarious Death Wish 3, but is there anything else worth checking out from their oeuvre?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Rock on April 10, 2021, 08:59:11 PM
This one sounds good

Little Girl... Big Tease
Plot
Virginia, the 16-year-old daughter of a wealthy businessman, is kidnapped by a two men, J.D. and Dakota, and Alva Coward, a woman who is her high school economics teacher. While the details of the payout of the $2 million ransom are being worked out by J.D. and Alva, Virginia is raped by the muscle-man of the outfit and is comforted by the woman, whom she has sex with. Virginia also has sex with the boss of the outfit. She enjoys having sex with the three and helps them escape after she is ransomed.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on April 10, 2021, 09:55:25 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 10, 2021, 08:46:58 PM
Please do. I watched that wildly entertaining Cannon documentary last week, and while I appreciate that it's probably more fun to sit through than most of the shite they pumped out, I did laugh at the sheer amount of shameless sleaze and gore in some of the film clips.

I've seen Over the Top, Masters of the Universe, Superman IV and the hilarious Death Wish 3, but is there anything else worth checking out from their oeuvre?

Runway Train and 52 Pick-Up are both well worth your time (one genuinely excellent, one a brilliant exercise in high sleaze from Elmore Leonard source material). I get my share of high-low chortles from the two titles they produced when Golan-Globus were trying to buy sophistication: Godard's King Lear and Norman Mailer's Tough Guys Don't Dance. Can't in good faith call them "good" films, or even "non-boring for the most part," but they have their moments if you're in the right mood. (There's a certain Ryan O'Neal moment in the latter that has justly become legendary, which I shan't ruin if you haven't seen't.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on April 10, 2021, 09:56:00 PM
.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 10, 2021, 10:35:03 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 10, 2021, 08:46:58 PM
Please do. I watched that wildly entertaining Cannon documentary last week, and while I appreciate that it's probably more fun to sit through than most of the shite they pumped out, I did laugh at the sheer amount of shameless sleaze and gore in some of the film clips.

I've seen Over the Top, Masters of the Universe, Superman IV and the hilarious Death Wish 3, but is there anything else worth checking out from their oeuvre?

I'll get round to doing a proper thread shortly. I found it quite funny how Alex Winter was simultaneously so jolly and scathing about Cannon and Winner.

Life Force is good in a scifi B-Movie kind of way. It's not exactly sleazy as such but there's a lot of gratuitous and unneccesary nudity from the leading woman (she's pretty much in the buff for most of her time on screen) but if you're willing to put that aside there's a good B-Movie with decent special effects (I think they may have near bankrupted themselves on that, Buzby did a good explanation last time it was mentioned).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 11, 2021, 11:38:29 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on April 10, 2021, 10:35:03 PM
I'll get round to doing a proper thread shortly. I found it quite funny how Alex Winter was simultaneously so jolly and scathing about Cannon and Winner.

Life Force is good in a scifi B-Movie kind of way. It's not exactly sleazy as such but there's a lot of gratuitous and unneccesary nudity from the leading woman (she's pretty much in the buff for most of her time on screen) but if you're willing to put that aside there's a good B-Movie with decent special effects (I think they may have near bankrupted themselves on that, Buzby did a good explanation last time it was mentioned).

I spose you could argue within that story of a space vampire seducing people the nudity isn't "unnecessary" and honestly I do suspect it had a bit of an influence on Under the Skin in the kind of unsettling inhuman pacing. Moreso really the whole film is a bit of a mess of ideas, none of which are really devolped that well but have enough of a budget behind them to make for impressive B-movie entertainment, exploding zombies, alien ships, etc.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 11, 2021, 04:01:11 PM
Capricorn One1970s with made for TV vibe about a Mars mission that turns into a conspiracy thriller. Mostly Unremarkable except for a faceless villians that are pair of helicopters. They search in tandem for
Spoiler alert
rogue astronauts
[close]
. After they hover facing the camera and any sign of what they are looking for, they turn and face each other and exchange unblinking chocohelicopter gaze before resuming their mission. It is brilliant/hilarious. Seen here just after surveying a "crash" scene.

(https://i.postimg.cc/mknRvZvW/Screen-Shot-2018-12-28-at-1-44-05-PM.png)

And it has  mostly silent OJ as one of the astronauts.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 11, 2021, 06:19:26 PM
Made a gif

(https://j.gifs.com/5QJErX.gif)

what ya thinking choppy?

<choppy shrugs>
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 12, 2021, 06:39:58 AM
Rewatched Kiss of the Spider Woman. Holds up very well, tender and nuanced prison bottle film. William Hurt and Raúl Juliá act up a storm as two cellmates in Brazil. Woefully forgotten I think.

The Legend of 1900. Schmaltzy tale with Tim Roth as a virtuosic pianist who was born on a cruise ship and never left. Directed by Giuseppe Tornatore who made Cinema Paradiso, one of my favourites. I feel like if this was filmed in Italian I would have loved it, something about the English dialogue made it a bit naff. But features some brilliant cinematography.

Who's Singin' Over There?. Serbian comedy about a ragtag bunch of passengers travelling on a bus to the capital at the cusp of the outbreak of WWII. Seems to be quite renowned; I quite liked it but didn't think it was particularly amazing.

Kuroneko. Japanese horror drama from the director of the excellent Onibaba, Kaneto Shindo. Beautiful ghost story.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 12, 2021, 12:15:14 PM
Party Girl (1995) - low budget New York-set indie comedy starring Parker Posey as an irresponsible young woman who goes to a lot of parties, but takes a job as a library clerk to pay back her godmother for bailing her out of jail, and is bewitched by the Dewey Decimal System. Apparently a cult among librarians, it's entertaining with some funny moments (jokes about DJing and psychotic club-owners) and nice clothes, although it's nothing very special, and some cultural appropriation around her Lebanese boyfriend now seems slightly dodgy. It's directed by Daisy von Scherler Mayer whose best-known film is probably the 1998 adaptation of French schoolgirl story Madeline. It's free on Amazon Prime but their version is really shitty quality and seems like a bad NTSC TV conversion with extra frames for added jerkiness and slightly non-synced speech (unless the original is like that too).

The Boston Strangler (1968) - Overly flashy with lots of split screen gimmicks, but a great cast (Tony Curtis, Henry Fonda, George Kennedy) all giving solid performances, and an engrossing investigation. Some interesting stuff about how a lot of detectives (incorrectly) assumed the killer was gay, leading to scenes of early-60s gay establishments that may or may not be accurate. It was spoiled for me afterwards on learning that the events in the film are almost entirely made up and bear very little resemblance to the real murders or investigation. The real killer strangled his victims with silk stockings, none of that here, and rather than as in the film
Spoiler alert
Henry Fonda's bookish lawyer breaking him down
[close]
, the real DeSalvo originally confessed to another inmate, and then made a confession to police which wasn't used because they were unable to find corroborating evidence (some people believe he was lying) but it was eventually revealed by his defence lawyer (!) in an entirely separate case trying to argue he was insane. Still, as a film it's solid entertainment and fun for fans of armchair psychology.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on April 12, 2021, 12:52:42 PM
Two return viewings...

The Station Agent 2003

Gentle yet dry comedy starring pre GOT Peter Dinklage as Finbar who inherits an old derelict station in the middle of nowheresville USA and his (non) adventures with lovavble lunk Bobby Carnavale and Patricia Clarkson's unhappy with her lot Olivia.

Quirky would be doing it a disservice as it's more than the sum of it's parts. Well worth 90 minutes of your time.

The Quick and the Dead 1995

Well made Sam Raimi western that wears it's Leone influences on it's sleeve. Star studded for such a directorial indulgence with Sharon Stone, Di Caprio, Gladiator, Bishop and of course the great Gene Hackman reprising his role from Unforgiven. Love it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Spiteface on April 12, 2021, 01:21:58 PM
Destroy All Monsters (1968)

Epic Showa-era goodness, with Godzilla and all the other Toho kaiju up to that point engaging in a big scrap. This is the kind of thing that if they ever follow up the recent Godzilla vs Kong, they should do, or even full-on Final Wars insanity.

All Monsters Attack (1969)

This was short, and even at less than 70 minutes, this dragged. There's even recycled footage from the previous few films. The worst so far.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on April 12, 2021, 02:00:26 PM
Smithereens (1982)

A Criterion blind buy which I liked a lot. Refreshingly moral-free (definitely no hugging and only the hint of learning) and with great and authentic performances from everyone, especially Susan Berman in the lead role. Her character Wren is affected and caustic and a social parasite, but you can see the fragility of the facade, and the constant self-aware tension that she's been inspired by society to want something that isn't fulfilling. A very real and affecting performance worn very casually.

It was filmed without permits and the early 80s New York and punk scene captured by Susan Seidelman's guerrilla-style filmmaking are fascinating to see. Feels like a peek into living history. For its simple 'week in the life' narrative, it's deceptively complex too. It's nice that there are no judgements about Wren's decisions, although the consequences are there to see. I wasn't sure about the ambiguous ending at first, as it felt a bit too bleak-leaning for a character you've come to know and empathise with, but after thinking it over I like that they didn't wrap it up neatly or offer anything more than the chance for development.

It was also a great reminder of how films don't have to be straightforward or follow the tried-and-tested storyline structures to work. Been watching too much algorithm-produced stuff lately and this was a proper blast to the senses. Cracking soundtrack too.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 12, 2021, 10:01:35 PM
Winter Kills from 1979, Jeff Bridge staring in a kind of black comedy send up on political conspiracy theories with a alternate Kennedy family. Very nice looking film and excellent cast though it doesn't feel like it really gets to grips with the black comedy side of things to me, I spose being a fore runner to this kind of film does mean its feeling its ground somewhat but only really Huston and especially Antony Perkins I think really tap into true absurdity. The obvious comparison I spose is the Coens and especially Lewbowski with Bridges uncovering a similarly absurd plot.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 14, 2021, 10:38:56 AM
Maps To The Stars

After reading about this David Cronenberg film that I've never heard of in the "Scanners" thread I thought I'd give it a go.

Meh. It's sort of disjointed and feels like it's been chopped down from a much longer running time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on April 14, 2021, 01:17:17 PM
Bad Words

A very funny film about a 40 year old man entering a spelling bee, although I really didn't like how the main character made several racist comments about one of the other characters. If they had got rid of those, this would be one of my favourite films. His racist comments went otherwise unremarked in the film, which annoyed me. It was made in 2013 as well.

I mean the main character is meant to be a complete dick but the racist comments made him totally vile.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 15, 2021, 08:39:45 AM
Wild In The Streets

A band of "young" "kids" (feat. 28 year old Richard Pryor on drums) take over America and put anyone over 30 into LSD camps. Hal Holbrook is the one voice of reason.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on April 15, 2021, 09:03:29 AM
Assault on Precinct 13 - Carpenter really was the tits in the 70s/80s. This is lean, taut, economical, cliched but knowingly. I really liked the proto-Plisken despite not being sure at the start. There is almost nothing to the film but it is just so enjoyable
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on April 15, 2021, 09:39:38 AM
Quote from: phantom_power on April 15, 2021, 09:03:29 AM
Assault on Precinct 13 - Carpenter really was the tits in the 70s/80s. This is lean, taut, economical, cliched but knowingly. I really liked the proto-Plisken despite not being sure at the start. There is almost nothing to the film but it is just so enjoyable

Picked that up recently when Second Sight had a sale and it really is the nuts isn't it. Studio Canal releasing the four Carpenter films they had access to on remastered 4K the other year was a bloody gift.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 15, 2021, 12:30:20 PM
Quote from: frajer on April 15, 2021, 09:39:38 AM
Picked that up recently when Second Sight had a sale and it really is the nuts isn't it. Studio Canal releasing the four Carpenter films they had access to on remastered 4K the other year was a bloody gift.

I think theres actually more Carpenter on UHD disk than any other director, those releases plus Halloween and Christine in the US, talk about The Thing happening as well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 15, 2021, 12:30:41 PM
Double shite feature last night

Parker 2013 Statham film I only realized I had already seen about an hour in. Quite poorly done, even for a Statham film. Jennifer Lopez isn't too bad in it, Bunk from The Wire is terrible. Gary Bussey seems barely alive.

Ava (2020 ) Jessica Chastain is black ops killing machine. John Malkovich is a black ops killing machine. Common (the rapper) ex-boyfriend of Ava is a very bad actor. The story is weak and unoriginal.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on April 15, 2021, 12:37:08 PM
Quote from: greenman on April 15, 2021, 12:30:20 PM
I think theres actually more Carpenter on UHD disk than any other director, talk about The Thing happening as well.

Ha yeah there might well be! That's very pleasing to think. As phantom_power said, his run of films in the 70s/80s is brilliant.

Also a big fan of In The Mouth of Madness. Would love that to get the full Arrow Video treatment.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on April 15, 2021, 12:57:30 PM
Lucky Grandma (2019) - deeply disappointing Chinese-language US indie film about an old woman who 'finds' (steals) a bag full of cash on an expired mafia man. Empty.

The Mole Agent (2020) - Chilean documentary/meta-documentary about a widower recruited by a PA to go undercover in an old folks' home. There's a litle element of seriousness but most of it is accidental Fielder-esque comedy. Quite good.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 15, 2021, 02:23:15 PM
Rocky 1, 2 & 3 - Seeing as ITV4 were showing them all and I never went past the first before. First is obviously a nice bit of late-70s grime with a heart of gold. 2 and 3 weren't bad either, I liked the mutual respect between Balboa and Creed. By 3 we're seeing the template go a bit stale, but Lawrence Tureaud does a great job playing the bastard nutter proto-Tyson, really believable, pretty scary.

Gave up on 4, just too fucking ridiculous. But the first 3 are definitely a worthwhile watch. May catch up with the later restart films (Balboa and Creed) if they ever turn up on TV at the right time.

Raging Bull - Also happened to turn up on TV, and I had just enjoyed those Rocky films, so might as well. Eeh, it's Scorsese, so it's well done, but it's also about Italian-American men being cunts to their wives. I'm not one of them types that goes all "oooh no, I can watch violence against women", but it really felt like there wasn't much else to the story. Guy's good at boxing, (doesn't quiet) learns too late there's more to life than boxing. Couldn't find any real reason to care about LaMotta. Also, although well shot, the fight scenes didn't really work as fights for me, just a collection of well framed punches but no overall flow.

So there you have it, Rocky is better than Raging Bull. Don't know if I've tripped the iconoclast alarm there, take it up with my robot butler.

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/LHwsYaaqHpc/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 03:57:56 PM
Quote from: Blumf on April 15, 2021, 02:23:15 PM
Raging Bull ... although well shot, the fight scenes didn't really work as fights for me, just a collection of well framed punches but no overall flow.
If I may go all Pseuds Corner, it's not really about boxing. They aren't trying to work as fights, but expressionistic depictions of anger and violence (hence all the wild animal noises on the soundtrack).

One slightly naff bit that's always stuck in my brain is the scene in which his brother is blanking him after their big bust up years prior. They pass by a shop with a big 'Closed' sign in the window - because his brother isn't open to reconciling, see? As Scorsese symbolism goes, it's up there with the rat at the end of The Departed.

Quote from: Dex Sawash on April 15, 2021, 12:30:41 PM
Parker

Ava
This reminds me; What is point naming films after the lead character like that? It makes sense for biopics of famous people, but what am I supposed to get from Parker? Is it the riveting tale of how one man created a line of fountain pens against all odds, or a spinoff from Thunderbirds?[nb]Bad example perhaps, as I know it's actually based off a vaguely well known series of novels - although previous adaptations changed the character's name, so he can't be that much of a draw.[/nb]

I supposed the aforementioned Rocky did the same thing (which could have been even more confusing for anyone expecting a film about Rocky Marciano) but even Indiana Jones and Rambo had to wait until the sequels to get their names in the titles.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on April 15, 2021, 04:03:22 PM
I think the unknown name title can work okay for artier films, but it really does make action films sound like they're going to be shite.

When trailers and posters told us Keanu Reeves IS "John Wick" I remember being massively surprised that the film was actually good.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 04:08:49 PM
John Wick. The heartwarming story of how candles were invented.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 15, 2021, 04:15:10 PM
Quote from: frajer on April 15, 2021, 04:03:22 PM
I think the unknown name title can work okay for artier films, but it really does make action films sound like they're going to be shite.

When trailers and posters told us Keanu Reeves IS "John Wick" I remember being massively surprised that the film was actually good.
Yeah, it sort of makes sense for something like Jack Reacher where the books are very successful (and the films are solidly mediocre). But why would you go see a film named after someone you've never heard of? Are we supposed to believe the filmmakers have done such a good job coming up with the lead character's name that you have to see it? With something like Harry Brown (great name there, guys) the assumption must be that Michael Caine's name on the poster is five times as big as the title and it's interchangeable with every other movie in which he plays an elderly bad lad.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 04:38:53 PM
Also, titles that start with American... can chuff off as well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 15, 2021, 06:05:48 PM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 03:57:56 PM
This reminds me; What is point naming films after the lead

When I googled them each to be sure I didn't say they starred Marky Mark or Matt Damon accidentally, the auto suggest second choices were AVA 2 and Parker 2. Maybe it is so big fans of barely watchable films can search for sequels easier.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 06:28:06 PM
Hesher (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1403177/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1) is a good example. What on Earth is that supposed to mean? Is it the main character's name, his job, or something else?[nb]It's his name, as if that makes things any clearer.[/nb]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on April 15, 2021, 08:21:03 PM
Quote from: Blumf on April 15, 2021, 02:23:15 PM
Raging Bull - Also happened to turn up on TV, and I had just enjoyed those Rocky films, so might as well. Eeh, it's Scorsese, so it's well done, but it's also about Italian-American men being cunts to their wives. I'm not one of them types that goes all "oooh no, I can watch violence against women", but it really felt like there wasn't much else to the story. Guy's good at boxing, (doesn't quiet) learns too late there's more to life than boxing. Couldn't find any real reason to care about LaMotta. Also, although well shot, the fight scenes didn't really work as fights for me, just a collection of well framed punches but no overall flow.

So there you have it, Rocky is better than Raging Bull. Don't know if I've tripped the iconoclast alarm there, take it up with my robot butler.

rewatched it recently and i think it's more a film about (as the kids say these days) 'toxic masculinity' and the madonna/whore complex than a sports drama.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 09:31:17 PM
Quote from: Blumf on April 15, 2021, 02:23:15 PM
Rocky 1, 2 & 3 - Seeing as ITV4 were showing them all and I never went past the first before. First is obviously a nice bit of late-70s grime with a heart of gold. 2 and 3 weren't bad either, I liked the mutual respect between Balboa and Creed. By 3 we're seeing the template go a bit stale, but Lawrence Tureaud does a great job playing the bastard nutter proto-Tyson, really believable, pretty scary.

Gave up on 4, just too fucking ridiculous. But the first 3 are definitely a worthwhile watch. May catch up with the later restart films (Balboa and Creed) if they ever turn up on TV at the right time.

Raging Bull - Also happened to turn up on TV, and I had just enjoyed those Rocky films, so might as well. Eeh, it's Scorsese, so it's well done, but it's also about Italian-American men being cunts to their wives. I'm not one of them types that goes all "oooh no, I can watch violence against women", but it really felt like there wasn't much else to the story. Guy's good at boxing, (doesn't quiet) learns too late there's more to life than boxing. Couldn't find any real reason to care about LaMotta. Also, although well shot, the fight scenes didn't really work as fights for me, just a collection of well framed punches but no overall flow.

So there you have it, Rocky is better than Raging Bull. Don't know if I've tripped the iconoclast alarm there, take it up with my robot butler.

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/LHwsYaaqHpc/maxresdefault.jpg)

Agree on raging bull. Who cares about this prick?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 09:35:13 PM
Quote from: chveik on April 15, 2021, 08:21:03 PM
rewatched it recently and i think it's more a film about (as the kids say these days) 'toxic masculinity' and the madonna/whore complex than a sports drama.

Nah its a film about a cunt and his berk mates

Raging Knobhead

Should be called
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on April 15, 2021, 09:40:12 PM
yes he's a cunt, that's the fucking point
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 09:56:21 PM
That's it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 09:57:21 PM
Can't throw a rock in this town with out it bouncing off a Couplea cunts

Maybe it's just a busmans holiday for me
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on April 15, 2021, 10:00:51 PM
Quote from: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 09:56:21 PM
That's it?

an interesting cunt, like Travis Bickle and Rupert Pupkin
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 15, 2021, 10:11:10 PM
I watched it recently on Blu-Ray, still love it although De Niro's fake nose really stands out in HD. LaMotta is a pitiful figure, unable to solve his problems without resorting to violence or threats (as a child he was forced by his Dad to fight the neighbourhood toughies for cash which probably contributed to this), feelings of inadequacy and jealousy. But also part of a world where he's in some ways controlled by more powerful men. Great fight scenes, incredible editing (particularly the sound editing) and a wonderful soundtrack. Definitely find it to be Scorsese's most depressing film though (although ironically it was the film which brought him out of a deep depression).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 11:03:35 PM
Quote from: chveik on April 15, 2021, 10:00:51 PM
an interesting cunt, like Travis Bickle and Rupert Pupkin

Not even the best cunt in the beatles
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 15, 2021, 11:10:08 PM
Quote from: chveik on April 15, 2021, 10:00:51 PM
an interesting cunt, like Travis Bickle and Rupert Pupkin

That's just it, he's not. Bickle and Pupkin are interesting characters (and do interesting things), LaMotta is just an aggressive cunt, ten a penny in Scorsese films. I don't think you learn much from him, or about him, that you don't get within the first 10-15 minutes of the film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on April 15, 2021, 11:17:21 PM
Is there a best cunt in film thread?

Not best villain, specifically best CUNT
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 16, 2021, 07:17:40 AM
Boy Meets Girl. Debut of Leos Carax. Jaunty yet depressed vibes. Wears its French New Wave influences on its sleeve. I liked it but didn't knock me out.

Summer Interlude. Earlyish Ingmar Bergman. Pleasantly light.

I Kiss Your Hand, Madame. Earlyish Marlene Dietrich. Pleasantly light.

Every-Night Dreams. Earlyish Mikio Naruse. Pleasantly melodramatic.

The Meetings of Anna. After seeing Jeanne Dielman last year and being utterly blown away I thought I'd watch another Akerman. This one is almost just as brilliant; wholeheartedly melancholy.

The Valley of the Bees. Czech medieval-set drama. I find it incredibly hard to connect to Very Serious Films About Faith so this probably didn't do for me what it could for others but it's undoubtedly impressive and well-made with many striking moments.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 16, 2021, 11:26:01 AM
Black Girl (La noire de..., 1966) - groundbreaking Senegalese film, a minimalist chamber drama about a young African woman who works for a French couple and goes with them to the south of France where she finds herself reduced to kitchen slave and subject to the racist attentions of their friends and casual cruelty of the wife. It's largely set in the family's small French apartment - they're clearly not rich but still have all the power over the lead character - with some scenes in Dakar. It's generally shot in a realist way, but there are some excellent point-of-view shots and good use of a kid with a mask. Very impressive. The DVD also has a short film Barom Sarret (1963) about a man and his horse which is great. Despite its themes, immensely pleasurable to find there is so much world cinema to discover.

I also watched Strictly Ballroom (1992) - a big bundle of cliches but lots of fun and great dancing. Another film about the brutalising influence of colonialism. Seriously, was suburban/small-town Australia as grotesque as films depict it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on April 16, 2021, 11:32:37 AM
love The Meetings of Anna and Black Girl and Borrom Sarret (think this is the first black-made sub-Saharan film, quite a feat, and it is good!).

what I like about The Meetings of Anna is how you can input your own reading: is she manipulative, shrugging off trauma, confused, enjoying, etc. I think I preferred this to Jeanne Dielman actually.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blue Jam on April 16, 2021, 07:35:48 PM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 15, 2021, 04:08:49 PM
John Wick. The heartwarming story of how candles were invented.

And then used to
Spoiler alert
burn a puppy to death
[close]
.

Watched that yesterday, didnae like it
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on April 17, 2021, 07:41:10 PM
Quote from: chveik on April 15, 2021, 10:00:51 PM
an interesting cunt, like Travis Bickle and Rupert Pupkin

I've still never seen the film, but the parts about Raging Bull in Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, the seminal Peter Biskind book about 70s Hollywood are great, and filled with fascinating tidbits and moments of intrigue. Been a minute since I read the book now, but from memory:

Paul Schrader's script - while fascinating to Scorsese and De Niro - was loathed by almost everyone else. One reaction from the producer set to make it was along the lines of 'This guy's just a piece of shit' - it was certainly the commonly held opinion. From memory, the book traffics in a rumour that De Niro was the driving force, that he identified something elemental in LaMotta, and that HE did a huge rewrite on the script himself, uncredited, and that was the version that found at least some glimmers of humanity and got the film greenlit (which until then looked impossible).

I'll definitely watch it because it's my favourite era of Hollywood - and because especially if it's difficult material, I admire Martie and Robbie persevering to try and deliver their vision. At the same time, the book mentioned a scene where he's punching his own erection with rage or something, so I've always known I'll have to be in the mood for it...

Funnily enough, LaMotta ended up as a neighbour of Doug Stanhope's in Bisbee, Arizona, and he did a routine about how fucked up he was.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: bakabaka on April 17, 2021, 07:51:16 PM
Thought I'd introduce my son to a classic comedy or ten, starting with Blazing Saddles. I've not seen it probably since the 80's but always thought it was the most 'Mel Brooks' of his movies.

They made anti-racist movies differently back then; the number of times the word 'ni**er' was used was incredible and turned it into a very different film.

But it made the post-film discussion with my son was much more interesting than expected.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 17, 2021, 07:55:42 PM
Quote from: bakabaka on April 17, 2021, 07:51:16 PM
Thought I'd introduce my son to a classic comedy or ten, starting with Blazing Saddles. I've not seen it probably since the 80's but always thought it was the most 'Mel Brooks' of his movies.

They made anti-racist movies differently back then; the number of times the word 'ni**er' was used was incredible and turned it into a very different film.

But it made the post-film discussion with my son was much more interesting than expected.

I watched that for the first time in about three decades about a month ago and while I liked it I didn't love it, there's some really funny moments for sure and the cast are all great but I found it a little repetitive. Also on the parody front I watched Top Secret for the first time since I was a teenager and loved it, the plot is weak but it's packed full of absurd madness that made me laugh a lot, and the underwater finale is one of the funniest things I've seen in years.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 17, 2021, 07:57:59 PM
Heh, in a similar vein I watched Ishtar a while back, which I quite enjoyed (especially the scenes with different nations of spies all trying to look inconspicuous in hawaiian shirts etc).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on April 17, 2021, 08:18:53 PM
Great to see you back SMBH!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 17, 2021, 09:40:09 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on April 17, 2021, 08:18:53 PM
Great to see you back SMBH!

Even better to finally confirm he isn't Prince Phillip
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 17, 2021, 09:40:37 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on April 17, 2021, 08:18:53 PM
Great to see you back SMBH!

Thank you, that's very kind of you to say, as fond of this place as I am in general it was the people in Deeper Into Movies that I missed the most, and I've a backlog of mini-reviews I'll post over the next week or so.

Santa Claus (1959) - Strange Mexican film which spends the first ten minutes introducing all the children from different countries as they help Santa make toys, before we travel down to Hell where an off screen Lucifer demands that the devil makes children evil and thus angers Santa. And yeah, I thought Lucifer and the devil were one and the same but apparently not, and either way this takes a little while to get going as Santa mucks about the night before Christmas, hanging out with some kids and the wizard Merlin (yes, that one) and has access to a device that lets him witness children's dreams, which is disturbing indeed as young kid Lupita dreams of adult sized dolls emerging from their boxes and dancing around her, and one is the devil in disguise as he tries to persuade her to steal and be evil. Santa's eventually ready to leave and he gets his bag of toys and his giant wooden reindeers who laugh like a resident of the black lodge, and that is as traumatic as it sounds. From this point on it's a mixture of the devil trying to annoy Santa in increasingly petty ways and Santa doing nice things for people, and it's a strange mix, often quite funny and even occasionally quite touching, before going back to being incredibly weird or daft again. It's a shame the first thirty minutes are a little patchy as otherwise this would be a cult classic, but as it is it's just a pretty enjoyable slice of oddness. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 18, 2021, 10:23:05 PM
T-34 russian tank film. Tank crew gets captured and steals tank to escape from POW/concentration camp.
Amazon only has a shitty american dub. Pretty well done overall, some CGI was cheesy but the slo-mo of artillery rounds was good. Heaps of tension throughout. Would like to see in Russian with subs though.  Should have had East Bound and Down as theme song. 7.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 18, 2021, 10:27:11 PM
North by Northwest. Bit good innit?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 19, 2021, 07:43:44 AM
Death By Hanging. Brilliant satire of a man who survives an execution but loses his memory and the philosophical/logical gymnastics the guards and authorities have to go through as a result.

The Raid 2. Nowhere near as good as the first one by virtue of trying to be More Dramatic (and failing hard - it does not handle the gangland politics/emotions very well at all). The action, when it comes, admittedly, is top notch. Sags a bit in the middle with some unsurprising one-at-a-time-bashing, but comes back for a fantastic final half-hour or so.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 19, 2021, 09:32:56 PM
On Body and Soul Intriguing 2017 film from Hungarian director Ildikó Enyedi about two colleagues at a slaughterhouse - a tetchy manager, who seems a loner by choice, and an awkward inspector, a loner because she is evidently on the spectrum - who find that they are connecting in their dreams, and toy with starting a relationship. It's a really interesting film, a drama that is just ever so slightly off, and has a definite style of its own, but I found it frustratingly elusive: I wasn't sure what questions it was asking or ideas it was provoking, and the characters never quite rung true.

Boyz N the Hood Strange in a way to think this is nearly thirty years old, because neither the society it depicts nor the pop culture surrounding it have moved on that much; one thing that has moved on, though, is the depiction of those in film and TV, and this now seemed pretty tame in comparison to something like The Wire. Cuba Gooding Jr's naff performance didn't really help though the rest of the cast are strong and it's an engaging if predictable story.

Orlando I kind of had this written off as some stuffy, serious drama, and I've never cared much for Tilda Swinton, but I thought it was magical. Splendidly mounted, with the eerie music building a great atmosphere, and just the right mixture of grace and irreverence.

Ghost in the Shell I'm not convinced I'll ever really get into anime but it was interesting to see this and Akira. Like with Akira I really liked the production design - if you can call it that, meaning the background art of the city and locations - and there were a lot of interesting ideas floating around here, and great music; on the other hand, the plot was a mix of garbled backstory and simple chase scenes, and I'm simply not keen on the character design in anime and manga.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 19, 2021, 10:46:57 PM
I, Tonya (2017) - Good bit of fun, 2 hours breezed by. The story washed passed my at the time, so I had little idea about it, and it's clear here that I probably wouldn't have got close to the facts with the tabloid reporting at the time (she
Spoiler alert
didn't actually attack Nancy Kerrigan herself
[close]
? Glad to have that cleared up after three decades), not that the film itself is any truer. You end up liking Tonya Harding, although I'm not 100% sure you should. Doesn't matter.

A lot of people seem to be playing up the Scorsese styling to the film, but I found it more like the Coen Bros., something like Burn After Reading (2008), a comedy of arseholes.

Casting was pretty nice, Margot Robbie was good, and Allison Janney was brilliant (such a monster, I sincerely hope there was a lot of exaggeration to her character).

Anyway, my only real complaint is the music. The story is predominantly set in the late 80s/early 90s, yet most the tracks used seem to be from the 70s. Yeah, they're nice, if obvious/overused tunes, but could have worked better for scene setting to use more contemporary stuff.

Previous threads, where I think people were a bit too hard on it:
https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=63487.0
https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=65747.0
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on April 20, 2021, 11:40:29 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on April 19, 2021, 07:43:44 AM
Death By Hanging. Brilliant satire of a man who survives an execution but loses his memory and the philosophical/logical gymnastics the guards and authorities have to go through as a result.


Outstanding film. Surprised more haven't seen it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 20, 2021, 12:11:33 PM
The Fury (1978)

"Scanners" before "Scanners" with better acting but a bad execution. It felt really disjointed, like they kept forgetting there was another thread of the film in action at times.

It does feature a young Daryl Hannah and Denis Franz though and you get to see Kirk Douglas' bitch tits wobble as he dives onto the sand at the beginning.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 20, 2021, 12:42:52 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on April 19, 2021, 09:32:56 PMGhost in the Shell I'm not convinced I'll ever really get into anime but it was interesting to see this and Akira. Like with Akira I really liked the production design - if you can call it that, meaning the background art of the city and locations - and there were a lot of interesting ideas floating around here, and great music; on the other hand, the plot was a mix of garbled backstory and simple chase scenes, and I'm simply not keen on the character design in anime and manga.

That film is I think a bit patchier than Akira which manages to pull off the Kaneda/Teusto story very well for me even if the overall narrative is very compressed. Here there does I think feel like theres a bit more dramatic short hand going on with the Major, more a collection of strong individual scenes.

Character design wise I'm not sure I'd say either of those films is really that typical for anime.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on April 20, 2021, 08:05:51 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on April 20, 2021, 12:11:33 PM
The Fury (1978)

It does feature a young Daryl Hannah and Denis Franz though and you get to see Kirk Douglas' bitch tits wobble as he dives onto the sand at the beginning.

You also get to see Jim Belushi trying to get as much screen time as possible as an extra near the beginning of the picture - very amusing if you watch carefully: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpzMI--Lg7k
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on April 21, 2021, 01:11:30 AM
The Cranes are Flying
Pretty great, not too sure the story by itself holds up that well but it's by a guy who began his career doing silents and you really get the impression he was waiting 25 years for talkies to catch up to the kind of shit he wanted to do cos this thing looks amazing in the same kind of way late 20s silent film occasionally managed but with none of the restrictions silent film had to contend with either.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 21, 2021, 09:39:00 AM
I heard talkies set cinematography back quite a bit as with silents people were getting more experimental with handheld cameras but sound sets meant fixed positions and boxed off cameras to silence them from the sound recording equipment.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on April 21, 2021, 10:32:22 AM
The Godfather Part III - to start with I was enjoying this and was thinking I would have to have a contrarian opinion about it but it is shit really. The main thrust of the plot is sound but that's about it. There is a load of love interest stuff which has no place in a Godfather film. It looks bland. The hitman is ridiculous (especially the part where he is choosing his disguise) and it just seems to want to conform to the boilerplate formula set out by the first two (start with a celebration, big hit in the middle, big event at the end). It really misses Tom Hagen as well and I think there was a lot of changing of plot when Duvall dropped out. I read that the original version had Hagen turning informant and that might have been interesting.
I actually don't think Sofia Coppola is that bad in it. She is playing a spoilt rich kid and does that adequately. The problem is we are never given any reason to give a shit about her character so don't really care when she dies. The main thing though is that the tone is all wrong. It doesn't feel like the first two, which is understandable given the time that has passed.
I also think Pacino is really good and restrained until Michael has his stroke. Even the famous "just when I thought I was out" bit is not as overblown as I remember but that is about the last good bit of acting he does.

Dead Man's Shoes - Fucking hell. Fucking. Hell. I have seen this a couple of times before but it still hits with the force of a charging rhino. It is one of the few bleak films that I can stand re-watching, which is odd as it is really fucking bleak. I think it is mainly down to the powerhouse performance by Considine, and the music. Fucking hell though
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 21, 2021, 03:57:47 PM
Quote from: peanutbutter on April 21, 2021, 01:11:30 AM
The Cranes are Flying
Pretty great, not too sure the story by itself holds up that well but it's by a guy who began his career doing silents and you really get the impression he was waiting 25 years for talkies to catch up to the kind of shit he wanted to do cos this thing looks amazing in the same kind of way late 20s silent film occasionally managed but with none of the restrictions silent film had to contend with either.

Although I think as much about the climate becoming more conservative in Hollywood and Soviet cinema.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 21, 2021, 04:28:19 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on April 21, 2021, 10:32:22 AM

Dead Man's Shoes - Fucking hell. Fucking. Hell. I have seen this a couple of times before but it still hits with the force of a charging rhino. It is one of the few bleak films that I can stand re-watching, which is odd as it is really fucking bleak. I think it is mainly down to the powerhouse performance by Considine, and the music. Fucking hell though

I love this film, although it is bleak. Not just the story, but the setting which I'm pretty familiar with from my Uni days. Those kinds of grim Midlands towns filled with self-proclaimed hard blokes who are actually not hard at all away from their little groups.

Spoiler alert
When the guy is tripping balls and he pulls out the suitcase containing his hacked up friend and asks him if he wants to "give him a kiss". Jesus.
[close]

Interesting that both Considine and Kebbell played Rob Gretton in two separate Joy Division films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 21, 2021, 08:06:44 PM
It Should Happen To You (1954) - Gladys Glover (Judy Holliday) moved to New York hoping to make it as a star but then struggles, yet after a chat with documentary maker Pete (Jack Lemon in his first lead role, and who gets an "and introducing" credit) and a chance sighting of a sign that's for hire everything changes, especially when after she has her name put up on it a company that normally uses that board tries to buy her out. Pete is oddly enraged by Gladys's fame obsession but it starts paying off quickly when people presume she's famous, though it's a mixed bag and this functions as a perils of fame kind of piece as well as a rom-com, mainly as the men in the industry are shit. Holliday's a delight as per usual, Lemmon's great too, the sleazy men are good at being creepy, and the whole thing is extremely charming. 7.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on April 22, 2021, 12:19:21 AM
Ghost in the Shell 1995

Fancied a Blade Runner-ish anime and this seemed to fit the bill. And of course, I knew it was held in some esteem in the film community. I don't know, though, man. It was visually stunning in fits and starts, but the plot was completely incoherent - and it seemed to get bored of certain ideas quite quickly then just leap into totally different ones. Also, there were a hilarious amount of tits in it. Don't get me wrong, I'd really like a noir film that plays with the conventions of the male gaze or femme fatale or siren, and I like tits, but this was just over kill.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 12:56:20 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on April 22, 2021, 12:19:21 AM
Ghost in the Shell 1995

It's not that incoherent; protagonists are on the hunt for a super-hacker, turns out
Spoiler alert
it's a rouge AI that escaped from the US and wants to transcend itself by merging with The Major
[close]
Pretty straight forward, if sci-fi-y.

Also, not that much tittage. Get a hold of yourself man! Then stop it, you'll go blind.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 22, 2021, 02:45:51 AM
Blue Mountains, or Unbelievable Story. Gentle Georgian comedy in which a young writer visits a publishing house in an attempt to publish a novel and the entire film essentially follows him through the winding office bureaucracy. One of those farces that's a little slow to begin with but whirls up into a veritable tornado by the end.

Survive Style 5+. Wacky manic Japanese comedy with five seemingly unrelated vignettes playing out and slowly intertwining. The absurdism often pays off but also runs out of steam a little.

Mauvaise graine. Very early Billy Wilder (in France!), decent and pleasant enough, a guy gets caught up with a bunch of car thieves.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 22, 2021, 04:02:24 AM
Quote from: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 12:56:20 AM
It's not that incoherent; protagonists are on the hunt for a super-hacker, turns out
Spoiler alert
it's a rouge AI that escaped from the US and wants to transcend itself by merging with The Major
[close]
Pretty straight forward, if sci-fi-y.

Also, not that much tittage. Get a hold of yourself man! Then stop it, you'll go blind.

1 m 50s first tits. Can you direct me to one with too much tits?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Chedney Honks on April 22, 2021, 07:07:01 AM
I think we need a Ghost In The Shell thread. I'd seen it a couple of times many years ago and it didn't really click apart from the music but I watched it again recently and I thought it was superb. The intermission scene of the city in the rain was the highlight. Lots of interesting themes which resonated with me much more now I'm older. I'm going to watch it again and start a thread.

Also, after the opening tits, there's not even much tits. I'd recommend Wicked City if you want a stylish, violent, noirish anime with too much tits, and a spider lady who fires web out of her twat.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 22, 2021, 08:17:50 AM
Speaking of silent/talkies as well started off that von Sternberg/Dietrich box from Indicator and Morocco does 1930 does I think highlight that the style of silent cinema didn't instantly vanish with the talkies. Not hand held I spose but several moving camera shots and generally a strong focus on the physical, facial expressions, moving around sets, picking up objects, etc. I actually tend to find one of the big strengths of that era tends to be scenes with flirting in them that come across much more believable than was common for a very long time afterwards.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 22, 2021, 08:36:54 AM
Quote from: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 12:56:20 AM
It's not that incoherent; protagonists are on the hunt for a super-hacker, turns out
Spoiler alert
it's a rouge AI that escaped from the US and wants to transcend itself by merging with The Major
[close]
Pretty straight forward, if sci-fi-y.

Also, not that much tittage. Get a hold of yourself man! Then stop it, you'll go blind.

I watched it just a bit further up the page and I agreed with amputeeporn. Not so much that the plot was incoherent, just that it basically involved a handful of action scenes with someone blabbering expositional backstory in between them.

And though I didn't mention it in my post, the obvious obsession with tits was laughable.

"We've developed the technology to engineer cyborg agents, what are the most important attributes we need to give them?"
"Speed, dexterity, strength, intelligence, I think. Anything else?"
"Great big tits."
"Hmm, think you're onto something there."
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 09:47:48 AM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on April 22, 2021, 08:36:54 AM
I watched it just a bit further up the page and I agreed with amputeeporn. Not so much that the plot was incoherent, just that it basically involved a handful of action scenes with someone blabbering expositional backstory in between them.

I'd agree with that. The exposition and action aren't that well blended. Not sure if you ever could do that well here, as the core of the story is somewhat abstract.

Also, I suppose you'd prefer the (much smaller, and unseen) tits at the end of the story, perv!!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 22, 2021, 11:48:22 AM
Quote from: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 09:47:48 AM
Also, I suppose you'd prefer the (much smaller, and unseen) tits at the end of the story, perv!!

Hey, it's OK as long as they're fictional and hand-drawn!

Right?

Yeah?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 22, 2021, 11:51:07 AM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on April 22, 2021, 04:02:24 AM
1 m 50s first tits. Can you direct me to one with too much tits?

Urotsukidoji I-VI
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 22, 2021, 12:03:26 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on April 22, 2021, 08:36:54 AM
I watched it just a bit further up the page and I agreed with amputeeporn. Not so much that the plot was incoherent, just that it basically involved a handful of action scenes with someone blabbering expositional backstory in between them.

And though I didn't mention it in my post, the obvious obsession with tits was laughable.

"We've developed the technology to engineer cyborg agents, what are the most important attributes we need to give them?"
"Speed, dexterity, strength, intelligence, I think. Anything else?"
"Great big tits."
"Hmm, think you're onto something there."

That is probably the biggest fault I'd agree and moreso in the sequel were characters tend to go into long philosophical/expositional monologs every so often.

I would say its also kind of on the boundry between commenting on sexploitation and actually being mild sexploitation, I wouldnt say the majors character isnt shown as being "sexy" and I think some comment on her having idealized manaquin like looks being depersonalizing but still she's stripping off to fight people.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 22, 2021, 04:04:32 PM
EDIT GLITCH FIX:

Also, Space Dandy S01E03 has too much titage (https://i.imgur.com/CzLDwx4.gif). (NSFW)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 22, 2021, 07:16:12 PM
Cape Fear (1991) - this is great, Scorsese basically making a full-on Hitchcock homage and De Niro, 48 and looking in the best shape of his life, having a great time hamming it up as Max Cady. The bit where he
Spoiler alert
bites the woman's cheek off
[close]
is brutal. I've gone past the real Cape Fear sign a couple of times but sadly it's while driving on a freeway so no real photo ops.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 22, 2021, 11:47:06 PM
Since then its mostly been stepping on rakes.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on April 23, 2021, 12:14:36 AM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on April 22, 2021, 07:16:12 PM
Cape Fear (1991) - this is great, Scorsese basically making a full-on Hitchcock homage and De Niro, 48 and looking in the best shape of his life, having a great time hamming it up as Max Cady. The bit where he
Spoiler alert
bites the woman's cheek off
[close]
is brutal. I've gone past the real Cape Fear sign a couple of times but sadly it's while driving on a freeway so no real photo ops.

how many black people are there in that one?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 23, 2021, 03:01:16 AM
Quote from: chveik on April 23, 2021, 12:14:36 AM
how many black people are there in that one?

Lenny or Karl
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 23, 2021, 10:39:34 AM
Quote from: chveik on April 23, 2021, 12:14:36 AM
how many black people are there in that one?

There was Golden Globe-nominated Esther Rolle, who had a very prominent part playing "Woman Watching Cady Get Out From Under Car". Apparently jazz soul singer Jackie Davis is in it too, but I didn't notice him. A veritable banquet of African-American acting talent on display!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 23, 2021, 11:25:46 AM
The China Syndrome. Been meaning to see this for a while. Really good conspiracy thriller, nothing absolutely astounding but one of those solid engaging 70s jobs. Main cast (Jane Fonda, Michael Douglas, Jack Lemmon) are fantastic. Enjoyed it very much. Terrific cut to credits.

Save the Green Planet!. A fanatic kidnaps a CEO believing him to be an alien. I dunno I'm not 16 anymore so probably a bit immune to this kind of stuff. Charming enough I suppose.

That Day, on the Beach. My third Edward Yang (his first), after A Brighter Summer Day and Yi Yi, both phenomenal. A striking, confident debut. Gets a little muddled as it goes on (or maybe I was just struggling to follow?) but it's wonderful.

Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on April 22, 2021, 07:16:12 PM
Cape Fear (1991) - this is great, Scorsese basically making a full-on Hitchcock homage and De Niro, 48 and looking in the best shape of his life, having a great time hamming it up as Max Cady. The bit where he
Spoiler alert
bites the woman's cheek off
[close]
is brutal. I've gone past the real Cape Fear sign a couple of times but sadly it's while driving on a freeway so no real photo ops.

