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July 12, 2024, 06:36:32 PM

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Was 35 the Cut Off for you liking New Comedy?

Started by Memorex MP3, June 12, 2024, 11:35:04 AM

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Memorex MP3

^ not really but was there a point where you massively slowed down your hunt for fresh comedy?

I look back on how heavily I used to follow standup and comedy podcasts a decade ago and I don't know if it's just a common aspect of ageing or whether the way media is served now makes more formal comedy (rather than off the cuff stuff like Cum Town) a low more work to sit through than it used to be. Can remember listening to basically every George Carlin standup special while now I'd struggle to get deeper than two specials into an act I liked without feeling some fatigue; there'd be sitcoms with quite bad starts I'd stick with because they seemed to have some promise.

It does seem like most people tend to stick with their era of comedy, remaining somewhat open to new stuff but not that arsed about actively seeking it out.


Do you still seek out comedy as actively as you did when you were younger? Do you stick with acts well beyond the initial freshness of the first show or two you've seen? Do you last further than the first few episodes of a show if there's a hint of some potential promise?

Ignatius_S

"Do you still seek out comedy as actively as you did when you were younger?"

No - but largely because  of online, streaming services etc., it's a lot easier to discover things, rather than my own inclination of not seeking it out.

Similarly, the amount I'm consuming is more to do with the sheer volume available to me - there was a time when if it was new and I could access it, I would. There's no way I have the time to do that now.

Another big change that's happened is although I will stick with a show to a large degree, I believe people are far more likely to bail after one episode or even less than they used to. I have quite a few friends who have changed their attitude and although they may recommend a drama series but say it's not very good until the last episode but stick with it, they'll watch a sitcom but happy to give up after ten minutes and would be horrified if others did that with a non-comedy series.

Small Man Big Horse

I definitely seek out new comedy when it comes to stand up / live shows, and I love this time of year especially where there's a lot of fairly inexpensive work in progress shows which are pretty much the finished product.

I've kind of lost interest in sitcoms though, both UK and US. If there's a lot of positive praise for something on CaB I might give it a go, but I rarely check out out new shows which aren't mentioned here.

Oh, and I'm 50 next month, when I was 35 I still had a huge passion for both.

Pink Gregory

approaching 35 I've incorporated a lot more actual live comedy into my diet, more than I ever have done (was usually just seeing Stew Lee/Richard Herring with my dad) and thanks to CaB since turning 30 I consume comedy a lot less passively than I used to when I was just rinsing whatever comedy DVDs I could find.  Even then rewatching Red Dwarf or Blackadder or Spaced, I find things that I hadn't noticed before or appreciate a lot more.

Previously I would have watched a lot of TV comedy but on a very surface level.  Don't really think I became who I really am until recently.

madhair60

When it comes to keeping up with stand-up surely that's more to do with where you live and how much money you earn than any other factor such as age. I've barely seen any live comedy outside of some definitive favourites because I just can't afford to.

Shaxberd

If anything I'm probably more interested in new comedy now than when I was young. In my teens and early twenties I was really into finding and watching classics that I hadn't been alive for / old enough for at the time - Pete and Dud, the Pythons, the Fast Show, the Young Ones, Red Dwarf, M*A*S*H, that was all new to me then.

Of course, back in the 00s I also took for granted that I'd be sitting down and watching new comedy on the TV every week, whereas these days it's entirely by streaming and I only pick up recommendations by word of mouth rather than just watching whatever's in the comedy slot in the schedules. However, there's still plenty of great stuff out there and I credit CaB for helping me find stuff I might not otherwise have paid attention to.



Thinking back to the other thread that inspired this, though, I think people generally have different relationships with music and comedy. Popular music is so strongly tied to youth subcultures in a way that comedy isn't. Pop and rock musicians often go stale after a certain age, while (good) comedians keep developing.

Comedy also ages differently from music. It dates faster, and I don't just mean "you can't say that any more" but style, presentation, and a need to understand the cultural environment it was created in to make sense of it.

