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July 18, 2024, 09:25:55 PM

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Mike Bassett - a cult classic?

Started by The Lurker, June 17, 2024, 05:42:08 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

The Lurker

Just rewatched the film as I typically do every two years during an international tournament.

Most football media is either for kids or absolute cringe. But Mike Bassett appears to be the exception to the rule.

It was released in 2001 and it's aged remarkably well, and still very quotable.

Ricky Tomlinson was perfect for the role of Bassett. I read in the Athletic that Steve Coogan was originally going to play the titular role which - as great as he is - I just cannot imagine. Bradley Walsh, Dean Lennox Kelly, and Phill Jupitus all play a good part too. Not forgetting a brilliant cameo from Pele also.

Is it a film that non-football fans like? Would they get the majority of the references? What's the general CaBsenus?

THREE CHEERS FOR RAMIREZ!


Fambo Number Mive

Been a long time since I watched but I remember enjoying it and giving it at least one rewatch. I always enjoy anything with Tomlinson in.

Fambo Number Mive

There was also a TV series called Mike Bassett: Manager but I never watched that.

Memorex MP3

Fun cast elevating a very weak script

madhair60

hazy memories of an absolute last-ditch desperation wank

Senior Baiano


George White

Was watching it recently (after one of the myriad DVDs I bought during my mum's illness).
Directed by Steve 'TMNT/Take on Me' Barron, who also did a really fun and underrated Dublin comedy called Rat, which is Kafka's Metamorphosis, but in Kimmage, with Pete Postlethwaite as the titular vermin, and Dame Imelda Staunton as his wife, both incredibly convincing as Dubs, with Kerry 'Theresa Carmody' Condon (I don't care if she has an Oscar nomination, she'll always be that poor girl that Frank McCourt exploited), Geoffrey Palmer, Frank Kelly... A strange union for the Henson Creature Shop and Irish soap titan Wesley Burrowes (creator of the Riordans/Bracken/Glenroe). My dad's lover was neighbours with Burrowes, and she was offered one of the rats used in the film. Despite being an animal rights advocate, she said no.

Drebin

I avoided Mike Bassett for a long while as I assumed it would be terrible as TV/film rarely gets football. It surpassed my very low expectations and was watchable.

The best football comedy film for my money is Eleven Men against Eleven with James Bolam installed as the unlikely manager of a Premiership team who staggers from crisis to crisis.

Think it's still available on Channel 4's streaming service. A sort of darker version of Ted Lasso.

Andy147

Does anyone remember Bostock's Cup? Comedy from 1999 with Tim Healy as the manager of a 3rd division side who won the FA Cup in the 70s. To be honest, all I really remember is the match against the non-league side with the famous sloping pitch.

ros vulgaris

I was going to mention Bostock's Cup. The most memorable part for me was when they illegally signed an obscure Brazilian World Cup player who could only say the old Charlie Williams catchphrase "Hey up me old flowers".

I highly recommend the BBC series on Sunderland's 96/97 PL campaign called Premier Passions, way better than that Sunderland Til I Die thing on Netflix. The sweary rants on Mike Bassett and Bostock's Cup were without doubt taken from the scenes with Peter Reid and Bobby "fucking minging that" Saxton in the dressing room.


The Culture Bunker

Quote from: ros vulgaris on June 22, 2024, 05:30:48 PMI highly recommend the BBC series on Sunderland's 96/97 PL campaign called Premier Passions, way better than that Sunderland Til I Die thing on Netflix. The sweary rants on Mike Bassett and Bostock's Cup were without doubt taken from the scenes with Peter Reid and Bobby "fucking minging that" Saxton in the dressing room.
There was a "fly on the wall" show in 1990 on Sheffield United as they (successfully, as it happened) fought to get back into the top flight after years in the doldrums. Dave Bassett (appropriate, given the thread) was the manager and I remember clearly the numerous "beeps" in his team talks. Seemed like every other phrase out of his mouth was saying a player was a <beep>ing <beep> for not marking up properly and such.

Fambo Number Mive

Sorry for going off topic, but I like how the thread title rhymes.

copa

Always wonder about these fly-on-the-wall docs with managers berating players.
And why it's deemed acceptable when it wouldn't be tolerated in many other workplaces.
Especially in the lower divisions where players aren't making mad money and careers are so short. Why should anyone put up with abuse from some angry/sweary little man?