Have you seen the original? I watched both back to back and while the Scorsese is really good sadly doesn't quite compare to the Thompson one.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 23, 2021, 12:58:00 PM
I've recently re-watched the Matt Damon Bourne Trilogy (Identity, Supremacy, Ultimatum).
Good fun yarns. Some actors in there I'd forgotten were in it (a really boyish Karl Urban, Paddy Considine, Daniel Bruhl(!!), Scott Glenn, Clive Owen).
Nothing life changing, but good fun.
And also it made me remember how much I enjoyed reading the books at the time.
SO BLOODY GOOD!!
Must read them again before I die.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on April 23, 2021, 03:33:05 PM
Did we watch the same series? The first one was fairly fun but (though I admittedly haven't watched them since the cinema) I thought the sequels were utterly dreary and vastly overrated. Greengrass' shakycam nonsense doesn't put you in the middle of the action, it puts you in the middle of a tumble dryer. I'm a little baffled that the Jeremy Renner one was received so indifferently, to the extent that the return of Damon and Greengrass was treated as the dream team getting back together. Green Zone was dreary as well.
Also, I remember Considine being shockingly wooden in Ultimatum. That's not supposed to happen.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on April 23, 2021, 04:27:01 PM
The editting/shakey cam in the second film gave me a headache, didnt watch any of the others.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Vitalstatistix on April 23, 2021, 05:15:00 PM
What's really shit about Greengrass films is that they think they're not shit.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 23, 2021, 08:47:21 PM
The Farewell (2019) - Based on a true story / lie, when their grandmother is diagnosed with stage 4 cancer her family return to China to hold a rushed wedding for her grandson, all without telling her that she's ill, with that being a tradition in the country. It's a warm hearted work, emotive, sometimes funny and an intriguing insight in to Chinese culture and the lives of Chinese Americans, but it's shot through with melancholy and a little too repetitive with the number of discussions over the morality of what they're doing.
Spoiler alert
Still, at least the twist at the very end is a sweet one,
[close]
and the performances are all superb, the grandmother especially. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 23, 2021, 08:50:30 PM
The no cctv world of the Bourne books makes a much more interesting story and the young lady he hijacks in 1st one is an economist with talent to move the plot, not a pointless hipster.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 24, 2021, 12:51:09 AM
The Old Guard 2020 Charleze Theron leads a  group of warriors who can't be killed. Was too shitty to watch and I quit after half hour.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on April 24, 2021, 10:36:27 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on April 23, 2021, 11:25:46 AM

Have you seen the original? I watched both back to back and while the Scorsese is really good sadly doesn't quite compare to the Thompson one.

I haven't, heard it's superior though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on April 24, 2021, 06:23:43 PM
The Ascent
Pretty good, there were moments where I thought it was about to absolutely blow my mind but they never fully hit. Wouldn't be surprised if her first film gets a bit closer so I'll def be checking it out soon.
There was a moment right at the end where the string heavy score had a very very quiet electric guitar kick in. Would've been massively out of place but my brain was full on preparing for a massive guitar solo to wash over everything.

Double Team
Weakest JCVD I've seen so far, everything just was a bit too janky, none of the action bits brought me into it. Real shame cos a shitty Mickey Rourke at near rock bottom is perfect for Van Damme.

Smiley Face
Anna Faris is very charming in a way that's quite tricky to make work in a film, this felt like an exercise to prove it can work and I guess it did but it still kinda leaves her at a bit of a dead end.
Script was probably garbage but Araki managed to pull a few laughs outta it all.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 24, 2021, 09:59:37 PM
Jane and the Lost City (1987)
Noticed that this is the only film Jasper Carrott has starred in so thought I'd give it a try. Free on Amazon Prime, and that's about the right price.

It's pretty faithful to the original strips, so I'd say it's not a bad effort, just that it's not that good either. There are a few jokes to keep things passable, but the tale just plods along with little peril. Kirsten Hughes does well enough as the title character, Graham Stark does good with the little he has, and Maud Adams can console herself that this isn't Octopussy. Oh, and Jasper Carrott is exactly as good as you'd expect.

The Adventures of Jane (1949) had a stronger story (not saying much), and the correct actress. Stick with that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 25, 2021, 12:53:06 AM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on April 24, 2021, 12:51:09 AM
The Old Guard 2020 Charleze Theron leads a  group of warriors who can't be killed. Was too shitty to watch and I quit after half hour.

Went back and finished this, it was all fully shit. Never explained why  they didn't kill baby Hitler. Ending sets up Old Guards two through infinity. Good luck with that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 25, 2021, 10:12:57 AM
Quote from: peanutbutter on April 24, 2021, 06:23:43 PM
Smiley Face
Anna Faris is very charming in a way that's quite tricky to make work in a film, this felt like an exercise to prove it can work and I guess it did but it still kinda leaves her at a bit of a dead end.
Script was probably garbage but Araki managed to pull a few laughs outta it all.

I was surprised by this as Araki is best known for making some pretty frantic and bizarre movies, while this is a stoner comedy without a huge amount depth. That said I did really enjoy it (though did watch it back when I used to smoke weed myself) and Anna Faris is excellent in it, and it gives her a chance to show what a great comedic actor she is.

Adam's Rib (1949) - Spencer Tracey and Katharine Hepburn are married lawyers and when he takes on the case of a man shot by his wife (Judy Holliday), Hepburn is so annoyed she seeks out the wife and defends her, and so the battle of the sexes takes place at home and in the court room. It's frustrating as Hepurn and Tracey's marriage is initially that rare a thing, a long standing relationship where both are still madly in love with the other,
Spoiler alert
and so it's a shame they struggle, and I'm not convinced either were in the right when it came to the arguments they have, and Tracey pointing a gun at Hepburn was a cunt move, even if it did turn out to be made of liquorice. Of course there's a happy ending but ultimately it doesn't feel earned,
[close]
what the film is saying seems muddled, and though I enjoyed the first hour or so the final half hour is patchy. 6.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: neveragain on April 25, 2021, 01:46:51 PM
Deliverance - Worthy of its acclaim, tense and gripping with strong performances. The ending is a bit of a let down, the last ten minutes being quite superfluous.

The Game - Fantastic twisty-turny Michael Douglas vehicle, in which he gives a brilliantly subtle and nuanced performance. One exciting set piece after another, getting wonderfully surreal and proto-Truman Show. The ending (and some internal logic leading up to it) is daft but the film is good enough that you can ignore this. I certainly wouldn't have reacted like Douglas does in the last few scenes. Sean Penn would get a punch in the mouth.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 25, 2021, 04:00:12 PM
Quote from: neveragain on April 25, 2021, 01:46:51 PMSean Penn would get a punch in the mouth.

You don't need to watch the film to realise that
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 25, 2021, 04:07:30 PM
Moonlight The surprise three-part Oscar winner about growing up gay, black, dirt-poor and short in Miami. Very well-directed, very well-acted and very well-meaning, with a great soundtrack, and it's engaging from start to finish but slips too easily into cliché and predictability, and things like the drug dealer with a conscience and an open mind stretch things a bit. The look of it with the bleached light and those Florida colours is fantastic.

Beastie Boys Story Mike D and Ad-Rock take the stage for a slightly awkward but entertaining run through the band's history, mainly focusing on the early years and the making of their first two albums, reminiscing a lot about their late bandmate Adam Yauch. The stage banter and faked bloopers are less funny than you might expect, lending weight to the idea that Yauch was the biggest creative force in the band, but it's interesting to see the archive footage and get some insight into their story.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on April 25, 2021, 05:51:15 PM
Suburban Gothic - daft indie film with Matthew Gray and Kat Dennings putting a spirit to rest, Leiland Palmer is his impatient dad. It was quite enjoyable.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 25, 2021, 08:04:32 PM
The Belles Of St Trinian's (1954) - Upon the beginning of a new term the local town goes in to panic mode as shops are boarded up, the police lock themselves away and even chickens flee, and we soon learn why as the girls of St. Trinian's are an unruly bunch involved in all manner of dodginess, including a spot of gin distillation and the main plot revolves around a stolen horse involving Flash Harry (George Cole). Alastair Sim plays both the headmistress and her dodgy brother and is great but not given as many funny moments as you might expect, Joyce Grenfell is fine as a Police Officer who is forced to go undercover as games mistress Miss Crawley but whose plotline is weirdly forgotten about by the end, and it's very uneven, sometimes chaotically amusing but at other points a little bland. 6.1/10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Tokyo van Ramming on April 25, 2021, 11:53:42 PM
Finally got round to 12 Angry Men, which is a 9 on imdb. Think they can do away with the option of 10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 26, 2021, 12:24:01 AM
Continuing my string of <watches film, posts 'it was shit'>

Bright (2017) it was shit.

Fairies, elves, orcs and Will Smith.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 26, 2021, 07:08:53 AM
Brother. Pretty good but simple Russian crime drama, bit of coming of age too.

This Is Not a Burial, It's a Resurrection. Affecting portrait of an old woman whose son and husband are dead and who now has to face her village being flooded to make way for a dam. Reminded me a lot of the film Farewell.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on April 26, 2021, 09:31:29 AM
Pulp

It was everything I thought "99 and 44/100% Dead" was going to be. The plot didn't make that much sense but Mickey Rooney was OTT and it looked lovely.

It's also made me realise that I've never seen "Get Carter" the first collaboration between Michael Caine and Mike Hodges.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 26, 2021, 08:19:00 PM
Fritz The Cat (1972) - Ralph Bakshi's famous animated take on the sixties is a nihilistic work and people are either selfish, pretentious, hypocritical or stupid, and many are racist cunts too, though at the same time its portrayal of some of the black characters made me feel deeply uncomfortable. Its sexual politics are really fucking dubious as well and its satire isn't exactly subtle, what with the way the police are portrayed as pigs, and stupid violent ones at that, while Fritz is full of vapid opinions. Some of it is of interest but other parts are weak and / or annoying, and a good few aspects of it have aged very poorly making it an ugly, unpleasant film that contains very little of value. 3.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 27, 2021, 08:28:48 AM
Watched a couple of Mike Leighs, slowly slimming down the ones of his I haven't seen (two features and one short left!):

High Hopes. Beautiful. His early work does a great job of balancing the drama with lightness. Forgot how almost caricaturish (not in a bad way) his earlier stuff is. Some very touching bits.

All or Nothing. One of his bleakest for sure, or at least most downbeat. Everyone's so angry and miserable in this. Dripping with melodrama but in an incredibly unexaggerated way.

Both films have a tremendous cast, too; Leigh sure knows how to pick em.

Also watched Death of a Cyclist. Cracking Spanish noir about a couple having an affair who accidentally commit a hit and run and are attempting to cover up both. Wikipedia describes it as a "social realist drama" but I'd say it's absolutely a noir. Great opening and ending in particular.

And Mafioso. Italian comedy about a Sicilian man who goes back to visit his home town and gets drawn into old mafia dealings. Really brilliant, at once farcical and sinister. Third act really is something else, holy fuck.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 27, 2021, 10:52:03 AM
A Fistful Of Dollars or For A Fistful Of Dollars - 1964
Or 'Fistful Of Dollars' as it appears on screen.

Clint Eastwood's first leading role; the first of the 'Man With No Name' trilogy.
Vile, isn't it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 27, 2021, 01:48:15 PM
Space Sweepers Big-budget Korean Netflix space thing, notable for being Netflix's first something-or-other I didn't really read this bit. Opens with a Blade Runner homage then goes downhill. Some rag-and-bone people in space (including the girl from The Handmaiden) find a cute robot girl who it turns out the solar system's oldest, wealthiest and evilest man (Richard Armitage off Berlin Station, in a wig and glasses that make him look alarmingly like Jurgen Klopp) wants to blow something up and destroy earth because, well, he didn't become the solar system's oldest, wealthiest and evilest man by doing nice constructive things.
Some big budget space action, some nice production design where everything looks grimy and beaten-up on a massive scale, some 2D characters given manipulative sentimental backstories where it suits the plot, some fudged comment on capitalism and greed, lots of people from different countries speaking their own languages because translator apps innit, and a descent into total SPACE EXPLOSION BANG ZOOM incoherence in the last half-hour complete with hilariously contrived deus ex nanomachina happy ending.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 27, 2021, 05:19:36 PM

^ The kid in that was impossibly cute. I liked the main robot. The CGI seemed pretty good too but I watched it on my tablet so maybe not.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 27, 2021, 07:06:55 PM
I quite liked it too, I mean it was daft and ridiculous but largely entertaining.

The Marrying Kind (1952) - A Judy Holliday romantic comedy drama which starts with the couple wanting a divorce, and then telling the judge the story of their relationship. There's a fair few highs and lows, as you might expect, in this often very funny but also surprisingly touching film where Holliday's on great form but Aldo Ray is pretty decent too. The film has some fun with the different versions of a story each has, and an argument at an airport has some amusingly convenient noises which drowns out some sweary language, plus a dream sequence entertained a lot in this film which has dated in a couple of ways but still mostly works effectively. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on April 27, 2021, 08:40:15 PM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on April 27, 2021, 05:19:36 PM
^ The kid in that was impossibly cute. I liked the main robot. The CGI seemed pretty good too but I watched it on my tablet so maybe not.

Yeah it looked good and the effects were strong and it rattled along enjoyably, but it was forgettable bobbins. Perfect for a Saturday night when everyone else is in bed and you're having a nightcap or two.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on April 27, 2021, 09:46:11 PM
rewatches (unable to watch anything I haven't seen before of late)

ZODIAC - generally think Fincher is overrated (not 'bad', just not a genius) and while I liked the gently unspooling nature of this and how, as you'd expect really, it doesn't resolve much, I was just completely unmoved by anything, I didn't feel it was a compelling study of a man going off the deep end with obsession either, just a watchable procedural with some interesting details.

RUSSIAN ARK - probably still just about the king of the one-take films, not as narratively taut as Victoria, but an amazing feat of sustained technique and excavation of history.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on April 28, 2021, 12:52:01 AM
UNLOCKED (2017) Noooomi Rapace is a CIA agent and it wasn't really that terrible despite shitty twists.
Malkovich and Orlando Bloom were pretty bad in it.  May watch all the Noomi films now I've seen all the Statham ones.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 28, 2021, 11:14:50 AM
For A Few Dollars More - 1965
The second of the 'Man With No Name' trilogy.
This was better.
Lee Van Cleef is brilliant in this.
Although I did have to put up with Mrs Fufkin shouting CUNT! everytime he appeared, 'cos he shot a horse at the start of the film. Sigh.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on April 28, 2021, 11:25:13 AM
One Night in Miami - Some great performances and good writing and direction to tell a pretty interesting fictional account of the meeting between Sam Cooke, Jim Brown, Cassius Clay and Malcolm X. Some interesting discussions between Cooke and X about how black celebrities can best help the civil rights cause, by direct action and making their art about the struggle, or to appeal to white audiences to win hearts and minds that way and then funnel the profits of that back to black artists and businesses. Apparently it is a purely fictional dispute between the two that was borne of the film's (and the play it was based on) writer's internal struggles about how much of himself to put in his writing on Star Trek: Discovery, of all things
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on April 28, 2021, 02:32:27 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on April 28, 2021, 11:25:13 AM
One Night in Miami - Some great performances and good writing and direction to tell a pretty interesting fictional account of the meeting between Sam Cooke, Jim Bowen, Cassius Clay and Malcolm X

Can't stop reading it that way.

QuoteApparently it is a purely fictional dispute between the two that was borne of the film's (and the play it was based on) writer's internal struggles about how much of himself to put in his writing on Star Trek: Discovery, of all things

That'd be hard, as the play came out in 2013 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Night_in_Miami), and ST:DIS started in 2017. Maybe he added in more to the film version.

Still, sounds like a nice bit of character work for actors to get their teeth into.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on April 28, 2021, 02:42:21 PM
He did write on that show so it must be new to the film, or maybe expanded due to his issues on ST:D. He also co-wrote and co-directed Soul and is co-directing Into The Spiderverse 2, which is a pretty good track record of being involved in good stuff (if you ignore ST:D)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 28, 2021, 07:51:00 PM
Love & Mercy (2014) - Brian Wilson biopic which flits between the Beach Boys star when young and successful (played by Paul Dano) and later on his career (a very mannered performance from John Cusack) when he was struggling with mental illness and being controlled by cunt doctor Eugene Landy (Paul Giamatti). It's not a subtle film and the incidental music is sometimes manipulative, but the scenes with Brian as a young man composing are fascinating, though it's one of those films which feature a lot of distressing toxic behaviour from those in Brian's life which is something I can't say I enjoy watching. You're not meant to of course, and what it has to say about the horrendous ways people manipulate others is important, but despite some stunning acting because of those bleak elements it was a film that I struggled with, the overly sensitive idiot that I am. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 28, 2021, 08:34:15 PM
I agree that it's a difficult film to watch at times, for all the reasons you mentioned, but it's still one of the best music biopics I've ever seen.

For the most part it bypasses all the usual genre cliches and actually manages to convey a sense of the protagonist's personality and artistry. As you say, the scenes in which young Brian composes his masterpieces are very affecting - the quasi-documentary recreations of the Pet Sounds sessions are rather beautiful.

And Brian seeking approval by playing a solo piano version of God Only Knows to his bitterly jealous cunt of a father is a heartbreaking scene. A lesser biopic (e.g. the hilarious made-for-TV Summer Dreams) would've milked that moment for soapy melodrama, but this film lets that innate, terrible sadness speak for itself.

I didn't think Cusack was mannered as older Brian, though. He looks sod all like him, I know, but I thought he did a great job of capturing Brian's halting speech patterns and lack of social filter.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on April 29, 2021, 02:11:27 AM
A Bittersweet Life. Liked it, but thought it was trying too hard for some kind of meaning. Bit of a Michael Mann vibe but doesn't go hard enough to earn its moments of reflection, doesn't develop its protagonist pretty much at all. Some good action bits though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 29, 2021, 03:26:22 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 28, 2021, 08:34:15 PM
I agree that it's a difficult film to watch at times, for all the reasons you mentioned, but it's still one of the best music biopics I've ever seen.

For the most part it bypasses all the usual genre cliches and actually manages to convey a sense of the protagonist's personality and artistry. As you say, the scenes in which young Brian composes his masterpieces are very affecting - the quasi-documentary recreations of the Pet Sounds sessions are rather beautiful.

And Brian seeking approval by playing a solo piano version of God Only Knows to his bitterly jealous cunt of a father is a heartbreaking scene. A lesser biopic (e.g. the hilarious made-for-TV Summer Dreams) would've milked that moment for soapy melodrama, but this film lets that innate, terrible sadness speak for itself.

I agree with everything you say there, and my response to it was definitely linked to my own mental health issues, and the need not to see anything too miserable right now, I'm sure if I'd seen it upon release I wouldn't have had the same reaction.

QuoteI didn't think Cusack was mannered as older Brian, though. He looks sod all like him, I know, but I thought he did a great job of capturing Brian's halting speech patterns and lack of social filter.

Ah, I wasn't aware of that, the only footage I've seen of the older Brian was provided by the end of the movie, and of course the majority of that was him singing rather than speaking.

Attack Of The Demons (2019) - Animated horror with a knowing sense of humour that looks like a more arty South Park, and which also happens to be set in a small town in Colorado. where after an evil bastard casts a spell at a music festival anyone splashed by demonic blood becomes a demon themselves. Visually it's sometimes simplistic but also quite impressively odd, and though the plot isn't that original and some of the voice work is weak it's a strangely fun ride. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 29, 2021, 06:35:07 PM
Apologies, SMBH, my reply to your post came across as rather pompous and didactic. That wasn't my intention at all. Truly sorry.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 29, 2021, 07:04:31 PM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on April 29, 2021, 06:35:07 PM
Apologies, SMBH, my reply to your post came across as rather pompous and didactic. That wasn't my intention at all. Truly sorry.

No need to apologise at all, and I didn't read it like that, and thought you made some good points. I'm also just very aware right now that I'm not enjoying some films that I would have in the past, I didn't get on with Death Line recently and a close friend was amazed as he said that when we were in our teenage years we both watched and enjoyed many a film like that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on April 30, 2021, 12:38:33 AM
Crazy Rich Asians

More like Boring rich Bores. So dull. So awful. Film has some reasonable set ups for comedy or drama or peril and just ducks out. Supposedly celebrating other cultures but the takeaway message is the American way is so much better than old Chinese values. And the way the Sikhs were used for supposed comic effect was horrendous.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 30, 2021, 11:21:59 AM
Suicide Club (Sion Sono, 2001) - one for the things that make you say "fucking hell" thread. Part Pynchon-esque mysterious conspiracy voyage down the rabbit-hole, part Heathers-y satire, part gross-out horror with bags of blood and lots of flaying. Genuinely nightmarish, from the incredible number of teenagers committing suicide in improbably messy ways, to the impossibly cheesy Japanese pop group of 12 year old girls that obviously plays some role in things. In fact it's almost a musical between them and a shady glam-punk band. Plus great Japanese cop stereotypes, an excellently grumpy heroine, unbearably tense scenes that feel like they were filmed hand-held in real streets and stations, and so much more.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on April 30, 2021, 03:16:52 PM
Irma Vep

Been on my watchlist over half my life at this stage. Came outta it feeling much the same as Personal Shopper really in that aspects of it are amazing and it somehow both constantly feels on the verge of blowing me away but also at no real risk of doing so.
Easily the best Maggie Chung performance I've seen, surprised she hasn't done more English speaking roles really. The ending is pretty great in itself too.


An Autumn Afternoon

Had convinced myself that I hadn't seen it before despite logging it on letterboxd. About 5 minutes in I realised I remembered the bulk of it fairly well and turned it off.
Asides from a small few Ozu films, I'm not sure any of them are worth multiple watches and I don't think this one is among that small few.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on April 30, 2021, 03:29:07 PM
Sixty Six - 2006

This, although maybe a tad unfair to the actors involved, was a kind of B-List Star Studded gentle comedy about a boy who is due to have his bar mitzva on the day of the 1966 (hence the name) World Cup Final.
Eddie Marsan, Helena Bonham Carter, Peter Serafinowicz, Stephen Rea & Catherine Tate among the cast.
It was good. Almost charming.
And, although I'm CONVINCED I've seen it before, I couldn't remember a thing about it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on April 30, 2021, 09:10:21 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on April 30, 2021, 11:21:59 AM
Suicide Club (Sion Sono, 2001) - one for the things that make you say "fucking hell" thread. Part Pynchon-esque mysterious conspiracy voyage down the rabbit-hole, part Heathers-y satire, part gross-out horror with bags of blood and lots of flaying. Genuinely nightmarish, from the incredible number of teenagers committing suicide in improbably messy ways, to the impossibly cheesy Japanese pop group of 12 year old girls that obviously plays some role in things. In fact it's almost a musical between them and a shady glam-punk band. Plus great Japanese cop stereotypes, an excellently grumpy heroine, unbearably tense scenes that feel like they were filmed hand-held in real streets and stations, and so much more.

I loved that, it's a fucked up movie but incredibly gripping, and is up there with Love Exposure and Love & Peace in my list of favourite Sono movies.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on April 30, 2021, 11:20:16 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on April 30, 2021, 09:10:21 PM
I loved that, it's a fucked up movie but incredibly gripping, and is up there with Love Exposure and Love & Peace in my list of favourite Sono movies.
I was really blown away by Suicide Club, it's the sort of topic that could be done really badly but does manage to grip from start to end. I've not seen any of his other films but will definitely track those down.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 01, 2021, 03:28:30 AM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on April 30, 2021, 03:29:07 PM
Sixty Six - 2006

This, although maybe a tad unfair to the actors involved, was a kind of B-List Star Studded gentle comedy about a boy who is due to have his bar mitzva on the day of the 1966 (hence the name) World Cup Final.
Eddie Marsan, Helena Bonham Carter, Peter Serafinowicz, Stephen Rea & Catherine Tate among the cast.
It was good. Almost charming.
And, although I'm CONVINCED I've seen it before, I couldn't remember a thing about it.

Been ages since I saw it but recall thinking it was a (Jewish) A Christmas Story
Kick started my appreciation of Eddie Marsan too.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 01, 2021, 08:51:40 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on April 30, 2021, 11:20:16 PM
I was really blown away by Suicide Club, it's the sort of topic that could be done really badly but does manage to grip from start to end. I've not seen any of his other films but will definitely track those down.

There's a thread about his work here, it started out as just covering Love, Exposure but then spread to a lot of his other films too. https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,58890.0.html
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on May 01, 2021, 02:39:22 PM
Hoho, I saw Charlie's Angels 2 this morning. Man, that McG guy really was a piece of shit. So much unnecessary (M)CG! I actually think a few more drafts and a decent director would've turned an absolutely nothingy bit of fluff into a pretty decent bit of fluff. I liked the cast, particularly Demi Moore, who was looking fucking fly while chewing on scenery. I don't know what in the fuck was going on with Crispin Glover, that death scene was simply bizarre.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on May 01, 2021, 03:29:21 PM
Total Recall (2012 remake).
What a pile of shit.  They took out the Mars part and replaced Mars with 'The Colony' who were being menaced by some robots.  Included a scene where they had to access some information in Colin Farrell's head, including his brain having a firewall and someone using the phrase 'I'm In!'.  They needed to access a long number, a 'kill code' to deactivate all the robots.  They never got the kill code and it was never mentioned again, although some robots were blown up in a building but the whole point was to deactivate all of them and this never happened.  A horrible mess and very much poorer than the original.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on May 01, 2021, 04:31:32 PM
Deadpool I gave up on superhero films ages ago, having only ever had a casual interest in them; once the various series got beyond their second instalments they pretty much all turned to crap and there were only ever a handful that I was interested in in the first place. This was supposed to be different, though, and to my surprise I genuinely liked it a lot. Not everything works, it's definitely irritating at times, but the cast give it their all, there are two or three actual laugh out loud moments and it's overall a lot of fun because it's so rare that one of these films just tries to be itself and entertain the audience on its own terms rather than coming over as some soulless CGI drone written by and for a focus group.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on May 01, 2021, 11:37:15 PM
Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on May 01, 2021, 03:29:21 PM
Total Recall (2012 remake).
What a pile of shit.  They took out the Mars part and replaced Mars with 'The Colony' who were being menaced by some robots.

Usually I'm dead set against remakes, but I think this one puts in the effort to justify itself. It's not just a redo, they have an entirely different setting to work within, which give us some nice set pieces. And merging Richter and Lori into the one character worked well, Kate Beckinsale did a good turn playing the terminally pissed off bad guy/gal.

Still not a patch on the original, which just flows perfectly once the setup is established.

QuoteIncluded a scene where they had to access some information in Colin Farrell's head, including his brain having a firewall and someone using the phrase 'I'm In!'.  They needed to access a long number, a 'kill code' to deactivate all the robots.  They never got the kill code and it was never mentioned again

They do, it
Spoiler alert
was a fake bit of bait to entrap Matthias. Cohaagen explains that point right before he kills Matthias.
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on May 02, 2021, 01:21:06 AM
So he was labouring on a false premise, that makes the film even more pointless.

The different setting was weak.  If you're going to replace the Mars bit with something else it has to be at least as good.  The script should have been binned before they even got to the casting stage.

I didn't have much better luck this evening.  Saw Assasins Creed (2016) on the tv guide and it said it was a Scifi so i thought I'd watch it.  (I'm not a gamer and know nothing of the game, I don't know if that helps or hinders things.)  Bailed after about 15 minutes because I couldn't suspend disbelief enough to get over the multiple layers of utter bullshit.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on May 02, 2021, 11:51:29 AM
Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on May 02, 2021, 01:21:06 AM
I didn't have much better luck this evening.  Saw Assasins Creed (2016) on the tv guide and it said it was a Scifi so i thought I'd watch it.  (I'm not a gamer and know nothing of the game, I don't know if that helps or hinders things.)  Bailed after about 15 minutes because I couldn't suspend disbelief enough to get over the multiple layers of utter bullshit.

You should watch the Resident Evil films[nb]How are there six of them?? How?[/nb], completely grounded and sensible.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 02, 2021, 01:07:36 PM

I'm kicking off a Resident Evil powerwatch right now off this recc.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on May 02, 2021, 04:15:23 PM
Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on May 01, 2021, 03:29:21 PM
Total Recall (2012 remake).
What a pile of shit.  They took out the Mars part and replaced Mars with 'The Colony' who were being menaced by some robots.  Included a scene where they had to access some information in Colin Farrell's head, including his brain having a firewall and someone using the phrase 'I'm In!'.  They needed to access a long number, a 'kill code' to deactivate all the robots.  They never got the kill code and it was never mentioned again, although some robots were blown up in a building but the whole point was to deactivate all of them and this never happened.  A horrible mess and very much poorer than the original.

Quote from: JesusAndYourBush on May 02, 2021, 01:21:06 AM
The different setting was weak.  If you're going to replace the Mars bit with something else it has to be at least as good.  The script should have been binned before they even got to the casting stage.

You are aware that both the 1990 and 2012 movies are loose adaptations of the short story 'We Can Remember It for You Wholesale' by Philip K. Dick, right?  I'm not defending the 2012 adaptation because it is indeed a terrible, soulless movie but it seems a bit daft to expect it to more faithful to the "original" 1990 adaptation.  Neither cinematic adaptation is particularly faithful to the original short story.  Both adaptations take the short story and use it as a jumping off point to do their own thing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 02, 2021, 04:58:03 PM

8 out of 10 film festivals die within the first hour
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on May 02, 2021, 05:04:42 PM
Quote from: Blumf on May 02, 2021, 11:51:29 AM
You should watch the Resident Evil films[nb]How are there six of them?? How?[/nb], completely grounded and sensible.

I love me some Resident Evil. They get dafter as they go on. Complete bollocks but lots of fun.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 02, 2021, 05:11:50 PM
It's a shame Cronenberg launched his attempt at Total Recall, given he was a fan of the original text and thought the 1990 version was sacrilege.

I love the 1990 one for what it is but christ I'd love to have seen what Cronenberg could've done with it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 02, 2021, 08:38:57 PM
The Water Babies (1978) - It's the Victorian era so people fight in the street, women empty chamber pots in the street, and pickpockets, er, pick pockets in the street. But when poor old chimney sweep Tom is accused of being a thief he plunges in to the water and isn't sure how to get out, though he's told some water babies can help him out in this mixture of live action and animation with the latter making up the underwater sequences. It has a very seventies feel, especially some of the weirdness with Mrs Tripp (Billie Whitelaw), a maid who works for Ellie and her rich Uncle and Aunt, while Tom's underwater adventures are a strange affair where Tom meets a number of unusual characters, some friendly some not, including a Scottish lobster, a camp seahorse, a scouse otter and an evil shark. A rare film where Bernard Cribbins is a bit of a shit alongside  main villain James Mason, it also features the vocal talents of Jon Pertwee and David Jason along with members of the live action cast, and is a very offbeat movie, but one that's quite unique and entertaining. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on May 03, 2021, 12:28:51 AM
^^ Well I know The Water Babies is based in a book because I had the book when I was a small child.

Quote from: St_Eddie on May 02, 2021, 04:15:23 PM
You are aware that both the 1990 and 2012 movies are loose adaptations of the short story 'We Can Remember It for You Wholesale' by Philip K. Dick, right?  I'm not defending the 2012 adaptation because it is indeed a terrible, soulless movie but it seems a bit daft to expect it to more faithful to the "original" 1990 adaptation.  Neither cinematic adaptation is particularly faithful to the original short story.  Both adaptations take the short story and use it as a jumping off point to do their own thing.

I wasn't aware it was based on a PKD short story (or if I did I forgot long ago), but regardless of that, I'm not opposed to them doing something different compared to the first version - just that if you're going to do something different it has to be at least as good or there's no point in doing it.  This was so much poorer.  Many scripts probably get rejected because they're not up to scratch, or the scriptwriter gets told to go away and improve it.  This is one of those times when that should have happened.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: JesusAndYourBush on May 03, 2021, 12:34:31 AM
Quote from: Blumf on May 02, 2021, 11:51:29 AM
You should watch the Resident Evil films[nb]How are there six of them?? How?[/nb], completely grounded and sensible.

I've seen the first 5, I quite liked them.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 03, 2021, 07:49:09 AM
Rewatched Nine Queens the other night, hadn't seen it in around a decade, still held up very well. Great con film, quite lowkey but packs an enormous amount of thrills.

Finally got to see Sons of the Desert and it was honestly rather disappointing. There were maybe 2 or 3 good jokes in the whole thing and it felt incredibly plodding. Sorry.

Footlight Parade. Not nearly as sharp as 42nd Street but Cagney is fun to watch and the final dance numbers are striking (in particular the water sequences). Script is kind of slapdash.

Viktor and Viktoria. Charming but I did not like the (off-stage) musical interludes in this, of which there were many, though they did grow on me Bit of a sagging middle but enjoyed this a lot. Forgot Anton Walbrook was in this and his entry caused a cheer in my head.

Las Hurdes aka Land Without Bread. One of the many Buñuels I hadn't seen. Short documentary on the titular region, deliberately somewhat exaggerated to create what is essentially a parody of poverty porn ethnographies.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on May 03, 2021, 08:05:45 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 03, 2021, 07:49:09 AM
Rewatched Nine Queens the other night, hadn't seen it in around a decade, still held up very well. Great con film, quite lowkey but packs an enormous amount of thrills.

Although I remember thinking it didnt really need the twisty plot, just as a low key drama about two con men it was effective enough.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 03, 2021, 08:32:49 AM
Quote from: greenman on May 03, 2021, 08:05:45 AM
Although I remember thinking it didnt really need the twisty plot, just as a low key drama about two con men it was effective enough.

Yeah for sure - though I thought that that made it much more entertaining
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on May 03, 2021, 08:41:06 AM
Rushmore Since watching this and Royal Tenenbaums and disliking both I've always considered myself one of the people who doesn't like Wes Anderson. I was dragged along to see Moonrise Kingdom and thought it a bit better, though, and then genuinely enjoyed The Grand Budapest Hotel, so when this popped up on Disney+ I thought I'd give it a rewatch to see if my feelings had changed.
Nope.
I just find this an incredibly frustrating film. There is evidence throughout of Anderson's eye for detail, imagination, and technical skill; it's just that what he uses them for has so little charm or appeal. Inconsistent, inexplicable characters and a mechanical, heartless plot. There were some amusing scenes and lines but mostly near the beginning, and eventually I found myself thinking that it had pretty much worn out its welcome but at least we were nearing the end, only to pause and find I wasn't even halfway through.
I think that what I liked about TGBH was that Anderson just dropped all the pretence and made a piece of fast-paced, light-hearted fluff: this one was much more muddled and uneasy in its tone and the appeal wore off pretty quickly.
It's a very cheap shot to criticise the director for what others see in him, I guess, and hard to know whether there's even supposed to be any meaning behind all of it. Whatever, there is something that rubs me up the wrong way about the man and his work.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on May 03, 2021, 10:09:02 AM
Besides Budapest though I like Rushmore and Moonrise Kingdom more than the rest of Andersons stuff, his style does seem to fit more with a teenager/childs view of the world plus I think sticking to his upper class east coast nostalgia grates less than turning foreign locations into exotic playgrounds.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 03, 2021, 07:32:28 PM
Me And Orson Welles (2008) - Richard Linklater's film concerning Richard (Zac Effron) an actor who briefly worked for Orson Welles (Christian McKay) on his 1937 production of Julius Caesar, and the romance he has with production assistant Sonja (Clare Danes). It portrays Welles as a charismatic if cunty playboy  egomaniac, while Danes is okay and Effron is watchable but sometimes annoying, and I struggled to care about either. Linklater stressed a dislike for biopics and factual retellings and Richard's story is completely fictional (with surviving cast member Norman Lloyd elaborating on that here: https://film.avclub.com/norman-lloyd-on-upstaging-orson-welles-and-playing-tenn-1798286982), but it's a shame Linklater doesn't dislike bland and tiresome stories as that's what we largely get here, and only McKay's Welles and the little we see of Julius Caesar is any fun. 4.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 04, 2021, 08:23:43 AM
The Bowery. This was Twentieth Century Fox's first feature. Wallace Beery, George Raft, Fay Wray. Made in 1933 but set in the 1890s, it's like if we made a film now but set in the 80s, which was an interesting bit of perspective to see. Raoul Walsh is a fantastic director.

The Mascot. Mostly silent stop-motion animation short about a toy dog that goes out in the streets to get the little kid that owns it an orange and the dangers it encounters along the way. Incredibly inventive especially for the time.

A Song of Lisbon. Broad Portuguese comedy about a medical student who fails his exams but tries to convince his wealthy aunts that he passed to get their money. Charming!

Alice in Wonderland. Bit muddled but not without its moments. Definitely odd to get a bunch of stars and shove them in surreal animal costumes but I suppose that's not unlike them providing their voices to animations.

The Little Giant. Edward G. Robinson is electric. Plays a gangster who decides to leave the crime business post-prohibition and join high society. Really fun, quick, light comedy. A blast.

(Yes I'm going through the year 1933. A forum I'm on goes through polls of various years at a time and the current year is 1933.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: kitsofan34 on May 04, 2021, 02:09:04 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 03, 2021, 07:32:28 PM
Me And Orson Welles (2008) - Richard Linklater's film concerning Richard (Zac Effron) an actor who briefly worked for Orson Welles (Christian McKay) on his 1937 production of Julius Caesar, and the romance he has with production assistant Sonja (Clare Danes). It portrays Welles as a charismatic if cunty playboy  egomaniac, while Danes is okay and Effron is watchable but sometimes annoying, and I struggled to care about either. Linklater stressed a dislike for biopics and factual retellings and Richard's story is completely fictional (with surviving cast member Norman Lloyd elaborating on that here: https://film.avclub.com/norman-lloyd-on-upstaging-orson-welles-and-playing-tenn-1798286982), but it's a shame Linklater doesn't dislike bland and tiresome stories as that's what we largely get here, and only McKay's Welles and the little we see of Julius Caesar is any fun. 4.4/10

How do you decide on the decimal points?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 04, 2021, 02:55:45 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 03, 2021, 07:49:09 AM
Viktor and Viktoria. Charming but I did not like the (off-stage) musical interludes in this, of which there were many, though they did grow on me Bit of a sagging middle but enjoyed this a lot. Forgot Anton Walbrook was in this and his entry caused a cheer in my head.

I saw that earlier this year and really enjoyed it, and was especially impressed by the opening where the camera all but floats through the theatrical agency in an Altman-esque way.

Quote from: kitsofan34 on May 04, 2021, 02:09:04 PM
How do you decide on the decimal points?

There's no real method, it's just based on a rough feeling I have after watching the film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 04, 2021, 07:18:10 PM
The Princess And The Frog (2009) - New Orleans set Disney flick where an evil magician turns a prince (Bruno Campos) in to a frog and when our heroine Tiana (Anika Noni Rose) kisses him instead of transforming him back in to a man she turns in to a frog too. An odd couple road movie sort of affair follows as they go on various adventures, team up with a jazz playing alligator (Michael-Leon Wooley) and a firefly called Ray (Jim Cummings), and
Spoiler alert
eventually a happy ending is found for all, apart from the one character who is viciously murdered
[close]
. Randy Newman's songs are some of his best, the animation is delightful and the only real downside is that it'll make you miss this style and wish that not every single f***ing Disney film was cgi these days. 8.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 05, 2021, 02:13:26 PM
More Disney!

Pete's Dragon (2016) - pleasant Disney remake, about a feral boy living in the forest of the Pacific Northwest with a dragon (which is furry when not invisible), whose life is upset by an evil logger played by Karl Urban and a saintly conservationist (Bryce Dallas Howard), while Robert Redford is the crazy old man who keeps talking about dragons. The first couple of minutes are very saccharine but it nicely undercuts that by
Spoiler alert
killing the boy's parents
[close]
. It doesn't have the moral complexity and depth of the best Studio Ghibli, but it's beautifully filmed, the dragon looks great (despite being furry), the cast is impressive, there's some nice folk music, and the invisibility effect looks more like a flatfish than something out of Harry Potter. From director David Lowery who made sheet-over-head fantasy A Ghost Story, there's a similarly gentle air, and not much in the way of drama (even the loggers aren't that evil), although a bit of action later
Spoiler alert
and even some fire-breathing
[close]
. I saw the 1977 original as a small child but remember nothing about it, and would guess this is better: the mix of live action and CGI is a good replacement for the cartoon/live action blend of the original.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on May 05, 2021, 03:59:01 PM
It's funny how some Disney[nb]Trad Disney, not any of that MCU/Star Wars stuff[/nb] films are massive (Frozen), yet other films (like the two mentioned above) just seem to come and go without anyone noticing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 05, 2021, 07:09:39 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on May 05, 2021, 02:13:26 PM
More Disney!

Pete's Dragon (2016) - pleasant Disney remake, about a feral boy living in the forest of the Pacific Northwest with a dragon (which is furry when not invisible), whose life is upset by an evil logger played by Karl Urban and a saintly conservationist (Bryce Dallas Howard), while Robert Redford is the crazy old man who keeps talking about dragons. The first couple of minutes are very saccharine but it nicely undercuts that by
Spoiler alert
killing the boy's parents
[close]
. It doesn't have the moral complexity and depth of the best Studio Ghibli, but it's beautifully filmed, the dragon looks great (despite being furry), the cast is impressive, there's some nice folk music, and the invisibility effect looks more like a flatfish than something out of Harry Potter. From director David Lowery who made sheet-over-head fantasy A Ghost Story, there's a similarly gentle air, and not much in the way of drama (even the loggers aren't that evil), although a bit of action later
Spoiler alert
and even some fire-breathing
[close]
. I saw the 1977 original as a small child but remember nothing about it, and would guess this is better: the mix of live action and CGI is a good replacement for the cartoon/live action blend of the original.

I watched the original last year and it's lacking in drama a little, and is a more a selection of sketches with Eliot getting up to daft antics, but it does have a right old bastard of a villain in the form of Shelley Winters and her two sons who have clearly abused Pete pretty horribly before he managed to run away. I do plan to watch the remake at some point too, but am in no real rush.

Quote from: Blumf on May 05, 2021, 03:59:01 PM
It's funny how some Disney[nb]Trad Disney, not any of that MCU/Star Wars stuff[/nb] films are massive (Frozen), yet other films (like the two mentioned above) just seem to come and go without anyone noticing.

Yeah, neither of them were exactly box office disasters and didn't lose money, but they seem to have failed to set the world on fire. There is supposed to be a Disney+ series based on The Princess And The Frog coming in 2022 though, so maybe that'll raise its profile, I hope it does as it is one of my favourite Disney movies.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on May 05, 2021, 07:14:49 PM
I'd guess when your dealing with younger audiences especially theres arguebly a larger divide between what gets watched once at the cinema and what gets watched 300 times at home.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 05, 2021, 07:23:02 PM
Quote from: greenman on May 05, 2021, 07:14:49 PM
I'd guess when your dealing with younger audiences especially theres arguebly a larger divide between what gets watched once at the cinema and what gets watched 300 times at home.

Bought by kids but acclaimed by parents is probably what happens, the fact it doesn't drive the parents completely potty after 300 watches is probably the decider.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 05, 2021, 08:44:24 PM
Uncle Peckerhead (2020) - Judy (Chet Siegel), Max (Jeff Riddle) and Mel (Ruby McCollister) are in a band together and about to go on tour when their van is repossessed, but they meet Peckerhead (David Littleton) who seems to be a nice enough fella who lets them use his vehicle as long as he can roadie for them. But it turns out that he has a slight problem in that every night at midnight he turns in to a flesh eating monster for 13 minutes, and the band discovers this when he eats a promoter who cheated them out of their money. Judy's horrified but the others are strangely accepting, and as Peckerhead is otherwise seemingly sweet natured and friendly even when he murders more people they don't call the police, in this comedy horror which sends up genre tropes, pricks the pomposity of pretentious bands, but is only intermittently funny, The AV Club gave it a positive review which is why I watched it but I thought that it stretches its central concept far too thinly and as a whole it ultimately disappointed. 5.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on May 06, 2021, 09:37:06 AM
Get Carter

After watching "Pulp" the other weekend I was up for some more Mike Hodges/Michael Caine knockabout action. I was not disappointed. I think I've only seen the scene where he sees his daughter/niece in the film before but somehow had it in my head that I'd seen the whole thing. I loved seeing Peter Kay in it. We're watching the remake next.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 06, 2021, 10:30:03 AM
The Wrong Man - fairly grim Hitchcock thriller starring Henry Fonda as a regular schmo accused of a crime he didn't(?) commit. Based on true story. Felt oddly lightweight and empty

The Truth About Cats and Dogs - I know this is what the kids these days call problematic and Garofalo as since disowned it, saying it has changed from the film she signed up for and is anti-feminist, but I still enjoyed it. I can't argue with what she says but the leads are so likeable and the atmosphere so light that it is still quite charming, despite the odd cringe, and the idea that Garofalo is somehow ugly. Ben Chaplin should have stuck to romcom leads rather than trying to be a serious actor as he is very good at it. It is uber-90s though, in terms of the colour palette, clothing, music choices
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 06, 2021, 11:09:35 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 05, 2021, 07:09:39 PM
Yeah, neither of them were exactly box office disasters and didn't lose money, but they seem to have failed to set the world on fire. There is supposed to be a Disney+ series based on The Princess And The Frog coming in 2022 though, so maybe that'll raise its profile, I hope it does as it is one of my favourite Disney movies.
The Princess and the Frog (which IMO is a good, entertaining film in a solidly traditional Disney way) is quite big with girls of a certain age and some of their parents, and Tiana has joined the growing ranks of Disney Princesses, but it never had the wider cultural impact of something like Frozen. There are a lot of Disney films, especially with the live-action remakes, and not all can be Frozen-big. Pete's Dragon doesn't seem to have made an impact even with kids and parents: reviews were generally positive at the time, and you can buy toy dragons, but maybe kids just prefer that syrupy Disney pop sound and princesses in long dresses to a quiet, picturesque drama with a soundtrack that includes Bonnie Prince Billy, Leonard Cohen, and the Lumineers.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 06, 2021, 09:05:50 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on May 06, 2021, 11:09:35 AM
The Princess and the Frog (which IMO is a good, entertaining film in a solidly traditional Disney way) is quite big with girls of a certain age and some of their parents, and Tiana has joined the growing ranks of Disney Princesses, but it never had the wider cultural impact of something like Frozen. There are a lot of Disney films, especially with the live-action remakes, and not all can be Frozen-big. Pete's Dragon doesn't seem to have made an impact even with kids and parents: reviews were generally positive at the time, and you can buy toy dragons, but maybe kids just prefer that syrupy Disney pop sound and princesses in long dresses to a quiet, picturesque drama with a soundtrack that includes Bonnie Prince Billy, Leonard Cohen, and the Lumineers.

Ha, I didn't know that about the soundtrack but it's moved it higher up in my queue to watch now as I'm intrigued as to how they'll use such artists in what was sold as a kid's film.

The Green Butchers (2003) - Danish comedy about butchers starring Nikolaj Lie Kaas, Mads Mikkelsen and some bizarre haircuts, where they open a butchers shop which does badly until Mads accidentally freezes to death an electrician, serves his flesh to his butcher enemy, and suddenly is a huge success. It's not that original a premise then, somewhat weirdly, and despite the bleaker aspects is quite a gentle comedy about two unusual men, but while it has a very funny ending most of the time it's only mildly amusing fare, likeable for sure but little more than that. 6.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 07, 2021, 02:11:29 PM
The Devil Wears Prada (2006) - fun, snappily directed and excellently-acted workplace comedy/drama that's free on Amazon Prime. Anne Hathaway is the frumpy (yeah, I know) graduate seduced by the world of fashion magazines, and Meryl Streep (auditioning for Margaret Thatcher) is her boss. It does a good job of communicating both the excitement/glamour of this world, and the costs (especially for women, who're held to different standards). Amazing clothes, and some nice jokes too; Stanley Tucci (bitchy but kindhearted magazine designer) and Emily Blunt (bitchy co-worker) are both at the top of their game.