Tiggles

Quote from: madhair60 on June 13, 2024, 09:08:35 AMWhen it comes to keeping up with stand-up surely that's more to do with where you live and how much money you earn than any other factor such as age. I've barely seen any live comedy outside of some definitive favourites because I just can't afford to.

In terms of seeing it performed live, this is absolutely true. Even if you live near somewhere you do have access to good stand-up, even the cheaper stuff still costs money and needs you to travel, which I know is a big luxury for a lot of people (especially at the moment).

However, there's great filmed stand-up on streaming and for free on YouTube. I definitely respond differently to it in my living room, but while I was living in Spain for a few years it was the only way I could discover new anglophone stuff/ keep up with stuff I liked. I lived in a city of wits, but my regional/ colloquial Spanish was never good enough to fully appreciate the local talent, sadly.

I'm not sure I've got any less or more hungry to see new stuff as I went past 35. It's always been an art form that I've been fascinated with. I guess as I've got older I've developed more tools for understanding my own response to what I'm seeing, although I'm always a bit hesitant to deconstruct too far. I don't always want to know what's behind the magic trick, and just enjoy the experience.

Telly-wise, I'm probably more of a dramedy person these days although, having said that, I'm really looking forward to the second season of Colin From Accounts.

madhair60

i used to get my comedy recs from here but there doesn't seem to be as much discussion/analysis of new TV stuff as there used to be, most likely because of the rise of streaming meaning nobody's really sat in one place watching this stuff go out and commenting on it - exception being Inside No 9 (which isn't a comedy, really). There's also tons and tons of stuff put out almost constantly that falls through the cracks due to the volume.

that said, the stuff I enjoy the most now would get (or already gets) short shrift on here so I don't bother sharing my enjoyment of it, similar to music.

Pink Gregory

Quote from: madhair60 on June 13, 2024, 09:08:35 AMWhen it comes to keeping up with stand-up surely that's more to do with where you live and how much money you earn than any other factor such as age. I've barely seen any live comedy outside of some definitive favourites because I just can't afford to.

Certainly true of seeing standup, from 1 moving to a city and then 2 moving to a town with a regular comedy club, but my awareness of the circuit and people who don't get on e.g. Live at the Apollo started with Richard Herring's three years of Edinburgh Fringe podcasts, which kind of remain unique.  There's a thousand 'comedians talking to comedians' podcasts now, but nothing with that crossover.

bgmnts

Live comedy is a treat for me as a live in the arse end of nowhere, have little disposable income and am so depressed my body is now basically a jelly substance.

I've been happy with Stewart Lee and Limmy for a while, no bother.

Garam

Open mics are free, if you live in a city there will be some

I'm 35 and still enjoy new comedy tho I invest less time into seeking stuff out, just let myself stumble across it

Matthew Dawkins Jub Jub

My introduction to new comedy has come pretty late in life (late 30s) as I only started attending the Fringe, going to see unknown comedians, checking out what a lot of the old SNL cast (up to the mid-90s) did after SNL.

Small Man Big Horse

Quote from: madhair60 on June 13, 2024, 09:08:35 AMWhen it comes to keeping up with stand-up surely that's more to do with where you live and how much money you earn than any other factor such as age. I've barely seen any live comedy outside of some definitive favourites because I just can't afford to.

There's definitely a truth to that, but there are sites like GoFasterStripe, NextUp and 800 Pound Gorilla that can lead you to seeing new stand up relatively inexpensively.

Also when I lived in Cambridge I worked at the now demolished student union bar at Anglia Polytechnic University on comedy nights, and as no one ever came up to the bar when acts were on I technically paid to watch comedy. So I'd recommend travelling back in time and getting a job at the now demolished student union bar. That or go back in time to the really cheap monthly comedy nights at the no long in existence Boat Race venue near the Grafton Centre.