The Lurker

If you're on a two year contract, you'll be at the club longer than the shit manager who'll lose their job in six months time so it's best to ride it out. Football managers are under a ridiculous amount of pressure and stress, so that is bound to come out at times. The best way to be successful in management is man management - people will forget parts of training but they'll never forget how they're spoken to or treated, when things get tough - that's when people work for the manager, they'll run through bricks walls for them if treat them well but they'll think "fuck them" if their manager's a twat. A good manager certainly knows when it's appropriate to scream and shout, if it's constant - you won't listen and just think "here we go again". It's all about balance and knowing what makes each individual tick.

Edit: and if you're not able to take some stick from a manager, you're gonna struggle from loads of fans giving you abuse

madhair60

Quote from: Fambo Number Mive on June 22, 2024, 06:13:25 PMSorry for going off topic, but I like how the thread title rhymes.

It doesn't

Gurke and Hare

Quote from: Fambo Number Mive on June 22, 2024, 06:13:25 PMSorry for going off topic, but I like how the thread title rhymes.

You've got to have a system.

lemint

I recorded it on VHS as a kid. It was aired the night before the Bayern Munich v Man U Champions League Final iirc


Quote from: Andy147 on June 22, 2024, 11:08:11 AMDoes anyone remember Bostock's Cup? Comedy from 1999 with Tim Healy as the manager of a 3rd division side who won the FA Cup in the 70s. To be honest, all I really remember is the match against the non-league side with the famous sloping pitch.

FeederFan500

Quote from: Drebin on June 19, 2024, 10:19:46 PMI avoided Mike Bassett for a long while as I assumed it would be terrible as TV/film rarely gets football. It surpassed my very low expectations and was watchable.

The best football comedy film for my money is Eleven Men against Eleven with James Bolam installed as the unlikely manager of a Premiership team who staggers from crisis to crisis.

Think it's still available on Channel 4's streaming service. A sort of darker version of Ted Lasso.

I started watching that Bolam film the other day, but it wasn't doing anything for me.


I thought the Mike Bassett film was much better than I'd expected, although my expectations were pretty low. Most comedies based on football are terrible whereas I did actually enjoy watching this one, it tails off a bit as it wraps up the story but a lot of it was good. Sometimes even when you can tell what the joke is (delay on interview, Bradley Walsh agreeing with another interviewer for every question) it's still executed well.


ros vulgaris

"13 stone or 10 stone, Norwegian players are in awe of him" -- a line I say every time I'm on the scales.

George White

Quote from: ros vulgaris on June 22, 2024, 05:30:48 PMI was going to mention Bostock's Cup. The most memorable part for me was when they illegally signed an obscure Brazilian World Cup player who could only say the old Charlie Williams catchphrase "Hey up me old flowers".
 
Tony Marshall, who played 'Brian Parkinson', alias Nero now does a one-man show as Williams, fittingly.

Yussef Dent

I cannot for the life of me remember the forum it was on, but it was pre YouTube, as Bostock's Cup was never reshown at the time and there was no trace of it online, even on torrent. People looked into buying copies of it straight from ITV (or whoever produced it) and it was north of £500. I still think it's brilliant even now, as well as the many references to An Impossible Job, there's the odd one or two from Club For A Fiver, the Leyton Orient documentary about John Sitton.

It's been mentioned in this parish recently but An American Dream, the story of American Football coach Terry Smith, who financially saved Chester City from extinction only to think he could then become team manager despite having precious little knowledge of football (the inspiration for Ted Lasso) is a great/excruciating watch."We're going down the hill first, we gotta get scores, three goals first half. Three goals" "That was an automatic penalty!" "WAY TO GO LUKE!" "That's the most pitiful effort I ever dang seen."

George White

Tim Healy's such an underrated actor too. He should be the one internationally famous not his son.

Quote from: Yussef Dent on June 24, 2024, 04:37:56 AMthere's the odd one or two from Club For A Fiver, the Leyton Orient documentary about John Sitton.

Yes! Bring your fucking dinner! A classic of the genre.

The Lurker

Oh yeah, that's a good'un. Haven't seen it in years but I did feel for Sitton a little bit though; some of those players were openly taking the piss. I'm not surprised he lost it.

cacciaguida

The film is funny. Of that, there can be no doubt.

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