Sadly lurches into rom-com mode late on, with an ending which makes little sense:
Spoiler alert
she stays with her whiny passive-aggressive boyfriend whose only accomplishment is to cook her the American equivalent of a cheese toastie, rather than choosing the cool, handsome, talented journalist who actually shows interest and helps her AND after evoking the excitement of fashion so well, we're supposed to believe our heroine gives it up to write about the labour disputes of janitorial staff (this is literally what they say).
[close]

Plus, parodied by the Simpsons (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Devil_Wears_Nada), and Roger Ebert hated it (https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-devil-wears-prada-2006).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 07, 2021, 08:47:04 PM
To Be Or Not To Be (1942) - A black comedy set in 1941 where after Poland has been invaded an actor has to impersonate a professor working for the nazis who has important knowledge about the resistance, and its complicated by his wife's flirtatious relationship with a soldier
Spoiler alert
and the real professor turning up dead
[close]
. It's a farcical affair with a lot of strong wordplay, mockery of actorly types and the odd dig at those pesky nazis, and its pretty funny throughout, but for reasons I can't quite explain I didn't love it in the way that many do. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on May 08, 2021, 12:08:12 AM
Does anyone else feel like they've hit a real films rut?

At the start of the pandemic, I really embraced the opportunity to watch a lot of films - taking in far more classics and foreign language things. Now I just feel like I've burned through all the obvious choices of things I'm sincerely interested in (and in some cases, even through most of the non-obvious choices, too). Maybe part of it's the lack of a normal release schedule. Maybe if there were new, interesting things coming out (or big spectacle things like Mission Impossible, etc), I wouldn't be putting quite so much pressure on my home viewing.

Tonight I tried to watch One From The Heart and then The Long Kiss Goodnight. And, unfortunately, I had to turn both of them off. Until the last month or so I've never had to turn films off because I work out ahead of time if I'm interested, then commit. Now I'm just half-heartedly watching quite second-rate stuff. Maybe I need some decent lists to pour through?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 08, 2021, 01:44:05 PM
Quote from: amputeeporn on May 08, 2021, 12:08:12 AM
Does anyone else feel like they've hit a real films rut?

At the start of the pandemic, I really embraced the opportunity to watch a lot of films - taking in far more classics and foreign language things. Now I just feel like I've burned through all the obvious choices of things I'm sincerely interested in (and in some cases, even through most of the non-obvious choices, too). Maybe part of it's the lack of a normal release schedule. Maybe if there were new, interesting things coming out (or big spectacle things like Mission Impossible, etc), I wouldn't be putting quite so much pressure on my home viewing.

Tonight I tried to watch One From The Heart and then The Long Kiss Goodnight. And, unfortunately, I had to turn both of them off. Until the last month or so I've never had to turn films off because I work out ahead of time if I'm interested, then commit. Now I'm just half-heartedly watching quite second-rate stuff. Maybe I need some decent lists to pour through?

I've been doing a film a day challenge sort of thing since the end of December and at weekends normally manage two and it hasn't been an issue, but that's partially due to a) Falling in love with Bollywood movies when I'd only seen two prior to this year, b) Giving modern Russian cinema a go and finding some delightfully weird oddities, and c) Finding that any movie I watched thirty years ago plus I have basically no memory of unless it was something I saw more than once or truly loved, and that combined means I haven't struggled yet.

That's a shame to hear about One From The Heart too, I've not seen it but was planning to do so this weekend as I (somehow) only just discovered it was a musical, though I'll still watch it at some point due to my insane love for the genre.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: joaquin closet on May 08, 2021, 01:48:06 PM
Quote from: amputeeporn on May 08, 2021, 12:08:12 AM
Does anyone else feel like they've hit a real films rut?

At the start of the pandemic, I really embraced the opportunity to watch a lot of films - taking in far more classics and foreign language things. Now I just feel like I've burned through all the obvious choices of things I'm sincerely interested in (and in some cases, even through most of the non-obvious choices, too). Maybe part of it's the lack of a normal release schedule. Maybe if there were new, interesting things coming out (or big spectacle things like Mission Impossible, etc), I wouldn't be putting quite so much pressure on my home viewing.

Tonight I tried to watch One From The Heart and then The Long Kiss Goodnight. And, unfortunately, I had to turn both of them off. Until the last month or so I've never had to turn films off because I work out ahead of time if I'm interested, then commit. Now I'm just half-heartedly watching quite second-rate stuff. Maybe I need some decent lists to pour through?

I was rescued from such a rut last month by a fucking mega 6-film tear. A real faith-restorer (not that the faith was ever really lost... although watching Mark Whalberg's The Gambler (2014) pushed me to the fucking edge).

That list was:

Only Angels Have Wings (1939) dir. Howard Hawks
Is there a better film variety that cool guys/girls hanging out in far-flung frontier dives? This, Rio Bravo, Casablanca... Can anyone recommend any others?

Brief Encounter (1945) dir. David Lean
The young people look so old. Reminds me of my grandparents.

To Be or Not to Be (1942) dir. Ernst Lubitsch
Find it interesting how the general consensus seems to be don't acknowledge Covid on screen it's too traumatic we want escapism when people were making shit like this in WWII. So funny.

U.S. Go Home (1994) dir. Claire Denis
A fascinating sister to Assayas' Cold Water... literally, seeing as they originated from the same series of made-for-TV films. I mean read this:

""All the Boys and Girls of Their Time" comprises nine films, all by directors who would continue making films, some of them acclaimed worldwide. In addition to Denis, the directors included: Chantal Akerman, Olivier Assayas, Laurence Ferreira Barbosa, Olivier Dahan, Émilie Deleuze, Cédric Kahn, Patricia Mazuy, and André Téchiné. Each director was asked to make a film between fifty-six and seventy minutes, set during the years of their own adolescence. The budgets were around $1 million, and all the films were shot in Super 16 mm. The series was coproduced by the TV entity La Sept/Arte and Sony Music Entertainment (France). Sony insisted that there be one teenage party in each film (it saw the series as promos for Sony recording artists). While the directors were able to use music that would have otherwise been prohibitively expensive, the issue of music rights is sadly part of what has prevented the films from being distributed beyond their original television broadcast. "

How fucking cool is that! Made me think... Small Axe S2, but with McQueen (assuming he feels he's said all he can in that format) passing each episode to a different young filmmaker. Also, the insistence on a teenage party led to the best scenes in both Cold Water and this... Thank you 90's French Sony execs!

Night of the Demon (1957) dir. Jacques Tourneur
Always loved the idea of British folk horror but never been able to get on with The Wicker Man... This hit the spot perfectly.

Scorpio Rising (1963) dir. Kenneth Anger
Feel like anything said about it would come off as trite. It's fucking great.


Sure you've seen a bunch (maybe all) of these, but if not I'd recommend them all highly!

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 08, 2021, 02:43:17 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 08, 2021, 01:44:05 PM
I've been doing a film a day challenge sort of thing since the end of December and at weekends normally manage two

How do you find this longish term? I generally watch several films a week and two a night at weekends isn't unusual. Back when Mubi had stuff rolling off daily it was both a blessing and a curse as I'd watch a lot of stuff and enjoy it but certainly find I was sometimes forcing myself to watch stuff I genuinely wanted to see in the wrong mood. And even if I was in the right mood I'd sometimes get a bit fatigued and have a week or so off (missing stuff expiring in the process).

I guess having more flexibility with regards to your own mood might make it easier though?

Still sometimes need to have a night off where I zone out to something easier to watch though, currently going through Northern Exposure for this.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 08, 2021, 02:44:56 PM
Also there's some great 40's films mentioned in here I like and other's I've not seen so will need to make a list, nice one.

Only Angels Have Wings is especially great.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 08, 2021, 04:09:27 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 08, 2021, 02:43:17 PM
How do you find this longish term? I generally watch several films a week and two a night at weekends isn't unusual. Back when Mubi had stuff rolling off daily it was both a blessing and a curse as I'd watch a lot of stuff and enjoy it but certainly find I was sometimes forcing myself to watch stuff I genuinely wanted to see in the wrong mood. And even if I was in the right mood I'd sometimes get a bit fatigued and have a week or so off (missing stuff expiring in the process).

I guess having more flexibility with regards to your own mood might make it easier though?

Still sometimes need to have a night off where I zone out to something easier to watch though, currently going through Northern Exposure for this.

There's been the odd time when I've felt like I'm forcing myself to watch something just so I don't miss a day, or where I'm halfway through a film that at other times I might have given up on it, but 98% of the time it's been a real pleasure and has helped keep me sane during the lockdown. I forgot to mention in the previous post that I'm also working my way through every Disney animated film (well, the theatrical releases, not the straight to dvd fare) so when I'm in the mood for something simple and fun that's what I've been watching, and most have been a delight too, and only Bambi and The Fox And The Hound have disappointed so far.

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 08, 2021, 02:44:56 PM
Also there's some great 40's films mentioned in here I like and other's I've not seen so will need to make a list, nice one.

Only Angels Have Wings is especially great.

That's another area where I'd watched some but not many, and it's have been a great source of fun films, at the end of last year / the beginning of this year I watched all of Preston Sturges films and would especially recommend them, along with a good few from the ninteen thirties as well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: steveh on May 09, 2021, 10:03:59 AM
Also watched One from the Heart last weekend for the first time since it was on telly in the eighties and as critics generally summarise it's great in how it looks and its technical achievements but does absolutely nothing to help you engage with the characters and their predicaments. Post Truman Show the soundstage sets also kept leading to an anticipation that maybe there was going to be a similar big reveal.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on May 09, 2021, 08:25:24 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 08, 2021, 02:44:56 PM
Also there's some great 40's films mentioned in here I like and other's I've not seen so will need to make a list, nice one.

Only Angels Have Wings is especially great.

Its not perfect, but this is a pretty good list of noir from the 40's. A relatively obvious list but some absolute belters listed.

Only thing that was annoying, recommending The Postman Always Rings Twice before The Big Sleep and The Killers , but meh not something to get that worked over about.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 09, 2021, 09:07:59 PM
Straw Hat (1972) - Another comedy from Czech director Oldrich Lipský, this is based on a stage play and one that is about farcical as you can get as while in the woods with her lover a woman gets her straw hat eaten by a horse, and fears her husband may discover the truth, while said horse is owned by Maurice who was also cheating on his fiancée with another woman and who is due to get married that very day. It piles up the silliness and there's a whole heap of misunderstandings, at one point it threatens to become a little too exhausting when it comes to the idiocy on display, but the final half an hour is a return to form and it ends strongly. 6.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 09, 2021, 10:22:46 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on May 09, 2021, 08:25:24 PM
Its not perfect, but this is a pretty good list of noir from the 40's. A relatively obvious list but some absolute belters listed.

Only thing that was annoying, recommending The Postman Always Rings Twice before The Big Sleep and The Killers , but meh not something to get that worked over about.

Sorry, I think you've forgotten the link!

As an initial starting point, not knowing where to look I ended up going for a list I found in a filmnoir subreddit.

QuoteThe Untouchables

    Double Indemnity

    Sunset Boulevard

    The Big Sleep

    Maltese Falcon

    Chinatown

Film Noir

    Kiss Me Deadly

    The Postman Rings Twice

    The Third Man

    Alphaville

    The Killers

    The Killing

    The Naked City

Neo Noir

    The Long Goodbye

    Blade Runner

    LA Confidential

    The Big Lebowski

    Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

    The Friends of Eddie Coyle (Anthony Bourdain's favorite film btw)

    Brick

    Harper

I've seen more since, not entirely sure where else from though now.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on May 10, 2021, 12:33:12 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 09, 2021, 10:22:46 PM
Sorry, I think you've forgotten the link!

As an initial starting point, not knowing where to look I ended up going for a list I found in a filmnoir subreddit.

I've seen more since, not entirely sure where else from though now.

Apologises, its a safe enough list but plenty of good stuff their.
https://www2.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/one-great-film-noir-every-year-1940-59
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 10, 2021, 12:37:28 AM
Ahh the BFI! Bookmarked.

I was considering buying their screen guide on the subject at one point as it gives a bit of info about the films.
https://shop.bfi.org.uk/100-film-noirs.html
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on May 10, 2021, 12:39:49 AM
there's a they shoot pictures don't they list for noirs
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 10, 2021, 01:31:37 AM
Pure Shit. Melbourne-made film from 1975 about a group of heroin addicts trying to score. Fairly light touch on a dark subject but doesn't ever regress into farce or make the characters into caricatures despite being a little lively.

The Mayor of Hell. James Cagney rips it up as a gangster who gets put in charge of a boys' reform school. Pretty rousing stuff.

Japanese Girls at the Harbor. Silent Japanese drama. A little overly melodramatic at times but it's very soft and lovely and the final moments are masterful.

Life Begins Tomorrow. Some call this the last German expressionist film before the Nazis took over. Minimal dialogue, maximal brooding. Bit of a tragedy of errors as a newly-released prisoner and his wife who was meant to meet him attempt to find each other and miss crossing paths.

Heroes for Sale. Cracking social drama tracking a man from his time in WWI to the Great Depression. Really captures the events and attitudes of the time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Charles Lindberg Jr on May 10, 2021, 03:14:55 AM
Just watched 'Edge of Tomorrow' and was completely blown away by how much I enjoyed it. Not the usual sort of thing I'd go for, whatever that means, but days later and fuck me, still can't get my head around the pure entertainment factor I got out of it. It's cooked me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Charles Lindberg Jr on May 10, 2021, 04:03:17 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 10, 2021, 01:31:37 AM
Pure Shit. Melbourne-made film from 1975 about a group of heroin addicts trying to score. Fairly light touch on a dark subject but doesn't ever regress into farce or make the characters into caricatures despite being a little lively.

We're did you come across this?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 10, 2021, 05:24:58 AM
Quote from: Charles Lindberg Jr on May 10, 2021, 04:03:17 AM
We're did you come across this?

Borrowed a DVD off a friend...
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 10, 2021, 07:40:33 AM
Steelyard Blues. Dismal crime comedy starring Donald Sutherland, Peter Boyle and Jane Fonda. Best missed.

Slap Shot. Paul Newman stars as an aging ice-hockey player whose losing team starts playing rough to get ahead. Really enjoyed it on the whole though some of the casual homophobia was a bit grating and the relationship subplots weren't very well developed. The
Spoiler alert
striptease
[close]
at the end was genius stuff.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blue Jam on May 10, 2021, 09:28:55 AM
Finally watched the rest of John Wick. Actually enjoyed the daftness of it by the end.
Spoiler alert
and he liberates a cute doggo!
[close]
. Could be tempted to watch 2 and 3.

Also watched The Aviator with Sproutface as Howard Hughes. Went on a bit but it was an enjoyable few hours, it looks gorgeous and there's some nice aircraft porn in there. My only problem was Cate Blanchett- nothing at all wrong with her performance as Katherine Hepburn, I just couldn't stop being reminded of Jennifer Jason Leigh doing the Katherine Hepburn voice in The Hudsucker Proxy.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 10, 2021, 10:31:50 AM
Quote from: Blue Jam on May 10, 2021, 09:28:55 AM
Finally watched the rest of John Wick. Actually enjoyed the daftness of it by the end.
Spoiler alert
and he liberates a cute doggo!
[close]
. Could be tempted to watch 2 and 3.

For me the first was easily the best, I liked it a lot and was then surprised that I really struggled with the second and almost didn't finish it (which is rare for me), and though I found the third a bit better it's still overlong and the ending drags on for far too long.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 10, 2021, 07:24:27 PM
Ocean Waves (1993) - Studio Ghibli made for tv movie where Rikako, a girl from Tokyo, joins the school and takes advantage of fellow classmate Taku, treating him poorly throughout the film and her behaviour is never really explained other than that she's a child of divorce. It's a lightweight romantic drama, a slight effort which doesn't have much to say and Rikako is so irritating I can't understand why Taku or anyone else would show any interest in her. 4.9/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 11, 2021, 06:26:03 AM
The Pink Panther Strikes Again. It's very James Bond in particular this time. I liked Herbert Lom going mad. Surprisingly not a huge fan of this series overall but I keep watching them. Nice opening titles. Are the gags in this especially dumb as fuck (in a good way) or have I just not seen one for enough time that I've forgotten how dumb all the gags in the series in general are?

In the Realm of the Senses. THEY CERTAINLY DO LIKE TO FUCK. Looking past this it's quite beautiful and fascinating.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 11, 2021, 01:23:20 PM
Election (Johnnie To, 2005) - Hong Kong crime drama about a dispute between two would-be Triad leaders played by the always dependable Simon Yam and Tony Leung Ka-fai, alongside a ton of great character actors. It almost seems to be deliberately anti-action as a riposte to the more showy style of Hong Kong cinema: there are no guns, no real car chases, but there are a couple of brutal knife fights and some nasty beatings, as well as some dry humour and lots of shadowy conversations about betrayal. It's very much about the notion of honour among thieves, and whether the Triad traditions and oaths are more than window dressing, and the result is tense and gripping, more like the Godfather films than John Woo.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 11, 2021, 02:05:20 PM
Night Shift - Ron Howard's first film, and one of a slew of "straight laced men become pimps" films of the early 80s. Quite fun and ramshackle, and very un-Ron Howard. Michael Keaton is a bit too early Michael Keaton in this and it might be seen as problematic nowadays but it was watchable
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 11, 2021, 06:20:42 PM
Peter Pan (1953) - Disney adaptation of the famous children's tale by J.M. Barrie where Peter's a childish sod, Tinkerbell's a jealous psychopath, the mermaids are flirty stroppy types and its treatment of native Americans is problematic and then some, but otherwise it's a fun romp with a great villain and some enjoyable songs. Not first class Disney, but a very strong second tier effort. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 12, 2021, 01:53:12 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 11, 2021, 06:20:42 PM
Peter Pan (1953) - Disney adaptation of the famous children's tale by J.M. Barrie where Peter's a childish sod, Tinkerbell's a jealous psychopath, the mermaids are flirty stroppy types and its treatment of native Americans is problematic and then some, but otherwise it's a fun romp with a great villain and some enjoyable songs. Not first class Disney, but a very strong second tier effort. 7.4/10

Oh wow I hated this - Peter Pan was incredibly annoying and it was all very Family Values and Racism at the forefront
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 12, 2021, 08:42:21 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 12, 2021, 01:53:12 AM
Oh wow I hated this - Peter Pan was incredibly annoying and it was all very Family Values and Racism at the forefront

I can completely understand why you'd feel that way, I think I was just very bemused at how much of a shit Peter and Tinkerbell were, and though the family values and racism stuff is deeply unpleasant I was forgiving of it for some reason.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 12, 2021, 02:50:09 PM
Fast and Loose (1930) - Very mild rom-com where a posh brother and sister fall for a chorus girl and a mechanic, and the parents aren't impressed at all, except that it turns out both are salt of the earth types and it's the posh kids who are selfish and self-obsessed. Bar some outdated opinions regarding women there's nothing really wrong with it and some scenes have a certain charm, but the dialogue is often bland and it only raised a couple of smiles. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 12, 2021, 08:19:13 PM
Out Of The Dark (1995) - Stephen Chow stars in this comedy horror from Jeffrey Lau which doesn't have much of a plot, it's just a series of daft events taking place in a block of flats where some ghosts are a little murderous, and Chow's sometime mental patient claims to know how to deal with them and recruits a good few security guards to aid him. It's beyond silly most of the time, and there are a couple of dodgy jokes which I wish had been cut, but it made me laugh a great deal and despite having a few minor issues with it it's something I really liked as a whole. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on May 12, 2021, 10:00:11 PM
Borat One of those films that has become a cultural touchstone but which I'd managed never to see. I think that at the time I was a bit tired of the whole Ali G/Borat thing and a belief that this was a bit crass and lowbrow held me off. As it is it's a weird mixture of undeniably funny and indefensibly offensive passages, its exposé of American life undermined not only by the tedious familiarity that comes with the passage of time but by the film's own cynical exploitation of, for example, the Romanian villagers who were unknowingly the butt of Cohen's gags in the "Kazakhstan" sections. If you can put your snowflake sensibilities aside you will probably still be won over by some of the laugh-at-the-stereotypical-poor-foreigners jokes there, of course.

Philomena Decent effort from Coogan and co about a little old Oirish lady (Judi Dench, who is not Irish, standing in some fields with green Instagram filters on and being nice to people) searching for her long-lost son who was stolen from her by evil nuns. No, really. As in it really happened in real life, although it was Martin Sixsmith and not Steve Coogan who helped her. A bit corny, especially Dench's performance, while Coogan is good yet too much himself to be really good, and the flashback sequences are a tad heavyhanded, but the story at its heart is a good one and it does well to swerve a lot of obvious sentimental beats.

The Place Beyond the Pines Ryan Gosling plays Ryan Gosling who Ryan Goslings around a small town in New York state. Then Bradley Cooper and his face, a face I have an irrational dislike of, there is something slightly rodenty and Australian about it, he looks like he is always about to break out in a pervy sweat, are a cop trying to decide whether to do the right thing or what the right thing even is. Then two teenage models are their two teenage sons on a collision course.
All very try-hard, American and epic, lots of stuff about fathers and motorbikes and crime and family and being your own man and that, but all these elements I can snarkily criticise somehow add up to a film I found compelling and thought-provoking, the subtle direction and cinematography doing a lot of the groundwork. The acting is very good, too: yes Gosling is Gosling, but he's good at being Gosling and this was before he started parodying himself, and I can even forgive Bradley Cooper's face here. The two young lads do decent jobs, though in Emory Cohen's case I'm not sure whether he's putting in a very good performance as a teenage twat trying to be cool, or just a bad actor. Ben Mendelsohn is good as Gosling's pal, Ray Liotta eyebrows the scenery as Cooper's. All very manly, of course: Eva Mendes is good as Gosling's ex but Rose Byrne as Cooper's wife barely gets anything to do.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 13, 2021, 04:50:17 PM
Bio-Zombie (1998) - Someone online claimed this was a wacky affair in the vein of Peter Jackson's Braindead, but they were lying bastards who I will now track down and feast upon as they wasted so much of my life, this doesn't have anything in common with that great film other than it features zombies. The first fifty minutes are especially slow and you could skip them completely without missing out on anything, and once the action does kick off it's tedious and repetitive, poorly filmed with weak make up and effects. The characters are nearly all unsympathetic and it's a rare occasion where I feel actively annoyed that I watched a  film, this is one to avoid even if you normally like comedy horror movies. 2.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on May 13, 2021, 05:53:20 PM
A friend of mine was a big fan of Bio-Zombie & loaned me a VCD of it years back that I never bothered watching as the two lads on the cover looked like annoying twats. Sounds like my instincts saved me a couple of hours.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 13, 2021, 08:32:43 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on May 13, 2021, 05:53:20 PM
A friend of mine was a big fan of Bio-Zombie & loaned me a VCD of it years back that I never bothered watching as the two lads on the cover looked like annoying twats. Sounds like my instincts saved me a couple of hours.

I guess if I'd never seen a zombie comedy before I might not have been quite so angry about it, but it's not even a greatest hits of the genre as it was in the late 90s, just a lazy, shitty effort and you're absolutely right about the two lads being annoying, I've never wanted the leads in a film to die as much as I did with those two.

Sextette (1978) - Mae West, Timothy Dalton, Ringo Starr, Keith Moon, Tony Curtis, Regis Philbin  and Alice Cooper all in the same movie from the director of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang? No, it's not some fever dream but a seventies musical based on a play written by West where she's much loved movie star Marlo Manners, who has just married Sir Michael Barrington (Dalton) and the coverage is akin to a royal wedding. Manners used to be hired by the US government to spy (and sleep with) various dodgy geezers and even though it's her wedding night they ask her to do so one last time, while Sir Michael spends the movie giving interviews to prove he's not gay only to say something which suggests that he is, and boy has that aspect not aged well. Nearly everything's wrapped up after an hour so a new plotline involving a presumed dead gangster husband of Marlo's is thrown in, while there's some idiocy with a tape of Marlo's memoirs, all of which makes the narrative feel quite bitty and unsatisfying. Almost every line West delivers is a dodgy innuendo or pun, it's packed full of ridiculously contrived scenarios and laughably poor overacting, the song and dance numbers are cheesy at best and it's one of those movies that with my film critic hat on I'd rate 3.0/10, but I enjoyed the insanity of it all a lot and so would give it 7.2/10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on May 13, 2021, 10:15:58 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on May 12, 2021, 10:00:11 PM


The Place Beyond the Pines Ryan Gosling plays Ryan Gosling who Ryan Goslings around a small town in New York state. Then Bradley Cooper and his face, a face I have an irrational dislike of, there is something slightly rodenty and Australian about it, he looks like he is always about to break out in a pervy sweat, are a cop trying to decide whether to do the right thing or what the right thing even is. Then two teenage models are their two teenage sons on a collision course.
All very try-hard, American and epic, lots of stuff about fathers and motorbikes and crime and family and being your own man and that, but all these elements I can snarkily criticise somehow add up to a film I found compelling and thought-provoking, the subtle direction and cinematography doing a lot of the groundwork. The acting is very good, too: yes Gosling is Gosling, but he's good at being Gosling and this was before he started parodying himself, and I can even forgive Bradley Cooper's face here. The two young lads do decent jobs, though in Emory Cohen's case I'm not sure whether he's putting in a very good performance as a teenage twat trying to be cool, or just a bad actor. Ben Mendelsohn is good as Gosling's pal, Ray Liotta eyebrows the scenery as Cooper's. All very manly, of course: Eva Mendes is good as Gosling's ex but Rose Byrne as Cooper's wife barely gets anything to do.

That's a really good post.

I agree with the last one, I recall at times been bored and underwhelmed by some of the cast, but I could not stop thinking about it for ages after I seen it.


I watched Gregory's girl the other day on Prime, its a lovely film. 4/5.

Its only the second Forsyth film (the other the excellent Local Hero which is always on film4) I have seen so curious to see if anything else he did was of any use.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sex Festival Organizer on May 14, 2021, 05:45:55 PM
Figures in a Landscape (1970) directed by Joseph Losey, and starring Robert Shaw (who also wrote the screenplay) and Malcolm McDowell.

I've wanted to see this ever since I saw a very evocative poster (which I can't find online) for it in a high-brow movie magazine from the 70s, and finally I got my chance! Shaw and McDowell are two fugitives on the lam in an unnamed country (but it is Spain), constantly being harassed by a sinister black chopper. The first half or so is pretty good, where it's just the two protagonists in an existential battle against the elements and the ever-present chopper, which they can do nothing about (yet), and there's a very effective scene set in a tiny village, which I won't spoil any further, but it did give me a good jolt. Or, more accurately, two good jolts! There is also some insane helicopter-flying along the way, and I'm really surprised that no one got killed or seriously hurt during the shoot (John Landis, take note).

Unfortunately, the second half turns into an arty action film and a bit of a slog, where Shaw mows down enemies by the dozen, and Losey is definitely *not* the right director for this sort of stuff. It's dull, and the denouement is interminable (but very well shot, as is the whole movie; there is some great cinematography here).

All in all, it's worth a watch if you like Losey or any of the stars, who are both good, and/or want to see some great landscape shots or a helicopter seemingly coming very close to actually killing the star of a movie. Fucking helicopters, man. I'll never forget when I did my stint for king and country and was «lucky» enough to go on a tactical flight in a chopper, i.e. flying as close to the ground as possible, over hills, through valleys and constantly dipping and turning every which way. Worst 30 minutes ever.

Rating: 6/10

Oh, and it's available on YouTube in good quality: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5pJLX5AzkQ

I forgot to add: There's a lengthy scene towards the end, where Shaw is ranting wildly about his (former?) wife, that should be an endless source of avatars. His face is caked with mud, except for his eyebrows, which are spot-free, and he looks completely mental.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 14, 2021, 08:59:12 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on May 13, 2021, 10:15:58 PM
I watched Gregory's girl the other day on Prime, its a lovely film. 4/5.

Its only the second Forsyth film (the other the excellent Local Hero which is always on film4) I have seen so curious to see if anything else he did was of any use.

I watched Gregory's Girl tonight after seeing your post and realising I'd somehow never seen it and I'm a big fan of Local Hero too, and though I did like certain aspects of it a lot and it made me nostalgic for school life in the 1980's, the plot is really slight and there's a good few moments which haven't aged well at all (one of the kids saying "Ten years old but with the body of a thirteen year old" being the dodgiest bit), and though I'm fond of it I can't say I understand what all the fuss is about. 6.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 15, 2021, 09:52:12 PM
Greyhound (2020) (ship film)
THanks is skipper of a ww2 destroyer on N Atlantic convoy duty. CS Forester adaptation so the story is solid enough. CGI looked great at times, terrible others. Standard hooray for are brave seamen of god thing. The tension of the running 48 hour battle with U-boats was as tight as the better submarine films. They missed the opportunity early in the film to
Spoiler alert
kill baby Hitler
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 15, 2021, 10:39:20 PM
One from the Heart (1981) - The film that famously bankrupted Francis Ford Coppola, it's a strangely theatrical affair as Hank (Frederic Forrest) and Frannie (Teri Garr) split up, and sleep with others, but will they reunite? I certainly hoped they wouldn't as Hank's something of a twat, and the film gives us no reason to believe that Frannie would be happier with him. With a blues-y soundtrack from Tom Waits and Crystal Gayle it's a film I really liked for the majority of the running time, and it's directed in a playful and often quite stunning manner, but the script is thin
Spoiler alert
and the ending fucked me off no end, I'd have really liked this a good deal if it had ended on a downbeat note but the rushed happy ending
[close]
is shit. 7.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on May 16, 2021, 02:33:06 PM
I watched most of the first (proper) Dad's Army film and bits of the second Dad's Army film.

Loved the 1971 Dad's Army film, it's impressive how well they translated from TV to film.

The second Dad's Army film - a very tedious and pointless film, I say I watched "bits of it" because I fast forwarded through a lot of it. The bits I saw weren't very funny, I laughed twice in total. Lots of good actors but it felt like a bad fan film of Dad's Army, in fact I imagine most Dad's Army fan films would have been better than this.

It's weird how they were trying to be very true to the characters on the one hand but Pike had
Spoiler alert
a girlfriend
[close]
. The bit where Godfrey tries to piss against Jones who is wearing a tree costume was particularly disturbing, given the look of pleasure on Godfrey's face as he is about to urinate against something he knows is a fellow platoon member.

I was thinking of putting this in Comedy Chat instead but there is so little humour in the second Dad's Army film there isn't much to say. The final scenes are somewhat interesting but there is no reason at all for this film to exist and no reason to watch it even if you are very bored. Lots of good performances and lots of great actors, but a dull and charmless film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 16, 2021, 08:46:37 PM
Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) - Disney film where old Irish fella Darby (Albert Sharpe) captures the king of the leprechauns (Jimmy O'Dea) and takes his time mulling over three wishes he'll receive, while his daughter Katie (Janet Munroe) flirts with a sometimes macho but occasionally goofy pre-fame Sean Connery. It's a simple affair, amusing for sure and it has plenty of charm,
Spoiler alert
while the supernatural ending involving a banshee and the carriage of death is nicely weird
[close]
, but it's a little bit of a shame the narrative wasn't a bit stronger overall. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Talulah, really! on May 16, 2021, 10:25:07 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on May 13, 2021, 10:15:58 PM
That's a really good post.

I agree with the last one, I recall at times been bored and underwhelmed by some of the cast, but I could not stop thinking about it for ages after I seen it.


I watched Gregory's girl the other day on Prime, its a lovely film. 4/5.

Its only the second Forsyth film (the other the excellent Local Hero which is always on film4) I have seen so curious to see if anything else he did was of any use.

That Sinking Feeling 1979 his first is on iplayer, shares most of the young male cast of Gregory's Girl and is full of the same whimsicality though shot through with a more melancolic tinge in a rainy Glasgow and shot on a budget of 99p probably. Technically it is a caper movie.

Comfort and Joy 1984 seems to be have forgotten about, never gets mentioned in Christmas film lists, but I love it, a starring role for Bill Paterson, the great Rikki Fulton in a comedy set around the Glasgow Ice Cream van wars, the city itself has never looked more beautiful on film and it has one of the greatest pull back and reveal jokes ever. Clare Grogan also shows up. Doesn't quite pull together though.

The Gregory's Girl sequel isn't up to much. Haven't seen his American made films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on May 16, 2021, 11:40:52 PM
Se7en
Was this always a dumb pile of shite? Like, I know the plot is dumb, but it doesn't seem to wear its stupidity very well and you'd think the  script thought it was actually well clever.

Heat
Absolute fucking peach of a film, cannot believe I've been going around for over half my life writing it off as an overlong dud. Been watching a lot of Hong Kong cop things lately and despite being by Michael Mann and set in LA this is by far the best one.

Quote from: Talulah, really! on May 16, 2021, 10:25:07 PM
That Sinking Feeling 1979 his first is on iplayer, shares most of the young male cast of Gregory's Girl and is full of the same whimsicality though shot through with a more melancolic tinge in a rainy Glasgow and shot on a budget of 99p probably. Technically it is a caper movie.

Comfort and Joy 1984 seems to be have forgotten about, never gets mentioned in Christmas film lists, but I love it, a starring role for Bill Paterson, the great Rikki Fulton in a comedy set around the Glasgow Ice Cream van wars, the city itself has never looked more beautiful on film and it has one of the greatest pull back and reveal jokes ever. Clare Grogan also shows up. Doesn't quite pull together though.

The Gregory's Girl sequel isn't up to much. Haven't seen his American made films.
Housekeeping is an absolute gem of a film. Probably his best imo, fantastic lead performance from Lahti and a great autumn vibe to the whole thing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 17, 2021, 12:51:31 AM
The Eagle Has Landed (1976) German commandos try to kidnap Churchill aided by Irish republican Donald Sutherland doing an impression of the Lucky Charms leprechaun. Jenny Agutter gives aid and comfort to the nazis. Drags on forever without much action or substance until Larry Hagman shows up and takes charge JR style
Spoiler alert
with a great comic death
[close]
. Strange film that should have been worse.  Michael Caine is the lead nazi.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on May 17, 2021, 10:32:56 AM
The Woman In The Window

Agrophobic Amy Adams sees a murder in the house across the road. It starts with her watching "Rear Window" so it knows what it's doing. I enjoyed it. Gary Oldman was a bit terrifying.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 17, 2021, 07:14:41 PM
The Mask (1994) - Adaptation of the comic book where Stanley Ipkiss (Jim Carrey) finds a mask that upon wearing it gives him amazing powers, though the main one is the ability to annoy. A cartoonish slice of idiocy, when Stanley's The Mask it's fun but when it gets bogged down with the plot it becomes dull, while Cameron Diaz fancying The Mask, then suddenly thinking he's creepy and kneeing him in the balls, before then trying to romance Stanley about five minutes later despite knowing he's The Mask doesn't make a lot of sense. Still, Carrey and Diaz are great and there are some very funny moments, but it definitely suffers from a few too many dull bits and if it wasn't for the strong ending I wouldn't have rated it quite so highly. 6.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on May 17, 2021, 10:34:09 PM
Quote from: Talulah, really! on May 16, 2021, 10:25:07 PM
Comfort and Joy 1984 seems to be have forgotten about, never gets mentioned in Christmas film lists, but I love it, a starring role for Bill Paterson, the great Rikki Fulton in a comedy set around the Glasgow Ice Cream van wars, the city itself has never looked more beautiful on film and it has one of the greatest pull back and reveal jokes ever. Clare Grogan also shows up. Doesn't quite pull together though.

This has become quite popular in our house - obviously it's not Local Hero, but I think it does share some of the surreal good nature. If you go in expecting a really nice, warm time and not a classic, I don't know how you'd be disappointed. (and yes, it looks beautiful!)

As well as some others mentioned in this thread, I've also seen Housekeeping, his big US effort, which was extremely well made and very different to his other things - if desolatingly sad at the end.

It's certainly not the kind of film you'd imagine would more or less end someone's career. I know he made three films after, but they were two US studio things and then the misbegotten Gregory's Girl sequel.

It does seem a shame that the system seemed to drain him of creative energy, and still not leave a huge body of work behind.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 18, 2021, 07:28:19 AM
(Forgot to post these and they've been building up whoops)

Southland Tales. What was this. Feels like time treated this oddly kindly to be honest, lots more stuff like this has been coming out afterwards. Some people I saw this with made comparisons with latter Lynch. I saw some Vernon Chatman in it. Either way it's certainly a lot to digest. I didn't hate it. Admirable cacophony.

Madame X: An Absolute Ruler. First major feature by overlooked German New Wave practitioner Ulrike Ottinger. Somehow fortuitous watching this after watching the above, it's also quite a surreal weave; a group of women set sail on the ship Orlando captained by Madame X who promises to liberate them from their mundane lives with promises of "gold, love and adventure". Incomprehensible in many ways but a remarkable burst of avant-garde energy.

Ticket of No Return. Ottinger's next film. Quite a lot more subdued though still surreal and irreverent. I liked it more than Madame X. Something of an Akerman or Fassbinder about it.

Orchestra Rehearsal. Frivolous Fellini satire. Always forget how excellent his films look and feel even if this is a minor work.

Bleak Moments. Mike Leigh's feature debut. Not nearly as well-formed as many of his later films but you can see an incredibly solid groundwork of singular characters he really cares about.

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song. Bombastic, eccentric; cited to be one of the very first blaxploitation films. Sags a bit in the middle but boasts some of the coolest opening and closing title texts I've seen. A lot more experimental than one would be led to believe. Really a unique style.

Then watched another Van Peebles film, a TV film from 1996 called Gang in Blue. Black cop digs up a white supremacist group within the force. Mainly watched it because I came up with a very similar idea and was interested to see how this executed it. Definitely extremely 90s Drama with a plot to match that turns increasingly thrillery, goes quite hard politically at the start and has some decent directing and editing, let down a bit by its script but it's an interesting treatment of the issue even if it's maybe not as deep as I'd have hoped.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: monkfromhavana on May 18, 2021, 09:43:10 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on May 17, 2021, 10:34:09 PM
This has become quite popular in our house - obviously it's not Local Hero, but I think it does share some of the surreal good nature. If you go in expecting a really nice, warm time and not a classic, I don't know how you'd be disappointed. (and yes, it looks beautiful!)

One of my all-time favourites, always to be watched in the run up to Christmas. The Rikki Fulton "Santa" joke on the phone never fails to make me laugh.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 18, 2021, 12:28:56 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 18, 2021, 07:28:19 AM
(Forgot to post these and they've been building up whoops)

Southland Tales. What was this. Feels like time treated this oddly kindly to be honest, lots more stuff like this has been coming out afterwards. Some people I saw this with made comparisons with latter Lynch. I saw some Vernon Chatman in it. Either way it's certainly a lot to digest. I didn't hate it. Admirable cacophony.

I loved Southland Tales when I watched it, though I am fond of preposterously ridiculous over the top monstrosities and it was definitely that, plus I was very stoned when I watched it and have found that I've been very forgiving of a good few dodgy movies when in that state.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on May 18, 2021, 12:44:17 PM
Quote from: Talulah, really! on May 16, 2021, 10:25:07 PM
Comfort and Joy 1984 seems to be have forgotten about, never gets mentioned in Christmas film lists

I mention it on every Christmas film list on here. It's one of my favourite films.  Love everything in Forsythe's imperial phase: Gregory's Girl, Comfort and Joy and Local Hero in that order.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 18, 2021, 12:46:51 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 17, 2021, 07:14:41 PM
Jim Carrey) finds a mask that upon wearing it gives him amazing powers, though the main one is the ability to annoy.

Doesn't he have that naturally? Hated his early TV stuff (Wayans Brothers show) and am put off for life.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 18, 2021, 02:58:07 PM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on May 18, 2021, 12:46:51 PM
Doesn't he have that naturally? Hated his early TV stuff (Wayans Brothers show) and am put off for life.

I know you're far from alone in thinking that but when he's not The Mask I thought Carrey across as quite sympathetic, and far more naturalistic than he is in 99% of his other performances.

Cinderella (1950) - Out of all of the Disney films I'm currently revisiting this was the one I wasn't looking forward to the most, if only because it's a tale I've seen told a huge amount of times, from faithful film versions to modern stage plays like Soho Cinders. But it keeps the tale fresh by containing a sod load of entertaining slapstick between Cinderella's very chatty mice friends and evil cat Lucifer, indeed Cinders doesn't even arrive at the ball until 49 minutes in but it manages to make it feel like these early scenes aren't filler quite impressively. The songs are nothing amazing but they're very sweet, and the evil step-mother is a decent villain, but perhaps a little more could have been done with the ugly sisters and Prince Charming, though otherwise this is a strong effort and one much more enjoyable than I thought it'd be. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on May 19, 2021, 09:36:49 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on May 18, 2021, 07:28:19 AM
(Forgot to post these and they've been building up whoops)

Southland Tales. What was this. Feels like time treated this oddly kindly to be honest, lots more stuff like this has been coming out afterwards. Some people I saw this with made comparisons with latter Lynch. I saw some Vernon Chatman in it. Either way it's certainly a lot to digest. I didn't hate it. Admirable cacophony.

Madame X: An Absolute Ruler. First major feature by overlooked German New Wave practitioner Ulrike Ottinger. Somehow fortuitous watching this after watching the above, it's also quite a surreal weave; a group of women set sail on the ship Orlando captained by Madame X who promises to liberate them from their mundane lives with promises of "gold, love and adventure". Incomprehensible in many ways but a remarkable burst of avant-garde energy.

Ticket of No Return. Ottinger's next film. Quite a lot more subdued though still surreal and irreverent. I liked it more than Madame X. Something of an Akerman or Fassbinder about it.

Orchestra Rehearsal. Frivolous Fellini satire. Always forget how excellent his films look and feel even if this is a minor work.

Bleak Moments. Mike Leigh's feature debut. Not nearly as well-formed as many of his later films but you can see an incredibly solid groundwork of singular characters he really cares about.

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song. Bombastic, eccentric; cited to be one of the very first blaxploitation films. Sags a bit in the middle but boasts some of the coolest opening and closing title texts I've seen. A lot more experimental than one would be led to believe. Really a unique style.

Then watched another Van Peebles film, a TV film from 1996 called Gang in Blue. Black cop digs up a white supremacist group within the force. Mainly watched it because I came up with a very similar idea and was interested to see how this executed it. Definitely extremely 90s Drama with a plot to match that turns increasingly thrillery, goes quite hard politically at the start and has some decent directing and editing, let down a bit by its script but it's an interesting treatment of the issue even if it's maybe not as deep as I'd have hoped.

Gang In Blue is a film I've wanted to watch for a long while.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 19, 2021, 01:29:59 PM
Comfort and Joy is great.

I've been working through some earlier Cronenbergs I hadn't seen.
Stereo - interesting and wonderfully shot, the faux documentary with narration and no ambient noise makes it a bit slow and sterile though I think. Might need to watch this one again when I'm in a different mood.

Rabid - This is a fairly basic story but done well enough, shot well and Marilyn Chambers is great in it, some wonderful shots like this appear:
(https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5b76c81055b02cf394f9ece5/1561633720981-5SCO8JNCL6KYIUA0JPRD/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kNvT88LknE-K9M4pGNO0Iqd7gQa3H78H3Y0txjaiv_0fDoOvxcdMmMKkDsyUqMSsMWxHk725yiiHCCLfrh8O1z5QPOohDIaIeljMHgDF5CVlOqpeNLcJ80NK65_fV7S1USOFn4xF8vTWDNAUBm5ducQhX-V3oVjSmr829Rco4W2Uo49ZdOtO_QXox0_W7i2zEA/MV5BNjAyYmYyMjUtZGYxZi00MzdhLTk3OTgtZjYwODZiZTE3NTQxXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjUyNDk2ODc%40._V1_.jpg?format=1500w)

I don't know how well I'd regard it if it was by another director, I feel like it's a bit more interesting because it's the seeds of what his peak body horror work will grow into. He's still finding his feet at this stage I reckon.

I also watched Scorsese's After Hours, which was great and felt a lot different to the way a Scorsese usually tells stories I think; it feels like there's a load of side stories and the central character is a foil for that, rather than the usual big story about a central protagonist that's typical of his work.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 19, 2021, 02:18:49 PM
After Hours was a quickie I think that he did when he couldn't get funding for Last Temptation of Christ. It might be my favourite film of his
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 19, 2021, 09:02:13 PM
Phffft (1954) - Judy Holliday and Jack Lemmon team up again for the second time in 1954 with another sort of romantic comedy, though this time they spend the majority of the film apart as at the beginning their characters divorce after eight years together, but once they've signed the papers both struggle with the single life. Their first film, It Should Happen To You, had much more charm, and much more Holliday too, and so was a lot better, while fine this concentrates too much on Lemmon's antics and not enough on Judy. Still, Jack Carson and Kim Novak offer up strong support, and the ending's fun, but this isn't something I'd rush to watch unless you really love the cast. 6.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 20, 2021, 01:39:34 AM
Quote from: Fambo Number Mive on May 19, 2021, 09:36:49 AM
Gang In Blue is a film I've wanted to watch for a long while.

Found it on YouTube :)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: kittens on May 20, 2021, 07:37:18 AM
watched an hour of riddly scot's legend. bad movie. blade runner and alien are boring too. this guy sucks!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on May 20, 2021, 09:28:18 AM
Never Let Go (1960)

A film about how car theft can effect your whole life. Peter Sellers is the big bad and he is terrifying. He appears to be channeling Norman Rossington in accent and jaw-jut. He should've done more roles like this as his switches from charming to menacing are so well done.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on May 20, 2021, 06:56:11 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on May 19, 2021, 02:18:49 PM
After Hours was a quickie I think that he did when he couldn't get funding for Last Temptation of Christ. It might be my favourite film of his

Interesting! Watched it on a flight a couple of years ago and couldn't believe how light and fun it was - even as it got darker, it was in a kind of genre way rather than his usual lacerating mode. Shows his incredible talent (and range) that he could make such an uncharacteristic film into what feels like an easy classic. There's also a strangeness at the heart of it - it doesn't quite exist in our world, and trying to work out exactly where the line is can be quite stimulating and fun.

I'm still in the film-funk I mentioned up-thread, and it's sad to think that there aren't films like this anymore, and that there likely never will be again.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 20, 2021, 08:22:13 PM
Excision (2012) - A really dark comedy horror where acerbic teen Pauline (AnnaLynne McCord) and fantasises about sex, death and blood and cheery subjects like that, and her relationships with her parents and fellow classmates slowly sees her decline in a believably traumatic way. It's got a really strong cast including Traci Lord and Roger Bart as her parents and Modern Family's Ariel Winters as her unwell sister, all of whom really impressed here, while the likes of John Waters, Malcolm McDowell, Ray Wise and Marlee Matlin turn in great cameos. It perhaps doesn't have a lot that's new to say when it comes to the horrors of teenage life, but it's bleakly funny and often disturbing, and it pulls of its ending effectively. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: amputeeporn on May 21, 2021, 12:02:43 AM
Irma Vep

Well, that's the best film I've seen in so long I can't possibly pretend I'm still in a funk. The first Assayas I saw was Clouds of Sils Maria, which I loved and have rewatched a couple of times since, and Personal Shopper, which I also felt tuned into, though I'm yet to go back and watch again, I loved its sense of quiet, ambient dread.

So Irma's been on my radar for a while but, somehow, the plot sounded a little floaty - a Chinese actress arrives at a chaotic French film shoot and experiences the madness and disfunction of a very particular industry. Anyway, cutting to the chase, I loved it - maybe my favourite film from him.