Small Man Big Horse

Quote from: Small Man Big Horse on June 13, 2024, 06:39:16 PMThere's definitely a truth to that, but there are sites like GoFasterStripe, NextUp and 800 Pound Gorilla that can lead you to seeing new stand up relatively inexpensively.

Edit: Oops, missed Tiggles post, but that's a good source as well.

Also when I lived in Cambridge I worked at the now demolished student union bar at Anglia Polytechnic University on comedy nights, and as no one ever came up to the bar when acts were on I technically paid to watch comedy. So I'd recommend travelling back in time and getting a job at the now demolished student union bar. That or go back in time to the really cheap monthly comedy nights at the no long in existence Boat Race venue near the Grafton Centre.

g0m

i'm not 35 yet. I will log back on in 2028 and let you know

g0m

i probably won't still be posting in 2028... i'll probably have gotten laid by then

Poirots BigGarlickyCorpse

I was gonna say "yes" but actually it depends on what you mean by comedy. I haven't picked up any new sitcoms in forever - I think the last one I watched while it was still being broadcast was Scrubs. That said, I've seen all of Big Mouth and watched Human Resources out of morbid curiosity, but the former only made me laugh once and the latter not at all.

However in the last year I've picked up Jarrod Benson, Rudy Ayoub and Laura Ramoso, all of whom are doing short skits on YouTube and Tiktok. There's also Doobus Goobus, although whether their stuff counts as "new" comedy is debatable since they usually do cartoons about pre-existing IPs. And Honest2Betsy, who counts as far as I'm concerned - her schtick is dressing up in period-appropriate clothes and reacting with horror to real vulgar songs from the 30s-60s.

So it's more accurate to say that my choice of medium has changed and my taste in comedy has changed. Except I'm still a fan of Seanbaby and I read his (and Robert Brockway's) site 1900 Hotdog, and occasionally listen to their podcast The Dogg Zzone (it depends what they're discussing). Seanbaby's changed, he's much less of an edgelord and no longer tosses around all the words we thought were hilarious in 2000 but were actually slurs. Still funny.

Quote from: madhair60 on June 13, 2024, 09:47:56 AMi used to get my comedy recs from here but there doesn't seem to be as much discussion/analysis of new TV stuff as there used to be, most likely because of the rise of streaming meaning nobody's really sat in one place watching this stuff go out and commenting on it - exception being Inside No 9 (which isn't a comedy, really). There's also tons and tons of stuff put out almost constantly that falls through the cracks due to the volume.

This is very true. I barely watch telly any more and only slightly more barely watch the three (!) streaming services I pay for. Most of the sitcoms I watched in the 1990s, I watched because they were on the telly and they weren't The News or Boring and there was only one telly and my parents wanted to watch it too.

flotemysost

I've possibly seen more new live comedy in the last 2-3 years than I had in my preceding years put together. This is largely thanks to this place, and also hanging out with people who are up for going to stuff - in my 20s it just wasn't really something any of my mates were into, or at least not into enough to actively suggest comedy as something to do (and for the most part I used to be very much "go along with whatever my friends are interested in").

Goes without saying I'm fortunate to live in London with its thrumming smorgasbord of nightly options, and I've now got a better awareness of how the hell you find out when/where stuff is actually on. Went to the Edinburgh Fringe for the first time last year (again, a massive privilege nowadays I realise) and thought "ffs, this is right up my street, why am I only just doing this now?".

In terms of TV/radio/podcasts though, I'm pretty rubbish - mostly due to screen fatigue/godawful attention span/reluctance to spend too much of my free time sitting on my arse gawping at a laptop when I already spend the majority of my waking hours doing that for work. As with music, streaming and the Internet offer a wealth of possibilities, but the choice can be overwhelming; CaB is invaluable for recommendations, but even the time I spend on here is fairly limited these days (due to above reasons).

Still insanely grateful to you lot though (and agree with other posters re: a shift in becoming more instinctively analytical when watching new stuff).

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