At times it feels so warmly 90s that it slightly made my heart soar. Everyone is terrific, and it has a really Altman-like feel at times, with fascinating characters all colliding and talking over each other, all of them quietly suffering the various aches and pains of love and life as they do. There's more to it - even just on a visual scale - than that, but that's the gist.

Maggie Chung is one of the most watchable actors I can remember seeing here, she's wonderful. Polite and obviously much more intelligent than she at times feels able to let on. Beautiful, but able to become this slightly other force when inhabiting her role. Frustrated but professional.

Mainly, the whole thing made me smile and yearn. Cracking.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 21, 2021, 07:35:02 AM
Girl with Hyacinths. Swedish drama/mystery about a young woman who commits suicide and her neighbour who tries to unravel the reasons behind it. Starts off intriguingly and has some excellent touches but unfortunately doesn't really rise above a fairly standard piecing together of details of someone's life.

Side Street. Nice little noir starring Farley Granger as a schmuck who accidentally steals a lot of money and gets himself into a  mess. Directed by Anthony Mann.

Last Holiday. Beautifully scripted by J.B. Priestley, Alec Guinness plays a man who finds out he has not long left to live. Constantly astounded at how good Guinness is. Sid James and Bernard Lee also pop up. Light and touching.

"Un chant d'amour". Only film (a short) made by Jean Genet. Incredibly expressionistic and evocative, two gay prisoners.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 21, 2021, 08:41:42 AM
Quote from: amputeeporn on May 20, 2021, 06:56:11 PM
Interesting! Watched it on a flight a couple of years ago and couldn't believe how light and fun it was - even as it got darker, it was in a kind of genre way rather than his usual lacerating mode. Shows his incredible talent (and range) that he could make such an uncharacteristic film into what feels like an easy classic. There's also a strangeness at the heart of it - it doesn't quite exist in our world, and trying to work out exactly where the line is can be quite stimulating and fun.

I'm still in the film-funk I mentioned up-thread, and it's sad to think that there aren't films like this anymore, and that there likely never will be again.

I love how the madness is more hinted at than shown explicitly, and there are some great performances from the. mainly, character actors playing the supporting roles, all held together by Griffin Dunne's innocent but ultimately unlikeable main character. It is also a snapshot of a New York that probably doesn't exist any more
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 21, 2021, 12:28:17 PM
The Girl In The Picture (1985) - a lot of talk about Gregory's Girl and other Bill Forsyth here, and this is another John Gordon-Sinclair Scottish romcom, with JGS playing a photographer who's living with his girlfriend but feels in a rut and wants to break it off. It's all very inconsequential/feather-light, not much deep exploration of character, not much plot, but it's amusing and likable. A young Gregor Fisher has a funny supporting role, and there are some other very Glaswegian faces I couldn't quite place. It would probably have a much better reputation if it was French (like Rohmer or someone), but it's entertaining in a similar way to Gregory's Girl.

Also nice to see some pretty bits of Glasgow's west end that don't often feature on film, and some superbly 80s clothes and bar interiors, and the analogue-photography nostalgia appeals to me. Lots of pretty women and nerdy men, and a bit of a weird subplot where he keeps seeing an attractive woman around
Spoiler alert
who turns out to be a high-class prostitute
[close]
. Seems to be the only thing the director Cary Parker did, according to IMDb.[nb]IMDb recommends that if you like this film, you'll like 70s terrorist/disaster movie Black Sunday[/nb] It was on Talking Pictures a couple of months ago (whence I recorded it), so maybe they'll show it again.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dugarbandier on May 21, 2021, 06:07:42 PM
The Great Sinner (Siodmak, 1949)

Dug this out on a lockdown-facilitated dally thru Robert Siodmak's noir films (Phantom Lady being one of my faves, time was due to crack the rest of the man's 40s CV). This is textually quite pious and moral, but tolerably, I'd say, given that it's largely unsentimental and rarely contrived, and Peck's descent is (seemingly) unredeemed -
Spoiler alert
the last scene shows him having finished his manuscript, and reconciled with Gardner, but whether this foretells a brighter future is unclear (he will have to make the book pay, quickly, to be entitled to its profits - having signed his future income over to the banker (Douglas) as collateral against repaying his debt by a certain date).
[close]

Elsewhere, quite enjoyed the otherworldliness of it, this alcove of Germany billed as a health resort, but really a place where the casino consumes all (suicides at the tables, gambling in the hotel rooms, the cult of luck and superstition, and the untouchable doyen at the top, the banker). It's quite simplistic and very familiar with Peck's rise and fall into addiction and destitution, but no less excruciating to watch, owing to the erasure of the dignity, confidence and moral certitude he exhibits in the first half of the film. A certain look from Gardner on the train when they first see each other is memorable, impossibly staggered as her eyelids draw back and she turns her eyes up toward him. I don't think you could classify this as noir - it has some of the tropes, but stylistically and structurally it feels more like a fable. There's no sense of perhaps what I find to be the essential conflict in noir, between the world as it is imagined and the seediness underneath - here, all the degradation is on the surface, glittering and alluring. Based off Dostoyevsky's semi-autobiographical novella, The Gambler. Worth a go.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 21, 2021, 09:07:56 PM
Haruko Azumi Is Missing (2016) - aka Japanese Girls Never Die. In this odd Japanese film the titular character goes missing in what's mostly a lowkey affair which flits all over the place timeline wise, following two quite different women, Haruko and Aina, along with a group of school girls who attack men. Sometimes it's bursting with a frenetic energy but sometimes it's a little dull, and while it's skilled at juxtaposing images in a powerful way, and it tackles sexism and misogyny in Japanese society in a bleakly captivating manner,
Spoiler alert
it took a little too long to get to it's (weirdly optimistic) destination for
[close]
it to be a film I love. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on May 22, 2021, 02:21:56 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on May 21, 2021, 12:28:17 PM
The Girl In The Picture (1985) - a lot of talk about Gregory's Girl and other Bill Forsyth here, and this is another John Gordon-Sinclair Scottish romcom, with JGS playing a photographer who's living with his girlfriend but feels in a rut and wants to break it off. It's all very inconsequential/feather-light, not much deep exploration of character, not much plot, but it's amusing and likable. A young Gregor Fisher has a funny supporting role, and there are some other very Glaswegian faces I couldn't quite place. It would probably have a much better reputation if it was French (like Rohmer or someone), but it's entertaining in a similar way to Gregory's Girl.

Also nice to see some pretty bits of Glasgow's west end that don't often feature on film, and some superbly 80s clothes and bar interiors, and the analogue-photography nostalgia appeals to me. Lots of pretty women and nerdy men, and a bit of a weird subplot where he keeps seeing an attractive woman around
Spoiler alert
who turns out to be a high-class prostitute
[close]
. Seems to be the only thing the director Cary Parker did, according to IMDb.[nb]IMDb recommends that if you like this film, you'll like 70s terrorist/disaster movie Black Sunday[/nb] It was on Talking Pictures a couple of months ago (whence I recorded it), so maybe they'll show it again.

Thanks for reminding me of this as I'd forgotten all about it. Youtube has a high quality version so I'll be watching it later in all it's 80's glory.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on May 22, 2021, 02:53:40 PM
Deja Vu

Continuing my pandemic attempts to see everything Tony Scott has done, this one was a real mixed bag. From what I gather at the time a lot of people were unhappy that he took this very high concept sci fi thing and turned it into a Tony Scott action film. 15 years on and it just looks like he took some interminable Nolan-esque script and managed to squeeze some fun and emotion out of it instead.
There's some really great moments in it and the way it manages to just steamroll past the bullshit exposition in a manner you can just be like "ah right, got it, good enough" is pretty impressive, Denzel is on top form with his charm too but it's ultimately trying for far too much and doesn't have the emotional weight it probably needs. Could've possibly benefitted from the script being butchered a bit more to remove some of the attempts at profundity tbh, the bullshit outweighs the fun.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 23, 2021, 08:40:57 PM
This Is Spinal Tap (1984) - It's always a worry when rewatching a much loved classic decades later that you might not click with it, but thankfully I did with this absurdly silly mockumentary about a rock band where the songs are amazing, the satire's really strong, the performances across the board are great, and unlike 99% of films it doesn't outstay its welcome running at a very tight 82 minutes. 8.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on May 23, 2021, 10:52:24 PM
Black '47 (2018) Death Wish; Irish Famine Edition. Sort of standard revenge film except a lot of Bad English get killed. Almost a western.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 24, 2021, 07:53:38 AM
The Gunfighter. Western with Gregory Peck as an outlaw who gets a sort of mid-life crisis. Really beautiful character study, poetic stuff.

Stromboli. My first Rossellini. Some terrific sequences (fishing, volcano) and a great ending, with strongly earnest core themes. But I somehow didn't really connect with Ingrid Bergman's character in this, or her husband.

No Way Out. Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz the same year as (the superior) All About Eve, this sees Sidney Poitier as a black doctor dealing with Richard Widmark, a racist criminal brought in to the prison ward in a hospital. Nasty and tense, very frank about race relations.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on May 24, 2021, 01:24:44 PM
The Usual Suspects
Fucking state of this film, I can remember watching it in my early teens and being a bit underwhelmed, finding the twist pretty obvious and just not a whole lot it but ultimately okay. Nearly 2 decades on I've no clue how I could go that easy on it.
The film _entirely_ hinges on you giving a shit about the twist, it doesn't even attempt to make anything else engaging. It goes out of its way to try and bully you into expecting a different outcome and is never at all convincing about it (
Spoiler alert
maybe in 1995 when Byrne was a bigger star than Spacey it could've worked a bit better???
[close]
). Then the reveal just makes a point of reminding you everything from the last 90 minutes was probably bollocks. Film ends with
Spoiler alert
Spacey driving off with Pete Posteltwaithe but why bother? Who even is he meant to be?
[close]
Why am I supposed to give a shite about any of this???!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on May 24, 2021, 02:46:58 PM
I remember liking it at the time, but watched it again years later and was underwhelmed, aside from a few good moments. The fact that it was directed by an (alleged) dodgy sex pest and stars a (definitely) dodgy sex pest would probably dampen my enthusiasm for it a bit now too.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on May 24, 2021, 05:23:39 PM
Wish it was good enough for their involvement to dampen my enthusiasm
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on May 24, 2021, 11:01:48 PM
Watched that Popstars:Never Stop Never Stopping or whatever with Andy Samberg

Good stuff, real funny. Can't go wrong if you're a fan of The Lonely Island / Samberg's stuff
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on May 25, 2021, 12:25:25 PM
Quote from: peanutbutter on May 24, 2021, 05:23:39 PM
Wish it was good enough for their involvement to dampen my enthusiasm

I think it has its moments but really the best thing in it, Gabriel Byrne's character is pretty much lifted from Millers Crossing so just watch that greatly superior film instead.

Still getting though the big load of Criterion Blurays I bought in the last sale, had seen La Jetee before but San Soleil on the same disk was certainly "interesting" although not really sure what it all amounted to, I'm sure my subconscious does.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 25, 2021, 02:56:47 PM
Quote from: Mobius on May 24, 2021, 11:01:48 PM
Watched that Popstars:Never Stop Never Stopping or whatever with Andy Samberg

Good stuff, real funny. Can't go wrong if you're a fan of The Lonely Island / Samberg's stuff

I liked that a great deal and it's a huge shame it wasn't more of a hit, it really deserved to be.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 25, 2021, 06:53:16 PM
The Black Cauldron (1985) - Disney in the eighties saw them attempt a more fantastical action type of movie, as assistant pig keeper Taran (Grant Bardsley) is a bit fed up with his job until he discovers his pig is magical and said pig is kidnapped by dragons owned by evil bad guy The Horned King (John Hurt, sounding very much like the emperor from those pesky Star Wars movies). Thus Taran heads off on his quest, meeting Gollum sound-a-like Gurgi (John Byner), Princess type Eilonwy (Susan Sheridan), minstrel Fflewddur Fflam (Nigel Hawthorne) and fairy Doli (John Byner, again). It's a pretty odd affair and though I've not seen them all I think it's the only Disney film where a main character gets trapped inbetween the very large breasts of a very horny female witch,
Spoiler alert
and another essentially commits suicide, though annoyingly he's brought back to life in an unsatisfactory manner right at the end.
[close]
There's nothing particularly wrong with it either, and some of the animation is inventive, yet none of the characters are that memorable or likeable and the story is fairly pedestrian too. 6.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 26, 2021, 01:52:57 AM
Quote from: greenman on May 25, 2021, 12:25:25 PM
Sans Soleil on the same disk was certainly "interesting" although not really sure what it all amounted to, I'm sure my subconscious does.

This is definitely one that has lingered in my mind long after I watched it
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on May 26, 2021, 12:52:15 PM
Walkabout

After Googling how old Jenny Agutter was at the time of filming, I enjoyed this. Even though the situation was more perilous, t didn't give me the same amount of fear that "Wake In Fright" did.

Can the panel tell me why the
Spoiler alert
Aborigine boy hanged himself though? Rejection from Jenny? Or seeing how the white men offed the cow thing he was trying to get with a spear?
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on May 26, 2021, 12:58:08 PM
I think it's partly a mirroring of
Spoiler alert
the father's suicide (also unexplained), as many suicides are. Could have been influenced by the things you mentioned also though, and generally having a tough life.
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on May 26, 2021, 01:44:36 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on May 26, 2021, 12:52:15 PM
Walkabout

After Googling how old Jenny Agutter was at the time of filming, I enjoyed this. Even though the situation was more perilous, t didn't give me the same amount of fear that "Wake In Fright" did.

Can the panel tell me why the
Spoiler alert
Aborigine boy hanged himself though? Rejection from Jenny? Or seeing how the white men offed the cow thing he was trying to get with a spear?
[close]

Spoiler alert
The scene before that seems like a courtship that she doesnt really understand and rejects out of fear and the white hunters I'd say its more the indiscrimate killings rather than just killing the same animal he was after
[close]

I mean in some ways in the opposite of Wake in Fright isnt it? the landscape becomes paradisaical instead of threatening.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 26, 2021, 08:37:29 PM
Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957) - Tony Randall and Jayne Mansfield star in this adaptation of the Broadway hit which took out nearly all the songs and apparently replaced most of the script too, where Rock Hunter (Randall) works in advertising but his company is about to go under, only for him to save the day when after helping out Hollywood actress Rita Marlowe (Mansfield) she agrees to front his new advertising campaign. A fake relationship plays out with Rock really in love with girlfriend Jenny (Betsy Drake), only for Rita to fall for him, Jenny to react (understandably) badly, and Rock becomes famous just for being Rita's "Lover doll". It's filled with a fair amount of innuendo and a sprinkling of satire of Hollywood, advertising and the media in general, along with your standard rom-com nonsense and though a couple of aspects are a bit dated (mostly involving Jenny's response to Rock's faux-mance) a
Spoiler alert
nd Mansfield all but disappears towards the end of the movie
[close]
, otherwise this is pretty funny and engaging throughout. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on May 26, 2021, 10:53:07 PM
Heaven Knows, Mr Allison - Robert Mitchum washes up on a desert island in WW2, to find a nun. Quite the delight. Really enjoyed so much about this film, but Mitchum is absolutely great.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on May 27, 2021, 12:05:06 AM
The Gay Deceivers (1969)
Two friends dodge the draft by pretending to be gay, mildly amusing stuff happens as they attempt to balance their love and family lives with their deception.

It's the 60s, so all things considered, it seems pretty gay friendly. Camp stereotypes abound, but the community is portrayed as a friendly place rather than a bunch of dysfunctional creeps. Doesn't really deal with the issues (gay or conscription) but I think that would be a detriment to the light hearted nature of the film (I could see a modern version digging into all that and sucking out all the joy in the process)

5/10 - Nice enough, but really needs more jokes and momentum to pull off the farce.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TrNwO5FZ8g (has some bits muted/blanked to avoid copyright hits, including the best scene (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOZY7e5XN6s))

There's at least one Star Trek link.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 27, 2021, 02:32:14 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on May 26, 2021, 12:52:15 PM
Can the panel tell me why the
Spoiler alert
Aborigine boy hanged himself though? Rejection from Jenny? Or seeing how the white men offed the cow thing he was trying to get with a spear?
[close]

I think it's because
Spoiler alert
the courtship rejection made him think he'd failed in his entire rite of passage - or that he thought he couldn't exist in a world where the chasm between cultures was so wide?
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 27, 2021, 08:02:25 AM
Babyteeth. Australian drama about a teenage girl with cancer who falls for an older problem boy (drugs, etc). Not bad but gets a bit grating as it goes on, not to mention the fact that she's in high school and he's in his twenties and that's never really addressed and things aren't really fleshed out much, which can be ok but in this case feels underdeveloped rather than deliberately pared back.

The Underworld Story. Noir about a conniving journalist who finds himself in a small town where a prominent murder took place and weasels himself into the situation just to earn some money. Lots of good twists and turns. Came out a year before Ace in the Hole which is interesting.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 27, 2021, 10:49:33 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 15, 2021, 10:39:20 PM
One from the Heart (1981) - The film that famously bankrupted Francis Ford Coppola, it's a strangely theatrical affair as Hank (Frederic Forrest) and Frannie (Teri Garr) split up, and sleep with others, but will they reunite? I certainly hoped they wouldn't as Hank's something of a twat, and the film gives us no reason to believe that Frannie would be happier with him. With a blues-y soundtrack from Tom Waits and Crystal Gayle it's a film I really liked for the majority of the running time, and it's directed in a playful and often quite stunning manner, but the script is thin
Spoiler alert
and the ending fucked me off no end, I'd have really liked this a good deal if it had ended on a downbeat note but the rushed happy ending
[close]
is shit. 7.1/10

I watched this as it is now on MUBI. I really enjoyed it, but then I am a sucker for over-stylised films with flashy camera moves and massive sets. The characters are a bit crap and the plot is, as you say, paper thin but it doesn't outstay its welcome and looks amazing. Some of the camera work and little cinematography tricks are dazzling, and Terri Garr is a very appealing lead. Less so Frederic Forrest, but good to see Harry Dean Stanton playing someone vaguely normal for once
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 27, 2021, 07:31:41 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on May 27, 2021, 10:49:33 AM
I watched this as it is now on MUBI. I really enjoyed it, but then I am a sucker for over-stylised films with flashy camera moves and massive sets. The characters are a bit crap and the plot is, as you say, paper thin but it doesn't outstay its welcome and looks amazing. Some of the camera work and little cinematography tricks are dazzling, and Terri Garr is a very appealing lead. Less so Frederic Forrest, but good to see Harry Dean Stanton playing someone vaguely normal for once

I pretty much agree with everything you say there and was probably a bit harsh about it, the ending just fucked me off at the time an enormous amount as
Spoiler alert
I think it'd be a much better film if she hadn't gone back to that surly old twat of a boyfriend!
[close]

Weekend At Bernies (1989) - After Richard (Jonathan Silverman) and Larry (Andrew McCarthy) discover fraudulent behaviour at the insurance company they work for, boss Bernie (Terry Kiser) asks dodgy gangster Vito to murder them, but he decides to take out Bernie instead. It was recommended to me by an old friend as an eighties comedy which has aged really well, and there's a generally amiable and likeable tone to it, with the occasional dash of black comedy, but the rom-com subplot drags it down and it could easily be a good twenty minutes shorter. 6.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 27, 2021, 07:52:33 PM
I suggest you follow it up this Elliot Gould classic (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVOvSaqV7VU) as a nice little chaser.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: bakabaka on May 27, 2021, 08:43:55 PM
Dick Tracy (1990) - presumably a vanity project by Mr. So Vain and the Material Girl as they were a couple at the time. With a wealth of source material and some truly bizarre bad guys, this was a comic book movie that had potential. But a large part of the budget seems to have gone on a few very impressive sets (the foreshortened cityscape is wonderful, but as it only works from one angle it only gets used a couple of times). The bad guys' makeup is relatively true to the comics, but in the end they all look too similar and none stand out.

The reason to watch it is the colour - large areas of flat, bright colours throughout that make it visually stunning.
The reason not to watch it is the script - Madonna as the femme fatale is given very little to do and no character development, as is Tracy's 2-dimensional true love and Beatty appears to have had botox or similar that prevented him from showing any emotion at all.

And the finale, with the big shoot-out that has been anticipated throughout, keeps cutting back to Madonna singing in the cabaret for half a verse before returning to the battle, thus destroying any excitement or flow. Impressively poor editing.
5.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 27, 2021, 09:32:12 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 27, 2021, 07:52:33 PM
I suggest you follow it up this Elliot Gould classic (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVOvSaqV7VU) as a nice little chaser.

Wow, that looks really dodgy and very garish, but I do like Elliot Gould so may well watch it one day.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 27, 2021, 10:44:36 PM
Army of Shadows (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1969) - amazing French Resistance/World War 2 drama. Long and bleak, but gripping, utterly drawing you into the characters' world and moral perspective where nobody can be trusted and anyone is expendable. Rather than focusing on action sequences or torture-porn, it's about moral decisions, when to risk your life, when to kill, when to accept death, and when to postpone it a little and fight. In some ways it's very different from Melville's gangster films, but there's the same focus on moral codes and things that are worth dying for.

Aside from an opening scene of Nazi troops in Paris, it doesn't explicitly tell you what's happening, who these people are or what they're fighting for, but lets you watch their actions. The performances are underplayed and ambiguous, and Pierre Lhomme's moving camera fits in with the uncertain perspectives. Lino Ventura in the lead is anonymous-looking, nothing like Melville's other handsome stars; it's not immediately clear that he is the lead character. Melville (who was Jewish) served in the Resistance at a time when the vast majority of Frenchmen were happy to collaborate, which adds an extra recommendation. Plus, for comedy value, some nice cheery British people.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on May 28, 2021, 02:59:25 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on May 27, 2021, 10:44:36 PM
Army of Shadows (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1969) - amazing French Resistance/World War 2 drama. Long and bleak, but gripping, utterly drawing you into the characters' world and moral perspective where nobody can be trusted and anyone is expendable. Rather than focusing on action sequences or torture-porn, it's about moral decisions, when to risk your life, when to kill, when to accept death, and when to postpone it a little and fight. In some ways it's very different from Melville's gangster films, but there's the same focus on moral codes and things that are worth dying for.

Aside from an opening scene of Nazi troops in Paris, it doesn't explicitly tell you what's happening, who these people are or what they're fighting for, but lets you watch their actions. The performances are underplayed and ambiguous, and Pierre Lhomme's moving camera fits in with the uncertain perspectives. Lino Ventura in the lead is anonymous-looking, nothing like Melville's other handsome stars; it's not immediately clear that he is the lead character. Melville (who was Jewish) served in the Resistance at a time when the vast majority of Frenchmen were happy to collaborate, which adds an extra recommendation. Plus, for comedy value, some nice cheery British people.

Have you watched much Melville btw?

I think that film was my first, but posted something similar (nowhere as in depth!) and got loads of recommendations.

Basically  he is great.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Rizla on May 28, 2021, 05:28:45 AM
Hellraiser (Clive Barker, 1987)
Highly enjoyable load of bollocks. Got it into my head that Pinhead was played by Mr Barraclough from Porridge, even though I know he wasn't, but it seemed to make sense cos it's also got the bloke from the potting shed love scene in Scum! (Alan Clarke 1979) and Porridge also had the melting nazi from Indiana Jones in it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on May 28, 2021, 08:45:27 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on May 27, 2021, 07:31:41 PM
I pretty much agree with everything you say there and was probably a bit harsh about it, the ending just fucked me off at the time an enormous amount as
Spoiler alert
I think it'd be a much better film if she hadn't gone back to that surly old twat of a boyfriend!
[close]

I agree with what you say about the boyfriend but I was sort of expecting that ending as the rest of the plot was so rote, so it didn't really bother me.

By golly Nastassja Kinski was a beautiful woman
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 28, 2021, 08:55:09 AM
Submarine. Been wanting to watch this ever since it came out. Loved how sympathetic the film made Oliver out to be while simultaneously showing how much of a fuckwit he was. Some pleasantly surprising takes on the indie teen genre.

The Blue Lamp. British noir by Basil Dearden. Nice to see a young Dirk Bogarde; he plays a petty criminal in a small gang, hunted by the cops. All the segments with the Bogarde gang were really good, including the chase sequences, but the cop segments were fairly dated, portraying them as Good Old Upstanding Citizens Just Doing Their Duty.

Bitter Springs. Ealing-made Australian Western starring Tommy Trinder and Chips Rafferty. Fairly stock standard adventure stuff but it's a novelty to see outback Australia in 1950 (though in the film it's turn-of-the-century), and they play this up, with kangaroos hopping about and so on. By the same token however the aboriginal people in this film are portrayed extremely exoticised, which on one hand means there's a degree of authenticity to the depiction but on the other hand means they're rarely shown as people in their own right. I suppose there's a case to be made that this in itself is noteworthy simply because there may not have been many portrayals at all at that time.

The Woman in Question aka Five Angles on Murder. Seem to be on an accidental British kick. Anthony Asquith directed this one, Dirk Bogarde's in it again. A woman is found dead and a Rashomon-style (same year!) series of flashbacks follows while the whodunnit is untangled. Quite even-handed direction, though remains frustratingly placid for the most part; starts off well enough but doesn't seem to maintain suspense that well until the ending. But the multiple re-enactments are a nice source of amusement and intrigue, particularly in the cast's characterisation in each recollection.

And finishing this up with Dance Hall. Another Ealing effort, this time directed by Charles Crichton. It's not particularly exceptional, but it's a nice snapshot of the time. And it's amazing to see that even a fairly standard release like this boasts such impressive technical ability - camera, editing, etc.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on May 28, 2021, 10:55:02 AM
Last of the Mohicans (1992)


Some wonderful scenery; great fun action sequences; a compelling soundtrack - (that did get a bit distracting as several radio ads in Ireland seem to use it); film aesthetic appears largely true to its time and Daniel Day Lewis looks great running and jumping around the place.

But just could never get hooked into the story. Didn't see what Daniel Day Lewis's motivation was throughout the film and no chemistry with his main love interest. Pretty much no charisma by any actors when interacting and while great individual sequences just never felt invested in the narrative.
It did fly-by though as I was expecting a Dances With Wolves type running-time.

Overall 4.5 out of 10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 28, 2021, 11:59:10 AM
Quote from: Rizla on May 28, 2021, 05:28:45 AM
Hellraiser (Clive Barker, 1987)
Highly enjoyable load of bollocks. Got it into my head that Pinhead was played by Mr Barraclough from Porridge, even though I know he wasn't, but it seemed to make sense cos it's also got the bloke from the potting shed love scene in Scum! (Alan Clarke 1979) and Porridge also had the melting nazi from Indiana Jones in it.

I quite like Hellraiser, I feel like it gets unfairly maligned a bit and I'm not really sure why. I've not seen all the sequels though I assume they decline rapidly.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 29, 2021, 08:43:48 PM
Berserk: The Golden Age Arc I - The Egg of the King (2012) - Anime based on a comic by the sadly recently deceased Kentaro Miura, I know there's a thread about the manga in the books forum but it seems very spoiler-y so I avoided it. Anyhow, this is a medieval set epic where mercenary for hire Guts likes going around stabbing people and being mildly homophobic, and ends up joining "The Band of the Hawk" and stabbing even more people. It's pretty for sure and stylishly animated, but narratively it's a bit all over the place, there's a sudden reference to three years having passed at one point which comes out of the blue, while around the half way point it becomes a supernatural affair. With the latter I've no issue as I was starting to get a bit bored and it definitely shakes things up, but it feels very episodic, it's the first in a trilogy but makes no effort to feel like a self contained whole, and though I will watch the rest as I just about enjoyed it enough to want to see where it goes next I won't be rushing to do so. 6.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 29, 2021, 11:05:32 PM
Trolls World Tour (2020) - I really liked the first film even though I normally hate jukebox musicals and movies with James Corden in them, and this also has Rachel Bloom in it so I had to watch it, she made it law just last year. And once again it's a bright, loud, sugar high / lsd overdose in film form, if such a thing is possible, I've never had an underdose so wouldn't know, and comes with an unsubtle but commendable anti-racism theme combined with the importance of maintaining cultural diversity and a surprising amount of overt drug references. Sam Rockwell and Bloom are strong new additions to the cast, though on the downside Ozzy Osbourne's a bit too convincing playing a confused old man in scenes which felt uncomfortable and a couple of the pop covers are bland, but it's a surprisingly weird film, one that I feel a bit embarrassed about liking so much but can't deny rating pretty highly. 7.7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on May 30, 2021, 11:49:09 AM
Quote from: rjd2 on May 28, 2021, 02:59:25 AM
Have you watched much Melville btw?

I think that film was my first, but posted something similar (nowhere as in depth!) and got loads of recommendations.

Basically  he is great.
I've seen some of his crime films, but only really knowing him from those, it was a surprise to see Army of Shadows, although I now see he directed quite a lot of other genres (including Les Enfants Terrible which I've seen but thinking Cocteau I didn't connect it with him); I've been meaning to watch Leon Morin for ages, loving a good priest film. But I'll definitely have a look at that thread.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on May 31, 2021, 07:41:54 AM
The Man Who Cheated Himself. Noir about a woman who accidentally kills her soon-to-be-ex-husband; her lover is a police lieutenant, and the two of them try to hide the crime. John Dall plays the detective's younger brother, a detective, who tries to tie the knots together. Fantastic finale in particular.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on May 31, 2021, 06:39:27 PM
The Return Of The Pink Panther (1975) - Another outing for Sellers' Clouseau, over ten years since the last one and quite disappointingly it's a mixed bag as too many of the gags can be seen coming from a mile off, boss Herbert Lom hating him isn't as fun this time around, while there's also a sprinkling of light racism and sexism and Christopher Plummer's Sir Charles Litton feels like he's in a completely different film to that of Sellers. That's not to say there aren't some very funny moments but it's not the classic I was expecting, I was a little bored every so often, and I doubt I'll bother with any of the other films in the series now. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on May 31, 2021, 07:57:45 PM
The funniest line in that film - which always makes me laugh - is Clouseau's "Ah, the old falling on the bed with the arm on the floor ploy." Which was presumably improvised.

But yes, I agree, it's an awkward combination of Sellers hijinks - most of which are very funny - and a deeply boring jewel heist storyline. The sequels focus entirely on Clouseau, which sounds like fun in theory, but Sellers overindulges himself with stupid disguises and a general lack of discipline. He looks old and desperate, I find them quite sad.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on May 31, 2021, 08:10:37 PM
Southern Comfort 1981
Finally got round to watching this after seeing it on the shelves of our local video shop back in the early 80's amongst Carrie, The Exterminator and Animal House. Directed by Walter Hill it shares similarities to his classic, The Warriors in that it's an ensemble piece where a group of men have to survive a journey through a dangerous environment. There are some silly moments and 'broad' performances but with stand out turns from Keith Carradine, Fred Ward and Powers Boothe it's fun. The last ten minutes are exceptionally tense. It's no Warriors or indeed Deliverance but still worth a watch.

Great Poster too.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMWFiNGJhN2UtNWY0My00ZWFlLTk2NzMtZTg5OTI5ZThjYWVhXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjI4MjA5MzA@._V1_.jpg)

Now onto The Long Riders
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on May 31, 2021, 08:20:48 PM
Yeah I really liked Southern Comfort.

You kind of see
Spoiler alert
the Cajun captive being able to speak English coming from a mile off, but it's still executed quite well when it happens
[close]
.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 01, 2021, 09:29:11 AM
Quote from: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on May 31, 2021, 07:57:45 PM
The funniest line in that film - which always makes me laugh - is Clouseau's "Ah, the old falling on the bed with the arm on the floor ploy." Which was presumably improvised.

But yes, I agree, it's an awkward combination of Sellers hijinks - most of which are very funny - and a deeply boring jewel heist storyline. The sequels focus entirely on Clouseau, which sounds like fun in theory, but Sellers overindulges himself with stupid disguises and a general lack of discipline. He looks old and desperate, I find them quite sad.

I got the feeling that the best parts were improvised, and also found myself wishing it had more dialogue and less physical comedy., and yeah, the whole Christopher Plummer part is really bland and I'm surprised no one noticed how weak it was, though I suppose without it the movie wouldn't have any story at all. That's interesting to hear about the sequels too, and I definitely won't bother now.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 01, 2021, 10:07:08 AM
The Return is the one where he crashes cars into the swimming pool twice isn't it? I always really liked that gag.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 01, 2021, 12:02:10 PM

I saw all the PP films when I was a kid and the gags are still good for me, probably not if I hadn't seen them before.  Love seeing images of Lom with his nose bandaged.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 01, 2021, 12:32:32 PM

The Nightingale revenge film[nb]not really revenge though, is it[/nb] in early 1800s Tasmania. Grim/brutal as fuck, don't watch if you have any empathy. Young convict mother is
Spoiler alert
raped and her family killed
[close]
by some soldiers.
Looks 4:3 which was annoying but after watching I reckon it was a good choice. Made me reconsider originally  thinking Black '47 was shot too tight, this sort of film can't allow too much natural beauty (or something, dunno).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on June 01, 2021, 12:35:25 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on May 28, 2021, 11:59:10 AM
I quite like Hellraiser, I feel like it gets unfairly maligned a bit and I'm not really sure why. I've not seen all the sequels though I assume they decline rapidly.

Hellraiser 2 is sometimes on Horror channel on Freeview.

Well worth a watch.

3rd sequel cheesier but also has moments.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 01, 2021, 01:15:29 PM
I like the fourth one, Bloodline, more than the previous entry. The cenobites aren't as silly as the CD firing twat and camera head, plus Pinhead has a great time throughout.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on June 01, 2021, 01:18:50 PM
Clouseau vs Hellraiser
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 01, 2021, 01:46:07 PM
Quote from: chveik on June 01, 2021, 01:18:50 PM
Clouseau vs Hellraiser

2021 VERSUS
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 01, 2021, 01:58:29 PM
Doing a bit of a Joe Dante gap-filling:

Innerspace. Inspired by Fantastic Voyage, deals with a top-secret miniaturisation procedure which goes awry when a rival developer hijacks it, leaving Dennis Quaid inside Martin Short. Dante was the perfect choice for this, it's zany and always semi-comic. In the original I quite liked how inventive it was with the inner body, which this version unfortunately only did minimally, but overall it had a really fun energy about it and I enjoyed it.

Hollywood Boulevard. Co-directed with Allan Arkush. Distinctly wears its 70s indie nature on its sleeve: the film stock quality and sound quality are unmistakable; plus Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov are in it. Irreverently pokes fun at its own surroundings, but at the same time there's something earnest in its depiction amidst all the sending-up.

Matinee. Now this is what Dante was made for. Kind of a gentler John Waters. John Goodman is a William Castle-like film director showing his latest feature - Mant (Half Man Half Ant - maybe the funniest joke of the film tbh) - in a small town during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Clearly lots of love for the work. Charming stuff.

Amazon Women on the Moon. Didn't realise this was going to be so vignette-sketchy - not a criticism, though some of the individual sketches are so slight that it does make me wonder how small a gag could be and still make it into a film. I guess this is what happened when you couldn't just easily release stuff on TV.

And finished it off with Gremlins 2: The New Batch. Really a lot of fun, doesn't get the heart or cohesiveness of the original but it makes up for it with flair and inventiveness and batshit hooliganism. And Gizmo is just so cute!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Rizla on June 01, 2021, 02:15:49 PM
Quote from: Neomod on May 31, 2021, 08:10:37 PM
Southern Comfort 1981

Great Poster too.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMWFiNGJhN2UtNWY0My00ZWFlLTk2NzMtZTg5OTI5ZThjYWVhXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjI4MjA5MzA@._V1_.jpg)

And the music! About as authentic as it gets, performed in its natural habitat by legends Marc Savoy and Dewey Balfa. Worth the price of admission alone.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 01, 2021, 04:17:47 PM
Quote from: chveik on June 01, 2021, 01:18:50 PM
Clouseau vs Hellraiser

Would watch.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 01, 2021, 07:15:03 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 01, 2021, 01:58:29 PM
Doing a bit of a Joe Dante gap-filling:

Innerspace. Inspired by Fantastic Voyage, deals with a top-secret miniaturisation procedure which goes awry when a rival developer hijacks it, leaving Dennis Quaid inside Martin Short. Dante was the perfect choice for this, it's zany and always semi-comic. In the original I quite liked how inventive it was with the inner body, which this version unfortunately only did minimally, but overall it had a really fun energy about it and I enjoyed it.

Hollywood Boulevard. Co-directed with Allan Arkush. Distinctly wears its 70s indie nature on its sleeve: the film stock quality and sound quality are unmistakable; plus Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov are in it. Irreverently pokes fun at its own surroundings, but at the same time there's something earnest in its depiction amidst all the sending-up.

Matinee. Now this is what Dante was made for. Kind of a gentler John Waters. John Goodman is a William Castle-like film director showing his latest feature - Mant (Half Man Half Ant - maybe the funniest joke of the film tbh) - in a small town during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Clearly lots of love for the work. Charming stuff.

Amazon Women on the Moon. Didn't realise this was going to be so vignette-sketchy - not a criticism, though some of the individual sketches are so slight that it does make me wonder how small a gag could be and still make it into a film. I guess this is what happened when you couldn't just easily release stuff on TV.

And finished it off with Gremlins 2: The New Batch. Really a lot of fun, doesn't get the heart or cohesiveness of the original but it makes up for it with flair and inventiveness and batshit hooliganism. And Gizmo is just so cute!

I'm a massive fan of Joe Dante's and always felt it's a shame that he's essentially become a tv director for hire, though that said the last film of his that I loved was Matinee. I'm glad to hear that Innerspace still stands up as well, I haven't seen it since it's cinema release and really should rectify that.

Quote from: Egyptian Feast on June 01, 2021, 04:17:47 PM
Would watch.

Ha, I thought exactly the same thing.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) - Quasimodo has been locked up in the bell tower his entire life so it's not a surprise that he's gone quite mad and thinks the statues can move and talk. His life is made even worse by all round evil turd Frollo, but made better by Esmerelda who Frollo also dislikes because he's a racist shit who hates gypsies while Kevin Kline's on hand to be a heroic soldier type who gets to sleep with Esmerelda in the end. It leans in on the nazi allegory rather heavily and is quite bleak in places, what with the way the public treat poor old Quasimodo and the way Frollo treats, well, everyone, and the songs are often drab and only one is catchy, all of which adds up to a Disney movie which is surprisingly bland. 6.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 02, 2021, 02:19:16 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 01, 2021, 07:15:03 PM
I'm a massive fan of Joe Dante's and always felt it's a shame that he's essentially become a tv director for hire, though that said the last film of his that I loved was Matinee. I'm glad to hear that Innerspace still stands up as well, I haven't seen it since it's cinema release and really should rectify that.

It is a lot of fun, not amazing but really a good time. He's great at PG. I think the only film post-Matinee that I've seen is Looney Tunes: Back in Action which I saw in the cinema when I was quite young so I don't remember it well enough to judge. Supposely The Second Civil War is decent. He's apparently got two films in the works, one of which is about the filming of the Roger Corman/Jack Nicholson acid film The Trip.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on June 02, 2021, 02:35:15 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 02, 2021, 02:19:16 AM
I think the only film post-Matinee that I've seen is Looney Tunes: Back in Action which I saw in the cinema when I was quite young so I don't remember it well enough to judge.

Looney Tunes: Back in Action was not a pleasant experience for Joe Dante, as he had no creative freedom on the project...

Quote from: Doe DanteThere was no freedom, but animation director Eric Goldberg and I did what we could to preserve the characters in their classic state, which is the one area where I think the film succeeds. The longest year and a half of my life.

I thought of it as a sacred trust, because Chuck Jones was a friend of mine. He was not happy with Space Jam because he thought it misrepresented the characters. I signed onto this movie very soon after Chuck's passing to be the keeper of the flame and to make sure the characters were presented in the classic tradition, to which I think we succeeded.

The actual making of the movie was a very contentious enterprise because "the powers that be" didn't really want to make the movie, but the marketing department did, so there was a lot of tension as to what kind of movie it should be, and what the humor was. It was really not a pleasant situation for a year and a half of your life to be making a Bugs Bunny movie that no one is happy on it. There are some very nice things in it, but it was my last studio movie because it wasn't a pleasant situation.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 02, 2021, 07:49:32 AM
Dang. That sounds super disheartening.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 02, 2021, 06:55:29 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 02, 2021, 02:19:16 AM
It is a lot of fun, not amazing but really a good time. He's great at PG. I think the only film post-Matinee that I've seen is Looney Tunes: Back in Action which I saw in the cinema when I was quite young so I don't remember it well enough to judge. Supposely The Second Civil War is decent. He's apparently got two films in the works, one of which is about the filming of the Roger Corman/Jack Nicholson acid film The Trip.

I saw that he had two films in the works on his imdb, I'm not sure how reliable the site is but it says they've been in pre-production since 2017 which doesn't bode well, but hopefully they'll still be made. And due to your post...

The Second Civil War (1997) - Joe Dante directed this HBO tv movie where after a nuclear bomb goes off in Pakistan orphans are sent to Idaho, but the sex obsessed and very shitty governor (Beau Bridges) closes the borders to prevent them entering the state. Most of the time it revolves around a CNN-esque news network covering the event and Dan Hedaya is the ratings obsessed producer there where cynicism is the order of the day, while Phil Hartman is the President who everyone tries to manipulate. It's a dry effort, gently funny with Hartman perhaps unsurprisingly being the highlight, though X-Files star Jerry Hardin has some amusing scenes where he bickers with another military type, and it ups its game toward the end, but I only found it mildly of interest and wished it was sharper and funnier. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 03, 2021, 12:24:19 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 02, 2021, 06:55:29 PM
I saw that he had two films in the works on his imdb, I'm not sure how reliable the site is but it says they've been in pre-production since 2017 which doesn't bode well, but hopefully they'll still be made. And due to your post...

The Second Civil War (1997) - Joe Dante directed this HBO tv movie where after a nuclear bomb goes off in Pakistan orphans are sent to Idaho, but the sex obsessed and very shitty governor (Beau Bridges) closes the borders to prevent them entering the state. Most of the time it revolves around a CNN-esque news network covering the event and Dan Hedaya is the ratings obsessed producer there where cynicism is the order of the day, while Phil Hartman is the President who everyone tries to manipulate. It's a dry effort, gently funny with Hartman perhaps unsurprisingly being the highlight, though X-Files star Jerry Hardin has some amusing scenes where he bickers with another military type, and it ups its game toward the end, but I only found it mildly of interest and wished it was sharper and funnier. 5.4/10

Yes true! I sometimes see directors with new things in the works and get excited and then they never happen...

And that's a bit sad to hear re The Second Civil War. The Hole, maybe...?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 03, 2021, 10:01:00 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 03, 2021, 12:24:19 AM
Yes true! I sometimes see directors with new things in the works and get excited and then they never happen...

And that's a bit sad to hear re The Second Civil War. The Hole, maybe...?

To be fair to The Second Civil War I did watch it post having a tooth out and was feeling a bit sore and out of sorts and not in the mood for a slow, talky film, so it may be better than I've given it credit it for. It's here in full if you (or of course anyone else) fancies giving it a shot: https://m4uhd.tv/watch-movie-the-second-civil-war-1997-240155.html

And I've not seen The Hole, but will add it to my watchlist.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on June 03, 2021, 11:02:33 AM
Menace II Society (1993) - In some ways I think this is better than Boyz In The Hood, with more realism and authentic performances and a less dated look/soundtrack. But on the other hand the characters are all really unsympathetic (aside from Jada Pinkett) which makes it hard going.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on June 03, 2021, 03:52:17 PM
Life Among The Cannibals

It took me a while for the director's name to finish percolating through my brain - it's Harry Davenport, who also made the XTRO movies, and whose post-XTRO career makes me half-suspect IMDB thinks two different fellas with the same name are the same person (possibly three, given the fairly distinct periods of unemployment). But anyway, it's...quite good? A bloke leaves his crazy girlfriend (Juliet Landau) and moves into a lovely house with a whole bunch of oddball characters as his neighbours and landlords.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on June 03, 2021, 05:52:05 PM
Red River

Fun John Wayne western where he toils with the idea of heeling it up, perfect for Sunday viewing as its got a very silly but entertaining ending but Wayne did much better before he died. 3/5

Rio Bravo
John Wayne western again! He plays a veteran gun slinger, teaming up with a drunken Robert Mitchum  and knife throwing James Caan in an early role for him. Its breezes by but like many of these sort of Wayne westerns , not much tension mainly due to lack of compelling villain. The casual racism obviously leaves a bad taste . 3/5

The Outlaw Josey Wales

Arguably to long, but Eastwood is great in this and plenty of tension with a quality supporting cast. Its not in his top tier Western bracket, but still pretty good 4/5

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 03, 2021, 08:34:21 PM
The Cat From Outer Space (1978) - As soon as a UFO lands the Army tows it away, much to the annoyance of its pilot - a cat! The cat's full name is Zunar-J-5/9 Doric-4-7 but local scientist Frank (Ken Berry) nicknames him Jake, and the feline has a special collar that allows him to open doors and spurt beer in to people's faces,
Spoiler alert
oh and he cheats at pool too as they need to win money to buy a sod load of gold to repair his spaceship
[close]
. Apparently without the collar he'd be as dumb as a normal cat, so even though logically it makes no sense you can guess what happens in a couple of scenes, while we also hear his thoughts as it sadly would have presumably cost too much to film scenes with it and then kill the cat and manipulate its mouth with strings and pulleys
Spoiler alert
(though that said the very dodgy stunt double used at the end of the movie clearly is no longer with us and hadn't been for some time)
[close]
. It's a daft affair, with some hilariously dodgy special effects, and the cat is a sassy so and so, and sometimes weirdly horny, and I feel a bit silly rating it so highly but I enjoyed this ridiculous romp a great deal, it's fully aware of its daft concept and has fun with it, and everyone involved gives it there all. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: joaquin closet on June 03, 2021, 11:37:57 PM
Quote from: rjd2 on June 03, 2021, 05:52:05 PM
Rio Bravo
John Wayne western again! He plays a veteran gun slinger, teaming up with a drunken Robert Mitchum  and knife throwing James Caan in an early role for him. Its breezes by but like many of these sort of Wayne westerns , not much tension mainly due to lack of compelling villain. The casual racism obviously leaves a bad taste . 3/5

That's El Dorado not Rio Bravo !
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: rjd2 on June 04, 2021, 12:48:56 AM
Haha no idea how I made that mistake. To be fair seen Rio Bravo not to long ago and their is very little difference really.
Its an issue with so many non Eastwood or so called spaghetti westerns the lack of creditable villains thus not as much tension as you would like which slightly ruins the experience.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 04, 2021, 08:30:26 AM
Scandal (earlyish Kurosawa). Toshiro Mifune plays a painter who gets paparazzied alongside a famous singer quite coincidentally and the story blows up and alters their lives. Pretty solid drama.

Story of a Love Affair (Antonioni's debut!). Melodramatic with tinges of noir, maintains a decent atmosphere of doom and suspense even if the story doesn't completely fit.

To Joy (earlyish Bergman). Excellent sequences in this but on the whole doesn't fully tie together, the relationship between the two leads is slightly too loose to fully engage.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on June 04, 2021, 10:21:59 AM
Vagabond (Sans toit ni loi, 1985) - interesting Agnès Varda drama about a few months in the life of a young homeless woman (an excellent Sandrine Bonnaire) in some chilly part of France (beautifully photographed). Some bits are very grim, but there are a lot of memorable characters - goat herds, petty criminals, arborologists, immigrant workers (most of the cast is non-professionals essentially as themselves). And the central character is often an asshole, despite not deserving what happens to her. It's more focused on how the different supporting characters react to her, rather than trying to explain her life, which makes it more than just a catalogue of woes. Fragmentary, but that's the point.

Tron (1982) - something to do with accountancy software playing video games? Nonsensical/incomprehensible plot (I was tired, to be fair), but the special effects are still great.

Final Score (2018) - Die Hard at a West Ham game with Dave Bautista. There's something very Sky Cinema productions about it, but it's entertaining with some good action, and the lack of originality in the plot is offset by the English references. Pierce Brosnan does another enjoyably terrible accent.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 03, 2021, 08:34:21 PM
The Cat From Outer Space (1978)
I have in the past confused this with John Sayles' The Brother From Another Planet. Neither of which is exactly a blacksploitation science fiction adventure.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 04, 2021, 07:34:57 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on June 04, 2021, 10:21:59 AM
I have in the past confused this with John Sayles' The Brother From Another Planet. Neither of which is exactly a blacksploitation science fiction adventure.

Ha, I can see why! I've never seen TBFAP either but should get around to it, as I'm fond of what I've seen of Sayles' work, though it's been a long time since I watched his films.

Port Of Seven Seas (1938) - Marius (John Beal) can't resist the call of the sea and so leaves both girlfriend Madelon (Maureen O'Sullivan) and father Cesar (Wallace Beery) without even telling them face to face, and both are rather upset. Events are complicated when Cesar's friend Panisse (Frank Morgan) proposes, and boy is he creepy as he keeps on calling Madelon a "little girl", and Madelon accepts as she's pregnant with Marius's son and fears being ruined.
Spoiler alert
Of course Marinus eventually returns and wants Madelon back, but will she ditch her old husband and forgive the man who treated her so poorly? For the first hour it's an often quite funny affair as Cesar and Panisse bicker, but threatens to lurch in to melodrama in the final twenty minutes, yet the ending is actually a rather sweet and touching one.
[close]
You can tell from the few locations it's filmed in it was based on a stage play but it's a strong adaptation, and the script is filled with some very witty moments along with some thoughtful observations on love and relationships. 7.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on June 04, 2021, 10:32:07 PM
The Long Riders 1980

Famous for it's casting of four sets of real life siblings (the Keach's, Carradine's, Quaid's and Guest's) and the Pekinpah-esque bank robbery gone wrong sequence midway through, this is a mediocre offering from Walter Hill.

For me Hill is your typical journeyman director. Nothing fancy, nothing visually memorable and so the quality depends on the material/cast. Sometimes it works, 48 Hrs (cast), The Warriors (Material) but even with it's stunt casting this left me wanting...

a better film.

The most notable thing was James Remar (Ajax from The Warriors) turning up literally dressed as 'a warrior'.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_GQygw-XI3NQ/TR95F4MbfII/AAAAAAAABdQ/kj67DxJo6f8/s1600/longriders6.JPG)

(https://i.imgur.com/MUJbazI.png)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blue Jam on June 04, 2021, 11:23:19 PM
Watched This is Spinal Tap again last night. It's always even better than I remembered. Every single time.

I also learned that it has a current rating of 7.9 out of 11 on IMDB. Heheheh (https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0088258/).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 05, 2021, 10:36:47 PM
Oh Mr Porter (1937) - I watched this as I'm slowly working my way through the CaB's 85 Greatest Comedy Films Of All Time list*, at least the ones I haven't already seen, and it deserves a place on the list for sure as it's quite the delight. In it Mr Porter (Will Hay) gets a job as a station master in the small Irish town of Buggleskelly where all the other station masters have either gone mad or died, in this extremely charming effort which is perhaps a little slight plot wise for the first two thirds but the action packed final twenty minutes more than make up for it, and the dialogue throughout is very funny too. There's the odd groanworthy line but it's impressive how many made me laugh out loud, and the stunt packed ending really is a fantastic one. 7.7/10

*https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,63958.msg3321187.html#msg3321187
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 06, 2021, 09:12:57 PM
The General (1926) - Another film from the CaB Greatest Comedy Films list, and once again I feel it definitely deserves it's place there. Apparently partially based on a true story this begins at the outbreak of civil war where Johnnie Gray (Buster Keaton) wants to sign up to fight for the Confederate Army but they think he's more valuable as a train engineer, much to his dismay and that of his girlfriend Annabelle (Marion Mack) who thinks he's a lying coward and refuses to talk to him until he's in uniform. A year later that hasn't happened but when a bunch of soldiers from the North steal a train and plan to blow up a whole load of bridges to screw over the opposition, and kidnap poor old Anabelle too, good old Johnnie's off in another train to try and stop them.
Spoiler alert
After about twenty minutes Anabelle and Johnnie are reunited, running through the night and avoiding bears and bear traps (or not avoiding them, as the case may be), before nicking a train themselves, and though the second half isn't quite as good as the first it's still pretty damn great, and the final battle scenes are extremely memorable
[close]
. This is the first Buster Keaton film I've seen in decades and didn't know what to expect, and it's quite odd how Buster spends so much of the movie looking haunted, but as a whole this made me laugh so much that I'll definitely check out his other work now. 7.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 06, 2021, 11:37:12 PM
The Adjustment Bureau - I know this is based on a Philip K. Dick book that predates it, but it just felt like a less gothy rip off Dark City.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 07, 2021, 06:51:20 AM
"Begone Dull Care" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r2COvWPO4Y) - short animation set to Oscar Peterson music where the filmmakers painted directly onto the film stock, something I always enjoy.

Variety Lights (Fellini's debut). Sweet, light story about a young actress who joins a vaudeville troupe. I liked it but it's not hugely bulky.

Panic in the Streets (Kazan). Film about a PANDEMIC that is on the verge of breaking out which sounds like a completely unbelievable premise to begin with am I right. Richard Widmark is in it as an infectious disease specialist and it's Jack Palance's debut. The film has heaps of potential but feels a little unevenly paced and lacking in urgency.

Quote from: dissolute ocelot on June 04, 2021, 10:21:59 AM
Vagabond (Sans toit ni loi, 1985) - interesting Agnès Varda drama about a few months in the life of a young homeless woman (an excellent Sandrine Bonnaire) in some chilly part of France (beautifully photographed). Some bits are very grim, but there are a lot of memorable characters - goat herds, petty criminals, arborologists, immigrant workers (most of the cast is non-professionals essentially as themselves). And the central character is often an asshole, despite not deserving what happens to her. It's more focused on how the different supporting characters react to her, rather than trying to explain her life, which makes it more than just a catalogue of woes. Fragmentary, but that's the point.

I think when I first saw this I thought it was very good but now it's perhaps my favourite Varda film. Utterly tragic.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on June 07, 2021, 08:52:54 AM
Poltergay (2006) - French comedy, free on Amazon Prime. There are a lot of gay stereotypes but generally a warm-hearted story about a construction worker who moves into a new house with his girlfriend, only to find that as the result of a tragic explosion at a gay nightclub on the site 20 years before, it's now haunted by gay ghosts who can only be seen by some people,
Spoiler alert
specifically, men who've never touched another man's willy
[close]
. The setup is a bit gruesome but ultimately it's Casper meets Queer Eye For The Straight Guy: lovers are reunited, dancing occurs, the gays decorate the new house nicely... The cast (which includes an Asterix, Gerard Depardieu's daughter Julie, someone actually called Georges Gay[nb]I can't find out if that's his real name but I can tell you he played a parking attendant in an episode of Highlander: The TV Beheadings[/nb], and a French celebrity called Dave) is fine, but a lot of it is cringy and there's a modest number of laughs. It also features Boney M's song Rasputin a lot.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 08, 2021, 07:27:50 AM
The Beauty of the Devil. Take on the Faust legend by René Clair, Michel Simon and Gérard Philippe playing Mephistopheles and Faust interchangeably. Simon at his mischievous best. Really loved the magical realism and inventiveness on display.

Detective Bureau 2-3: Go to Hell Bastards! Colourfully named cops and robbers romp from Seijun Suzuki, with Joe Shishido as a detective going undercover in an arms dealing gang. Features some of the most stringent background checks for a new mob recruit I've ever seen. Some fun action sequences.

The Quiet Duel. Another Kurosawa. Toshiro Mifune plays a surgeon who gets infected with syphilis during an operation, which begins to affect him in his personal life. Superb postwar sentiment.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 08, 2021, 08:56:13 AM
Moonstruck

Must've been a slow year at the Oscars. Although upon the film's conclusion I did check and it turns out that "Robocop" won an Oscar that year too.

In it's defence, I did really like how much Cher and Olympia Dukakis looked alike and Nicolas Cage appearing to be acting like he was in a totally different film for most of it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on June 08, 2021, 09:04:50 AM
Robocop is the best film ever made so it is no surprise it won an Oscar, though I imagine it was for effects or production design or some sound/editing technical award?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on June 08, 2021, 09:09:56 AM
Black Hawk Down 2001

Who hovers at a low altitude over a built up area where there's going to be RPG's around.

Idiots.

Technically well made guff from Ridley Scott I would have enjoyed a lot more aged 13.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 08, 2021, 09:12:12 AM
Quote from: phantom_power on June 08, 2021, 09:04:50 AM
Robocop is the best film ever made so it is no surprise it won an Oscar, though I imagine it was for effects or production design or some sound/editing technical award?

Still weird though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 08, 2021, 10:08:19 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on June 08, 2021, 09:12:12 AM
Still weird though.

And even weirder is this sketch from the Oscars that features Robocop, Ed-209 and Pee Wee Herman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETFHeMSIMGc
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 08, 2021, 10:39:05 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 08, 2021, 10:08:19 AM
And even weirder is this sketch from the Oscars that features Robocop, Ed-209 and Pee Wee Herman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETFHeMSIMGc

And the winner is..."Ray's Male Heterosexual Dance Hall"
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 08, 2021, 12:26:28 PM
Quote from: Neomod on June 08, 2021, 09:09:56 AM
Black Hawk Down 2001

Who hovers at a low altitude over a built up area where there's going to be RPG's around.

Idiots.

Technically well made guff from Ridley Scott I would have enjoyed a lot more aged 13.

Did they do the "STAY AWAY FROM THE CANS" gag from The Jerk in the film?
Spoiler alert
when a couple guys are pinned down behind the helichocter wreckage and the freedom fighters are shooting at it
[close]
For some reason I read the book and that's the only thing I remember.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on June 08, 2021, 12:48:11 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 08, 2021, 10:08:19 AM
And even weirder is this sketch from the Oscars that features Robocop, Ed-209 and Pee Wee Herman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETFHeMSIMGc

Why is Robocop firing lasers? No, no, no! Can't buy into this at all, completely ruined it!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on June 08, 2021, 01:24:54 PM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on June 08, 2021, 12:26:28 PM
Did they do the "STAY AWAY FROM THE CANS" gag from The Jerk in the film?
Spoiler alert
when a couple guys are pinned down behind the helichocter wreckage and the freedom fighters are shooting at it
[close]
For some reason I read the book and that's the only thing I remember.

I don't recall, but there is a bit of them all watching the "STAY AWAY FROM THE CANS" scene  on VHS
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 08, 2021, 07:06:01 PM
Treasure Planet (2002) - Disney takes the classic tale and transport it in to space, in what's surprisingly one of the best adaptations of Robert Louis Stevenson's pirate related antics. The mix of traditional animation and the odd burst of cgi often works effectively and it's quite a beautiful film to look at, while it moves at a great pace and the characters are fun to spend time with, this was a bit of a flop upon release but it really didn't deserve to be. 7.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blue Jam on June 09, 2021, 10:10:30 AM
When Charlie Brooker was on the Rule Of Three podcast he chose to talk about Airplane! but said he almost chose Robocop. I wish he had. After listening I went and watched Robocop on Netflix and it was as much of a comedy as he said, and not having seen it for year I hadn't remembered it as a comedy at all.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: George White on June 09, 2021, 11:04:35 AM

Cleaner and Deadman - by Jess Bryden
Stars: Tira Akina, Josephina Alvarez, Art Balligui Eva Jade Blacker
mdb.com/title/tt6643240/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_1
JR Obremski Films' Hawaiian noir with Playboy's CJ Miles and Lost's Arlene Newman-Van Asperen

Also Kevin and Perry Go Large. As much a time capsule of 2001 as the Confessions films were of the 70s.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 09, 2021, 11:21:37 AM
Something that stuck with me on K&P was how due to product placements or whatever, every house in their street had a Ford Focus in the driveway. At the time I thought it looked cheap and brazen but now I see it as a quite good Malvina Reynolds-esque comment on suburban aspiration.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: olliebean on June 09, 2021, 04:24:17 PM
Quote from: Blue Jam on June 09, 2021, 10:10:30 AM
When Charlie Brooker was on the Rule Of Three podcast he chose to talk about Airplane! but said he almost chose Robocop. I wish he had. After listening I went and watched Robocop on Netflix and it was as much of a comedy as he said, and not having seen it for year I hadn't remembered it as a comedy at all.

A lot of Verhoeven's films are like that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 09, 2021, 07:58:30 PM
The Time Machine (1960) - Adaptation of H.G. Wells' much loved novel, as George (Rod Taylor) has invented a time machine but when he shows a tiny working model of it to his friends they just mock him, in what's a slightly dry opening twenty minutes as we get an awful lot of exposition. Once George is off on his travels it's much more fun thankfully, especially as it accurately predicts the first and second world wars and that nuclear bomb that exploded in 1966 destroying much of the world, and George then decides to have a overnight stay in the year 802,701. While there he meets a bunch of childlike humans called the Eloi, including the unfortunately named Weena which means that when George is running around shrieking her name it sounds like he's shouting "Weiner" a lot, and the fact that the rather old George fancies Weena when she was played by a seventeen year old actress is rather off.
Spoiler alert
George is also quite difficult to like as he's often stroppy, getting annoyed with the Eloi for being sociopathic and boring but also irritated with the underground Morlocks as they're cannibals, but fortunately saves the day by teaching the Eloi how to be violent and murderous.
[close]
It's occasionally melodramatic and boy is George fond of giving speeches, but overall it's a fun yarn even if certain aspects have dated a little. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 09, 2021, 09:18:27 PM
I met Rod Taylor when I was a kid. He came to the local Folk Festival one summer (late 80s-early 90s) and must've opened some event or other, but mostly spent his visit getting shitfaced. They put him at a table outside the pub in the town square one evening to sign autographs. I mentioned I liked him in The Birds as it was the one film of his I'd seen, to which he replied "Oh yeah? Well, I FUCKING HATE PIGEONS!" and roared with laughter. I was dead impressed and wished I was old enough to hang around to see where his evening would go from there.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 09, 2021, 09:25:44 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on June 09, 2021, 09:18:27 PM
I met Rod Taylor when I was a kid. He came to the local Folk Festival one summer (late 80s-early 90s) and must've opened some event or other, but mostly spent his visit getting shitfaced. They put him at a table outside the pub in the town square one evening to sign autographs. I mentioned I liked him in The Birds as it was the one film of his I'd seen, to which he replied "Oh yeah? Well, I FUCKING HATE PIGEONS!" and roared with laughter. I was dead impressed and wished I was old enough to hang around to see where his evening would go from there.

Ha, that's a great story!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on June 09, 2021, 11:30:39 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on June 08, 2021, 08:56:13 AM
Moonstruck

Must've been a slow year at the Oscars. Although upon the film's conclusion I did check and it turns out that "Robocop" won an Oscar that year too.

In it's defence, I did really like how much Cher and Olympia Dukakis looked alike and Nicolas Cage appearing to be acting like he was in a totally different film for most of it.


Waaat Moonstruck is great stuff.

Cheer going to the basement to confront minatour nick cage but ends up shagging him instead, and who can blame her? What's not to like
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on June 10, 2021, 01:13:21 PM
Just watched Coal Miner's Daughter (1980) on TV. Fascinatin! Total Dewey Cox-style cliches throughout, but I guess it was new at the time. Loving the names attached to it, top Roy Mallard impressionist Michael Apted directing, Ellen Griswold as Patsy Cline, tubthumper Levon Helm as her grumpy old da (the wrong kid died!) and the never-funny Minnie Pearl as herself. And Tommy Lee Jones sounding like yer mumbling guy from King of the Hill...
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 10, 2021, 07:37:30 PM
The Subjects (2015) - A group of people (including Mythic Quest's Charlotte Nicdao, which is why I watched it) are involved in a drug test where after taking a pill they're locked away together for eight hours, initially they just bicker and annoy each other, but slowly they gain strange and unusual abilities. Set in one location it's a claustrophobic affair, and one of the main characters is a sexist homophobic cunt who really is quite annoying, but it has fun with its concept for a while
Spoiler alert
before ending in a very disappointing and even slightly annoying manner. Though it is worth sticking around for a song from Nicdao during the end credits which explains what happened to her character and which is quite amusing (and she's great in it throughout),
[close]
but it's not enough to save the movie. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 11, 2021, 08:19:18 AM
The Third Murder. Kore-eda from a few years ago. Feels much unlike his usual tone but still retains his beautiful compassion. Subdued legal thriller. I liked it but far from his best.

Sonatine. Haven't really seen much Takeshi Kitano (besides Ryuzo and the 7 Henchmen). What a splendid ennui peppered with violence. Kitano has such an expressively expressionless face. The ending stunned me. This is special.

Then delving into Gakuryû Ishii, never seen his films before. Described as the "godfather of Japanese punk cinema". Started making films when he was just a teenager (makes me jealous really).

"Panic High School". A short later developed into a feature, looking at a school shooting. Feels quite modern, though shot on 8mm.

The Solitude of One Divided by 880,000. Simple, tragic tale of a very lonely man, isolated and living along in his apartment, studying for exams. Stylistically quite different from the above, much more restrained and personal.

Attack! Hakata Street Gang. Loose, lofi look at smalltown street gangs, provides a nice almost ethnographic representation, mainly focussing on one gang escaping a bank robbery. Intense rocknroll soundtrack. But sadly not very engaging on the whole.

Panic High School (feature version). The expansion works quite well as it focusses on the events and situation behind the school shooting, beginning with a student's suicide and dealing with student pressure/youth disillusionment/the education system/cultural values - most of the film's runtime is devoted to the aftermath of the shooting/attempt at capturing the student perpetrator. Perhaps a little simplistic/caricaturish, but solid. Soundtrack makes it feel a little Italo-crime. Quite impressive.

Look forward to watching his next film Crazy Thunder Road one day.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 11, 2021, 07:33:46 PM
Evil Alien Conquerors (2003) - Written and directed by Chris Matheson, one of the writers of the Bill and Ted trilogy, this sees aliens Du-ug (Chris Parnell) and My-ke (Diedrich Bader)  transported to Earth as they've been given the job of destroying the planet. It's a fish out of water comedy, if the fish are arrogant and stupid, and it's pretty funny, clearly very low budget and perhaps a little repetitive, and it's one of those films I could understand someone being incredibly irritated by, but I liked it well enough. 6.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on June 13, 2021, 11:49:49 AM
We Have Always Lived In The Castle (2018) - one for fans of gothic mysteries and retro fashions who have Amazon Prime: based on Shirley Jackson's book, it's almost an update of The Fall of the House of Usher set in Kennedy-era America. Basically, the Blackwood family are rich and unpopular - seemingly so even before someone poisoned Mr and Mrs Blackwood with arsenic in the sugar bowl and the older daughter was acquitted of their murder. Everyone who remains is damaged: uncle Crispin Glover in a wheelchair still having conversations with his dead brother; the younger daughter trying to cast spells and reciting lists of poisonous mushrooms; the older daughter trapped in the kitchen. Then Sebastian Stan arrives as a paragon of preppy manhood. As with a lot of Jackson, the message is that people are disturbing and evil. But also feminist undercurrents. The art direction is beautiful, particularly things like fabric patterns and wallpaper. Director Stacie Passon and her cast do a good job of controlling the tone, keeping everything heightened but not too over the top. Just the right amount of over the top.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 13, 2021, 09:16:01 PM
Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928) - The second Buster Keaton movie I've watched lately though it wasn't as good as the previous one, The General, if only because the first half is only quite amusing, some sequences are very funny (the title card "No jury would convict you" made me laugh especially hard) but some of the slapstick is a little familiar. The finale involving a hurricane and absolute chaos feels like it's from a different movie as well, though it's packed with incredibly stunts and over ninety years on it still impresses. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 14, 2021, 01:48:09 AM
Bad Company 1972 Civil War draft dodger flees west and joins up with Jeff Bridges.
Bridges is really good but film is just ok. Remember really liking this when I was a kid.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 14, 2021, 02:27:40 AM
Norbit the worst 26 minutes I have ever viewed.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 14, 2021, 09:39:59 AM
Stuber

Dave Bautista is a cop who's just had laser eye surgery but still has a case to crack. Kumail Nanjiani is an Uber driver who's down on his luck. Hilarity should ensue but it doesn't really. The twist is given away too early to create any tension at the end.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on June 14, 2021, 09:43:03 AM
Quote from: Dex Sawash on June 14, 2021, 02:27:40 AM
Norbit the worst 26 minutes I have ever viewed.

Who was it that said this was his favourate film the other day?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 14, 2021, 07:57:05 PM
Sixty Million Dollar Man (1995) - Stephen Chow stars in this cartoonish silliness which includes a number of spoofs of US movies like Pulp Fiction and Lethal Weapon, in a movie which has a vague storyline about a guy who is blown up after he dates the woman a Triad boss is interested in, and (eventually) attains incredible powers, though it's less about plot and trying to throw in as many gags as possible. Not every joke lands and there's the odd dodgy one, but the majority do, it has some amusingly naff effects and is nicely weird in places too. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 14, 2021, 09:52:48 PM
Quote from: PlanktonSideburns on June 14, 2021, 09:43:03 AM
Who was it that said this was his favourate film the other day?

Searched and found the Kermode quote in a post from 2007

QuoteNorbit - "If you paid to see Norbit, look deep inside yourself. Look deep inside yourself and take the same amount of money you paid to see that movie and give it to a good cause because believe me, you're karmically unbalanced if you paid to see that film."   
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 15, 2021, 12:05:58 AM
Doing a bit of a Kiyoshi Kurosawa binge (still can't get Cure out of my brain), picking one from a few different eras:

Sweet Home. Boasts the unusual angle of being released alongside a video game of the same name. In the film, a TV crew arrive at a large possibly cursed mansion to film a documentary about the painter who lived and died there. Slowly nightmares, madness and deaths begin to plague the crew. Definitely a camp sort of spooky but there's some real creepy thrills in here as well.

Pulse. Fucked. This film is fucked. No no no no no no. Just absolutely cursed. Holy shit on a manicured baseball. Completely haunted inside and out. A thousand noperinos. Get it away from me. 10/10. I feel like this taps into something intangibly embedded into anyone who grew up with early mainstream internet - beyond just oozing uncanny, unsettling eeriness from its every frame. Fucking hell. I think Cure is still better but this is a top tier horror. Immensely poetic at its core - yearning, loneliness, connection

Daguerrotype. Sort of like a modern gothic mystery-horror about a photographer's assistant who falls in love with the photographer's daughter. Sadly I don't think it fully embraces its themes of art and vision and memory etc and the story doesn't really play out or engage that well as a result.

and his latest film (should probably have its own thread) Wife of a Spy. Period drama set in the 40s wherein the titular wife begins to suspect her husband is the titular spy (and also having an affair). Loyalty, trust and truth are explored through narratives of national identity. Entertaining but doesn't quite spark.

What this has shown me is that from beginning to present Kurosawa has had an ardent knack for fusing image and meaning. A truly singular cinematic voice.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 15, 2021, 08:14:13 AM
Empire of Passion. Nagisa Oshima seems to be popping up a lot for me. This is the film he made after In the Realm of the Senses, and while some elements seem like a retread it's definitely its own entity. Tale of a woman and her lover who kill her husband, who comes back to haunt them as a ghost.

Blue Christmas. Curious film about a UFO landing which causes the blood of people who see it to turn blue and the conspiracy and frenzy that occurs as a result, nationally and even internationally. Incredibly allegorical of course and played fairly straight. It's quite good.

Sebastiane. Never seen any Derek Jarman before this. I don't think I really got into this unfortunately. But I'm interested enough and have planned to watch Jubilee soon with a friend.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 15, 2021, 02:33:40 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 15, 2021, 08:14:13 AM
Sebastiane. Never seen any Derek Jarman before this. I don't think I really got into this unfortunately. But I'm interested enough and have planned to watch Jubilee soon with a friend.

I really loved Wittgenstein, Edward II and Blue but haven't seen any other Jarman, which is odd and something I must rectify.

Pocahontas (1995) - Disney takes us back to the good old racist days of the 17th century where Native Americans were called savages by the English and treated appallingly, but luckily for them that doesn't apply with lovely old John Smith (Mel Gibson, and yes, separating the art from the artist when he's all but the opposite of his character was a little difficult for me) who falls for Pocahontas, who in this version of the tale hangs out with a raccoon and a hummingbird who provide light relief for the younger members of the audience. There's a couple of decent songs and though the moralising is a bit heavy handed the
Spoiler alert
way it ends unhappily for John and Pocahontas (but well for Percy the Dog and the raccoon)
[close]
impressed, but it's a film I wasn't really charmed by, it's fine but only that. 6.7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on June 15, 2021, 08:05:03 PM

Watched 2014's Cold In July last night. A film I'd never heard of until yesterday but found it in a charity shop for 10p, saw the many four star reviews and various accolades, noted that it's set in 1989 and the comparisons to John Carpenter, Tarantino, Coens and Drive.

Put the DVD on last night and was hooked from pretty much the first scene. There's a great deal to enjoy - All round terrific performances, atmospheric synth soundtrack, at least three twists that aren't just plot twists, they're also genre twists as the film starts as one thing and turns into something quite different by the end. A real nice gem of a film.

Was surprised to learn that it was from the writer/director team of Stakeland - A film which I don't recall being much good at all.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 15, 2021, 08:28:32 PM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on June 15, 2021, 08:05:03 PM
Watched 2014's Cold In July last night. A film I'd never heard of until yesterday but found it in a charity shop for 10p, saw the many four star reviews and various accolades, noted that it's set in 1989 and the comparisons to John Carpenter, Tarantino, Coens and Drive.

Put the DVD on last night and was hooked from pretty much the first scene. There's a great deal to enjoy - All round terrific performances, atmospheric synth soundtrack, at least three twists that aren't just plot twists, they're also genre twists as the film starts as one thing and turns into something quite different by the end. A real nice gem of a film.

Was surprised to learn that it was from the writer/director team of Stakeland - A film which I don't recall being much good at all.

Ah, that sounds interesting, I didn't mind Stakeland either so will definitely give it a go at some point.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on June 16, 2021, 01:02:39 AM
I have to rewatch Cold in July, I recall liking it. Maybe it will erase the memory of how bad the Hap and Leonard tv series was. I really like Joe Lansdale's writing.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on June 16, 2021, 02:12:41 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 15, 2021, 08:28:32 PM
Ah, that sounds interesting, I didn't mind Stakeland either so will definitely give it a go at some point.

I take back what I said about Stakeland as although I know I've seen it (it's logged on my ridiculously detailed spreadsheet of films I've seen) I remember nothing about it so assume it wasn't any good.....

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on June 16, 2021, 05:48:02 PM
I don't remember liking it that much either. But one I did love was:

Six String Samurai

Bonkers late 90s indie about a post-"apocalyptic" future where Russia beat America in the 50s, but Vegas remained as a beacon of hope, ruled by Elvis. But Elvis dies, so a bunch of rock-n-rollers head for Vegas to become the new king. The star, Jeffrey Falcon, was mostly known as a goon in various Cynthia Rothrock movies, and he's not much of an actor, but it's extremely good fun. I'm struggling to define it quickly, but it's slightly like if Alex Cox liked every single genre equally instead of westerns when he made "Straight To Hell".

Also, it's a matter of lightning only striking once, as the director Lance Mungia only made one other movie, "The Crow: Wicked Prayer", with Edward Furlong and David Boreanaz, and that was apparently a stinker.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 16, 2021, 06:23:30 PM
Rock-A-Bye Baby (1958) - Jerry Lewis stars in this remake of The Miracle Of Morgan Creek which should have been called "A Man And Three Babies" if it wanted to accurately describe the story. It's one of those times where the idea of it being a remake is something of a stretch too, it takes a very minor element of Preston Sturges film but goes off in it's own direction where a woman finds she's pregnant and regrets it, but here she dumps the kids on Jerry Lewis and fucks off and he has to bring them up even though he's not the father. It's occasionally a musical with a number of short songs, and unfortunately has the odd dodgy racist gag (Lewis pretending to be Japanese and a Native American being the worst moments) but most of the time this is good natured fare which has some pretty funny bits of physical comedy and all round silliness in it. 7.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 17, 2021, 12:21:38 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 15, 2021, 08:14:13 AM
have planned to watch Jubilee soon with a friend.

So this was to my mind better than Sebastiane, though still heavily betrayed his art school sensibilities. Seemed far too sanitised for a punk film. But what do I know. I liked a lot of the imagery. My favourite characters were the Malcolm McLaren send-up and whoever Little Nell was, mainly because they were the only ones visibly enjoying themselves.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 15, 2021, 02:33:40 PM
I really loved Wittgenstein, Edward II and Blue but haven't seen any other Jarman, which is odd and something I must rectify.

Yeah I think his later films are much more highly acclaimed, I'll definitely be checking the rest of them out at some point.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 17, 2021, 02:03:33 PM
Diamond Jim (1935) - Biopic of railroad man Jim Brady (Edward Arnold) a jocular man who makes a hell of a lot of money wheeling and dealing, and has a long standing friendship with entertainer Lillian Russell who he loves but who doesn't reciprocate his feelings. It's a sweet natured film, Brady is a fun character to spend time with, and the script by Preston Sturges while not up there wish his best contains some fun dialogue. 6.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 18, 2021, 06:04:44 AM
Doosmday. Neil Marshall of The Descent fame released a new film last year but before I see that I wanted to watch something else he'd made, so I watched this post-apocalyptic pandemic action film. Lots of people seem to think this is some kind of grindhouse B-movie throwback - but to me it felt too self-serious and not really self-aware enough for that (though the Mad Max-y car chase was admittedly great). Gets a bit better once it gets inside the compound but that's 45 minutes into the film. Has all the individual elements but none of the spice. However it did have Siouxsie and the Banshees on the soundtrack so maybe it's not all bad.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 18, 2021, 02:56:00 PM
Dr. Plonk (2007) - A silent film made by Rolf de Heer, the director of Bad Boy Bubby, it's a whimsical and very daft effort where Dr Plonk (Nigel Martin), a scientist from 1907, predicts that the world will end in a hundred and one years time but when he tells the prime minister he and other politicians just laugh at the good doctor. So he builds a time machine to try and bring them proof, though it doesn't go quite the way he'd hope, at least initially. It's a very lightweight affair and sags in the middle a little, but most of the time this is an affectionate homage to silent cinema, and there's some very strong physical comedy in it, especially in the final half hour. 7.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 19, 2021, 10:19:09 PM
Waiting For Guffman (1996) - Christopher Guest mockumentary with a sod load of very funny people in it including Guest, Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Fred Willard, Parker Posey and Bob Balaban, as a small town celebrates their 150th anniversary and puts on a musical about the place. It's sweet natured and gently funny, rarely hilarious but amusing throughout, with the musical predictably being my favourite part,
Spoiler alert
though the slightly bittersweet ending felt an odd choice.
[close]
7.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on June 19, 2021, 10:30:30 PM
I bought a compendium of Chris Guest stuff (Mighty Wind, Best in Show, Waiting for Guffman and possibly another one?) probably 3 years ago (pre-Ferris Jr anyway) and still (!) haven't got around to watching it, which is mad considering how formative This is Spinal Tap was for me as a teenager[nb]used to use Tonight We're Gonna Rock Ya for my soundchecks back when that was a thing I had to deal with[/nb].

You have reminded me to watch it and have the evening free - so either thank you in advance, or you are to blame if I don't like it. Will be sure to report back and apportion credit/blame accordingly.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 19, 2021, 10:40:31 PM
Quote from: FerriswheelBueller on June 19, 2021, 10:30:30 PM
I bought a compendium of Chris Guest stuff (Mighty Wind, Best in Show, Waiting for Guffman and possibly another one?) probably 3 years ago (pre-Ferris Jr anyway) and still (!) haven't got around to watching it, which is mad considering how formative This is Spinal Tap was for me as a teenager[nb]used to use Tonight We're Gonna Rock Ya for my soundchecks back when that was a thing I had to deal with[/nb].

You have reminded me to watch it and have the evening free - so either thank you in advance, or you are to blame if I don't like it. Will be sure to report back and apportion credit/blame accordingly.

Go in with low expectations (it's fun, but it's no Tap) and you'll probably like it a fair bit, I hope you do as for this evening at least it appears I am not monstrously evil.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on June 19, 2021, 11:04:31 PM
I love Guffman and for me it's the second best of Guest's films (I know Rob Reiner directed Tap, but just for the sake of this discussion).

Fans of Guffman and Corky are well advised to also watch Billy Crystal's Don't Get Me Started, which features Guest as Corky in all but name, and also Reiner as Marti Di Bergi (SENSITIVITY TRIGGER WARNING - also features Crystal in blackface doing [a spot on, to be fair] Sammy Davis Jr).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 20, 2021, 01:12:04 AM
Have seen about half of Guest's films (Best in Show, For Your Consideration, Waiting for Guffman - they're all exceptionally funny), really need to rectify the other half at some point.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on June 20, 2021, 01:13:03 PM
Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010) - wacky European art movie that starts like a cross between romcom and car commercial: Juliette Binoche is a single mum running a shop in Italy with a bratty teen; William Shimell is a smug annoying writer. They meet and she's utterly obsessed with him and takes him on a daytrip where he's shitty to everyone. Then halfway through in an almost Lynchian twist they are mistaken for a married couple and
Spoiler alert
start acting like they've been married 15 years and having big married-couple rows
[close]
. Fuck knows what it's about, if anything, but it's entertaining, sometimes funny, Italy is very pretty, and the talk about art never gets too jargon-heavy. Shimell has enough Bill Nighy-style cool to get away with being a total git to the ladies, and Binoche is always watchable (while being far from perfect herself). Plus Peter Bradshaw absolutely hated it, and if that's not recommendation enough, what is?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 20, 2021, 02:09:45 PM
De Palma's The Fury - really quite good, it feels like Scanners owes a lot to it, and then there's the action movie elements played by a reasonably old dude. Cassavetes as the baddie. Great ending (that feels quite Cronenbergy in itself), lots to like.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on June 20, 2021, 02:25:50 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on June 20, 2021, 01:13:03 PM
Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010) - wacky European art movie that starts like a cross between romcom and car commercial: Juliette Binoche is a single mum running a shop in Italy with a bratty teen; William Shimell is a smug annoying writer. They meet and she's utterly obsessed with him and takes him on a daytrip where he's shitty to everyone. Then halfway through in an almost Lynchian twist they are mistaken for a married couple and
Spoiler alert
start acting like they've been married 15 years and having big married-couple rows
[close]
. Fuck knows what it's about, if anything, but it's entertaining, sometimes funny, Italy is very pretty, and the talk about art never gets too jargon-heavy. Shimell has enough Bill Nighy-style cool to get away with being a total git to the ladies, and Binoche is always watchable (while being far from perfect herself). Plus Peter Bradshaw absolutely hated it, and if that's not recommendation enough, what is?

I'v by no means seen everything she's been in my I think Binoche might have a good case for being the most consistently good actor over the last decade, not all the films as good as the above but she does pretty much always seem to be good in them and not just in a "thesp ham" fashion.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: A Hat Like That on June 20, 2021, 05:42:59 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on June 20, 2021, 02:09:45 PM
De Palma's The Fury - really quite good, it feels like Scanners owes a lot to it, and then there's the action movie elements played by a reasonably old dude. Cassavetes as the baddie. Great ending (that feels quite Cronenbergy in itself), lots to like.
Recorded for an off-day in the Euros
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 20, 2021, 08:28:10 PM
Conspirators Of Pleasure (1996) - Jan Svankmajer film about a number of individuals whom have quite unusual tastes when it comes to deriving pleasure, including a man who dresses up as a chicken and throws rocks at a woman and then eats some chicken, a woman who whips a man size doll and then drowns it, and a man with a complicated mechanical wanking machine and the newsreader he's obsessed by, among various others. Dialogue free visually it's odd and then some, and sometimes strangely funny, but it doesn't seem to have much to say other than that hey, some people have odd fetishes, and it's a rare occasion where I'm struggling to come up with a rating, I found it quite captivating but I'm not sure what the point of it is. 6.0/10, maybe?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 21, 2021, 05:47:28 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on June 20, 2021, 01:13:03 PM
Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010) - wacky European art movie that starts like a cross between romcom and car commercial: Juliette Binoche is a single mum running a shop in Italy with a bratty teen; William Shimell is a smug annoying writer. They meet and she's utterly obsessed with him and takes him on a daytrip where he's shitty to everyone. Then halfway through in an almost Lynchian twist they are mistaken for a married couple and
Spoiler alert
start acting like they've been married 15 years and having big married-couple rows
[close]
. Fuck knows what it's about, if anything, but it's entertaining, sometimes funny, Italy is very pretty, and the talk about art never gets too jargon-heavy. Shimell has enough Bill Nighy-style cool to get away with being a total git to the ladies, and Binoche is always watchable (while being far from perfect herself). Plus Peter Bradshaw absolutely hated it, and if that's not recommendation enough, what is?

Watched this a couple of years ago and still can't stop thinking about it. Tremendously emotionally confusing in a deft and confident way, which I love in a film.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 20, 2021, 08:28:10 PM
Conspirators Of Pleasure (1996) - Jan Svankmajer film about a number of individuals whom have quite unusual tastes when it comes to deriving pleasure, including a man who dresses up as a chicken and throws rocks at a woman and then eats some chicken, a woman who whips a man size doll and then drowns it, and a man with a complicated mechanical wanking machine and the newsreader he's obsessed by, among various others. Dialogue free visually it's odd and then some, and sometimes strangely funny, but it doesn't seem to have much to say other than that hey, some people have odd fetishes, and it's a rare occasion where I'm struggling to come up with a rating, I found it quite captivating but I'm not sure what the point of it is. 6.0/10, maybe?

This is one of my absolute favourite 10/10 films. To me it perfectly captures the joy of life and includes so many wonderfully bizarre, surreal details that all build up to a beautiful climax.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Johnboy on June 21, 2021, 12:55:29 PM
Watched Velvet Goldmine for the first time.

Wow it's all over the shop. It's bad but interesting.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 21, 2021, 01:43:35 PM
Yeah, that sums it up pretty well. I've had multiple reactions to it. I thought it was great the first time, utter shit on the second viewing and every time I catch bits on telly I'm either laughing at it or intrigued to watch it again. Odd movie, bad but interesting as you say.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Johnboy on June 21, 2021, 04:21:22 PM
I only watched half of it tbh - the dvd started jamming and I was falling asleep anyway (got it from the library)

but I'll go back to it - production design was fairly decent
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on June 21, 2021, 05:42:25 PM
It's interesting to see Christian Bale playing a very different character than any of his subsequent roles. And also playing a 16-year old at age 24.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 21, 2021, 07:37:20 PM
One, Two, Three (1961) - James Cagney stars in this Billy Wilder comedy set in a post war Germany where he's the head of the West Berlin Coca-Cola office, but when Scarlett (Pamela Tiffin ) the seventeen year daughter of one of his American bosses comes to visit chaos ensues, mainly as she secretly marries communist Otto (Horst Buchholz) and one farcical moment after another quickly follows. It's got quite a few very funny moments in it,
Spoiler alert
Otto being tortured to "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" and a car chase that follows shortly afterwards
[close]
being the funniest for me, and though both Tiffin and Buchholz play it quite broadly Cagney is magnificent, it's not a film I loved it's one I liked an awful lot. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 22, 2021, 07:34:33 AM
The Cheap Detective. Follow-up to Murder By Death (which I thought was pretty awful) focussing specifically on Peter Falk's character. This one got me on board from the very beginning with some stylish opening titles, and then nonstop very silly gags and the whole cast hamming it up. Not sure why I liked this much more than Murder By Death but it was extremely funny. Somehow pulls off being a parody of The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca simultaneously. Starts sagging a little towards the end, mainly a pace/urgency issue, but the gags don't stop coming.

Blindfolded Eyes. Carlos Saura's Raise Ravens/Cría cuervos is a film that continues to affect me deeply since first watching it, yet I've never seen another one of his films. Decided to rectify that with this film - simple, taut drama about a theatre director who decides to stage a play based on a hostage's testimony, and also gets involved with his friend's wife. Touch of the bizarre, fantastic emotionally, really well done. Looking forward to seeing more of his films at some stage.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on June 22, 2021, 09:10:48 AM
The Hitch-hiker - 50s drama directed by and co-written by Ida Lupino (who was quite groundbreaking in her time I think). Fairly lurid melodrama about a murderous hitcher who picks up a couple of blokes to take him to Mexico. Short (70 minutes) and sweetv with a good villainous performance and some nice cinematography.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 22, 2021, 09:44:50 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 22, 2021, 07:34:33 AM
The Cheap Detective. Follow-up to Murder By Death (which I thought was pretty awful) focussing specifically on Peter Falk's character. This one got me on board from the very beginning with some stylish opening titles, and then nonstop very silly gags and the whole cast hamming it up. Not sure why I liked this much more than Murder By Death but it was extremely funny. Somehow pulls off being a parody of The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca simultaneously. Starts sagging a little towards the end, mainly a pace/urgency issue, but the gags don't stop coming.

I didn't mind Murder By Death but thought Peter Sellers was strangely bland in it, and Truman Capote a terrible actor, I know it's highly rated by some on here but I couldn't see what the fuss was about. I wasn't aware of the sequel / spin-off though and love Falk, so will check that out soon.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on June 22, 2021, 10:05:06 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 22, 2021, 07:34:33 AM
The Cheap Detective. Follow-up to Murder By Death (which I thought was pretty awful) focussing specifically on Peter Falk's character.

I enjoy Murder By Death for what it is, agree with SMBH's criticisms, and also had no idea this sequel existed, so will be on it, thanks.

Looks like it's on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pi-FC_M_NLY
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on June 22, 2021, 11:21:32 AM
The Cheap Detective is not a sequel to Murder By Death, more of a close kissing cousin.  Falk doesn't play the same character (well, it IS basically the same type of character, but it's not THE same character) and there's no relation between the two other than they're similar films and both collaborations between Robert Moore (the best Bond, obvs) and Neil Simon.

I like both, but Murder By Death just pips it for me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on June 22, 2021, 11:34:03 AM
Two Women

Sofia Loren stars as the young widowed mother of a 12 year old who aims to see them both survive in war-torn Italy. A magnificent performance by Loren; who deservedly won an Oscar for this role. Some good background on the feelings of regular Italians as the war kept swaying in different directions.
Final act has a very brutal and harrowing scene; of which there is some foreboding about throughout. A beautiful emotional film by the wonderful Vittorio De Sica.

On discussion above; I guess I have to get round to Cheap Detective cos Falk's performance was by far the highlight of the film; with a lot of the other detectives particularly the Poirot character and David Niven and his wife being quite humorous. Even aside from the criticism of the cultural appropriation of Sellars' role; never found his character to be particularly funny.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 22, 2021, 11:53:39 AM
Angel Heart.

Mickey Rourke doing a good job in what is quite a nasty little supernatural noir. Good aesthetic and executed quite well but the concept is a bit grim. Good though.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 22, 2021, 02:29:46 PM
Watched the three Bill and Ted movies over the weekend. I must've rinsed the first one as a kid as every second of it was so familiar it could've been streaming directly from my brain. Still a huge amount of fun, despite the horrendous soundtrack.

I had a horrible night when I saw Bogus Journey at the cinema originally (the friend I went to see it with turned on me afterwards on a whim and said some pretty nasty things) which kinda tainted it for me, so my memories of it were not as strong, aside from the odd thing like Station's excellently huge Martian butt. I hugely enjoyed the revisit and continually marvelled that they were allowed to make such a creatively inspired sequel to a minor cult hit. The CGI looks well ropey now, but fuck me, the animatronics are a wonder. Best of the trilogy for me.

The soundtrack was a huge step up from the original too. I don't remember that Faith No More song (or Jim Martin's cameo) at all, must seek it out. I was amused to see each member of Kiss and Bob Ezrin getting a songwriting credit for 'God Gave Rock And Roll To You 2'. I've only heard the original a couple of times on those BBC4 '[Genre] At The BBC' compilations, so maybe I'm missing something, but what have they added to the song to warrant that?

Alex Winter's appearance as the nightmare granny reminded me of Freaked, which my partner had never even heard of, so that's tonight's viewing sorted. I was surprised (but not that surprised given the experience) that was his last major role in a movie until the new Bill and Ted. He's had a good year, his Zappa doc was superb and the other two docs he's released look interesting.

I'd avoided any advance word on Face The Music so wasn't sure what to expect. I guessed it would've had quite a mixed response on here and some posters would hate every frame of it, but that was a given (I'm not bumping that thread). It was pretty much as good as I hoped it'd be and much better than such a belated sequel had a right to be. I agree there was something a bit sad and off about Ted (
Spoiler alert
which only made the death bed encounter funnier
[close]
) a couple of plot threads were iffy and
Spoiler alert
the song at the end was proper shit (but the song that unites humanity would more likely be some bland shite the BBC could play over a montage of crowd footage at the end of their Glasto coverage than a shreddy rock anthem, unfortunately, so I'll forgive that glaring flaw),
[close]
but nothing that made it a non-non-henious experience. I thought the ending seemed slightly rushed, but the post-credits scene made up for it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 22, 2021, 02:55:47 PM
I can't argue with any of the above, I love all three and though I'm aware of some minor faults (the use of fag as an insult really made me wince in the originals) most of the time they're enormous fun, and as you said the third is better than any belated sequel has any right to be.

Mulan (1998) - China is under attack but to save her father from having to fight the evil Huns his daughter Mulan dashes off in the middle of the night and takes his place, aided by a tiny sassy dragon played by the famous Chinese actor Eddie Murphy, though to be fair to him half the cast are American as that was apparently acceptable back in the nineties. Mulan has to not only battle the hun but also institutionalised sexism, and it's also occasionally a musical though the fact that he only has a couple of songs feels odd, like they couldn't make up their mind whether it was or not. Despite having minor issues with it this was a film that I liked a good deal, the plot is strong, Mulan's great as the lead and there's a bunch of fun supporting characters, and for me if this had had a few more songs in it then it would have been up there with Disney's very best. 7.7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 23, 2021, 12:24:48 AM
Yeah unfortunately Murder By Death was a real disappointment to me, so many performers I enjoy and a whodunnit parody and everything, but it was just so flat and unfunny... somehow The Cheap Detective avoided that. Or maybe I was in a different mood. Glad people are now finding out about it!

Quote from: phantom_power on June 22, 2021, 09:10:48 AM
The Hitch-hiker - 50s drama directed by and co-written by Ida Lupino (who was quite groundbreaking in her time I think). Fairly lurid melodrama about a murderous hitcher who picks up a couple of blokes to take him to Mexico. Short (70 minutes) and sweetv with a good villainous performance and some nice cinematography.

This is her best work for me - The Bigamist is alright, and Outrage is really quite good. But this is just chiselled goodness. I need to see more of her films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 23, 2021, 11:46:46 AM
The Whole Shootin' Match. For some reason I thought I heard about it on here but can't find any mention of it (except in a post from before my time). This is some real independent American cinema, bordering on outsider cinema - supposedly the inspiration for the Sundance Film Festival. Warm, grassroots energy, really dug this one.

Remember My Name. Slightly off vibes in this thriller about a woman stalking a couple (unfortunately the Wikipedia brief synopsis spoils the narrative), directed by Alan Rudolph. Anthony Perkins is in it but I didn't really like his performance, however Geraldine Chaplin smashes it as the sociopathic stalker. Jeff Goldblum has a little role in it as well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 23, 2021, 11:54:08 AM
Being There

Like "Derek" but in the 70s. But seriously folks, I really liked it.

I've read a few things about the ending but would like to know what people here think about it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on June 23, 2021, 02:21:24 PM
Well, gave The Cheap Detective (1978) a try. It seems like they were trying to play ZAZ with a film noir beat, which didn't really work. Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982) does a better job with noir.

Some nice jokes throughout, but the story didn't really hold up it's side of the deal, never felt engaged by it. Could have really done with that backbone holding the whole thing together and then they could have gone in harder with the gags. Cast was excellent, production we good too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pi-FC_M_NLY (very good copy, at least DVD quality, may be from a BR)

Seeing as it gets linked/compared with Murder by Death (including google insisting on highlighting MbD when you search for The Cheap Detective!), I'll have to come down on MbD's side. Just a bit more energy to it. Neither are stone cold classics, both do a decent enough job. Give them both a watch if you haven't, if only for the interest in spotting the cast.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on June 23, 2021, 03:26:56 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 19, 2021, 10:40:31 PM
Go in with low expectations (it's fun, but it's no Tap) and you'll probably like it a fair bit, I hope you do as for this evening at least it appears I am not monstrously evil.

Well, we watched Best In Show last night and both absolutely
Spoiler alert
it was ok
[close]
it!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on June 23, 2021, 03:28:20 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on June 23, 2021, 11:54:08 AM
Being There

Like "Derek" but in the 70s. But seriously folks, I really liked it.

I've read a few things about the ending but would like to know what people here think about it?

One of my favourite films ever actually. I think the ending just acknowledged how surreal the whole situation is.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 23, 2021, 07:25:52 PM
Following on from the discussion a couple of pages back I watched Cold In July but have mixed feelings and I'm not sure it all adds up (
Spoiler alert
I may have missed something but if Sam Shepherd's son was part of the witness protection system why was he still hanging out with the people he made the snuff videos with, and wouldn't the police be very aware that Shepherd's body wasn't demolished by a train?
[close]
) while what it has to say about violence isn't in any way original. I found it quite gripping while watching it, and the performances from Hall, Shepherd and Don Johnson are strong, but I was disappointed by the final act and the film as a whole. 6.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on June 24, 2021, 12:23:54 AM
Quote from: SteveDave on June 23, 2021, 11:54:08 AM
Being There

Like "Derek" but in the 70s. But seriously folks, I really liked it.

I've read a few things about the ending but would like to know what people here think about it?

Love the ending, the film is a bit of a modern fairytale so why not? When he pokes the umbrella in the water it's a nice little bit of Clouseau-style whimsy, but not too much.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ballad of Ballard Berkley on June 24, 2021, 12:33:44 AM
Quote from: FerriswheelBueller on June 23, 2021, 03:28:20 PM
One of my favourite films ever actually. I think the ending just acknowledged how surreal the whole situation is.

One of my favourite films too. As you say, when
Spoiler alert
Chauncey walks upon water
[close]
that's just one last poetic flourish: what a strange, insane, bewildering world.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 24, 2021, 03:40:25 AM
A Woman After a Killer Butterfly. Truly bizarre South Korean film about death and suicide, centering on a young man who becomes obsessed with death and the various surreal people and situations he finds himself in. Unique, unusual and existential.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on June 24, 2021, 08:13:40 AM
The Long Good Friday

Fa-la-la what a film. From start to finish I was engrossed. Bobo giving it everything (especially in his pro-Europe speech on the Thames), Helen Mirren refusing to play the dumb gangster's moll, Charlie from "Casualty", the chef from the Nag's Head, Denzil from "Only Fools And Horses" getting his arse slit up, Jacko from "Brush Strokes", Kathy from "Eastenders", Alan Ford, Belloc and a sexy but silent Pierce Bronson.

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/40/eb/89/40eb89a7842a3fac00020848ffaa2edf.jpg)

My favourite bit of the wikipedia page about the production is this-

QuoteThe film was scheduled to be televised with heavy cuts on 24 March 1981. Because of the planned cuts, in late 1980, Hanson attempted to buy the film back from ITC to prevent ITV screening the film. The cuts, he said, would be "execrable" and added up to "about 75 minutes of film that was literal nonsense". It was also reported at the same time that Bob Hoskins was suing both Black Lion and Calendar Films to prevent their planned release of a US TV version in which Hoskins' voice would be dubbed by English Midlands actor David Daker.

Harry from "Boon" is more intelligible to Americans than Bob Hoskins.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on June 24, 2021, 01:29:55 PM
Watched the film Ma. A lot of it just felt like filler although the ending was quite disturbing. It's interesting how you feel a bit
Spoiler alert
sorry
[close]
for Ma despite how
Spoiler alert
she treats her daughter and the children she "befriends"
[close]
.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on June 24, 2021, 04:48:21 PM
The Truman Show

I'd seen bits and pieces of this over the years, but apparently not the whole thing. Having finally seen it all the way through it's... not bad.

I remember Carrey getting a lot of praise for it at the time, but it doesn't seem like a particularly revelatory performance - he still does plenty of arm flailing. Meanwhile, in the role of what is essentially just a reality show/soap opera producer, Ed Harris' unblinking intensity makes his character come across as ridiculously pretentious. He should be some sleazy cokehead, not a mononymically monickered beret sporter.

The entire film is similarly stuck between two points. The premise is treated seriously enough that it's hard not to think about the ways it doesn't actually make sense. For instance, if Truman's wife is just an actress, does she have no real family or friends outside the show?[nb]Even Adam Woodyat gets to go home at the end of the day[nb]but he can never leave Ian Beale.[/nb][/nb]. I think it could have done with being either more rigorous, or going the other way into magical realism territory.

It's interesting that it came around at a similar time to Dark City and The Matrix. You always see the latter two compared with each other, but I've never seen this mentioned in the same breath, despite the similar themes and setup. If that's a particularly novel insight, I'm claiming it now. I wonder what it would have been like if the audience wasn't told from the start that it's all a telly programme - if nothing else, I think the point about insidious product placement could have been more subtle. I also wonder how it would play if it were made today. I can imagine the end featuring a montage of Truman being flamed online for "selfishly" ending the show.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on June 24, 2021, 05:00:38 PM
Part of what made The Truman Show work at the time was that reality TV wasn't a thing back then. Big Brother didn't start till a year or so later.

I've always liked it, despite the massive holes in logic. Things like they can tell he's cottoned onto the cars driving in a loop, but they can't just change the loop? Or when he's heading for the elevator that is a film set, how does he catch them by surprise?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 24, 2021, 05:16:18 PM
Although far less iconic or good, EDtv is probably a more prescient satire of what reality tv became.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on June 24, 2021, 05:58:04 PM
Quote from: Gulftastic on June 24, 2021, 05:00:38 PM
Part of what made The Truman Show work at the time was that reality TV wasn't a thing back then. Big Brother didn't start till a year or so later.
I think The Real World had been on for some time in 1998, but it has certainly only got bigger since then. Not to mention people broadcasting their lives in the internet.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 24, 2021, 08:26:55 PM
Love On Delivery (1994) - Stephen Chow comedy where he plays a cowardly delivery boy who attempts to man up in the hope that a woman will fancy him. Daft and silly with quite a few cutaway gags and parodies of other movies, the gag rate is high and it's pretty inventive throughout, with a great final act, and it made me laugh a lot. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 25, 2021, 12:05:27 AM
Quote from: Gulftastic on June 24, 2021, 05:00:38 PM
Part of what made The Truman Show work at the time was that reality TV wasn't a thing back then. Big Brother didn't start till a year or so later.

Albert Brooks' Real Life seems even more prescient.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on June 25, 2021, 08:45:53 AM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on June 24, 2021, 04:48:21 PM
The Truman Show

I'd seen bits and pieces of this over the years, but apparently not the whole thing. Having finally seen it all the way through it's... not bad.

I remember Carrey getting a lot of praise for it at the time, but it doesn't seem like a particularly revelatory performance - he still does plenty of arm flailing. Meanwhile, in the role of what is essentially just a reality show/soap opera producer, Ed Harris' unblinking intensity makes his character come across as ridiculously pretentious. He should be some sleazy cokehead, not a mononymically monickered beret sporter.

The entire film is similarly stuck between two points. The premise is treated seriously enough that it's hard not to think about the ways it doesn't actually make sense. For instance, if Truman's wife is just an actress, does she have no real family or friends outside the show?[nb]Even Adam Woodyat gets to go home at the end of the day[nb]but he can never leave Ian Beale.[/nb][/nb]. I think it could have done with being either more rigorous, or going the other way into magical realism territory.

It's interesting that it came around at a similar time to Dark City and The Matrix. You always see the latter two compared with each other, but I've never seen this mentioned in the same breath, despite the similar themes and setup. If that's a particularly novel insight, I'm claiming it now. I wonder what it would have been like if the audience wasn't told from the start that it's all a telly programme - if nothing else, I think the point about insidious product placement could have been more subtle. I also wonder how it would play if it were made today. I can imagine the end featuring a montage of Truman being flamed online for "selfishly" ending the show.

What makes Harris' performance even more great is that apparently he came in at the last minute as the original choice (Harvey Keitel maybe?) didn't work out

EDIT: Actually it was the other "cast but then binned when it didn't work out" all-star Dennis Hopper
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on June 25, 2021, 01:22:58 PM
I really liked the Truman Show as well! Great selections on this page. Has the odd plot hole (he's lived there all his life so how would he know people were acting a bit weird without the context of normality?) but still very good.

Mrs Ferris admitted she's never seen Jurassic park last night so that's our evening sorted!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 25, 2021, 01:47:35 PM
Quote from: FerriswheelBueller on June 23, 2021, 03:26:56 PM
Well, we watched Best In Show last night and both absolutely
Spoiler alert
it was ok
[close]
it!

I missed this before but am deeply sickened you didn't watch Guffman, you only have yourself to blame for
Spoiler alert
thinking it's okay
[close]
! Have to say I wasn't that impressed by it at the time but given the praise it received my expectations might have been too high.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on June 25, 2021, 05:37:47 PM
Creation Of The Humanoids

Like if Philip K Dick had written a cheap drive-in B-movie scifi - in fact, I hope he saw it and enjoyed it. After WW3, humanity is slowly dying out, and they've all got humanoid robot assistants who they dismissively call "clickers". And then it goes off in a few odd directions. Very much of its time in terms of sexual politics, but garishly beautiful colours and a really interesting ending.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7c6YuMNSJ8E
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 25, 2021, 08:17:05 PM
Weekend At Bernies II (1993) - Larry (Andrew McCarthy) and Rich (Jonathan Silverman)  are back with their deceased boss (Terry Kiser) and it's set just hours later despite four years having passed and all clearly looking older. Unfortunately for Rich and Larry right at the start they're fired as the company thinks they were involved with Bernie's thieving, and two million dollars is still missing, so they decide to steal his corpse and head off to a beautiful island where they think he hid the money. The first one was a farce with lots of slapstick and this is along those lines again though it's also extremely cartoonish as it has a plot involving some voodoo silliness as whenever Bernie hears music he starts dancing all over the place but the second it stops he drops to the floor. Perhaps unsurprisingly there's a couple of plot holes, the duo comment early on about the stench Bernie's corpse is giving off but a sod load of other people don't seem to notice, not even a woman who fondles and then spends the night with him, but maybe they all had no noses or something. Also an issue is the way Richard and Larry treat women, there's a fair amount of filler and it's undoubtedly a dumb, stupid movie which could / should have been half the length, but the idiocy with Bernie did often make me laugh a fair amount. 5.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 25, 2021, 08:26:11 PM
Ha, I had no idea they'd even made a second!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 25, 2021, 09:21:36 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on June 25, 2021, 08:26:11 PM
Ha, I had no idea they'd even made a second!

I can't recommend it despite some aspects making me laugh, though I imagine someone could make a very silly and very funny movie by editing both together in to just one 80 minute film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 25, 2021, 09:35:25 PM
I'm quite tempted to watch the first one when I'm in the right mood for it, I don't think I've seen it since I was a kid so might stick it on when I'm in a daft mood.

My Cousin Vinny is number 1 in the queue for that though, got jury duty in a week's time so need to brush up on the legalese somehow.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 25, 2021, 10:18:29 PM
I always thought the original Weekend at Bernie's got a bad rap, not that I've seen it since it came out on video.

Watched Coming To America (still good) and it's sequel, which wasn't as bad as I'd been led to expect, but still  nothing to get excited about either way. The film dragged every time it focussed on the son, Leslie Jones was obnoxious to an unfunny degree (though forgiven for the drunken mauling of 'The Humpty Dance') and the CGI wildlife was B-movie grade. Murphy was lacking and there wasn't enough Arsenio Hall, but Wesley Snipes just about made it worthwhile. He almost stole the Dolomite biopic and is the only compelling reason I could give for watching this.

Freaked was as fun as I remembered - twisted enough to understandably fall foul of a studio regime change (the guy who greenlit it was sacked by Murdoch for making too many weird films) and just about mean-spirited enough to still be funny (on this point, the humour sort of reminded me of Robot Chicken if that show hadn't been made by complete cunts).

I was fascinated to find it evolved from a low-budget horror movie starring Butthole Surfers (who cameo and provide some music). Not only do I think a horror movie starring that band would have potential, you could make a great horror movie about Butthole Surfers. Scroll way down to question #3 of this lengthy interview with Kramer (https://believermag.com/logger/three-questions-for-kramer/) and the story about them playing at the Norwegian private school to a crowd of terrified upper class kids - it could be the centrepiece of the first music biopic to crossover with the horror genre.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Smeraldina Rima on June 25, 2021, 11:16:35 PM
Interesting post about The Truman Show. The criticisms of logical holes and Ed Harris's intensity hadn't occurred to me but they seem fair. Over the years I'd gradually convinced myself it was a modern classic but now I wonder if it was just another film I have a childhood connection to.

Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on June 24, 2021, 04:48:21 PM
I wonder what it would have been like if the audience wasn't told from the start that it's all a telly programme - if nothing else, I think the point about insidious product placement could have been more subtle.

I have a memory of this being one of very few films I saw at the cinema without knowing anything about it and I could have sworn that I found out about things not being as they seem along with, or a bit before Truman, and the early confusion was something I liked about it. Like when the rain falls in one spot, it's strange but I thought it wasn't explained yet. I've seen it a few times since then but obviously not paid enough attention. Does it start by showing the audience that it's all a tv program?

Ed TV was another similar film from from the same period.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 26, 2021, 01:51:36 AM
Employee's Entrance, a 1933 black comedy/indictment of capitalism about a ruthless department store boss who spends the entire film being a horrible cunt to every other character. I'd never seen or heard of Warren William (inventor of the lawn vacuum) before, but he was magnetic, such a despicable piece of shit in every respect. He's completely irredeemable, yet so brutally compelling I was almost rooting for him to succeed, not that he would need or appreciate my support.

I want to see an earlier film someone mentioned in an imdb review, Skyscraper Souls, where he owns the world's tallest building and spends the entire film being a horrible cunt to every other character. Sounds ace.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on June 26, 2021, 07:56:07 AM
Quote from: Claude the Racecar Driving Rockstar Super Sleuth on June 24, 2021, 04:48:21 PM
The Truman Show

I remember Carrey getting a lot of praise for it at the time, but it doesn't seem like a particularly revelatory performance - he still does plenty of arm flailing.

I've always thought that The Truman Show is a good film in spite of Jim Carrey.  I reckon I'd like it a lot more with a different actor in the lead role though.  There's that shot with Carrey wiggling his arse in the camera's face and I just always think "oh, fuck off, Carrey".  Quite frankly, I simply cannot sanction his buffoonery.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Rock on June 26, 2021, 07:58:59 AM
You're not wrong.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: olliebean on June 26, 2021, 09:03:30 AM
Yes, his performance is rather too... performative for someone who's supposed to be unaware that he's on a TV show. I suppose the conceit would be that he'd been deliberately brought up to behave like that, but I feel like if The Truman Show really existed, that aspect of his personality would be something that would put me off watching (much as it does from watching many of the people who take part in real "reality" shows).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Rock on June 26, 2021, 09:21:48 AM
Should have starred Adam Woodyatt.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 26, 2021, 09:36:59 AM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on June 26, 2021, 01:51:36 AM
Employee's Entrance, a 1933 black comedy/indictment of capitalism about a ruthless department store boss who spends the entire film being a horrible cunt to every other character. I'd never seen or heard of Warren William (inventor of the lawn vacuum) before, but he was magnetic, such a despicable piece of shit in every respect. He's completely irredeemable, yet so brutally compelling I was almost rooting for him to succeed, not that he would need or appreciate my support.

I want to see an earlier film someone mentioned in an imdb review, Skyscraper Souls, where he owns the world's tallest building and spends the entire film being a horrible cunt to every other character. Sounds ace.

Employee's Entrance sounds really fun and I'll definitely watch it soon. And I found Skyscraper Souls here: https://ok.ru/video/339267881635 - ok.ru is often a really great source of old movies that I've struggled to find elsewhere.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on June 26, 2021, 10:29:22 AM
I watched Duel last night and was expecting something quite camp and daft but it's actually quite a good and menacing psychological thriller isn't it?

I lobbed it in the 'perfect films' thread because I think it is basically perfect in the sense of if someone said 'make a scary film about a truck' I doubt anyone could do any better.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 26, 2021, 11:55:13 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 26, 2021, 09:36:59 AM
Employee's Entrance sounds really fun and I'll definitely watch it soon. And I found Skyscraper Souls here: https://ok.ru/video/339267881635 - ok.ru is often a really great source of old movies that I've struggled to find elsewhere.

Excellent, many thanks! I'd be interested in seeing what you make of Employee's Entrance. I didn't know what to make of it at first as it's extremely bleak and unpleasant, but full of snappy dialogue, stock comedy characters and a running joke about a toilet. It's entertaining and troubling in equal measure. Funny to think this was mainstream entertainment in 1933 but would've been completely beyond the pale in 1935 and for decades afterwards.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 27, 2021, 01:58:17 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on June 25, 2021, 10:18:29 PM
Dance') and the CGI wildlife was B-movie grade. Wesley Snipes just about made it worthwhile. He almost stole the Dolomite biopic and is the only compelling reason I could give for watching this.

Agree with you about Snipes - it seems to me he is getting a bit of a resurgence post-jail but is only landing great roles in shit films. Saw him pop up in a subpar RZA film (Cut Throat City) and he absolutely slammed it out of the park. Mind you he was always a strong performer - great in Blade and Mo Better Blues for example.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 26, 2021, 09:36:59 AM
ok.ru is often a really great source of old movies that I've struggled to find elsewhere.

Seconded. Usually find their links by doing a search on Google video and filtering by 20+ minutes.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on June 27, 2021, 07:41:48 PM
Just watched The Devil and Father Amorthe.  Can't be arsed to say anything other than absolute dogshit.  Just solidifies what a load of bunk it is.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 27, 2021, 07:47:31 PM
The Cameraman (1928) - Buster (Buster Keaton) has a crush on Sally (Marceline Day) who works for MGM, and so attempts to become a cameraman for the news service even though he has no idea what he's doing. It starts off a little slowly but after the opening fifteen minutes it becomes funnier and funnier, it loses a couple of points for some questionably dodgy Chinese stereotypes but then gains them back for some daft monkey antics and the fact that scandalously for the period you can see Sally's nipples in her swimming costume. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Phoenix Lazarus on June 27, 2021, 07:50:10 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 27, 2021, 07:47:31 PM
The Cameraman (1928) - Buster (Buster Keaton) has a crush on Sally (Marceline Day) who works for MGM, and so attempts to become a cameraman for the news service even though he has no idea what he's doing. It starts off a little slowly but after the opening fifteen minutes it becomes funnier and funnier, it loses a couple of points for some questionably dodgy Chinese stereotypes but then gains them back for some daft monkey antics and the fact that scandalously for the period you can see Sally's nipples in her swimming costume. 7.5/10

That was prior to the Hays Code or whatever it was called though, wasn't it?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 27, 2021, 08:02:19 PM
Quote from: Phoenix Lazarus on June 27, 2021, 07:50:10 PM
That was prior to the Hays Code or whatever it was called though, wasn't it?

True, but this was an MGM film and such dodginess wasn't supposed to occur in major studio films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: EOLAN on June 28, 2021, 12:54:35 AM
A Face In The Crowd (1957)

A film about a bumbling rural bumpkin wonderfully portrayed by Andy Griffith straight talking natural way sees him climb to TV super stardom and become a major influencer both on products and in politics.
Patricia Neal guides him along.

A film many will point as having so many parallels with Trump's rise and there are some elements. Seen a few old films like this lately and 1949s All The Kings Men managed a similar theme much better.

One thing I have noticed is all the films I seen of person with the common touch (often guided by a smart sassy lady) are effectively rural southern rednecks and consistently mentioned as warning about Trump. There is probably something obvious I am missing but can't think of any that ever start off by portraying an urbanite, particularly on the coast as being the unworthy riser to fame and power who gets destroyed by their own hubris.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on June 28, 2021, 01:31:37 AM
City Streets - Rouben Mamoulian's other 1931 movie is not in the same league as Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde or indeed that year's better known gangster flicks The Public Enemy and Little Caesar, but is still unfairly overlooked. Gary Cooper is a carnival sharpshooter who gets pulled into the underworld by his girlfriend Sylvia Sydney and ends up working for 'The Big Fellow', basically a mobster Harvey Weinstein. It doesn't end up like you would necessarily expect it to.

The real star of the show was Mamoulian. Lots of lovely touches of expressionism and cinema's first dialogue flashback, when Sylvia Sydney relives her previous couple of scenes lying awake in her prison cell. It took me a little while to get into despite the technical qualities, but it swept me along in the second half.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 28, 2021, 06:57:11 AM
Fingers. Starring Harvey Keitel doing his best Christopher Walken as a (possibly autistic? OCD?) pianist who moonlights as a debt collector for his mobby dad. Two future Sopranos actors were in this which seems like a coincidence but this is quite Sopranos-y in some respects for a film released in 1978 (particularly the scenes between Keitel and his dad). Not sure this quite puts all the pieces together but they are interesting pieces nonetheless.

This was remade by Jacques Audiard as The Beat That My Heart Skipped, so I was curious to see what shape that would take. Really enjoyed it, liked it more than the original I'd say. Much more of a subdued character study and all the threads are woven in so much more organically. Duris is more of a charismatic performer in this than Keitel was in the original. Loved the
Spoiler alert
slightly changed "two years later" ending
[close]
as well. Out of the handful of Audiards that I've seen this has been my favourite.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on June 28, 2021, 12:57:39 PM
This Is Where I Leave You - 2014
I was surprised to enjoy this a whole lot.
Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver & Jane Fonda amongst others in this almost ensemble cast.
4 siblings reunite at their father's shiva (a wake for Jewish people). Dysfunctional family stuff ensues.
Yeah, I liked it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on June 28, 2021, 01:47:34 PM
The Missouri Breaks (1976) - tries to be a revisionist western like Butch & Sundance, ends up being a shit western. Waste of some great actors and Marlon Brando acting like a fucking twat. Apparently improvised most of his lines. had to use cue cards for the others and pretty much did what he wanted, including having a ridiculous Irish accent, dressing up in various stupid guises and generally Brandoing up to the nines. Him and Nicholson hated each other apparently so very rarely, if at all, share a frame together
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 28, 2021, 07:20:14 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on June 26, 2021, 11:55:13 AM
Excellent, many thanks! I'd be interested in seeing what you make of Employee's Entrance. I didn't know what to make of it at first as it's extremely bleak and unpleasant, but full of snappy dialogue, stock comedy characters and a running joke about a toilet. It's entertaining and troubling in equal measure. Funny to think this was mainstream entertainment in 1933 but would've been completely beyond the pale in 1935 and for decades afterwards.

I liked this a good deal overall, even though as you say he's an utter shit it's amusing to watch Anderson's brutal ways, though story wise it's a little slight,
Spoiler alert
and the way it handled what looked unpleasantly like rape (though it's impossible to confirm as it was off camera) is bleak
[close]
, and the ending isn't as dark as it looked like it was going to be, but this is still a fascinating effort and one I found quite captivating. 7.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on June 28, 2021, 11:28:22 PM
Quote from: EOLAN on June 28, 2021, 12:54:35 AM
A Face In The Crowd (1957)

A fantastic film. Decades ahead of its time. Every bit as important and prophetic as Network.

Last week I watched All That Jazz. I've never been much of a musical fan but All That Jazz is a musical done New Hollywood style. Gritty, meta, satirical and offbeat - It's also one of the best edited films I've ever seen, and a clear influence on the likes of Tarantino and Edgar Wright. A film about film-making, it seems like the kind of movie to be made decades into a director's career, but this was only Bob Fosse's fourth, and penultimate, film (although he famously worked as a choreographer on  musical films for 15 years before becoming a director) . I've now seen three of his five films (Cabaret, Lenny, All That Jazz) and they've all been excellent. Will be sure to check out his first feature Sweet Charity, and his swansong Star 80.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 28, 2021, 11:40:26 PM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on June 28, 2021, 11:28:22 PM

Last week I watched All That Jazz. I've never been much of a musical fan but All That Jazz is a musical done New Hollywood style. Gritty, meta, satirical and offbeat - It's also one of the best edited films I've ever seen, and a clear influence on the likes of Tarantino and Edgar Wright. A film about film-making, it seems like the kind of movie to be made decades into a director's career, but this was only Bob Fosse's fourth, and penultimate, film (although he famously worked as a choreographer on  musical films for 15 years before becoming a director) . I've now seen three of his five films (Cabaret, Lenny, All That Jazz) and they've all been excellent. Will be sure to check out his first feature Sweet Charity, and his swansong Star 80.


The final sequence continues to haunt me
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on June 28, 2021, 11:43:37 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on June 28, 2021, 11:40:26 PM
The final sequence continues to haunt me

Absolutely. That hard cut to
Spoiler alert
the body bag being abruptly zipped up
[close]
is all I've thought about for a week. Second only to Dancer In The Dark for haunting endings to musicals.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 29, 2021, 12:11:31 AM
Yeah and really the entire melancholy shroud over the whole thing masked with an ironic "it's showtime!" grin - it's a beautiful, gutting aura
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 29, 2021, 08:40:26 AM
I watched Why Don't You Play in Hell? (mentioned in the Sono thread) and it featured a fictional film trailer called "The Blood of Wolves", which reminded me there was an actual film called The Blood of Wolves from 2018 (completely unrelated) that I'd been meaning to watch, so I put that on. It's an 80s-set police vs yakuza (vs yakuza) crime epic - compelling story with some good performances and action. Surprisingly quite good - there's a sequel coming out this year which I'll be keeping an eye on.

Then Marco Ferreri's Bye Bye Monkey, featuring Depardieu and Mastroianni both speaking English in this surreal existentialist satire set in New York City. Ferreri is king of bourgeois ennui ad absurdum and this is no exception. Pure drifting fog of bizarre poetic symbolism.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 29, 2021, 05:17:08 PM
Tarzan (1999) - After saving him from a violent leopard baby Tarzan hangs out with a bunch of gorillas, all of whom accept bar Kerchak who hates him because he's different, the racist bastard. Disney made the odd choice to have all the songs sung not by the characters but by Phil Collins, which yes is quite annoying, and even worse is that the lyrics are awful, the most patronising and on the nose I've ever heard in any musical, let alone a Disney one, and it was frustrating as while I normally love musicals each time Collins burst in to song it disrupted the flow of the film and made me wince. At least when Collins isn't ruining the film it's pretty good, Brian Blessed is surprisingly restrained as the villain, Minnie Driver's a great Jane, and the action scenes are often quite thrilling, a monkey based chase sequence when Tarzan and Jane first meet especially, but due to the awful songs this is something I'll never rewatch. 6.7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on June 30, 2021, 08:18:57 AM
Knife in the Head. Incredible West German film starring Bruno Ganz as a man who gets shot in the head by police after visiting a youth centre looking for his wife, who is involved with a group of radicals. The police accuse him of stabbing an officer, but as a result of the shooting he loses his memory so is unable to remember. He has to relearn basic human faculties and attempt to reconstruct the night, while being torn between the police who are after him and his radical comrades. Beautifully shot (thankfully found a well-restored copy) and Ganz is a marvel. Poetic and political. Highly recommended.

Good Dick. Romantic comedy of sorts with and by Marianna Palka about a woman who gets stalked by a creepy video store clerk who has a crush on her. Intensely uncomfortable (which is the point), fascinating to watch as a result.

Killer of Sheep. What to even say about this one? Mesmerising captures of working class black Americans, autoethnography you might call it. Easy to dismiss as "nothing happens" but this film is pure image and emotion.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on June 30, 2021, 08:47:00 PM
I'll Be Yours (1947) - Based on the same play as Preston Sturges 1935 film The Good Fairy, with Sturges script being mentioned in the credits, Louise Ginglebusher (Deanna Durbin) is new to the city and broke too, and a succession of men are either kind to her or forcefully try to seduce her. It's by no means a bad movie but given how similar it is to the 1935 version I can't help but feel that there isn't any point in it existing, and anyone who has seen the original shouldn't bother with this. Louise is a slightly savvier and less naïve character than the first take on the play and Durbin is pretty great in the film, but the waiter character in the original was a lot more fun than the version we see here, and male lead Tom Drake is utterly bland and almost completely lacking in charm. The dialogue is fine in places but the majority of the time it's only gently amusing, the film starts off well but once Drake becomes a major player the film starts to drag and the second half is annoyingly dull. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 01, 2021, 09:12:08 PM
How To Use Guys With Secret Tips (2013) - South Korean rom-com that's very visually playful and inventive, where thirty year old Choi Bo-na (Lee Si-young) is a second assistant director at an advertising agency and her life and career aren't going anywhere until one night a mysterious man sells her a selection of videos that promise to help her carry out the title of the movie,
Spoiler alert
and hey, it works too and soon she's dating a famous actor (Oh Jeong-Se) and directing commercials herself. But will he find out about the tapes and then be all pissy for a bit until they're finally reunited for a happy ending? Well yeah, quite, but this is such a fun work, with a very smart script and lots of cute ideas and a sod load of memorable images that for once I'm not foaming at the mouth that it follows the traditional rom-com formula so precisely.
[close]
8.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on July 02, 2021, 07:24:04 AM
The Detective (1968) - Gritty Sinatra drama about a cop investigating the death of a "homosexual" and uncovering something deeper. Pretty progressive in a lot of ways, even though the portrayal of gay people is pretty regressive. All in all pretty decent, with its main claim to fame being that it was based on a book written by the same man who wrote the book that Die Hard was based on. Due to this, and the deal made by Sinatra when making this film, he had to be offered the McClane role in Die Hard first, despite being 78 at the time. Thankfully he declined

The Earth Dies Screaming (1964) - Short but effective british sci-fi about alien robots taking over the world. Gave Tom Waits and UB40 inspiration for song titles

The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser - Very Herzog Herzog. Bruno S is very watchable and it is an interesting concept but, like with most Herzog films, I feel I should like it more than I actually do

The Lady Vanishes (1978) - remake of the Hitchcock film from 1938. Engaging leads and the story is pretty much played with a straight bat, though Cybil Sheppard plays a slightly more fancy-free socialite, which is probably in keeping with the change of times between films.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 02, 2021, 10:24:42 AM
Vitalina Varela (2019) - I'm kind of feeling Pedro Costa is hitting diminishing returns with his Cape-Verdean chiaroscuro miserabilism. The scenario is almost parodically depressing: a woman arrives in Portugal from Cape Verde, just missing the funeral of her husband who emigrated 25 years ago, and is told "there's nothing here for you". She wanders round looking stoic, meeting a priest with his own problems and uncovering details of her husband's life. There are good moments, the visual style is still utterly distinctive, and when he allows his characters to monologue to camera it's interesting. But there is so much of people doing things very slowly in the darkness.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 02, 2021, 03:48:09 PM
TC 2000 (1993)

Chanced upon it's poster:

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2foNY5oPy4M/maxresdefault.jpg)

Yeah, that looks good. Nice bit of 90s trash sci-fi, like Cyborg (1989), or Nemesis (1992), or something.

Well, it's not really that, it's got the bones of a sci-fi story (environment degraded, blah, rich living underground, blah, kinda Robocop-ish cyborg thing going on), but it's basically an excuse for a bunch of martial artists to have fun kicking and punching. In fairness, to my untrained eye, they seemed to be doing a pretty good job on the fights, but the story never really took off and held everything together. Direction was competent, if not engaging, and clearly had influence from some big action films (definite Commando (1985) ref at one point) and they made good use of their (presumably low) budget with some of the locations.

In short, it is what it is, and whilst there's plenty worse out there, this just doesn't have enough interest or craziness (e.g. Undefeatable (1993)) to stand out. A bit more world building could have gone a long way. 6/10

On YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2foNY5oPy4M
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 02, 2021, 05:13:03 PM
Bolo Yeung AND Billy Blanks!?!??!?!?!?!?!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 02, 2021, 07:30:59 PM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 02, 2021, 05:13:03 PM
Bolo Yeung AND Billy Blanks!?!??!?!?!?!?!

Check them out!
https://youtu.be/2foNY5oPy4M?t=3411
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 02, 2021, 08:20:38 PM
The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956) - Judy Holliday comedy where she owns a small amount of shares in a company and causes havoc during stockholders meetings, so they give her a job in the hope she'll be too busy to annoy them. It's not a vicious satire by any means but it gently tackles the institutionalised sexism and fraudulent behaviour of the boys clubs in companies like this, Holliday is once again amazing and delivers many a funny line with her trademark bluntness, and though the relationship between the 35 year old Holliday and 173 year old Paul Douglas (well, okay, he was 49, but looks a fuck load older) might raise eyebrows it's still a very charming effort. 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Fambo Number Mive on July 03, 2021, 04:56:08 PM
The Game (1997)

A very obnoxious and wealthy business type finds his life going out of control after signing up to a mysterious game which his Legend Gary of a brother gives him as a birthday present.

I don't know if I liked this film. It was a mixture of thrilling and really dragging in places, and the ending was outlandish and unrealistic, but it really made me think. I would recommend it but the ending might anger you like it did me, although if you feel that passionate about a film that's probably a good thing? Really good acting by everyone in the film. It's on UK Netflix if you have that (but I wouldn't bother signing up just to watch the film).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 03, 2021, 05:41:11 PM
Quote from: Fambo Number Mive on July 03, 2021, 04:56:08 PM
The Game (1997)

A very obnoxious and wealthy business type finds his life going out of control after signing up to a mysterious game which his Legend Gary of a brother gives him as a birthday present.

I don't know if I liked this film. It was a mixture of thrilling and really dragging in places, and the ending was outlandish and unrealistic, but it really made me think. I would recommend it but the ending might anger you like it did me, although if you feel that passionate about a film that's probably a good thing? Really good acting by everyone in the film. It's on UK Netflix if you have that (but I wouldn't bother signing up just to watch the film).

The Game blew me away on my first viewing. I was captivated from the start and had no idea where it was going. Unfortunately, it's one of those films that only truly works on that first viewing. No matter how it ended, it was always bound to disappoint a portion of the audience. It's been a good 15 years since I last watched it, might revisit it while it's on Netflix.


I watched The Nice Guys last night. Thought it was a late 2018 release but, fuck me, it's already five years old. Found it rather disappointing. It's about 20 minutes too long, there's really no need to have the daughter character tagging along for the ride (something Shane Black apparently did again in The Predator), set in 1977 there were a good few anachronisms that pissed me off - A  wallposter of London Calling? FFS - And it was all a little bit too smug and self-satisfied. Felt pretty much the same about Black's Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang, but I remain a huge fan of the original Lethal Weapon.

On the plus side, Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe had decent screen chemistry, Gosling is excellent at physical comedy acting and it was good to see Kim Basinger popping up in a small role.

All in all, a bit of a letdown.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 03, 2021, 11:19:11 PM
Dororo (2007) - Thanks to some remarkably shitty parenting a man must kill 48 demons, and each time he does he gets a piece of his body back. Crazy Japanese fantasy antics are the order of the day then (except when it's sneakily attempting to be a western) with the various demons pleasingly weird, and the friendship between our hero and the self proclaimed world's greatest thief Dororo is a fun one. But while fun we don't meet that may demons, there's a fair amount of filler, and I couldn't help but wish it leaned in to the weirder elements more often. 7.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 03, 2021, 11:28:21 PM
Had my parents over the past couple of days and for some reason forced them to watch Bait.

I'd seen it before but it's great and there's a decent bit of foreshadowing I'd missed the first time.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 04, 2021, 03:12:53 PM
Design For Living (1933), Ernst Lubitsch's (apparently not very faithful) adaptation of a Noel Coward play about a copywriter for the underwear industry (Miriam Hopkins in a performance worthy of the Phwoarr RIP (https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,87977.0.html) thread) who meets an unsuccessful artist (Gary Cooper) and a seemingly talentless playwright (Frederic March) on a train to Paris. Both of them fall head over heels in love with her, but unfortunately she falls in love with both of them equally.

At first, she's shagging both of them behind the other's back, but the two men soon discover the deception. The three come to a gentleman's agreement where they will remain together as a platonic threesome ("Remember: No sex!") and she will whip them into shape as artists by shouting 'Rotten!' at them until they produce decent work. The second part of the plan succeeds beyond their wildest expectations, but the 'No sex' directive falls by the wayside as soon as one of the men turns his back for 5 minutes. Despite breaking the agreement, she remains horny for the other man. What to do?

I can't comment on the differences from the Coward version, of which only the line "For the good of our immoral souls!" was retained. I assume it's a little racier, but this is still pretty scandalous for 1933, and would be banned by the Legion of Decency a year later (it's planned re-release in 1944 was also blocked). I had a lot of fun with it, though it dragged a little at times. Miriam Hopkins was so charming it didn't stretch credulity that every male character in the film was hopelessly in love with her and I could appreciate her difficulty in choosing between Cooper and March. I was rooting for her to choose both of them and live in a triad (https://youtu.be/KYj2dWFNtpw) like that Jefferson Airplane song or the end of
Spoiler alert
Gozu
[close]
.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 04, 2021, 07:12:13 PM
That's interesting, I saw a version of that with a very young Rachel Weisz in the early-ish nineties and enjoyed it but had no idea it'd been (sort of) adapted to the screen, and will have to give it a go at some point.

Royal Tramp (1992) - Penis obsessed comedy with Stephen Chow where he ends up pretending to be a eunuch and involved with a number of plans to either save or kill the emperor and his family. It has its moments but its overlong and repetitive and the gag rate isn't that high, I've been enjoying a lot of Chow's films that he only acted in recently and this is by far the most average of them all. 6.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 04, 2021, 09:25:09 PM
Sherlock Jr (1924) - Buster Keaton works at a cinema but in his spare time moonlights as an amateur detective in this slapstick fare where after his girlfriend's father's watch is stolen Buster quickly gets framed for the crime he's investigating, and heads off to his job at the cinema and then there's a inspired dream sequence where he becomes part of the film he's screening. This is really inventive stuff, the stunts as per usual are amazing given how easily they could have gone wrong / killed Keaton, and best of all is that this is very funny from start to finish and a rare occasion where I wish a film was much longer. 7.9/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 05, 2021, 04:41:32 PM
The Amazing Mr Blunden (1972) - While living in a damp, shitty Camden flat the recently widowed Mrs Allen (Dorothy Alison) and her children Lucy (Lynne Frederick) and Jamie (Garry Miller) are visited by the elderly Mr Blunden (Laurence Naismith) who's all but certainly a ghost, and offered a job working in a remote country house which is all but certainly haunted. When there they meet two odd children who tell Lucy and Peter the traumatic story about how their parents died and their Uncle (James Villiers) and his new wife (Madeleine Smith) and mother-in law (Diane Dors, hamming it up a bit but effective nonetheless) and father in law (David Lodge, nicely demented) treated them appallingly.
Spoiler alert
But though it initially looks like it, it turns out they weren't killed they just found a quite unusual way to travel in time in to the future where they recruit Lucy and Jamie in an attempt to stop them being killed in a terrible fire back in the past. This isn't exactly an upbeat laugh a minute seventies kids film then but it is quite an unusual one with that unique grim seventies look to it, and it's amusingly disturbing at times, the final big set piece especially
[close]
. 7.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 05, 2021, 06:44:08 PM
Rewatched My Cousin Vinny, I always remember enjoying this but find I enjoy it more than I remember.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: peanutbutter on July 05, 2021, 08:30:10 PM
Sudden Death
That helicopter death was beyond shocking, did it look as bad when it came out? It must've done.
Not the best JCVD, tonally a bit messy and felt dragged out as a result, was okay though.


Out of the Blue
Linda Manz is great, Dennis Hopper has enough sense to leave it to her to carry the film. Really good.


Last Summer
Always thought Frank Perry's the Swimmer was a super strange one off oddity of a film but this definitely felt like him continuing down the same kind of path.
Quite unsettling throughout, def wish I watchced it at like 3am.



Ragtime

Bored the arse off me, can barely remember a bit of it


The Fast and the Furious
Weird blast of nostalgia but it ultimately was kinda boring. The occasional chunks of bullet time baffled me
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blue Jam on July 05, 2021, 09:09:52 PM
The Man With The Golden Gun

Was in the mood for a daft OTT Roger Moore Bond film last night and this hit the spot. Loved Britt Ekland as an unusually incompetent and stupid accomplice. Loved the way Scaramanga's real third nipple and Bond's fake third nipple both just looked like those round ones from out of a box of Elastoplast. Loved Bond being Pubes Daz to Scaramanga's Legend Gary as he blew up his ride home. Loved Bond having amazing martial arts skills, especially at fighting pairs of opponents where one just stands still and waits while the other one attacks, then the way he clean forgot all his martial arts skill as a very small Frenchman threw bottles of wine at him before he just trapped him in a suitcase. Loved the inevitable "HE MEANS HIS COCK!"-type innuendo at the end.

Lulu's theme tune is cobblers ("like a pastiche of a Bond theme" I think they called it on SMERSH Pod) and I struggled to suspend my disbelief at a Frenchman wasting so much good wine but otherwise, fucking ace.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 12:43:06 AM
China 9, Liberty 37. RIP Monte Hellman. Pretty wonderful Western drama with Warren Oates, Fabio Testi and Jenny Agutter, particularly the beginning and ending. Jealousies, loyalties, attractions, gunfights, the whole lot. Dreamy quality. Sam Peckinpah even shows up briefly.

This adorable Australian claymation called "Happy Hatchday to Plasmo" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=El_K7OkTmdE), which was then turned into a TV series about the titular alien.

Foul Play. Comedy-romance-mystery-thriller with Chevy Chase and Goldie Hawn which I'm pretty sure was only on my list because of Dudley Moore's supporting role. The whole thing is really slight and the gags run out after about the first half but it's pleasant enough.

Dead Bang. John Frankenheimer directs, Don Johnson stars as a cop tracking down a criminal with links to Nazi groups. Starts off really promisingly but gets a bit stale as it goes on.

Goin' South. Finally getting to watch this Western directed by and starring Jack Nicholson. Sadly this is a bit nothing, the comedy is mostly flat and the supporting cast (Mary Steenburgen, John Belushi, Christopher Lloyd, Danny DeVito) don't really get much to do. Oh well.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 06, 2021, 12:44:31 AM
Quote from: Blue Jam on July 05, 2021, 09:09:52 PM
The Man With The Golden Gun

...

Lulu's theme tune is cobblers ("like a pastiche of a Bond theme" I think they called it on SMERSH Pod)

The song is meh, and I know it's deservedly dismissed, but I do love the brass on it. The general theming around it in the rest of the soundtrack works for me too,
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 12:59:44 AM
Quote from: Blumf on July 06, 2021, 12:44:31 AM
The song is meh, and I know it's deservedly dismissed, but I do love the brass on it. The general theming around it in the rest of the soundtrack works for me too,

Imagine if they'd gone with Alice Cooper's version
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 06:20:35 AM
In a Year of 13 Moons (Fassbinder). Suspect this might be one like The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant where the full brunt of its misery will hit me much later. Looks beautiful as expected and the main character is wonderfully tragic.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Chedney Honks on July 06, 2021, 06:35:36 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 12:43:06 AM
China 9, Liberty 37. RIP Monte Hellman. Pretty wonderful Western drama with Warren Oates, Fabio Testi and Jenny Agutter, particularly the beginning and ending. Jealousies, loyalties, attractions, gunfights, the whole lot. Dreamy quality. Sam Peckinpah even shows up briefly.

Now on my list, cheers.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 06:58:56 AM
Quote from: Chedney Honks on July 06, 2021, 06:35:36 AM
Now on my list, cheers.

It'd be interesting to hear what you think! I still reckon Two-Lane Blacktop is his best but this does place a worthy second.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 06, 2021, 08:23:29 AM
It's still Cockfighter for me as Hellman's best.  Sadly it will never get any kind of UK release (the film would only be about 40mins long after the BBFC take their scissors to it).  Absolute powerhouse but understated performances from Oates and Harry Dean.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 06, 2021, 11:23:37 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 12:43:06 AM
Goin' South. Finally getting to watch this Western directed by and starring Jack Nicholson. Sadly this is a bit nothing, the comedy is mostly flat and the supporting cast (Mary Steenburgen, John Belushi, Christopher Lloyd, Danny DeVito) don't really get much to do. Oh well.

Given that these three worked together on Cuckoo's Nest and Goin' South I always hoped Christopher Lloyd would play a villain in one of the 80s/90s era Batman films. He'd have made a pretty good Two Face and a MUCH better Mr. Freeze.

Lloyd was on a recent-ish episode of WTF promoting that Bob Odenkirk film Nobody. He talked quite a bit about Jack, Danny and their experiences on Cuckoo's Nest and Goin' South.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 06, 2021, 12:11:15 PM

I spent part of this morning watching Weekend At Bernies. Found it in my "To Watch" pile of DVDs. Have no memory of how it got there. Either someone gifted it to me a while back as a dumb present or I bought from a charity shop as part of a five for a quid deal or something.

Look I wasn't expecting some high art film and as Lou Reed said of Police Academy "... Everything has its place, I mean one day we wanted to see something really gross and stupid and Police Academy was perfect. Y'know when you're in that kind of mood you don't want to think and you don't even want to follow the jokes too well, you just want something that's right in your face and that's what Police Academy was. I don't know if they teach it a film school but Thursday afternoon at 2* was OK" (* or Tuesday morning at 10 in my case with Weekend At Bernies).

So it was more of a background viewing while I did some work on the laptop. I obviously knew the premise of the film as it's one of those comedies that can be summed up in a sentence but it's quite remarkable that they managed to stretch that one idea into an entire film.

Released in 1989 (although it looks more like 86/87) this kind of movie was *just* about acceptable back then but it paved the way for the likes of The Hangover 20 years later which had a similarly flimsy plot but had had no legitimate reason to exist in 2009.

Kudos to Terry Kiser for playing a corpse for an hour of this 97 minute film. The most amazing thing I found out is that it's from Ted Kotcheff the director of Wake In Fright and First Blood. Poor old Ted must have fallen on hard times some time in the mid 80s.

I finished watching it about 40 minutes ago and I can already barely remember any of the gags, other than "Bernie's dead but nobody seems to realise".
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on July 06, 2021, 01:00:20 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 05, 2021, 04:41:32 PM
The Amazing Mr Blunden (1972)
I watched this earlier this year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Good stuff.

Telstar : The Joe Meek Story - 2008
Directed by Nic Moran, this is a fascinating, bleak biopic about Joe Meek, who wrote such songs as, obviously, Telstar, Johnny Remember Me & Have I The Right.
Starring, amongst others, Con O'Neill in the title role, Kevin 'Cancelled' Spacey, James ' Don't Let This Put You Off' Corden, Ralf 'Antony' Little (playing Chas from Chas n Dave) & Justin 'What The Fuck?!' Hawkins as Screaming Lord Sutch.
Was it good? Yeah, I guess. Was it interesting? Very! Loved seeing the likes of Richie Blackmore & Mitch Mitchell in it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 06, 2021, 01:42:19 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on July 06, 2021, 01:00:20 PM
I watched this earlier this year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Good stuff.

It's almost borderline horror in places which I wasn't expecting in a kid's film, but which made me like it all the more. I discovered yesterday that Mark Gatiss is remaking it with Simon Callow as Mr Blunden, and Gatiss himself as Mr Wickens, but as it's billed as "a Sky Original family adventure for Christmas 2021" in the press release I'm guessing it'll be far tamer and nowhere near as odd.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on July 06, 2021, 04:00:58 PM
Well, that's kind of cool, I guess? Ta for heads up.
I'm going to watch the 2010 adaptation of Whistle And I'll Come To You at the weekend, which I noticed pop up on Amazon *thumb*
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 06, 2021, 04:37:44 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on July 06, 2021, 04:00:58 PM
Well, that's kind of cool, I guess? Ta for heads up.
I'm going to watch the 2010 adaptation of Whistle And I'll Come To You at the weekend, which I noticed pop up on Amazon *thumb*

I suppose I shouldn't judge it before it's released but I can't imagine Gatiss's take on Mr Wickens will be as demented as the original, or that the tone will be as downbeat, though we'll see I guess.

The Sword In The Stone (1963) - I'd been warned that this take on King Arthur's story was an early Disney misfire and it really is an oddity, its not in anyway awful just a bit bland as it ignores the famous tale for all but ten minutes and the majority of it feels like filler as Merlin supposedly educates Arthur, but it's more about turning him in to a fish, a bird and a squirrel (where weirdly Arthur is sexually assaulted by a female of the species) and mucking about with magic. It's amusing in places but the story is weak, the songs quite nothing-y and its definitely one of the poorer Disney films. 5.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Famous Mortimer on July 06, 2021, 05:21:08 PM
Vice Academy 5

One of the USA Channel's "Up All Night" series, where they'd have either Gilbert Gottfried or Rhonda Shear introduce a movie, occasionally mock it at the beginning and end of ad-breaks, etc. Stuff like this was made pretty much specifically to show on there, I reckon.

It's moderately tolerable! Okay, the jokes are rubbish, but so is the delivery, so it loops all the way back round to being good again. Well, good might be stretching it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Chedney Honks on July 06, 2021, 06:00:56 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 06, 2021, 06:58:56 AM
It'd be interesting to hear what you think! I still reckon Two-Lane Blacktop is his best but this does place a worthy second.

I've never seen that, either, but I did pick it up. Can't remember if it's on Indicator or Criterion but heard some good things. Justice not been in the mood yet! Will report back on both. Ta.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 07, 2021, 02:40:19 AM
Quote from: Chedney Honks on July 06, 2021, 06:00:56 PM
I've never seen that, either, but I did pick it up. Can't remember if it's on Indicator or Criterion but heard some good things. Justice not been in the mood yet! Will report back on both. Ta.

Ooh you're in for a treat I think.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 07, 2021, 07:51:43 AM
The One and Only. Carl Reiner directs this Steve Gordon-penned comedy with Henry Winkler as perhaps the most overconfident man ever. His persona in this reminds me of a Woody Allen with zero anxiety. Cracking wise all the time and oblivious to everything. Anyway he has delusions of being a star and tries to make it big but his personality gets in the way and he goes into the next obvious choice, wrestling. Nothing extraordinary but it's quite nice and has a few decent gags.

F.I.S.T. Period drama about a Hoffa-like union leader played by Sylvester Stallone, directed by Norman Jewison. Impressive in scope, well-shot, but feels a bit like a flat retelling of someone's life and Stallone is not quite the leading man here that he should be. Good start and end, not much to go for it in the middle, which is unfortunate as the film is 2.5hrs long.

Redball. Australian cop drama about a hunt for a serial child murderer/general police corruption. Good ideas, not very good execution. Though always fun to see Melbourne on film.

Todd Haynes' early short film "The Suicide". Haynes made this when he was SEVENTEEN. I'm jealous. It's really good. Impressionistic look at a young boy's time at school.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 07, 2021, 08:41:46 PM
Vulgaria (2012) - A Hong Kong movie which at the start warns that it has high levels of adult themes and politically incorrect language, and they won't be held responsible if it causes emotional distress or erectile dysfunction, so expectations were raised and boy do they fail to deliver. Using an interview at a university as a framing device we learn of what happens when a dodgy low budget film producer has a yakuza gangster as a financier who wants to remake an old porn film he liked as a kid using the original actress, but to get her to agree they promise to cgi her face on to the body of someone much younger, plus we get an insight in to the producer's personal life in an attempt to make us care for the main character though it fails as he's such a tedious turd. God knows why there is that warning at the start, there's a running gag about the producer being made to fuck a donkey (though in a tiresome meta moment the film burns away just before he does so as if we were watching it at the cinema in prior to the year 2000), and some mild, tedious sexism and lazy stereotyping but otherwise none of it is even remotely shocking in the slightest and only a painfully immature twelve year old might find it so, and the only real surprise was how fucking awful this is. 2.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 07, 2021, 09:52:20 PM
I wonder how offensive a film would actually have to be to cause erectile dysfunction.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 08, 2021, 10:50:58 AM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on July 07, 2021, 09:52:20 PM
I wonder how offensive a film would actually have to be to cause erectile dysfunction.

Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom has probably come closest, in that I felt bleak and miserable and slightly broken after watching it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on July 08, 2021, 01:21:09 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 08, 2021, 10:50:58 AM
Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom has probably come closest, in that I felt bleak and miserable and slightly broken after watching it.

I read the wikipedia entry of that and decided, as with "A Serbian Film", that watching it wasn't necessary.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on July 08, 2021, 01:27:27 PM
Yeah I can handle most things but it's one I've always avoided. Same with The Painted Bird.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on July 08, 2021, 06:33:55 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on July 07, 2021, 09:52:20 PM
I wonder how offensive a film would actually have to be to cause erectile dysfunction.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 08, 2021, 10:50:58 AM
Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom has probably come closest...

As far as titles go, 120 Days of Sodom sounds quite sexy though, albeit a bit of a sore arse endurance test.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 08, 2021, 06:38:58 PM
Salo does have a lot of important things to say though (admittedly it helps if you're familiar with Pasolini as a person and his history, and also more generally Italy under nazi control), unlike The Gestapo's Last Orgy, for example.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 08, 2021, 08:02:58 PM
Quote from: SteveDave on July 08, 2021, 01:21:09 PM
I read the wikipedia entry of that and decided, as with "A Serbian Film", that watching it wasn't necessary.

I wish I'd done the same, though I have at least never seen A Serbian Film after reading about it on here and deciding I didn't need to do that to my fragile brain.

Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 08, 2021, 06:38:58 PM
Salo does have a lot of important things to say though (admittedly it helps if you're familiar with Pasolini as a person and his history, and also more generally Italy under nazi control), unlike The Gestapo's Last Orgy, for example.

It does, I agree, but despite that it's still a film I wish I'd never seen.

The Birds And The Bees (1956) - Remake of The Lady Eve but the only major differences are two songs and a slightly different ending, but otherwise it's very, very similar and as remakes go there's really no reason for this to exist. It's not a travesty because the original was so much fun, but Gaynor lacks Stanwyck's charm and moxy, George Gobel is very limp and even quite unlikeable in places and when it comes to the slapstick and physical comedy he's no match for Fonda. Also on the casting front George's valet Marty is no Mugsy, that's for sure, and the only improvement is David Niven's Colonel who makes for a fun sort of villain, but otherwise anyone who chooses to watch this over The Lady Eve is quite frankly insane and should be locked away for the rest of their lives, or for a day or two anyway. 4.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 08, 2021, 08:35:13 PM
Lol, that sounds supremely missable. I had to check Marty (Harry Bellaver) out on imdb to see what he looked like in comparison to Demarest and it turns out I've seen a bunch of movies he appeared in, though probably only in bit parts. I was pleased to see his final role was as 'Old Miner' in The Stuff.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 08, 2021, 09:09:12 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on July 08, 2021, 08:35:13 PM
Lol, that sounds supremely missable. I had to check Marty (Harry Bellaver) out on imdb to see what he looked like in comparison to Demarest and it turns out I've seen a bunch of movies he appeared in, though probably only in bit parts. I was pleased to see his final role was as 'Old Miner' in The Stuff.

It really was, I only bothered with it as I've been watching everything related to Preston Sturges and am at the very end now with some dodgy remakes and films listed on imdb which he didn't even get an on screen credit for, and the majority of them have been really poor.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on July 08, 2021, 11:57:27 PM
Has anyone watched the 1984 movie? Is it worth a watch?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 09, 2021, 12:29:29 AM
Quote from: Mobius on July 08, 2021, 11:57:27 PM
Has anyone watched the 1984 movie? Is it worth a watch?

The one with Hurt and Burton? Pretty good from memory
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Mobius on July 09, 2021, 01:37:35 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 09, 2021, 12:29:29 AM
The one with Hurt and Burton? Pretty good from memory

Yeah I've never seen it, and was just thinking the other day that I can't believe there hasn't been a modern version of remake or something of such a famous book. I just don't see the movie mentioned very often.

I think I'll check it out this weekend
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on July 09, 2021, 01:49:14 AM
Quote from: Mobius on July 08, 2021, 11:57:27 PM
Has anyone watched the 1984 movie? Is it worth a watch?

I like it a lot, watched it back in my high school days and again just recently. It's pretty timeless so it holds up well, gritty and awful and well made.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on July 09, 2021, 02:54:35 PM
Just for curiosity I'd like a modern US version where they tack on a happy ending like they did with 'I Am Legend'.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 09, 2021, 05:48:22 PM
The Big Pond (1930) - When chewing gum mogul George Billing (George Barbier) holidays in Venice his daughter Barbara (Claudette Colbert) falls for the very French Pierre (Maurice Chevalier) and George is appalled, but comes up with a plan to ruin their lives by persuading Pierre to relocate to America and work in his factory, believing that he'll hate America and isn't the sort to do a hard days work in his life. Chevalier went on to become a much loved actor and singer and you can see why on the basis of this, he's a charming so and so and then some, and Claudette Colbert is equally as good, not taking any nonsense from her parents or fiancé(s), though it's a shame she's not in it a little more. Barbier deserves a lot of credit for making this so enjoyable as well, while Lyon makes for a suitable sort of villain, and while I wish there was a couple more songs otherwise this is an impressive early musical and an auspicious start for co-writer Preston Sturges. 7.0/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Ferris on July 10, 2021, 01:38:22 AM
Jurassic Park.

Dead fucking good, you like dinosaurs? Got loads of the pricks in it, all running about like mad eating all the other lads, what a carry on!

7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 10, 2021, 12:28:37 PM
Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) - Jim Carrey's well known comedy that annoyingly has a really horrible element regarding the way a trans police captain is treated, and boy is it unpleasant as after making the discovery that Sean Young's character was once a man Carrey burns his clothes, vomits repeatedly and sobs in the shower, and it becomes a large element of the final set piece too. If you can ignore that aspect (not that you should, in any way), it's otherwise pretty decent, more consistently funny than The Mask and the gag rate is high and most of them they hit home. But yeesh, as much as I wish I could I can't get passed the ugliness of the ending. 6.0/10 (for the majority of the film), but 1/10 for the ending.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: paddy72 on July 10, 2021, 03:20:21 PM
U-Turn (1997) Revisited this after many years, and it holds up surprisingly well. Rotund-era Billy Bob Thornton, baby Joaquin and the late, great Powers Boothe are all excellent in the supporting cast.

Stone's last properly good movie?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 10, 2021, 03:40:42 PM
Isn't Jennifer Lopez in that as well? Remember seeing it yeaaaars ago and not really getting it because I was probably about 13, but reckon I'd quite like it now.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: paddy72 on July 10, 2021, 03:45:48 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 10, 2021, 03:40:42 PM
Isn't Jennifer Lopez in that as well? Remember seeing it yeaaaars ago and not really getting it because I was probably about 13, but reckon I'd quite like it now.

Yep, Sean Penn and Jennifer Lopez.

Well worth a look!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 12, 2021, 08:34:05 AM
True History of the Kelly Gang. Adaptation of the Peter Carey novel which sucks all the humour out of it; maybe if I look at it in a different light it's not so bad but it starts off with a title card saying "everything you are about to watch is not true" as if that wasn't already the whole point and so it lost me pretty much right there. A pretty good performance from the lead, and Crowe was quite good too, but it was just incredibly misguided.

The Odd Job. Graham Chapman as a man who loses the will to live and hires David Jason to kill him, then changes his mind (a plot that's been used many times). Light entertaining fare.

Blue Collar. Paul Schrader's debut film. An incredible start. Richard Pryor, Harvey Keitel, Yaphet Kotto, all excellent as three factory workers with bills to pay who decide to take their destitution into their own hands and rob their union.

Gothic. Ken Russell creates this nightmare based on the infamous meeting of Percy and Mary Shelley with Lord Byron. Not sure it all comes together but there's a few particularly brilliant sequences, and overall creates a beautiful sense of madness.

The Ice Pirates. Enjoyable scifi fluff with some nice mix of pastiche and original ideas.

The Freshman. Not the Harold Lloyd one but the one starring Marlon Brando as a Vito Corleone-alike and Matthew Broderick as a naive college freshman. Maybe ten years ago this would be exactly what I'd enjoy but today this did nothing for me.

Violette Nozière. Claude Chabrol directs a historical drama starring Isabelle Huppert as the titular (real) woman who murdered her parents. Typically grim yet personal.

Doris and Doreen. One of six TV plays written by Alan Bennett and mostly directed by Stephen Frears, absolutely feels like a TV film (set in one room, etc) so by no means a great film film, but it's rather well-written.

The Big Fix. Richard Dreyfuss is a private investigator who used to be a university radical and gets pulled into a political-adjacent job. Starts off okay but really gets going in the final act. I liked it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: paddy72 on July 12, 2021, 08:55:12 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 12, 2021, 08:34:05 AM
True History of the Kelly Gang. Adaptation of the Peter Carey novel which sucks all the humour out of it; maybe if I look at it in a different light it's not so bad but it starts off with a title card saying "everything you are about to watch is not true" as if that wasn't already the whole point and so it lost me pretty much right there. A pretty good performance from the lead, and Crowe was quite good too, but it was just incredibly misguided.

Shame about Kelly Gang, eh? I felt there was a really good movie in there somewhere, but that wasn't it.

Also, the SnorriCam shots reminded me of Sir Digby Chicken Caesar, and I couldn't unsee that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on July 12, 2021, 09:18:45 AM
Dune {1984} Fuck me, why did they do those thought voice-over bits?! Can't even enjoy the beautiful grotesque design of the ginger lad's world as it feels so racist and homophobic. When your villain first takes off cakling into the air its a genuinley weird and beautiful moment. Stings mate is trying to do evil, but is clearly lovely, too nice to pull it off. Coops little abomination sister and the pugs desperstley trying to add some charm to this fucking rotter of a script of a charmless chosen one who gets lost in the desert, tips over his dick and lands on a load of locals who worship him as a god and lob girlfriend at him. Those set designs tho! Those costumes! Really can't wait for Dennis to do a more homogenised pugless version of this
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 12, 2021, 09:56:28 AM
Old Boyfriends - 1979

Quite enjoyed this even though if it's a bit odd, especially the bit around boyfriend #3. Well directed and easy enough to watch though. Good scenes from Belushi playing boorish boyfriend #2
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 12, 2021, 11:47:55 AM

Miami Vice - Michael Mann's 2006 film version of the TV show he produced in the 80s is one of the worst films I've seen for a while. After a well executed opening scene in a sweaty Miami nightclub, set to the building rhythm of Goldfrapp's Strict Machine, it quickly turns into an uninteresting, mumbled mess. It looks nice and is well edited but it's utterly incoherent and incredibly boring. There's a classic Michael Mann shoot out at the climax of the film but due to the muddled narrative leading up to the end I didn't care what was occurring on-screen.

I've never seen the original TV series but what should have been a neon lit, vapourwave, self-aware updated celebration of 80s aesthetic (like 2011's Drive, which owed a debt to Mann's own Thief)  this film ends up being one of the one worst films of the 2000s.

Apparently Jamie Foxx, fresh from his Oscar success on Ray, was an egotistical nightmare during production and made several demands regarding his character, which explains the muddled ending. Colin Farrell was at the height of his alcoholism and he has no memory of making the film - He also appears a bloated and sweaty but is still infinitely more photogenic than most of us will ever be. There were also shots fired on set by local gangs and a tropical storms which disrupted shooting. Given all this, it's amazing Mann was able to finish the film at all. I'd love to watch a Burden Of Dreams type documentary about the making of the film but you'd have to pay me to watch Miami Vice again.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 12, 2021, 01:00:41 PM
Quote from: paddy72 on July 12, 2021, 08:55:12 AM
Shame about Kelly Gang, eh? I felt there was a really good movie in there somewhere, but that wasn't it.

Also, the SnorriCam shots reminded me of Sir Digby Chicken Caesar, and I couldn't unsee that.

Yeah it really seemed like it was trying to make a statement about all sorts of issues of national mythos and masculinity etc but it just didn't work.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 13, 2021, 08:00:20 AM
Youngblood. Blaxploitation-adjacent coming-of-age story set in the LA ganglands. Striking and tender in equal measure - and a soundtrack by War. Surprised this director hasn't made anything much else of note.

A Night Full of Rain (Wertmüller). A bourgeois feminist (Candice Bergen) and a sexist communist (Giancarlo Giannini) collide. Fascinating exercise in intersectionality. More than that: a fascinating love story.

A Stranger in Town (aka For a Dollar in the Teeth). Spaghetti Western that I thought was much more famous for some reason. It's clearly indebted to the Dollars trilogy (which ones aren't) but it's pretty good, very sparse, lots of conniving from the lead, though a little diminishing returns as it goes on.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 13, 2021, 11:45:05 AM
Deathtrap. Micheal Caine as a mad scheming playwright desperate to not have another bomb. It was done well but a bit long and I sort of lost interest in the farce.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 13, 2021, 11:17:29 PM
BMX Bandits (1983) - Three teenagers (including a young Nicole Kidman) find some walkie talkies that operate on the police frequency and which are going to be used in a robbery, and of course the villains want them back. The bad guys are nicely ridiculous, the police amusingly naff ("Goose? PJ? Powderpuff? That's BMX Talk!" claims one when listening in to their chat), and the stunts are often hilariously rubbish, in this knowingly daft kids film which largely consists of two long chase sequences (one on foot in a graveyard, one on the bikes) and then a silly ending, all of which charmed enormously. 7.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 14, 2021, 01:00:42 AM
That film was a huge deal in my school when it came out. I remember loving it, but can only recall the bit where they go down a big water slide with their bikes, which was frequently shown on kid's TV and seemed impossibly cool to a 5 year old. Nice to hear it's still a fun watch.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on July 14, 2021, 04:51:54 AM
There's a nice nostalgic bit in BMXB where they bike through Warringah shopping mall, once the biggest in the country. Also you'd think, for a film made in Australia in the 80's, with a decent budget and a reasonably known director, there'd be a lot of familiar faces in the cast? But there isn't really.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 14, 2021, 09:19:21 AM
That film's probably the reason my first bike was a hand-me-down Raleigh Strika, which is like a bmx but if it were designed and made in the Soviet Union.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 14, 2021, 10:08:00 AM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on July 14, 2021, 01:00:42 AM
That film was a huge deal in my school when it came out. I remember loving it, but can only recall the bit where they go down a big water slide with their bikes, which was frequently shown on kid's TV and seemed impossibly cool to a 5 year old. Nice to hear it's still a fun watch.

Likewise, I saw it at the cinema and me and my friends loved it, I vividly remember talking to one just as the film began and he got very annoyed and said (something along the lines of) "Shut the fuck up, I want to hear what they're saying, not you" in such an angry manner that I never spoke during a film at the cinema again (not that he was in any way wrong).

Quote from: famethrowa on July 14, 2021, 04:51:54 AM
There's a nice nostalgic bit in BMXB where they bike through Warringah shopping mall, once the biggest in the country. Also you'd think, for a film made in Australia in the 80's, with a decent budget and a reasonably known director, there'd be a lot of familiar faces in the cast? But there isn't really.

That chase sequence is a huge amount of fun, and the way it just goes on and on and on made me laugh a good deal.

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 14, 2021, 09:19:21 AM
That film's probably the reason my first bike was a hand-me-down Raleigh Strika, which is like a bmx but if it were designed and made in the Soviet Union.

Yeah, most of my friends got BMX's shortly afterwards, but I was stuck with a second hand Raleigh Grifter.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: paddy72 on July 14, 2021, 11:01:02 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 14, 2021, 09:19:21 AM
That film's probably the reason my first bike was a hand-me-down Raleigh Strika, which is like a bmx but if it were designed and made in the Soviet Union.

I also had the Raleigh Strika. Complete with 'shock absorbers', which were totally fake and certainly didn't absorb the shock of falling off.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 14, 2021, 12:01:39 PM
Quote from: paddy72 on July 14, 2021, 11:01:02 AM
I also had the Raleigh Strika. Complete with 'shock absorbers', which were totally fake and certainly didn't absorb the shock of falling off.

It did have a bit of plumbers lagging under a velcro strip to stop you losing your teeth on the top of the handlebars if I recall. And the banana shaped saddle.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 14, 2021, 10:24:57 PM

Ordinary People (1980) - Drama concerning a family learning to cope with the death of the favourite son. Robert Redford's directorial debut is well acted (Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore and Judd Hirsch, who is especially good), has a good script but is, at two hours, about half an hour too long and ultimately is essentially a very depressing TV movie of the week. The Oscars aren't everything but it's insane that this beat Raging Bull and The Elephant Man to win the Best Picture Academy Award.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 15, 2021, 10:14:42 AM
Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985, Héctor Babenco) - definitely a good title, but the film felt rather dated, not just in its treatment of homosexuality. It's also really hard to watch William Hurt who's spent 35 years playing sinister or boring corporate types as a flamboyant gay, but he is good, as is Raul Julia, despite the characters feeling a bit flat and cliched. The filmmaking wasn't brilliant - there are many better films set in a prison cell, and the pastiche sexy German film wasn't particularly exciting either. If you want a film about the relationship between fantasy and political struggle, watch Brazil or Petzold's Phoenix (2014) or something.

About Endlessness (2019, Roy Andersson) - anthology/sketches from the Swedish master, less funny than his earlier films (Songs from the Second Floor, etc), but looks astonishing, full of grace, and with a wonderful cast of characters. There are still some witty moments, but he completely refuses to work towards any kind of punchline, and it benefits from the attention to character. His earlier films mixed up humour with moments of transcendence (e.g. where everyone started singing) but this really extends that poetic side of his work. Lovely, warm-hearted, and still sometimes funny.

Dating Amber (2020, David Freyne) - Irish 90s gay coming of age drama. It has something of Sing Street and Derry Girls initially, with the first half very entertaining and light-hearted, but it grows up and moves into something more dramatic. There are Third Act Problems and the resolution isn't particularly good. Still, there are some amusing and touching moments, and Lola Petticrew is great as the titular Amber. Worth watching for free if you have Amazon Prime.

Parasite (2019, Bong Joon Ho) - rewatching the Korean Upstairs, Downstairs after first seeing it when it was released. It's a lot of fun, but subtle it ain't. Marvel at the plotting and crosscutting and the satire of rich Koreans. Try and work out at what precise moment it ceases to have any foundation in reality. Did it deserve Oscars? Yes. Is it a great film? Maybe not quite.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:29:27 AM
I've been reading Dirk Bogarde's autobiographies (lovely stuff) and I'm (re)visiting some old and new (to me) Bogarde classics.

In the list so far:
The Singer Not the Song
Accident
Darling
The Night Porter
The Servant
Death in Venice
King and Country

Obviously quite a few from his 60's imperial phase but are there any un-missables I've -ahem- missed?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:31:48 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 13, 2021, 11:45:05 AM
Deathtrap. Micheal Caine as a mad scheming playwright desperate to not have another bomb. It was done well but a bit long and I sort of lost interest in the farce.

Have you seen Sleuth (1972)? Well worth a watch and better than Deathtrap.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 15, 2021, 11:53:21 AM
Quote from: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:31:48 AM
Have you seen Sleuth (1972)? Well worth a watch and better than Deathtrap.

Nah I'll give it a look.

Last night I watched the first Pusher film. Wasn't bad, nice gritty gangster's 'world falling apart' stuff. Mad's Mikkleson plays a young dealer in it (although I think he's the main protagonist in the next one) his young scum to professional actor stuff is just as an iconic change as Vincent Cassel in La Haine, I think the film shares some other similarities although the stories are different.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 15, 2021, 01:17:29 PM
Quote from: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:29:27 AM
I've been reading Dirk Bogarde's autobiographies (lovely stuff) and I'm (re)visiting some old and new (to me) Bogarde classics.

In the list so far:
The Singer Not the Song
Accident
Darling
The Night Porter
The Servant
Death in Venice
King and Country

Obviously quite a few from his 60's imperial phase but are there any un-missables I've -ahem- missed?
Victim would be the obvious one; pivotal role, great hair, and good cinematography for a film that's mostly people talking in rooms. And you may as well watch one of Doctor in the House or the increasingly silly sequels: obviously incredibly dated but still fun in small doses on a Sunday afternoon.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on July 15, 2021, 03:21:15 PM
True Grit (1969). This film has been a source of terror for me through the years; I saw some of it as a wee bairn and was terrified, nasty old men yelling at each other and dying horrible bloody meaningless deaths, and the girl getting bit in a pit of rattlesnakes that I thought took up over half of the film. So I watched it in full tonight and I need not have worried, it's a rattling good film, even comedic in some places and zips along pretty well as Big Leggy overacts and chews the matte scenery.. Good to see the Wichita Lineman himself playing a big part, and apparently John Wayne wanted Karen Carpenter to play the female lead? Oh and the rattlesnake part lasts about one minute and she's like "ow my arm stings". Finishes on a terrible freeze-frame, except it's not, it's just a still from about half a minute before.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 15, 2021, 03:29:54 PM
Quote from: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:29:27 AM
I've been reading Dirk Bogarde's autobiographies (lovely stuff) and I'm (re)visiting some old and new (to me) Bogarde classics.

In the list so far:
The Singer Not the Song
Accident
Darling
The Night Porter
The Servant
Death in Venice
King and Country

Obviously quite a few from his 60's imperial phase but are there any un-missables I've -ahem- missed?

I watched The Mind Benders recently thanks to discussion of it in the Talking Pictures thread in Picture Box and it's really quite good, an unusual and strange movie that left quite the imprint.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 04:20:26 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on July 15, 2021, 01:17:29 PM
Victim would be the obvious one; pivotal role, great hair, and good cinematography for a film that's mostly people talking in rooms. And you may as well watch one of Doctor in the House or the increasingly silly sequels: obviously incredibly dated but still fun in small doses on a Sunday afternoon.

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 15, 2021, 03:29:54 PM
I watched The Mind Benders recently thanks to discussion of it in the Talking Pictures thread in Picture Box and it's really quite good, an unusual and strange movie that left quite the imprint.

Two more for the list. Victim rang a bell but my usual source didn't have it. Youtube to the rescue.

Oh I see the The Mind Benders has Midge Ure's mum in it.

Thanks both.

I guess I should have at least one Dr in the House an all. Dr at Sea it is . . . . with added BARDOT.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: chveik on July 15, 2021, 05:29:59 PM
Quote from: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 10:29:27 AM
I've been reading Dirk Bogarde's autobiographies (lovely stuff) and I'm (re)visiting some old and new (to me) Bogarde classics.

In the list so far:
The Singer Not the Song
Accident
Darling
The Night Porter
The Servant
Death in Venice
King and Country

Obviously quite a few from his 60's imperial phase but are there any un-missables I've -ahem- missed?

The Damned and Providence are good, maybe you can add Despair
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Neomod on July 15, 2021, 05:44:22 PM
Quote from: chveik on July 15, 2021, 05:29:59 PM
The Damned and Providence are good, maybe you can add Despair

Oh!

I'd never heard of The Damned and it's with Charlotte Rampling pre Night Porter.

Intriguing.

Cheers
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 15, 2021, 08:49:31 PM
Bride Of Re-Animator (1990) - Herbert West and his pal Dan flee the massacre at the end of the first movie to fuck about in Peru briefly, but post opening credits they're back at the hospital and mucking about with some green goo that brings body parts and sometimes even people back to life once again.
Spoiler alert
Dan's having doubts, the police are sniffing around, and Herbert's cackling a lot, so it's no shock that this doesn't have the happiest of endings, but there's a bit too much of Dan saying "This is insanity, I can't do this" only for Herbert to reply "Aw, go on, be a pal" and then Dan does so, and the actor portraying him is of the soap opera variety. It doesn't have the strongest of plots but Jeffrey Combs is still great, there's some enjoyably bizarre experiments (the dog with the human arm being my favourite) and the ending is deranged,
[close]
I just wish it had become crazier much earlier on. 6.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: phantom_power on July 16, 2021, 07:26:38 AM
Trouble In Mind (1985) - Sort of proto-Hartley oddity by Alan Rudolph. I wanted to like this more than I did but it had its moments, and is worth watching for Keith Carradine's increasingly bizarre hairstyle.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 16, 2021, 08:04:20 AM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 13, 2021, 08:00:20 AM
A Stranger in Town (aka For a Dollar in the Teeth). Spaghetti Western that I thought was much more famous for some reason. It's clearly indebted to the Dollars trilogy (which ones aren't) but it's pretty good, very sparse, lots of conniving from the lead, though a little diminishing returns as it goes on.

Watched the sequel to this, The Stranger Returns (aka A Man, a Horse and a Gun). Not as good as the first one, mainly because what made that so engaging was watching The Stranger get out of scrapes and this one with the exception of maybe a couple of sections didn't really have that (god I sound like a fucking wanker typing this). Still entertaining enough and like the first there's this real laconic quality to the lead and the film as a whole.

Also:

Django Kill... If You Live, Shoot!. One of the famous multitude of films with the word "Django" in the title that followed the original 1966 Corbucci film but that have little to nothing (in this case nothing) to do with the personage himself. This entry is a semi-horror in which the Django-like unnamed man comes back to life after being betrayed and killed over gold, and wreaks revenge on his killers. Sadly this did not live up to its hype of a "surreal horror western", it was mainly quite a trudging affair with a confusing storyline (doing the thing where it spends way too long with people who aren't the main gunman and not making them engaging), but the moments where it hit were pretty great (including a fantastic one with
Spoiler alert
molten gold
[close]
) - just not enough to make up for the sag. Inspired Alex Cox's Straight to Hell which I have yet to see.

Death Rides a Horse. (Yes if you haven't noticed I'm doing Spaghetti Westerns right now). This one opens with a bang and does just about everything right. Tense, grizzled revenge film, by the books in the best of ways - great style, characters, production design, camera, music, shootouts, everything's on point (despite a little diversion in the middle - it is two hours long after all). One of Lee Van Cleef's best tough guys.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 16, 2021, 12:51:38 PM
Quote from: phantom_power on July 16, 2021, 07:26:38 AM
Trouble In Mind (1985) - Sort of proto-Hartley oddity by Alan Rudolph. I wanted to like this more than I did but it had its moments, and is worth watching for Keith Carradine's increasingly bizarre hairstyle.
I really liked it the first time I watched it, probably at the right age for peak cult appreciation, but on subsequent viewing, Kris Kristofferson's character is a total shit. Divine is great though.

Alan Rudolph for a while in the 1980s or 1990s was a big cult director, I don't know if anyone cares about him now. I remember being impressed Equinox with Matthew Modine (remember him?) as twins: stylish and elusive in a modish indie way, even if I'm not sure it meant anything. At the same time, he loved his period drama (The Moderns, and a Dorothy Parker one) as well as his weird fondness for Carradines. He hasn't really worked this millennium according to IMDb.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 16, 2021, 01:47:03 PM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on July 16, 2021, 12:51:38 PM
I really liked it the first time I watched it, probably at the right age for peak cult appreciation, but on subsequent viewing, Kris Kristofferson's character is a total shit. Divine is great though.

Alan Rudolph for a while in the 1980s or 1990s was a big cult director, I don't know if anyone cares about him now. I remember being impressed Equinox with Matthew Modine (remember him?) as twins: stylish and elusive in a modish indie way, even if I'm not sure it meant anything. At the same time, he loved his period drama (The Moderns, and a Dorothy Parker one) as well as his weird fondness for Carradines. He hasn't really worked this millennium according to IMDb.

I remember Empire (back when it was good) being very fond of Rudolph and recommending his films, and I was extremely fond of Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, so it's odd that he worked consistently until 2002 and then there's only one film since then back in 2017. The only thing I've found which is partially an explanation is from this interview with The Guardian in 2018: "By his own account he's never really been any part of the conventional film industry – and he hasn't made a movie since 2002. "If I could use a metaphor," he says of his recent hiatus, "I was promised a few rides and they didn't show up, so I decided to walk. I just got so enamored of the scenery and the pace that I just kept on walking. I started painting about 10 years ago and that kinda consumed my life. I enjoyed it a lot, the creative itch was being scratched, I could finance it on my own, and I didn't have to talk to anyone – those were high priorities at the time."" https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/apr/30/alan-rudolph-film-robert-altman-interview
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 17, 2021, 07:32:47 PM
Delicatessen (1991) - Jeunet and Caro's first film is a low budget post apocalyptic effort which looks stunning, the plot may be a little simplistic as a butcher (Jean-Claude Dreyfus) hires a new employee (a very young looking Dominique Pinon) with the intention of killing him and selling his meat to his tenants, but the plan falls apart when his daughter Julie (Marie-Laure Dougnac) falls in love with him, but it's never less than captivating and is packed with memorable lunacy. 8.2/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 17, 2021, 08:11:50 PM
Delicatessen is one of my favorite films, brilliant French surrealism.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 17, 2021, 08:42:39 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 17, 2021, 08:11:50 PM
Delicatessen is one of my favorite films, brilliant French surrealism.

Likewise, I've a huge amount of love for Jeunet and Caro, and their solo films too, I rewatched City Of Lost Children earlier this year and loved it even more than originally and Amelie is something I adore. I'm nervous about rewatching that though as it has a special place in my heart as when I saw it at the cinema I was really struggling with life, despising the temp job I was doing and being single as well, but when I came out of the cinema that day I was filled with the joys of life and worry that if I don't like it as much a second time round it'll spoil the memory.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 17, 2021, 10:06:15 PM
Micmacs (2009) is worth a punt if you enjoyed Delicatessen. Always seems to be overlooked.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 17, 2021, 10:41:27 PM
Quote from: Blumf on July 17, 2021, 10:06:15 PM
Micmacs (2009) is worth a punt if you enjoyed Delicatessen. Always seems to be overlooked.

It does which is odd as it is really great, I'm also a big fan of the sometimes criticised The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet, and the only Jeunet film I didn't click with was A Very Long Engagement, though I should probably give that another go soon.

Has anyone seen his tv pilot for a Casanova series out of interest? It seems insane that Amazon didn't give it a full series given his status, but I guess it just didn't do that well viewing figures wise.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: badaids on July 18, 2021, 12:03:32 AM
I've just watched The Departed, because I fancied watching a Scorsese film.

De Caprio is good, Damon bland as fuck and Jack Nicholson thinks he's in a pantomime.  The plot gets more preposterous towards the end and some of the acting from the more minor characters is hammy as fuck.  It's not a shite film is it, but it's staggering to think that this film won an Oscar for best picture and Goodfellas didn't. 
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 18, 2021, 03:47:25 PM
The Ugly Dachshund (1966) - When Mark (Dean Jones) and Fran (Suzanne Pleshette) have a Dachshund who gives birth to some puppies they also end up adopting Great Dane Brutus, and then the majority of the film is all of the dogs causing chaos but Brutus being the one who takes the blame. There's some dodgy jokes relating to two Asian characters though otherwise it's a good natured affair, but boy is the plot slight and while mildly amusing it's one for dog lovers only. 6.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 18, 2021, 06:26:20 PM
Pusher II.

Was alright and nice and gritty. I dunno how true to life the series is but it was quite surprising, I guess you get dim criminals and organised crime everywhere but not exactly what you expect from Denmark. Tonny was a complete bellend.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Phoenix Lazarus on July 18, 2021, 06:39:13 PM
Blazing Saddles (1974) and The Producers (1968).  Both of them were excellent.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 18, 2021, 07:01:50 PM
Bicycle Thieves (1948) - Much loved Italian classic where jobs are scarce and a man needs a bicycle to work, but when it's stolen misery follows as he tears around a blood soaked Rome and John Wick style massacres ensue. Oh wait, no, the opposite applies, as he asks some people if they've seen it and then very slowly chases a couple of people around. It's interesting to see the examination of poverty in a post war Italy and the desperation of the men seeking work, as well as the relationship between the lead and his son and the commentary it makes about society, etc, etc, but I struggled with this, perhaps aspects of it went over my head / I'm just not smart enough to really appreciate cinema like this, but I'd be lying if I didn't admit to being really bored at times. 5.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 18, 2021, 09:25:28 PM
Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) - Sequel to the transphobic original which relocates the action to Africa and is extremely questionable when it comes to its treatment of the supposedly primitive tribes, but it's not quite as offensive as the first movie so that's something, maybe? Actually no, as while bar the ending that movie was often quite funny but this is a mixture of lazy catchphrases, tired parodies of various other movies and gross out comedy, though there's still the odd bit of amusing slapstick and silliness such scenes are few and far apart. Oddly while Ventura was eccentric and only vaguely annoying in the first film here he's a right old massive dick, coming across as quite deranged and almost psychotic at times, he may be occasionally funny but mostly is exhausting, while one of the final jokes is Simon Callow being raped by a gorilla, so yeah, this is really quite poor. 4.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 18, 2021, 09:55:43 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 18, 2021, 09:25:28 PM
Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995)

None other than Paul Thomas Anderson said of that the scene where Ace climbs out from the anus of the fake hippo "If I could create just one moment in a movie like that, that would be something."
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 18, 2021, 10:03:13 PM
That bit was quite funny.

I've not seen those films since I was a kid and not sure I really want to revisit them. I remember the second one not being great. I can recall the transphobia of the first, which looking back even from the memory of a child seems pretty bad, but ultimately it was a tighter film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on July 18, 2021, 10:22:37 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 18, 2021, 07:01:50 PM
Bicycle Thieves (1948) - Much loved Italian classic where jobs are scarce and a man needs a bicycle to work, but when it's stolen misery follows as he tears around a blood soaked Rome and John Wick style massacres ensue. Oh wait, no, the opposite applies, as he asks some people if they've seen it and then very slowly chases a couple of people around. It's interesting to see the examination of poverty in a post war Italy and the desperation of the men seeking work, as well as the relationship between the lead and his son and the commentary it makes about society, etc, etc, but I struggled with this, perhaps aspects of it went over my head / I'm just not smart enough to really appreciate cinema like this, but I'd be lying if I didn't admit to being really bored at times. 5.4/10

Yea I fucking hate this film also

Oooh it's a bit poverty is it? Could have still made it interesting!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on July 19, 2021, 03:02:47 AM
Wife made me watch the Downton movie with her.
Spoilera!

The king and queen visit Downton, the royal staff takes over and the downties pull some ruse so they can feed and arsewipe the king themselves. The Irish one stops a bad irish from shooting the king. The gay one goes to a popup gay rave and the rozzers round them all up. A gay from the king's crew bails him out and gives him the zecret gay handshake and they kiss.  Granny might die some day soonish but don't make a fuss about it..
Tiny Tim says 'God bless us all, everyone'
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 19, 2021, 08:56:24 AM
Another Spaghetti Western, another with Van Cleef, this time Day of Anger. It's quite good - slightly-too-lose story but the "gunman's apprentice" narrative was fun, and the soundtrack in particular is a standout (also the opening titles!).

Also watched The Believer, with Ryan Gosling playing a neo-Nazi Jew (based on a real-life person). Really well done in certain moments, never quite goes to the core of the character but it serves for an interesting character study nonetheless.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Chedney Honks on July 19, 2021, 09:08:15 AM
Adventures in Babysitting

One of my wife's favourite movies from her childhood and I thought it held up really well as a textbook Chris Colombus romp, minus the 'homo' punchline. Elisabeth Shue is fantastic, I always adored her since Karate Kid. Need to watch some of her more serious roles. She's funny and a great physical actress but she also manages to bring some element of grounded plight to what is largely a suburban whites in the urban jungle farce. Sweet and quite funny. Some likeable performances from the young cast.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on July 19, 2021, 10:59:02 AM
Quote from: Chedney Honks on July 19, 2021, 09:08:15 AM
Adventures in Babysitting

One of my wife's favourite movies from her childhood and I thought it held up really well as a textbook Chris Colombus romp, minus the 'homo' punchline. Elisabeth Shue is fantastic, I always adored her since Karate Kid. Need to watch some of her more serious roles. She's funny and a great physical actress but she also manages to bring some element of grounded plight to what is largely a suburban whites in the urban jungle farce. Sweet and quite funny. Some likeable performances from the young cast.

Yeah that's a pretty good one, I also like Shue a lot and will sit through the likes of Hollow Man to enjoy her. Still looks amazing for pushing 60. I recall it was renamed A Night on the Town when it was originally released in the UK, no idea why

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1351/2613/products/IMG_2719.jpg?v=1472914526)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 19, 2021, 11:02:53 AM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on July 18, 2021, 09:55:43 PM
None other than Paul Thomas Anderson said of that the scene where Ace climbs out from the anus of the fake hippo "If I could create just one moment in a movie like that, that would be something."

Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 18, 2021, 10:03:13 PM
That bit was quite funny.

I've not seen those films since I was a kid and not sure I really want to revisit them. I remember the second one not being great. I can recall the transphobia of the first, which looking back even from the memory of a child seems pretty bad, but ultimately it was a tighter film.

The fake hippo bit is grotesque but very funny, and easily the highlight so I can sort of see where Anderson was coming from. And yeah, bar the horrible ending the first film is pretty funny throughout, but the second film (which Carrey only did as he was contractually obliged and now hates, apparently) really is weak bar the occasional scene.

Quote from: PlanktonSideburns on July 18, 2021, 10:22:37 PM
Yea I fucking hate this film also

Oooh it's a bit poverty is it? Could have still made it interesting!

The frustrating part for me is that it starts really well and ends strongly too, but there's about half an hour of them looking at bike parts and wandering around the city looking surly that I found beyond dull, though it's more than possible I missed something when it comes to the intentions of such scenes.

Quote from: Chedney Honks on July 19, 2021, 09:08:15 AM
Adventures in Babysitting

One of my wife's favourite movies from her childhood and I thought it held up really well as a textbook Chris Colombus romp, minus the 'homo' punchline. Elisabeth Shue is fantastic, I always adored her since Karate Kid. Need to watch some of her more serious roles. She's funny and a great physical actress but she also manages to bring some element of grounded plight to what is largely a suburban whites in the urban jungle farce. Sweet and quite funny. Some likeable performances from the young cast.

I've not seen that since I was a teenager but I was a big fan as well and rented it at least three times from the local video shop.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 19, 2021, 01:14:47 PM
The Hebrew Hammer. Sorely disappointed - the opening couple of scenes were superb and there was a smattering of decent gags throughout but overall really quite mediocre and lacking in energy.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 19, 2021, 01:22:07 PM
Quote from: El Unicornio, mang on July 19, 2021, 10:59:02 AM
I recall it was renamed A Night on the Town when it was originally released in the UK, no idea why

As a guess, because there was a series of sex-comedy films with the title form of "Adventures of..."?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_a_Taxi_Driver
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on July 19, 2021, 01:40:14 PM
Makes sense, "babysitter" is a porn sub-genre as well (apparently).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 19, 2021, 02:36:54 PM
Watched A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night 'cos it was leaving Mubi. Should've watched it earlier so I could watch it again before it left really. Was decent.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 19, 2021, 06:58:17 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 19, 2021, 02:36:54 PM
Watched A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night 'cos it was leaving Mubi. Should've watched it earlier so I could watch it again before it left really. Was decent.

I'm a big fan of it too, was very atmospheric and stylishly made.

Howard Lovecraft And The Frozen Kingdom (2016) - From director Sean Patrick O'Reilly and starring Kiefer O'Reilly, Michelle O'Reilly, Summer O'Reilly, Phoenix O'Reilly, Harmony O'Reilly and Christopher Plummer O'Reilly (okay, fine, that last one is actually the well known actor Christopher Plummer, but he's barely in it) comes this hilariously naff kids film where a very young Howard travels to a different dimension, a strange frozen world where he meets Cthulhu, saves his life, and then befriends him, calling him Spot for the rest of the movie. The animation is similar to a PS2 cut scene, the dialogue clumsy at best, the action scenes bland, and this really is awful stuff, a 3.0/10 movie at best, except that it's terribleness made me laugh a lot so I'd rate it 6.0/10 if you're interested in Lovecraft and seeing his work made really quite embarrassingly silly, and there's two more in the series and I'll definitely watch them sooner or later, as I'm intrigued to see if they're somehow worse.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 19, 2021, 08:58:32 PM
A Mighty Wind (2003) - Another musical mockumentary from Christopher Guest, though this time it's folk music he casts his eye over as there's a mix of talking heads, supposedly archive footage and a slight plot where a selection of musicians are coming together to pay tribute to their recently deceased manager. Packed with quirky characters it's once again very strong material with some superb songs, it's not as good as Tap but is better than Guffman. 7.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 19, 2021, 11:58:50 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 19, 2021, 02:36:54 PM
Watched A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night 'cos it was leaving Mubi. Should've watched it earlier so I could watch it again before it left really. Was decent.

One of the only films I ever saw in cinemas twice during its initial run. Really quite singular stuff.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on July 20, 2021, 11:55:57 AM
Let It Ride

Richard Dreyfuss is an ex-alcoholic gambler who receives a tip-off from a recording his taxi driving friend (David Johansen) covertly makes of two drunk gangsters/businessmen saying how their horse is guaranteed to win.

The horse wins. He wins a lot of money. The rest of the film is him betting his winnings for the rest of the day. I was waiting for a fall that never comes. It was weird.

The best part was when the bookie (played by Robbie Coltrane) arranges for one of the security staff to look after Dreyfuss. They walk into a dingy bar so he can make a call and the guard starts a strange speech about how his eyes are all peripheral vision.

Also Meg Tilly is in it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 20, 2021, 02:14:18 PM
The Three Caballeros (1944) - Donald Duck gets a bunch of presents for his birthday, all of which is a very minor framing device where Donald watches some cartoons (including a penguin who wanted to move somewhere hotter and one where a boy discovers a flying donkey) and meets some folks from South America that leads to a mix of live action and animation where Donald is very horny for a dancing woman and later on some girls on a beach. There's also a couple of songs and towards the end Donald is a bigger part of the action, including the big finale which is a bizarre psychedelic fever dream that made me love the movie a lot. I had to put subtitles on to understand some of Donald's idiocy and it's a shame it wasn't as insane as the ending is all the way through, but I'm much fonder of it than I thought I'd be. Also, what I can only presume happened in 1943: Disney Executive 1: The kids love Donald Duck, but how can we make him even funnier? Disney Executive 2: How about we make him a disturbing sex pest who chases screaming bikini clad women around? Disney Executive 1: Of course! Why didn't I think of that! 7.5/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 20, 2021, 08:37:02 PM
I've always been curious about that one and now I'm very intrigued about the 'bizarre psychedelic fever dream' finale. I couldn't resist anything with that description.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 20, 2021, 08:41:16 PM
Quote from: Egyptian Feast on July 20, 2021, 08:37:02 PM
I've always been curious about that one and now I'm very intrigued about the 'bizarre psychedelic fever dream' finale. I couldn't resist anything with that description.

It's so strange as the first half of the movie is quite conventional, but then it's like they decided to change the movie completely, there's the odd average bit (one song isn't all that and I'm a huge musicals fan), but then out of the blue you get moments like this:

(https://i.imgur.com/AXnOxWI.jpg)

Seeing Donald being a sex pest is bizarre too, yet weirdly funny.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: samadriel on July 21, 2021, 06:20:55 AM
I don't know where I got ahold of that movie back then (maybe it was on Saturday Disney and I just remembered it thereafter), but I loved The Three Caballeros as a wee one. I thought the cowboy rooster was really cool.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 21, 2021, 10:52:16 AM
love Bicycle Thieves. shame.

saw Local Hero at the cinema last night. always suspicious of 'the magic of cinema' and worry about leaning toward cosy Brit nostalgia as some bulwark against violently hating Marvel shite and Netflix shite and expensive prestige shite, but this is a great film.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on July 21, 2021, 12:49:06 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 20, 2021, 02:14:18 PM
The Three Caballeros (1944)
Awww, man! Loved that film when I was a nipper. I remember finding it hilarious when the bikini girls turned up. Now I realise Donald was a sex pest. Cancelled.

Hang 'Em High - 1968 Apparently Clint's first leading role in a Hollywood film? And apparently based on fact.
Mweh. Not much went on really in this vigilante type film. Don't remember much in the way of gun fights, co0nsidering this was a western? I gave it 2/5.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 21, 2021, 04:04:52 PM
Quote from: sevendaughters on July 21, 2021, 10:52:16 AM
love Bicycle Thieves. shame.

Given that it's an acclaimed classic and loved by many I'm probably in the wrong, or wasn't in the right mood to watch it, and maybe I'll give it another go in a couple of years to see if I fare any better with it.

Little Murders (1971) - I'm pretty sure someone posted about this recently but a quick search has failed me. Anyhow, Patsy (Marcia Rodd) saves Alfred (Elliot Gould) from being mugged, only to end up being attacked herself as he walks away, yet the two bond and are soon married. Along the way we're introduced to her bizarre family including Dad Carol (Little Shop Of Horror's Vincent Gardenia) and mother (Elizabeth Wilson), a ranty judge (Lou Jacobi), a minister (Donald Sutherland, awesome) and Alfred's intellectual parents. It's bleak as hell, has a lot to say about a number of subjects including the state of America and the state of humanity, and is a pretty stunning piece of cinema packed with unforgettable performances and very funny monologues. 8.2/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on July 21, 2021, 06:19:06 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 21, 2021, 04:04:52 PM
Given that it's an acclaimed classic and loved by many I'm probably in the wrong, or wasn't in the right mood to watch it, and maybe I'll give it another go in a couple of years to see if I fare any better with it.



No no, you hated it and everyone who likes it is a deeply flawed and hideous person let's not backtrack
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 21, 2021, 08:12:48 PM
Quote from: PlanktonSideburns on July 21, 2021, 06:19:06 PM
No no, you hated it and everyone who likes it is a deeply flawed and hideous person let's not backtrack

Ah, alright then, as it's you.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: greenman on July 21, 2021, 08:31:12 PM
Moscow On The Hudson from 1984, early Robin Williams film role as a sax playign Russian defector but actually rather less broad than I expected, as much gritty drama as it is fish out of water comedy which I spose makes sense with Paul Mazursky directing. Rare kind of halfway performance from Williams as well between the more subtle and the manic.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PlanktonSideburns on July 21, 2021, 08:37:43 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 21, 2021, 08:12:48 PM
Ah, alright then, as it's you.

Yes!!

IN YOUR FACE AZIZ ANSARI
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 21, 2021, 09:48:31 PM
new threads for independent/European films seem to die on their arse so I will just say I went to the cinema to watch Another Round and thought it was a well-made and nuanced film about 4 blokes 'scientifically' seeing if getting blotto will improve their dull bourgeois sexless lives. Not a mind-blower but above cinema's recent batting average.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 21, 2021, 09:55:56 PM
I've got that in the chute, mate recommended it and saw good things when following up on that. Will report back.

Recently as probably drip fed in here that I watched the Pusher trilogy which apparently launched Mikkelson's career. It's probably not a good starting point if you like him as he plays a complete dickhead and definitely isn't the best thing about what is otherwise a good seedy crime series.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 22, 2021, 01:49:15 AM
Forgot to post this a couple of days ago:

An Unmarried Woman. Really fantastic portrait of a woman (Jill Clayburgh) whose husband leaves her which urges her to reevaluate and relearn what it means to be an individual human being and a single woman. It's all told in a really frank and refreshing way, I liked it quite a lot. Alan Bates and Michael Murphy feature in the supporting cast; directed by Paul Mazursky.

EDIT: did not see greenman's post about Moscow on the Hudson, but SNAP Mazursky!

To Dust. Charming, poignant little comedy-drama you might call it about an Orthodox Jewish widower (Son of Saul's Géza Röhrig) who becomes obsessed with the concept of his late wife's body decaying in the ground and seeks out the help of a community college biology professor (played by Matthew Broderick for some reason).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 22, 2021, 08:49:13 AM
A Stranger Among Us. Sidney Lumet undercover cop drama with Melanie Griffith going into an Orthodox Jewish community to investigate a disappearance. Feels rather flat? clunky?, and Griffith is either not the right choice or doesn't play it fittingly, though not quite as dire as I thought. There's some interesting scenes in it but overall a bit of a misfire.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 22, 2021, 01:35:35 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 22, 2021, 08:49:13 AM
A Stranger Among Us. Sidney Lumet undercover cop drama with Melanie Griffith going into an Orthodox Jewish community to investigate a disappearance. Feels rather flat? clunky?, and Griffith is either not the right choice or doesn't play it fittingly, though not quite as dire as I thought. There's some interesting scenes in it but overall a bit of a misfire.
Not seen this, but for some reason Melanie Griffith went through a misjudged period of Jewish cinema in the early 90s, also playing a Jewish WW2 undercover agent in the even more reviled Shining Through (which Ebert found slightly improbable (https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/shining-through-1992) but is still kind of fun). Both films were have gone down in history for their awfulness. Jay Boyar (https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:SetwySAEzSIJ:https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-1992-07-17-9207160850-story.html+&cd=21&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk) wrote of ASAU under the headline "Melanie Griffith - An Odd Choice...":
QuoteWhen Griffith tries to speak in the crude manner of a streetwise cop, her baby-doll voice turns the words into strained peaches. And while she's capable of projecting the wounded quality that the role demands, she's completely unconvincing when it comes to conveying a detective's intelligence. (And it's not that she's attractive: The role would be well within range for Annabella Sciorra, say, or Christine Lahti.)
Not very nice. Griffith seemed to be a punching bag for male critics (https://lebeauleblog.com/2015/10/30/melanie-griffith-dark-side-of-the-moon/). But was she as bad as they said, or did they just distrust any woman with the mannerisms of Betty Boop?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Inspector Norse on July 22, 2021, 06:58:27 PM
Quote from: sevendaughters on July 21, 2021, 09:48:31 PM
new threads for independent/European films seem to die on their arse so I will just say I went to the cinema to watch Another Round and thought it was a well-made and nuanced film about 4 blokes 'scientifically' seeing if getting blotto will improve their dull bourgeois sexless lives. Not a mind-blower but above cinema's recent batting average.

Watched that a while ago and thought it was a well-made and well-acted drama but was so determinedly ambiguous - so steadfast in its refusal to make any judgment about drinking amd its effects - that it kind of rendered itself irrelevant and ultimately pointless.

Happy to contribute to any threads that do pop up on Euro indie cinema as that makes up 50% of my film viewing. Been living in a hut with no Internet for nearly 3 weeks so itching to get back home and watch some people talking French on shakycam.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 22, 2021, 07:09:13 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on July 22, 2021, 06:58:27 PM
Watched that a while ago and thought it was a well-made and well-acted drama but was so determinedly ambiguous - so steadfast in its refusal to make any judgment about drinking amd its effects - that it kind of rendered itself irrelevant and ultimately pointless.

Happy to contribute to any threads that do pop up on Euro indie cinema as that makes up 50% of my film viewing. Been living in a hut with no Internet for nearly 3 weeks so itching to get back home and watch some people talking French on shakycam.

There's a very short thread about it here: https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php/topic,84501.msg4428121.html#msg4428121

Oddly it didn't come up via a CaB google search though, and I only found it as I remember Noodle Lizard started it, I'm not sure why but the site:www.cookdandbombd.co.uk "another round" search method seems very patchy of late.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 22, 2021, 08:31:55 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on July 22, 2021, 06:58:27 PM
Watched that a while ago and thought it was a well-made and well-acted drama but was so determinedly ambiguous - so steadfast in its refusal to make any judgment about drinking amd its effects - that it kind of rendered itself irrelevant and ultimately pointless.

Indeed and because of this I started to think what else it might be about and took a step back; it feels a little more satisfying when I think about the film as the circle of bourgeois indoctrinations, the pairing of traits between older men and younger people and their discrete pressures seemed to be suggesting a connection that was more interesting than lol get pissed destroy life get in water
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 22, 2021, 08:58:49 PM
Imitation Of Life (1934) - A sort of strange mix of rom-com, buddy pic and serious drama as after Delilah (Louise Beavers) is employed by Bea (Claudette Colbert) as her maid the two bond and open a pancake restaurant together. It touches on the difficulties Delilah has to deal with as a black woman, while Delilah's daughter Peola (Fredi Washington) can pass for white and is ashamed of the way her mother looks, but the rom-com element is a large part of it as when Bea falls for the fish expert Stephen Archer (Warren William) her daughter Jessie (Rochelle Hudson) ends up wanting to stick her tongue down his throat as well. It's an odd mix, sometimes light and frothy, sometimes more serious and didactic, the points it makes are sensitively dealt with but as a whole like it should have dealt with the racial themes in more depth (though it appears it didn't partially because of the Hays Code and the obnoxious shits rejecting elements of the script), though the ending at least is quite powerful. 6.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 22, 2021, 09:10:34 PM
the Sirk remake is very good, better probably
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 22, 2021, 09:17:33 PM
Quote from: sevendaughters on July 22, 2021, 09:10:34 PM
the Sirk remake is very good, better probably

That's interesting to hear, I'll definitely give that a shot sometime soon then.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 23, 2021, 02:00:26 AM
Quote from: dissolute ocelot on July 22, 2021, 01:35:35 PM
Not very nice. Griffith seemed to be a punching bag for male critics (https://lebeauleblog.com/2015/10/30/melanie-griffith-dark-side-of-the-moon/). But was she as bad as they said, or did they just distrust any woman with the mannerisms of Betty Boop?

Hmm I'm not sure - she was really good in Something Wild and Cecil B. Demented but those were larger-than-life characters so maybe that's her jam? Body Double too I suppose.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 23, 2021, 05:01:02 AM
Watched another 90s Lumet cop drama, this one heaps better: Night Falls on Manhattan. Andy García plays a lawyer who eventually climbs to the position of DA (as opposed to what most synopses say which is "newly-elected" - he doesn't get elected until an hour in) and gets a bit out of his depth with police corruption - his father is also a police officer and that starts to complicate things when certain implications come to the surface (played oddly enough by Ian Holm - he's great in this but just seems a bit strangely matched). Richard Dreyfuss and James Gandolfini appear in the supporting cast. Works really well, quite strong narrative and characterisations.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on July 23, 2021, 09:40:20 AM
Overnight

A documentary (made at the time) of the "overnight" sensation that was Troy Duffy. Need I say more?





I do need.

His debut script "The Boondock Saints" was "discovered" by Harvey Weinstein and he was given a truckload of $$$ to make it. He took too long and was too much of a dick to everyone and was dropped by Miramax. This film shows how to fuck up in Hollywood. Highlights include him pronouncing "Branagh" (as in Kenneth) several different ways, badmouthing Keanu Reeves and Ethan Hawke in the same sentence and his band (who are going to do the soundtrack to "The Boondock Saints") who are piss weak all-Americun white collar rawk and seemingly all drunks who hate each other.

The one moment of levity is brought by Billy Connolly gamely acting up for the documentary crew a few times.

From the few scenes shown in the documentary, "The Boondock Saints" itself, looks to be sub-Tarantino balls. Maybe I'll watch it next week to confirm. 
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 23, 2021, 09:49:56 AM
It's a total piece of shit, as is the sequel. Fascist Plastic Paddy power fantasy bollocks. Dafoe just about makes it watchable, but the making of is much more entertaining.

It's definitely worth a watch now you've seen what a prick the director is.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 23, 2021, 10:30:34 AM
C.H.U.D. (1984) - This is the sort of film that has slightly become part of wider culture: I'm not sure if it invented the idea of evil sewer mutants but it gave them an acronym. It wasn't really what I was expecting: I thought it would be some ultra-low-budget horror comedy, but it's actually played seriously with decent production values and some attempt at real world issues around toxic waste disposal, as well as villains in rubber suits. There are horror moments, but not enough to be seriously scary. Despite not being a comedy, there is some humour, notably from Daniel Stern (later Marv in Home Alone). There are a lot of characters, so it's lucky there's a strong, very 80s cast too with John Heard, Kim Greist (Brazil), and lots of New York cop types including Christopher Curry and briefly a young John Goodman. And it manages a reasonably sympathetic portrayal of homeless characters.

There are also a lot of moments for the "Film cliches you want to fuck off" thread, right from the start, where Heard refuses to answer his phone and lets it go to answerphone to show he lives by his own rules, but when it rings 5 minutes later picks it straight up. Also does that fun thing where you get to see an entire team be slaughtered via their own video link, for example. The relationship between Heard's photographer and Greist's model is a steaming pile of cliche, while the cops and conspiracies are straight out of a million other films and TV shows. Still, there's a lot happening, no sitting around, and it's good fun, particularly Stern. Included with Amazon Prime.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 23, 2021, 11:29:13 AM
The Case Against Brooklyn. Tight crime noir about a cop who goes undercover trying to unveil a syndicate of cops on the take from bookies. Last act is particularly solid.

Top of the Heap. Christopher St. John writes, directs, produces and stars in this angsty, gritty, slightly surreal account of a black cop. Seems messy at times and I do wish it had more on the ground depictions of what it is that makes his feelings of struggle so potent - but it's really singular and the general distress shines through strongly.

Quote from: dissolute ocelot on July 23, 2021, 10:30:34 AM
C.H.U.D. (1984) - This is the sort of film that has slightly become part of wider culture: I'm not sure if it invented the idea of evil sewer mutants but it gave them an acronym. It wasn't really what I was expecting: I thought it would be some ultra-low-budget horror comedy, but it's actually played seriously with decent production values and some attempt at real world issues around toxic waste disposal, as well as villains in rubber suits.

I had the same expectation and response!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on July 23, 2021, 02:48:15 PM
I've never seen CHUD, but the trailer must have been on some film we watched more than once in the 80s, because the VO saying 'CHUD - Cannibalistic Humanoid Underground Dwellers' has always stuck in my mind. I wonder what film it was.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 23, 2021, 03:56:59 PM
The Invisible Man (1933) - aka The Invisible Bastard, as after coming up with a serum to turn himself invisible there's a side effect Jack Griffin (Claude Rains) didn't expect - he's now a right old fucking mad man and then some. At first as he tries to perfect a formula to turn him visible again he's only surly and pushy, but
Spoiler alert
when kicked out of the room he's working in he turns psychotic, killing and murdering and causing horrendous train accidents and often singing gleefully post violence. This is an absolute delight, an extremely tight, lean number without an ounce of flab, and watching Rains fuck about while invisible is never less than extremely entertaining, the effects are impressive for their day, and it doesn't outstay it's welcome once the inevitably tragic ending
[close]
occurs. 8.4/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PeasOnSticks on July 23, 2021, 06:26:21 PM
Brief Encounter (1945)

This had somehow evaded me all these years - finally watched it the other night. Amazing performance from Celia Johnson carries the film - I found myself falling for her a bit as it went on, which made the somewhat shady Trevor Howard character easier to empathise with. Noel Coward's dialogue not as stilted as I thought it might be. Some great lines: 'Still, she meant to be kind. lsn't it awful about people meaning to be kind?'

It has a dark psychological edge which I wasn't expecting - Johnson's character backs out of a suicide attempt at the last minute. Cyril Raymond as Johnson's husband is convincingly solid, kind-hearted, yet disinterested. The settings are great for a bit of escapism - the station buffet, a smoky restaurant, a cinema complete with organ rising from the depths. There are some interludes with Stanley Holloway that seem a bit shoe-horned in to add a bit of levity - would have been interesting if they'd gone the whole way down the desire/guilt/anxiety route without that.

I read a Criterion essay on the film having watched it, and a good point was made about the Trevor Howard character: there's nothing to suggest he isn't a serial seducer of women, such is the weight given to Johnson's character's interpretation of events. And it's true, Howard's character is left open enough to have just about any motive attributed to him - and played by Howard with more than a hint of calculation.

Second David Lean film I've seen, after 'Summertime,' which is also great: Katherine Hepburn in a study of loneliness and longing in Venice. For some reason, have never been tempted by Lean's epics. Will give 'This Happy Breed' a go next, I think.

Any Lean recommendations from you good people?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 23, 2021, 07:22:25 PM
Quote from: PeasOnSticks on July 23, 2021, 06:26:21 PM
Any Lean recommendations from you good people?

Without being blase, most of his stuff has something good about it. Well, maybe not his propaganda piece In Which We Serve, but it was his first go.

Blithe Spirit is the current hip choice of his filmography, and it stands out as the weirdest and least obviously in line with a particular brand of English stoicism as it is more about the occult. I like it, but maybe not as much as the classic bumache rainy Christmas trilogy of Kwai, Lawrence, and Zhivago. Epics with a sense of humanity in each. I also quite like A Passage to India, though some find it a bit arid.

Brief Encounter is probably the most well-wrought in many respects.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 23, 2021, 09:20:51 PM
Quote from: PeasOnSticks on July 23, 2021, 06:26:21 PM
Any Lean recommendations from you good people?

Check out Hobson's Choice. It's a corker.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 23, 2021, 09:34:15 PM
I can't remember who it was (it MIGHT have been Noel Coward), or the exact quote, but when asked about their opinion of Lean they said something along the lines of "as a director he's a wonderful logistics manager".

I think Kwai is brilliant and his best film, Arabia very very good but doesn't quite live up to its iconic status, and Zhivago looks amazing but is so swoony and melodramatic that it feels like a soap opera that should have been made at least 10 years before.  Ryan's Daughter is underrated, but its parts are better than its whole and many people watching it for the first time these days will find John Mills' performance...troubling.  Brief Encounter might be the most British film ever made, but pretty much every romantic drama owes at least a bit of a debt to it.  A Passage To India is a bit of a patchwork.  Blithe Spirit is indeed atypical Lean of any period.

With the exception of Brief Encounter and Blithe Spirit, I've not seen any of his pre-Kwai films for years, but I still seem to remember Hobson's Choice having a lot of shonky northern accents.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 23, 2021, 09:35:47 PM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on July 23, 2021, 09:20:51 PM
Check out Hobson's Choice. It's a corker.

Second that
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 24, 2021, 07:06:48 AM
One of those "finally" watches: Training Day. It's really quite good - shot well, good performances, some excellent tension. Final act left a bit to be desired, though, started getting a little "plot device"-y. But I liked it and I'm glad I finally got to see it.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on July 24, 2021, 12:25:16 PM
Quote from: PeasOnSticks on July 23, 2021, 06:26:21 PM
Brief Encounter (1945)

Any Lean recommendations from you good people?

Sofia Coppola picked this as one of her all time favourites on one of those BBC things. Still haven't watched it but will soon.

A Passage to India is a David Lean one I really like, also watched Lawrence of Arabia recently for the first time and agree with all the plaudits it received. Some truly breathtaking shots.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: dissolute ocelot on July 24, 2021, 02:19:53 PM
Quote from: PeasOnSticks on July 23, 2021, 06:26:21 PM
Any Lean recommendations from you good people?
His film of Great Expectations is very good, probably the best version. He also did Oliver Twist which is more problematic owing to antisemitism (a very young Alec Guinness bizarrely cast as Fagin under a ton of prosthetics) but apart from that a great cast and wonderful-looking black and white. (BTW, I think Great Expectations works well in adaptation because it's a rather odd, rather slight novel, while Oliver Twist is so melodramatic it's exciting to read but risks being ridiculous when dramatised.)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 24, 2021, 03:34:59 PM
Best In Show (2000) - If you've got a good formula why mess with I suppose as Guest is back with another mockumentary and most of the same cast of his previous films, with the setting this time being a dog show. Unfortunately I thought it was fairly weak, perhaps it's due to having seen Tap, Guffman and Wind recently but I felt it paled in comparison, there's some decent gags but I didn't connect with many of the characters in the way I did with the other films, and was actively annoyed by some. 5.4/10

Also, after watching so much of his work I do wonder why Christopher Guest only casts white people in the main roles, I know Nina Conti was in Family Tree and the cast of Mascots is a little more diverse, but it does seem a little weird to me how white his best known films are.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 24, 2021, 04:29:17 PM
Everyone in that was unlikable apart from Harlan Pepper who was just a nice man.

I do quite like it though. I think some of this preference depends on what order you view the stuff in as the formula is the same as you say.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: PeasOnSticks on July 24, 2021, 04:58:01 PM
Thanks for the David Lean recommendations, everyone. Will get on them.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: olliebean on July 24, 2021, 05:39:10 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 24, 2021, 03:34:59 PMAlso, after watching so much of his work I do wonder why Christopher Guest only casts white people in the main roles, I know Nina Conti was in Family Tree and the cast of Mascots is a little more diverse, but it does seem a little weird to me how white his best known films are.

Nina Conti is white, isn't she?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: St_Eddie on July 24, 2021, 06:58:03 PM
Quote from: olliebean on July 24, 2021, 05:39:10 PM
Nina Conti is white, isn't she?

She is.  No idea what Small Man Big Horse was on about there.  Perhaps he was referring to the Native American heritage of her puppet...

(https://i.imgur.com/nhTVqyT.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 24, 2021, 07:16:39 PM
The Guard (2011), fairly basic comedy film that should be shit but is made hilarious by Cheadle and Gleeson, some dodgy/crass jokes in it but hit the spot on a lazy afternoon where I didn't really want to think.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: mothman on July 24, 2021, 07:56:55 PM
I watched Hunt For The Wilderpeople, and enjoyed it muchly. Now keen to go back to NZ soonish. Which realistically means 2-3 years at this point.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 24, 2021, 09:52:48 PM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 24, 2021, 04:29:17 PM
Everyone in that was unlikable apart from Harlan Pepper who was just a nice man.

I do quite like it though. I think some of this preference depends on what order you view the stuff in as the formula is the same as you say.

I quite liked Michael McKean and Eugene Levy's characters too, but yeah otherwise they're all pretty hideous.

And I had seen it once before when it first came out and liked it then, so I think it definitely does depend on how familiar you are with Guest's other films.

Quote from: olliebean on July 24, 2021, 05:39:10 PM
Nina Conti is white, isn't she?

Quote from: St_Eddie on July 24, 2021, 06:58:03 PM
She is.  No idea what Small Man Big Horse was on about there.  Perhaps he was referring to the Native American heritage of her puppet...

(https://i.imgur.com/nhTVqyT.jpg)

Ah, yeah, not sure what I was thinking there. Which makes Guest even more of a racist. Or me. But it's probably him.

Quote from: mothman on July 24, 2021, 07:56:55 PM
I watched Hunt For The Wilderpeople, and enjoyed it muchly. Now keen to go back to NZ soonish. Which realistically means 2-3 years at this point.

I love that film to pieces, and think it's easily Waititi's best.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: mjwilson on July 24, 2021, 10:47:01 PM
Quote from: Inspector Norse on July 22, 2021, 06:58:27 PM
Watched that a while ago and thought it was a well-made and well-acted drama but was so determinedly ambiguous - so steadfast in its refusal to make any judgment about drinking amd its effects - that it kind of rendered itself irrelevant and ultimately pointless.

I mean it's basically the Simpsons quote "Alcohol, the solution to, and cause of, all life's problems" in 90 minutes.

I thought it was terrific. I don't see why it should make a judgment about the effects of drinking, it puts them up there on screen for you.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 24, 2021, 10:52:30 PM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 19, 2021, 08:58:32 PM
A Mighty Wind (2003) - Another musical mockumentary from Christopher Guest, though this time it's folk music he casts his eye over as there's a mix of talking heads, supposedly archive footage and a slight plot where a selection of musicians are coming together to pay tribute to their recently deceased manager. Packed with quirky characters it's once again very strong material with some superb songs, it's not as good as Tap but is better than Guffman. 7.6/10

Guest's pronunciations of 'well' and 'there's' in the song 'Old Joe's Place' bump my enjoyment of this up an entire star.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Blumf on July 25, 2021, 01:29:54 AM
The Front (1976)
A film starring, but not directed by, Woody Allen, also Zero Mostel and a bunch of other blacklisted people.
A 1950's deadbeat gets roped into pretending to be a writer for his Hollywood blacklisted friend.

Considering that many people involved in making this, including the writer and the director, were themselves blacklisted, it quite a light take on the subject. You aren't hit over the head with the details and background to the McCarthyism craze. Instead we have a fairly gentle, not quite farce, but light drama, where Allen's character bluffs his way through script writing duties, whilst enjoying his cut from the pay, and getting into a relationship with his show's script editor. The story doesn't shy away from some of the consequences of blacklisting, but it never feels that hard, even
Spoiler alert
with a (based on a real incident) suicide
[close]
. Quite surprising really.

Another down mark is, it doesn't really feel like the 1950s, can't put my finger on it, but the film just feels like the 1970s it was made in.

All that said, if you like Allen or Mostel, you're going to have a decent time. I see it gets ~70% reviews, and I think that's fair.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 25, 2021, 02:43:38 AM
Quote from: Sebastian Cobb on July 24, 2021, 07:16:39 PM
The Guard (2011), fairly basic comedy film that should be shit but is made hilarious by Cheadle and Gleeson, some dodgy/crass jokes in it but hit the spot on a lazy afternoon where I didn't really want to think.

I remember seeing this in a cinema and having a great time. The Other McDonagh's best, I think he went downhill from there (haven't seen War on Everyone but haven't heard great things - and Calvary didn't do much for me).
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: famethrowa on July 25, 2021, 11:48:58 AM
Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on July 19, 2021, 08:58:32 PM
A Mighty Wind (2003) - Another musical mockumentary from Christopher Guest, though this time it's folk music he casts his eye over as there's a mix of talking heads, supposedly archive footage and a slight plot where a selection of musicians are coming together to pay tribute to their recently deceased manager. Packed with quirky characters it's once again very strong material with some superb songs, it's not as good as Tap but is better than Guffman. 7.6/10

Speaking of which, I had a glance at a concert on TV by original folkies The Seekers. The 3 chaps did a little song without the lady singer, and it looked (and sounded) amusingly familiar:

(https://i.imgur.com/ClQ6Nqy.jpg)

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 25, 2021, 03:40:18 PM
The Invisible Man Returns (1940) - It's nine years on from the first film and Sir Geoffrey Radcliffe (Vincent Price) is due to be executed for a murder he didn't commit - but after a visit from Frank Griffin (John Sutton), the brother of the original invisible man, Geoffrey mysteriously disappears and Scotland Yard are now on the case and trying to find him. Geoffrey is terrified that he'll go insane in the same way Jack did, while Frank is desperately working on an antidote that'll hopefully make Geoffrey visible again,  which involves killing a lot killing a lot of guinea pigs so it might be worth avoiding if you love the little furry bastards.. The film doesn't become really fun until about half way through when good old Geoffrey starts going a bit crazy, and though it has a couple of fun set pieces and the effects are decent enough, it's nowhere near as enjoyable as the 1933 film and the body count is much, much lower too sadly. 6.1/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: monkfromhavana on July 25, 2021, 04:16:22 PM
I've never seen Silence of the Lambs, or ready any of the books, and last night my other half persuaded me to watch Red Dragon. It was OK, apart from the predictable
Spoiler alert
"the killer is going to come for my family"
[close]
bit at the end. Perhaps I expected too much of the film, but it just seemed like a well made, run-of-the mill thriller to me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: McChesney Duntz on July 25, 2021, 04:34:06 PM
Manhunter is much better. Watch that.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Egyptian Feast on July 25, 2021, 04:42:47 PM
Quote from: monkfromhavana on July 25, 2021, 04:16:22 PM
I've never seen Silence of the Lambs, or ready any of the books, and last night my other half persuaded me to watch Red Dragon. It was OK, apart from the predictable
Spoiler alert
"the killer is going to come for my family"
[close]
bit at the end. Perhaps I expected too much of the film, but it just seemed like a well made, run-of-the mill thriller to me.

I prefer the ending of Manhunter where
Spoiler alert
Dolarhyde puts on 'In A Gadda Da Vida' to kill his girlfriend to and Graham crashes through the window when the song kicks in again after all the soloing and puts the fucker on ice. I saw it on Moviedrome around the time Lambs came out, thought that bit was cool as fuck and repeatedly copied it, crashing through the open patio door whenever I was over at my friend's house.
[close]
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 25, 2021, 09:19:26 PM
Yep, definitely watch Manhunter.  Red Dragon is dogshit.

I'm no fan of Lambs either.  It's great if you like your psychopaths and serial killers as laughable panto dames.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 26, 2021, 06:34:15 PM
The Invisible Woman (1940) - The third in Universal's Invisible series, this time they decide to play it for laughs and feature all new characters, as playboy Dick Russell (John Howard) normally funds the work of mad scientist Professor Gibbs (John Barrymore) but has run out of money. Gibbs thinks all of Russell's problems are over with however as he's come up with a machine to make people invisible, though after placing an advert in the paper for a victim to try it out on he's surprised when a woman called Kitty (Virginia Bruce) turns up. It's a mixture of screwball comedy and slapstick from here on, and there's also a subplot about gangsters wanting the machine, in what's a smart, fun comedy with some extremely strong dialogue, Barrymore and Bruce are both superb, and it's a shame they didn't make a sequel with Bruce in the lead role once again. 7.6/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dr Rock on July 26, 2021, 08:41:39 PM
Detour (1945)

Noirish story of a fella whose gf says she's off to LA to make it as a star, so their marriage is postponed indefinitely. Guy decides to follow, he's broke so he has to hitch. Fella picks him up, things start to go downhill from there. 9/10.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 26, 2021, 08:49:48 PM
Quote from: Famous Mortimer on June 16, 2021, 05:48:02 PM
I don't remember liking it that much either. But one I did love was:

Six String Samurai

Bonkers late 90s indie about a post-"apocalyptic" future where Russia beat America in the 50s, but Vegas remained as a beacon of hope, ruled by Elvis. But Elvis dies, so a bunch of rock-n-rollers head for Vegas to become the new king. The star, Jeffrey Falcon, was mostly known as a goon in various Cynthia Rothrock movies, and he's not much of an actor, but it's extremely good fun. I'm struggling to define it quickly, but it's slightly like if Alex Cox liked every single genre equally instead of westerns when he made "Straight To Hell".

Also, it's a matter of lightning only striking once, as the director Lance Mungia only made one other movie, "The Crow: Wicked Prayer", with Edward Furlong and David Boreanaz, and that was apparently a stinker.

I watched that tonight after seeing your recommendation above and really enjoyed it too, here's the mini-review I wrote for it:

Six String Samurai (1998) - After blowing the hell out of America in 1957 the Russians are in control, with only "Lost Vegas" still in American hands - and specifically those of Elvis, though the opening blurb informs us that he's just died and now they're looking for a replacement. Enter our hero the guitar and samurai wielding titular character, who a young boy insists on following about as this post apocalyptic road trip sees them meet all manner of weirdos. It's absurd, sometimes cartoonish violent nonsense that I could completely understand someone hating, but it clicked with me and the fun soundtrack and plenty of memorable imagery led to my liking it a lot. 7.8/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on July 26, 2021, 09:56:34 PM
John Bronco fake doc about the fictional spokesman for the Ford Bronco with Walton Goggins in the title role.
Very funny in parts. Tim Meadows was great. A pleasant enough way to spend 40 minutes. It's on Hulu in murca.
7/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dex Sawash on July 26, 2021, 10:00:04 PM
Also that Wilderpeople thing y'all said was good. Not as good as JoJo Rabbit but lots of fun.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 26, 2021, 10:10:58 PM
Suspect it'll be largely hated on here (and I know the director is a bit of a wrong 'un), but I just wanted to say how much I fucking loved Guns Akimbo.  I keep saying it, but I really do have a lot of time for Daniel Radcliffe - he doesn't give a shit and tries his hand at absolutely anything with no ego at all.  Good lad.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 27, 2021, 10:00:59 AM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 26, 2021, 10:10:58 PM
Suspect it'll be largely hated on here (and I know the director is a bit of a wrong 'un), but I just wanted to say how much I fucking loved Guns Akimbo.  I keep saying it, but I really do have a lot of time for Daniel Radcliffe - he doesn't give a shit and tries his hand at absolutely anything with no ego at all.  Good lad.

I thought it was a huge amount of fun (there's a thread here where most liked it: https://www.cookdandbombd.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=78369.0) and Daniel Radcliffe is turning in to a fantastic comedy actor, he was especially great here, in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Miracle Workers, and though it's a shame the director's a shit I watched it prior to knowing that so feel no guilt!
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sonny_Jim on July 27, 2021, 10:23:12 AM
I watched Mission 88 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBDJbW2HuH4)[nb]Also known as ISRA 88[/nb]with Casper Van Dien the other day as I just wanted some sci-fi schlock to have on in the background.  Unfortunately it wasn't as schlocky as I hoped.  The basic plot is two astronauts are sent to the 'end of the universe' to report back what is there.  Things go awry etc etc

The sets are proper cheap, the plot doesn't make a whole lot of sense and yer mate Casper isn't exactly a steller performer, but at least it was interesting so I'll give it that.  It's certainly no Moon[nb]arf[/nb].  Actually just watch 'Prospect' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F96wbQ698Z0), it's miles better.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 27, 2021, 10:33:03 AM
God Forgives... I Don't!. Continuing a vague Spaghetti Western watch with the first of the Terence Hill/Bud Spencer pairings. Bit all over the place but there's some fine moments in amongst it all.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Artie Fufkin on July 27, 2021, 12:54:13 PM
Quote from: zomgmouse on July 27, 2021, 10:33:03 AM
God Forgives... I Don't!. Continuing a vague Spaghetti Western watch with the first of the Terence Hill/Bud Spencer pairings. Bit all over the place but there's some fine moments in amongst it all.
As in They Call Me Trinity etc.? Loved those films when I watched them back in the day. Must check them out again.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 27, 2021, 02:49:24 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on July 27, 2021, 12:54:13 PM
As in They Call Me Trinity etc.? Loved those films when I watched them back in the day. Must check them out again.

God Forgives... is part of a more serious trilogy for Hill and Spencer.  God Forgives... itself is almost completely serious and, whilst the sequels (Ace High and Boot Hill) contain a lot more humour, they are still tonally VERY different from the Trinity films.  As it happens I can't stand most of those comedy westerns.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 27, 2021, 02:55:59 PM
Dinosaur (2000) - A mix of cgi and live action this is rarely spoken about so my hopes weren't high, but it's quite a decent old film, where a dinosaur ends up being brought up by monkeys, and oddly horny monkeys at that, but then a meteor strike all but destroys their home and our dino and a few surviving monkeys meet up with lots of other dinosaurs and go on a long walk. I've probably made it sound a bit odd but it's pretty entertaining fare, the action scenes are well orchestrated and though the cgi is sometimes a little weak and the moralising a bit on the nose largely it still stands up and is a mostly fun romp. 7.3/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 27, 2021, 06:47:54 PM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 25, 2021, 09:19:26 PM
Yep, definitely watch Manhunter.  Red Dragon is dogshit.

I'm no fan of Lambs either.  It's great if you like your psychopaths and serial killers as laughable panto dames.

Silence of the Lambs is a masterpiece and has aged far better than Manhunter. Demme does things with the camera in Lambs that shouldn't ever work, but he manages to make it work. Foster is a much better and more interesting screen presence than William Petersen.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 27, 2021, 07:25:35 PM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on July 27, 2021, 06:47:54 PM
Silence of the Lambs is a masterpiece and has aged far better than Manhunter. Demme does things with the camera in Lambs that shouldn't ever work, but he manages to make it work. Foster is a much better and more interesting screen presence than William Petersen.

I think we watch both of those films in VERY different ways...
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Dusty Substance on July 27, 2021, 07:36:00 PM

Just finished watching Warrior (2011), a solidly made but ultimately deeply forgettable sports drama set in the world of Mixed Martial Arts. Perfectly fine performances from the well cast father (Nick Nolte) and two sons (Tom Hardy and Joel Edgerton) trio at the centre of the story.
Most of the estranged family/boxing drama cliches are ticked off as the film progresses (Nick Nolte plays a recovering alcoholic so it was only a matter of time before the inevitable wagon-falling scene). The fight scenes are well handled and Hardy and Edgerton both bulked up well to make convincing MMA fighters (by Hollywood standards, anyway). 
Mark Isham's score, which sounds like it's been used in a million other films since, swells in the climactic fight scene but, in all honesty, by that stage of the film I was already eyeing up my "to watch" pile, considering what to watch next.
The very definition of a perfectly fine way to pass two hours and ten minutes. Naturally, this film is currently sat at #173 on IMDB's Top 250 - Above Fargo, Stalker, Barry Lyndon, Mad Max Fury Road, Cool Hand Luke and The 400 Blows, which is all you need to know about IMDB's Top 250.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Small Man Big Horse on July 27, 2021, 08:15:17 PM
Quote from: Dusty Substance on July 27, 2021, 07:36:00 PM
The very definition of a perfectly fine way to pass two hours and ten minutes. Naturally, this film is currently sat at #173 on IMDB's Top 250 - Above Fargo, Stalker, Barry Lyndon, Mad Max Fury Road, Cool Hand Luke and The 400 Blows, which is all you need to know about IMDB's Top 250.

The above made me smile, I did at one point start working my way through the films in the top 250 that I hadn't seen but ended up watching a sod load of very average films so soon quit.

Invisible Agent (1942) - The fourth in Universal's Invisible Man series, and set just after the Japanese have bombed Pearl Harbour and Frank (Jon Hall), the grandson of the original Invisible Man, is recruited by the US Army to head over to Germany and fuck with those pesky Nazis and flirt with double agent Maria (Ilona Massey). Slightly problematically is the fact that Peter Lorre plays the very Japanese Baron Ikito, and one scene where Frank plays pranks on a hungry Nazi goes on for too long, but the rest of it is largely entertaining, there's a couple of quite chilling scenes, and once again the effects are impressive for the time. 7.2/10
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Gulftastic on July 27, 2021, 08:53:39 PM
I've not seen Lambs since it's release but am I right in remembering that when the most dangerous man in the world is in town, they decide the best place to hold him is in a government building, inside a massive circus lion tamer cage guarded by a couple of security men?
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 27, 2021, 09:01:29 PM
Quote from: Gulftastic on July 27, 2021, 08:53:39 PM
I've not seen Lambs since it's release but am I right in remembering that when the most dangerous man in the world is in town, they decide the best place to hold him is in a government building, inside a massive circus lion tamer cage guarded by a couple of security men?

A government building that appears to have been built on top of a gothic castle.  In Baltimore. 

It's ridiculous high camp and I've always felt like I'm watching a completely different film from everyone else.  I also genuinely think it's a bit embarrassing.  That old saying "never state what you can imply"?  Lambs sticks it all on that airship in De Palma's Scarface.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Sebastian Cobb on July 27, 2021, 09:09:08 PM
A valid statement on the hubris of the American establishment imo. Just look at the wars they keep getting into.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 27, 2021, 11:46:06 PM
Quote from: Artie Fufkin on July 27, 2021, 12:54:13 PM
As in They Call Me Trinity etc.? Loved those films when I watched them back in the day. Must check them out again.

Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 27, 2021, 02:49:24 PM
God Forgives... is part of a more serious trilogy for Hill and Spencer.  God Forgives... itself is almost completely serious and, whilst the sequels (Ace High and Boot Hill) contain a lot more humour, they are still tonally VERY different from the Trinity films.  As it happens I can't stand most of those comedy westerns.

What SGN said - though for what it's worth I quite like the humour and I think maybe that's what was missing from God Forgives. Considering it was the first of the Hill/Spencer ones maybe the figured it out by the next one/s. Been meaning to see Ace High and Boot Hill for ages.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: Shit Good Nose on July 28, 2021, 12:08:39 AM
Ace High is pretty good, but Boot Hill is very poor.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: zomgmouse on July 28, 2021, 08:26:04 AM
Quote from: Shit Good Nose on July 28, 2021, 12:08:39 AM
Ace High is pretty good, but Boot Hill is very poor.

One day... I've also got a DVD of I'm for the Hippopotamus a friend lent me that I never quite get round to watching.

Another Spaghetti Western: Face to Face by Sergio Sollima - my first of his, and possibly the first Western I've seen where the protagonist is a pacifist history professor - which already sets the tone for this to be somewhat more intellectual than most other Westerns, Spaghetti or otherwise. Two Italian greats star together here: Gian Maria Volontè and Tomas Milian, playing the aforementioned professor and a runaway criminal respectively. The professor spends more time in the wild west and gets seduced by its power and violence - the whole thing is meant to be a statement on fascism inspired by the director's experiences in WW2 and it shows.

And a classic in the genre that has been on my list for ages: Keoma. Franco Nero at his dirty brooding best. One of the most elegiac and poetic of the genre. Some truly astounding shots and scenes here. Bonus plague, bonus plenty of slomo and bonus the always excellent Woody Strode. Not sure I liked the ending but the rest of it was fantastic.

And a couple of non-spaghetti Westerns: Will Penny, with Charlton Heston as an aging cowpoke. It's good, but I think it tries somewhat unsuccessfully to string together too much.

Hadn't seen a Peckinpah in a while so went for Junior Bonner. Similar themes to the above perhaps but oh boy was this a great one! Just a real heart-warming tale of getting on. Fabulous performances (Steve McQueen as the lead and Ida Lupino as his mother in particular), beautiful tone. This really moved me.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: SteveDave on July 28, 2021, 09:21:35 AM
I'd seen bits of "Silence Of The Lambs" (in the wrong order) over a number of years and thought I knew what was what, but finally saw it from S to F about 5 years ago and really enjoyed it. Even though it'd been parodied to almost death since it's release, the performances carried me through.

Weirdly, I saw "Hannibal" in the cinema on the day of its release without having seen all of "SotL", so confident was I that I'd seen it all.

Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: frajer on July 28, 2021, 09:26:59 AM
Boy (2010) from Taika Waititi.

Flipping loved it, you eggs. Heartwarming but with the right amount of edge running through it that it never felt saccharine. Great and natural performances from all the kids. I'm a big fan of Waititi's work and have seen all his others so not sure why it took so long for me to get round to this one, but I'm glad I finally did.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang on July 28, 2021, 11:03:44 AM
I watched Leon (1994) last night, the version with the 25 minutes of extra footage although I kind of wished I'd watched the original cut as I was reminded that there's some not very good and downright uncomfortable scenes involving sexual tension.

I was also shocked to discover that in the original script, Leon and Mathilda have sex. Apparently Natalie Portman's parents objected to this so it was taken out (would presumably have been nixed at some point anyway) and also Jean Reno made his character appear to be a bit mentally slow so as to appear more innocent/less like a paedo.

(https://i.ibb.co/8K8WKD1/leon.jpg)
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: olliebean on July 28, 2021, 12:08:02 PM
The way that's phrased in the script, I'd be asking some questions about Besson.
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: sevendaughters on July 28, 2021, 12:10:28 PM
Quote from: olliebean on July 28, 2021, 12:08:02 PM
The way that's phrased in the script, I'd be asking some questions about Besson.

he was banging a 15 year old iirc
Title: Re: What Non-New Films Have You Seen? (2021 Edition)
Post by: El Unicornio, mang